18 Burst results for "Sean Carroll"

"sean carroll" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

04:35 min | 4 months ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Your host sean carroll. And today's episode is going to be one of the more ambitious mind-bending episodes that we get here on mindscape. But not because we're doing some esoteric physics mathematics subject. We're thinking about human beings. Today's guest is herb. Genghis who originally became well known as an economist. But these days probably better to classify as a behavioral scientist because really herbs whole thing. The thing he really wants to get across is there's something called how human beings behave and we should study and develop theoretical models for that behavior in a rigorous quantitative empirically based way and then whatever we learn about how human beings behave should inform economics but also psychology sociology anthropology and so forth these different disciplines might care about different aspects of human behavior but they should ultimately tell compatible stories about human behavior right to me. This is just pushing buttons because this is a very poetic naturalist way of looking at human beings. There are different vocabularies for describing them. But they better be at the end of the day consistent with each other in some deep sense. So how'd you do this well. Herb has some ideas about how to do this. Roughly speaking based on the idea that we need to understand the sense in which human beings are rational. There's this whole story about rational choice theory which kind of gets a bad name because we think we know what the word rational means and it doesn't mean that in the sense of rational choice theory. He suggests the name beliefs and preferences as a replacement for rational choice theory. But we're stuck with the name but the idea is that people have beliefs and preferences faced with different situations. They will act in certain ways. We can study those ways using the tools of game theory to understand why they would think that they have incentive for behaving one way rather than another and then you can use ideas from actual empirical psychological studies as well as biology and evolutionary psychology. To think about why people don't maximize their one shot return in a game. They're going to play. Rationality is not completely individualistic in these situations. Social rationality so her wants to unify all of the human sciences..

mindscape sean carroll Genghis Herb
"sean carroll" Discussed on They're Terrified & Tipsy

They're Terrified & Tipsy

04:54 min | 7 months ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on They're Terrified & Tipsy

"I published novels and and i and i got to read for it and that was fun. That's awesome i love. That will definitely be listening for sean carroll. Will you play a game with us. Is this what you rather Yes okay. I'm so excited. Every time we do like a bonus episode. This is just kind of like our little schtick. It's just like we just have identified. Yeah so. I have like a handful of questions. I'm gonna ask him. We'll just see how feel about him. All right okay okay. i. I haven't even heard these so they're on my phone. Yeah i'm with you carol. I've only played once with my eight year old granddaughter. I think you're gonna be different. We'll be bad. It's probably going to be along the lines. Yeah okay i one. would you rather turn bright purple. When embarrassed or sweat so much you soak through your clothes. Well i already sweat so much that i soaked through my clothes. I'm a runner. So i we're talking like whenever i'm embarrassed that that would happen. I'd rather turn purple because that would make me far more interesting. Yeah i'd rather turn purple as well me too. I don't wanna sweat no. At least i feel like if you turn purple you can play it off a little bit. Better than being like yeah. I'm really happy. Yeah closest melt. Permanent actually fades away took like a like a blue lights lavender. Lavender airpot. maybe. Maybe whatever all right next one next one okay. Would you rather wear someone else's dirty underwear rows or use their toothbrush. Haw yeah you know. I think it would be. It would be toothbrush once again. It depends on the person in some ways. You have seen probably all kinds of stuff especially on the camino. You're not borrowing anybody's anything on the camino you keep yours. I'll keep mine. We're good but nowadays. Yeah we're not even allowed to you know hug hug people. Yeah.

sean carroll carol
"sean carroll" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And welcome back physicist Sean Carroll. With us. We'll get to your calls as well. Sean. Here's the question. If you can answer this, and it's a tough question, why are we even here? As what we call human beings. Well, I think there's two questions There's why is anything here? And then why is he anything that is here? The universe as we know it, Why did it evolve in such a way to give rise to us here enough, and I think the second part is is more straightforward. Actually, it seems complicated to go from the big bang to human beings. We can kind of sketch out all the step. There's Many steps along the way that we don't know all the details, too. But why complex structures arise in the first place is actually something with a very good understanding of the universe started out so very, very simple. In some ways that the analogy I use in the book is like it's stirring cream into coffee. In the cream in the coffee start out their separate from each other. It's very simple. When they're all stirred up. It's simple again. But in between when the cream is mixing into the coffee, is he all those tendrils? All those swirls and the turbulence? That's complex. Complexity arising very, very naturally in the voyage from simplicity to simplicity again. With Life the way we know it. Do you think there is a purpose for us being here? No, I don't think so. I think the there's no overarching, transcendent purpose that the universe gives us. There is the ability that we ourselves have to give ourselves purposes. I think that you know when you Build something. It's for a reason that you build it. But those reasons they're not inherent in the nature of reality, their reasons that you have, and I think that's okay. This is a big message of my book, which is that Things that you might have thought. We're out there in the universe to be discovered or to be revealed, are actually things that we create. And that's not a bad message. That's actually you know, quite a potentially good message because it gives us the creative force. Create purpose for ourselves. What is it about us? Sean, that creates competitiveness Drive. You know our personalities semi world different I mean, it is. It is amazing. I mean, what does that? Yeah, it's amazing in true, but in retrospect, not that surprising, right? I mean, I just adopted two little kitten. Some rescue kittens. Good for you Nurse back into health, and it's amazing that they're brother and sister and they're two months old, But you can already tell. They have very different personality. Right? And so you won't know why. What? Why? What? Why are they different from each other? They're you know, same mom and so forth. But That's part of evolution. That's part of what life did, as it evolved from very, very simple things to the more complex things that we are found new and different ways to survive and fry. And if you had a specie, in which every single individual on the species was exactly the same And you have one little plague that wipes out that exact member of the species and everybody die. Diversity is extraordinarily useful for survival. So a species that was naturally diverse is going to be a lot more robust and successful than one. That's all the same. It is amazing, though, at The complexity of this How do you explain that? Well, there's 14 billion years for it to come about and, in fact is a long way to go. There's no reason to think that the universe is is complex as it can possibly be. And maybe that complexity will come from we human beings, designing artificial intelligence and letting artificial intelligences design whatever they want them seeing where that goes. But it's it's like I said, It's a very natural thing, given that the universe exists and started in a very simple state. If you just let it go. The fact that complex structures appear along the way is just a straightforward consequence of the laws of physics as we understand. Okay, we're gonna take calls now with Sean Carroll is we talk about his work in the big picture. It's a great book on the origins of life meaning and the universe itself. Let's pick it up by going to British Columbia, Canada. Jalil is with us. Welcome to the program. Jalil. Yes? Why don't we just like God? It was bringing me back to my childhood. My father was a mathematician, and he explained to me that the Arab Invented the number zero I think they did. That is correct. Absolutely. Yes, And it was like it wasn't even it didn't even exist until they thought about mathematics. And like what is zero, It's nothing. Yes, but it turned out to be extraordinarily youthful. It is powerful. Write down the number 10 and the number used. The number zero is is very important. And I would say I would add on to that that it's not just The fact of the number zero that will circle we write down, but it's an idea that extends far further than that, because it's an abstract idea, right if the only numbers you had were 1234, etcetera. You think of numbers of things that you used to count with, like there's a three things in front of you. Or there are five things in front of you or whatever. But once you invent zero, you're thinking of numbers as a more abstract kind of thing. That might not be a way of counting like you started venting. Fractions, right or irrational numbers or negative numbers or imaginary numbers. And then all of modern mathematics is really at your feet. It. It is kind of Frustrating, I think.

Sean Carroll physicist Jalil Canada Columbia
"sean carroll" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Good morning. It's Tuesday and stocked up with six. Then it's going to be a cloudy day today with a chance of an isolated shower this afternoon. And the winds are going to start to pick up. You notice that too throughout the course of the day high 68 storm team 10, meteorologist Christina Ernie says Mostly cloudy tomorrow for Hump Day Wednesday Windy chance of afternoon showers increased. With a high of 73 show a little bit milder tomorrow. Right now it's 50 degrees. It's chilly Start Katie Davis, part of the eye team over there, and NBC. 10 says the lawsuit from a driver who's Vanity plate was denied by the Rhode Island. DMV has revealed the agency's list of blocked words and phrases, including some that raise a few eyebrows. A judge in federal court issued Pre Lim injunction agreeing with the plaintiff plaintiff is Sean Carroll, who owns an electric car and ordered the vanity plate K F. K G s. That's the vanity plate. F K G A. S Carol was ordered to take the plate office Tesler or have his registration cancelled. He filed suit in March with the help of the Rhode Island A C L U now a D. M V administrated. But Craddick, who's been on this show before He said. The plate in question has F k G A. S said that we got a complaint from an individual that called in about it, So it's said, that's how it came to their attention. I guess it stands for Forget gas, right? But I mean, I guess it could be construed as being obscene to in another way. So the First Amendment is that being violated? Stephen Brown, the executive director of the Rhode Island, a. C L U said. When it comes to the First Amendment freedom of speech, there's not a power that the government should have over. Or even exercise over it. So NBC Tens I team reviewed the list that the you submitted to the court is part of this lawsuit and learned plates, including Apple. A P P L, a Banana, Yankee and Jesus are just some of more than 1000 words and phrases on the DMV's banned list. Now the judge in this case, Mary McElroy said in her ruling, which came out on Friday, by the way that it's likely that she would conclude state law as written is just too darn vague and violates the First Amendment by giving the DMV unlimited power to allow or to deny these license plates. McIlroy ruled. Carole, as the individual who filed this back in March can keep that plate on his car until the case has been resolved. Writing that quote the revocation of the license plate, which would prohibit Mr Carroll from expressing his views on fossil fuel. Of motive vehicles would stifle him in an irreparable way. Irreparable harm would be done to this poor guy. Judge also said the DMV applied its own rules and consistently I'll say, Listen to these examples, for example. Our e D. Ck was refused, however are e d. N E C was approved. Drunk. Dru N K was refused. But tipsy was allowed, I guess because that's cute and chubby was blocked, but fatty somehow made the cut. So the NBC I team is all over this. The lawsuit revealing license plates blocked by the D M V. Okay, wreaking havoc over 19 still on the educational process here in the ocean State, All University of our island students. Now we're going to be required to be tested for Corona virus. Here's Amanda Hoskins from NBC 10. Mask social distancing in daily check if you are I now adding mandatory testing for every student to their coping 19 precautionary measures. The goal is to kind of just get a feel for it. What we're looking at right now. The online tracker shows 67 positive test last week, 184 total positive since January, but the university says they're seeing some areas concerned off campus. They're just these little pockets that were Concerned about what we want to pay attention to, and we want to stay open. But what took so long? Honestly, I think it was about time. Other colleges have required weekly testing, your eye says after testing when students moved in, and not seeing many positive cases they didn't feel they needed to. Until now. I don't think I don't think it's going to make a difference. Honestly, I see kids wearing their mass and I feel like we're doing a good job, but same time it's still good to know What's going on What the numbers are asymptomatic testing will be done at the Ryan center and student Union. Other testing will remain at the health center. We have been doing robust surveillance testing. And testing of students who either felt they were exposed or who have symptoms. But we really needed to get a sense of what's what's it like across our community. Students say they're hoping this proves the university is containing the virus. If we do get sent home, having all online classes would be Really hard and really stressful. I think students should check their e mails over the next couple of days. They will be send something about when their test is scheduled for. Oh, if students do not come, and it take their tests, there could be disciplinary actions that are laid out in the student handbook. Hoskins from NBC. 10 Good Want to get 7 41, and that's time to swing back into the traffic center. Check on the flow of things with John Hamlet, brought to us by unbound dot org's Gets busier Kravica £95 from 1 95 through the city starts from delays getting through the S curves and Pataki does well 95.

DMV Rhode Island NBC Amanda Hoskins Sean Carroll NBC. Christina Ernie Katie Davis Mary McElroy Stephen Brown Craddick Pre Lim Jesus McIlroy Carol Carole Tesler
"sean carroll" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Waves and the words and Daniel was probably anyway. Yes. So we could see very, very early on and that would be cool. But we haven't heard those yet. People organized so half how far into the big Bang? Could we listen with these gravitational waves? Yeah, tend the minus. 35 seconds after the Big Bang. Why not just call that zero like zero and put on your math goggles? There's a difference between zero and 10 to the minus 35 although I'll admit I don't even know what prefix goes. Before medicine If I'd like a second or two seconds or something, What do you think it is? Um, I think it's a sound second. Think it's Ah, Jorge said, Baby because it's so tiny That's a really exciting way to probe very, very, very early universe. But where does that number come from? 10 to the minus 35 that seems very late. Definitive Oh, there's a lot of uncertainty there. But it comes from calculations about how inflation happened. New inflation is the process of the universe stretching really, really fast. Just after it was born. You grow from a tiny microscopic dot Every tiny microscopic dot within just stretched out to a really big universe. The universe expanded by huge amount in a really Tiny amount of time. We should do a whole podcast on what is inflation. Sometimes that's when inflation stopped. But that's just it's an estimate and they're different theories of inflation and you know it could be 10 to the minus 36 seconds or 10 minutes, 32 seconds. And of course, as you say, why isn't it just zero? And we'd love to see zero would love to see the first moment when time was created that something happened. Attend to the minus 35. That's when inflation stopped. Yeah, um Yes, I'm very, very briefly. The history the universe's universes created somehow mysteriously, totally unknown process and then it stretched really, really dramatically, really, really quickly for about 10 demise 35 seconds. Right, And then it's been expanding ever since. And then about five billion years ago started stretching again, and that's what we call dark energy. Oh, I see. So you couldn't thes waves gravitational ways wouldn't tell you would happen when was stretching or before it stretch? Yeah, they're sort of the results of the stretch. It's like, Oh, if you jump onto a trampoline, you know these are the waves that move through the trampoline. Inflation caused these waves. It's like the bang of the Big Bang. It's the bang just after the big Bang is just down the street from the big Bang. And this is what you're here. All right, so then, But then who knows what I would be ever see what happened before 10 to the minus seconds. I know I'd love to see it zero right or even negative. Like what happened before what was there before and what made the universe started? That's it's hard to imagine how we could ever see that. Even see before 10 to the minus 35 to see what was happening at zero. And here's that veil and go through it and see what happened before. Yeah, that's just the realm of science fiction. It may literally be impossible. Maybe that no information from before that was even preserved. It's just like destroyed in the big Bang. We don't even know you don't think even math vision could get us through. Like who could we form a theory that just put on to math? Yeah, No, we certainly could. And you know, this is an interesting question of like, Can you even study that is this philosophy or is this science Can you know seriously about what happened before the Big bang or what caused the Big Bang and People like to talk about crazy ideas, like the Big Bang was the result of the collision of two other universes in higher dimensions. And I know it sounds like I just made up those words don't mean anything, but that's a real theory. You mean like, Could we talk about anything before there was anything that's right when there was nothing? Could we talk about something right? That sounds like that bit in Spaceballs. But yeah, it's it's a reasonable question. And some people say you can't is just philosophy because you could never tested. We can ever know what happened because we never get any data that confirmed or denied any those theories. But other people say you know you could Sean Carroll, for example, He argues that you could talk about what happened at a time or a place you can never visit. Because you can build theories that extrapolated you're saying using math vision into that time that you can confirm or deny those theories in time and place that you can test you can think about whether that extrapolation is valid Test those another way, So it's in direct, But you know, there are ways to talk about what might have happened then. Just be hard to kind of put your finger on it and really kind of see it. Especially because a time equals zero. Your finger doesn't exist anywhere would be really hot. You don't but your being around people don't put your finger on a big bang..

Daniel Jorge Sean Carroll Spaceballs
Ice Like Stone

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:28 min | 1 year ago

Ice Like Stone

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick and we're going to be talking about materials today but this is a really fun materials episode that will shatter like glass in our hands or will it I? Guess. It's a big question mark. Yeah we'RE GONNA be talking a lot about ice, but a lot of exciting stuff about is you're gonNA learn some new things about ice I think and you're also going to think A bit more deeply about what can be done and also. Perhaps cannot or should not be done with ice. So if you've read any of George are Martin's a song of ice and fire. If you've read that saga or if you've viewed the TV adaptation, a game of thrones, you're well acquainted with the wall but to reacquaint everybody, this is a fantasy world that's day stunt sort of a medieval European model, and in the far north, you have this massive three, hundred mile long seven, hundred foot tall wall of ice that we're told has stood there for eight thousand years is a barrier against the peoples and the supernatural horrors of the far north. Yeah. It's basically. HADRIAN's wall except much bigger and made of magic. Yes. Yeah. We're told it was built by brandon the builder with the aid of giants and the magical children of the forest were definitely to understand that there is actual magic in its construction. But also there's this idea that brandon was a master engineer that he's in the vein of these various engineering cultural heroes that you see in various cultures. But of course, the the real up feature that makes this while unique is that it is built out of ice not out of stone but out of frozen water. Yes it is a wall of ice so. Ignoring the magic for a second here. It sounds like a great plan, right? I. Mean Humans have been known to make shelters out of ice glaciers and snow has served as natural barriers to travel. So why wouldn't a it'd be ideal to construct this far northern barrier which is going to be dealing with you know with far northern climate why not build it out of ice good. Question is a block of ice not just as good as stone brick. Yeah. So I, I was looking around about this and Fortunately. There is already a great book out there that dives into this very question it sidled fire ice and physics the science of game of thrones by Rebecca Thompson, PhD A physicist, and author of the popular of Spectra Series of Comic Books About Physics and I should also note that Sean Carroll wrote the Intro Cool. So she first of all, this is just a really fun book. If you if if you're interested in game of thrones and science I encourage you to pick it up I love books like this. One about Dune. I I've been eyeing one about star wars. But she goes through various aspects of the books and the world of West rose in breaks about scientifically Indus-. So in a very engaging humorous but also West rose loving style. So, there's there's one section there where she tackles the wall and she points out that ultimately this question would an ice while work is a lot more complex than you might think. So for starters, there's not just one type of Ice Crystal. There are seventeen types of crystalline is that we know of plus there are three different types of amorphous ice and three hundred. Theoretically she says there might be as many as three hundred different phases of ice. Depending on some of the the research out there

Brandon Robert Lamb Joe Mccormick West Rose Rebecca Thompson George Sean Carroll Engineer Physicist Martin
"sean carroll" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Gravitational waves, words and Daniel was probably anyway. Yes, so we could see very, very early on and that would be cool. But we haven't heard those people weren't so how far how far into the big Bang? Could we listen with these gravitational waves? Yeah, tend the minus 35 seconds after the big bang. Why not just call that zero? Like so much happened zero and put on your math goggles. There's a difference between Zero intended minus 35 although I'll admit I don't even know what prefix goes before second or be Aptos second or something. What do you think it is? I think it's ah sound second. Think it's Ah, Jorge said, Baby because it's so tiny That's a really exciting way to probe very, very, very early universe. But where does that number come from? 10 to the minus 35 that seems very late. Definitive. There's a lot of uncertainty there, but it comes from calculations about how inflation happened. New inflation is the process of the universe stretching really, really fast. Just after it was born. You grow from a tiny microscopic dot Every tiny microscopic dot within just stretched out to a really big universe. The universe expanded by a huge amount in it, really Tiny amount of time. We should do a whole podcast on what is inflation sometimes that's when inflation stopped. But that's just it's an estimate and they're different theories of inflation and you know it could be 10 to the minus 36 seconds or 10 denies, 32 seconds. And of course, as you say, why isn't just zero? And we'd love to see zero would love to see the first moment when time was created that something happened. Attend to the minus 35. That's when inflation stopped. Um yes. So I'm very, very briefly. The history the universe is Universes created somehow mysteriously, totally unknown process and then it stretched really, really dramatically, really, really quickly for about 10 to minus 35 seconds. Right, And then it's been expanding ever since. And then about five billion years ago started stretching again, and that's what we call dark energy. Oh, I see. So you can thes waves gravitational ways wouldn't tell you would happen when was stretching or before it stretched? Yeah, they're sort of the results of the stretch. It's like, Oh, if you jump onto a trampoline, you know these are the waves that move through the trampoline. Inflation caused these waves. It's like the bang of the Big Bang. It's the bank just after the big Bang is just down the street from the big Bang. And this is what you're here. All right. So then, But then who knows what I would be ever see what happened before 10 to the minus seconds. I know I'd love to see a zero right or even negative. Like what happened before. What was there before And what made the universe started. That's it's hard to imagine how we could ever see that even see before 10 to the minus 35 to see what was happening at zero, and here's that veil and go through it and see what happened before. Yeah, that's just the realm of science fiction. It may literally be impossible, Maybe that no information from before that was even preserved. It's just like destroyed. In the big Bang. We don't even know you don't think even math vision could get us through it. Like the like. Who could we form a theory that just put on to math dog big deal? Yeah, No, we certainly could. And you know, this is an interesting question of like, Can you even study that is this philosophy or is this science Can you know seriously about what happened before the Big Bang or what caused the Big Bang and People like to talk about crazy ideas, like the Big Bang was the result of the collision of two other universes in higher dimensions. And I know it sounds like I just made up those words don't mean anything, but that's a real theory. You mean like, Could we talk about anything before there was anything that's right when there was nothing? Could we talk about something right? That sounds like that bit in Spaceballs. But, yeah, it's a reasonable question. And some people say you can't is just philosophy because you could never tested We can ever know what happened because we never get any data that confirmed or denied any those theories. But other people say you know you could Sean Carroll, for example, He argues that you could talk about what happened at a time or a place you could never visit. Because you can build theories that extrapolate is you're saying using math vision into that time you can confirm or deny those theories in time and place that you can test you can think about whether that extrapolation is valid and test those another way. So it's in direct, But you know, there are ways to talk about what might have happened then. Just be hard to kind of put your finger on it and really kind of see it, especially because a time equals zero. Your finger doesn't exist anywhere would be really hot. Don't put your finger in that people. Don't put your finger on the big bang. Yes..

Daniel Jorge Sean Carroll Spaceballs
"sean carroll" Discussed on Forward Faster

Forward Faster

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Forward Faster

"Your job is to give them more tools to tell the story. Give them the best tools that you have. That's awesome. Well, I remember those characters remember the. Impact if you told me that. If it hadn't been masterpiece, assist in the post, docs like I would have just it wouldn't have resonant would've made sense. And so people ask a well, that must have been so impactful, too young women, but it also must have been impactful, too young men like that's. That's an astrophysicist. Okay, yeah, you're absolutely with whole mommy. One of the things that we talked about today with the faculty is. Faculty. oftentimes here all this kind of conversation and say. Oh, my God. I know. What to WHO ran. I know? So. How how do you? How do you kind of make the case? What are some of the things that you talk about when you're talking to faculty member about why they should be thinking about communications, whether it should be engaging in these kinds of things it matters, and and what works in those conversations, because if you could patent, that will use it well. One of the things that really helps and certainly staff throughout the institution. Know this when you sent an email invitation from the National Academy of Sciences that, helps. So, at least open the email. Might have become a member. Oh, sorry, not yet twenty four. Baht I do so. I think the first thing that helps is that that it comes from the academy? So comes from a reputable source that they know it's not just I. In fact, we had heard the stories part of what incentivized us to create exchanges. There was a movie called Was It looper I. Don't remember if it was that movie or another one, it was about time travel. And I remember that the the the. The filmmaker went to mit to talk, and he'd been peppered with questions about the accuracy and his response. Was You know what I tried to talk to? People like you and nobody would talk to me. Pervert I kept making calls, and nobody wanted to have this conversation. And now you're mad at me so so now what we think that we do perform that service by being the national academies and making that phone call, and we often just say we do try to be pretty careful and deliberate about who we pick over time. Beginning I was going through all the National Academy of Sciences Database now we have a lot of people because I do go out in proselytize on behalf of this program. We've had a lot of people who self select into this, so it's a little easier to make the case because we've already had somebody who's raised their hand and said I will do this. Part of what we say is, it's not going to take a lot of time. It could be just an email conversation, so we try to make the bar pretty low in terms of resources because I think that's a lot of what sort of puts. People was like how how much do you want from me, so we keep that and I think people are very. Where if that from the academy's once we get our claws into, you know, let's go. We've got a committee meeting exactly so we keep the bar low, and then we try to. We always try to make sure it was a positive experience, so then somebody afterwards. So. There's. One Person We've worked with Jeff Kahn who is the director of the Berman Institute for? Bioethics and we had gone to him initially because I needed a bioethicist course. Nobody knows to ask for bioethicists, but I said well. That's what you need. Is a bioethicist think there's a little hesitant? At first he has loved the experience. It's been so rewarding. We've gotten the whole Berman. Institute in on this whole thing and I think he said you have also made me a cool dad. Is it. I talked to Ron Howard. You have made me a cool and Ron didn't cancel that meeting with cancer. The other one, but ron didn't exactly so. I think that there's that little element. Sean Carroll shown be Carol at h by the biologist, not the the theoretical physicist that we worth both Sean Carroll's Sean Carroll. It's at the same thing to me. You've made me a cool dad. That doesn't hurt. Yeah, absolutely. I've got a couple of questions here that if I don't cover, I will be fired from my job so I'm going to, but I did want to ask one sort of more general thing. Let's talk a little bit for a moment about the state of communications about science, generally and the and the dialogue, the discourse about science, because certainly as a dean and bring in public policy issues. We seem to be on a difficult path I were credibility is not what it was trust. You mentioned that the origins of this effort at the National Academies. It was because there wasn't the audience out there now. We seem to be actively pushing people away. How do you see it from where you're from where you're sitting? Listen to the academy's wrestles with this all the time I think the the science community is worried about this so much misinformation disinformation. Either by mistake, or on purpose, that's out there all the time. we we wrestle with how to communicate these things, because so much of sciences nuanced mean the process of science is is not known to many people, the idea that there's failure involved or that we can't definitively say something and I think that bothers people they want us to just say this is the answer and this whole notion that that scientists is an evolving practice. That doesn't. That doesn't always resonate people. It's not satisfying your. It is not satisfying. You can't give these answers oftentimes in one hundred forty characters. Just it's hard to do so. This is partly why we have relied on the characters in films because they don't have to be so new store so specific or so careful. Because I think if you can, if you can get that little bit of a hook that people will then spend the time if you've given them that. I little bit. That's not hard, not difficult, not intimidating then they may be willing to spend the time, but yes, it's. It's complicated and unfortunately it's not going to get any simpler. That I've my husband I was walking by our study and I. Heard there was a video playing about the norovirus and they were talking about. People are dropping dead in the streets in China and I said that's not true. And so that video I mean it looked very reputable. Why did somebody make that video I? Don't even why. Why does somebody want to do that? So as long as there are bad actors along, there's somebody that wants to do this thing I think all we can do is just continue to push on the push the levers that we know work and are effective both traditional and nontraditional and hope that our voice. It shouldn't be strident and it shouldn't be. I think we have to be very careful not to be dismissive of people that don't want to listen to us but we have to be a friendly voice that that goes out and makes a better offer than the voice. That's telling them things that are not right, but it's. It's very complicated and very worrisome. My hope you have no actual answer. Conversation. Is The answer I mean I do think that I'm I'm looking forward to that amulet that we can wear that. Translation I think it'll help them. We can just talk to everyone anywhere and immediately understand them person a person and we're close all right. I did also want to say though you know. There is a discipline of the science of Science Communications and I think the fact that so many people are now investing in this is important because we have to know not just what to say, but how to say it..

Ron Howard National Academies Sean Carroll National Academy of Sciences National Academy of Sciences D Science Communications faculty member Jeff Kahn Berman bioethicists Berman Institute China director physicist Carol
"sean carroll" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

The Alchemical Mind

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

"T low center per our podcast, and is there even such a thing as purpose I personally think there is because you have evolution, and if you look at evolution, you could have You know a lot of the evolutionary biologists. Just say Oh. You know this is just A. A mindless process. You know that that happens, and but my my point with with evolution is. It's moving towards something. Why would we all try and survive? Why would organisms try and survive? If there wasn't some point to it, it just doesn't make any sense logically or through reason in my opinion You, have you know what's his face? Richard Dawkins kinds of people, and and he's kind of frustrating to listen to, but I still listen to him because I want to know why he thinks the way he thinks, and I've come to the conclusion. He even admitted on Joe Rogan. He has never had a psychedelic experience, even though he's been offered and some of these people are so egotistic. They think that they're going to break their mind. which is most important resource? They have which yet I mean. In rare cases, people do go a little crazy afterwards, but if you're an intelligent person, and you don't have any history of mental illness or or issues or anything, you should be fine, but that's all I needed to know because that's that speaks to. To him, never having any sort of metaphysical experience, so if you don't have any sort of medical metaphysical experience, you don't have any way of uneven understanding people that have so somebody suggests something. You're just immediately going to poet so I. Guess What my point is with all this is i. look at what's the purpose. What's the the function of all this and for me? I found whether these things exist or not. It's important to to prime yourself for that because it'll just make you a better person regardless. Yeah I like that. I I was thinking about that. The other day in terms of you mentioned Panspermia earlier. You know maybe maybe that's the purpose. Right people are talking about viruses have Kuroda and stuff now like maybe there is a purpose to something simple as the virus and what that is I mean. We don't know right because our our perspective on reality is so short. We live for one hundred years and that's right. We're gone. So how can we understand something that's been around for at least fourteen billion years. When our personal experience, just a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of that. Even even some of the ideas we have currently about the way the world works. Weren't ideas that we had one hundred years ago or two hundred years ago. Right so our worldview may be more informed. But it's still based on on flawed logic and flood evidence, because if if there were some kind of truth behind some of the things that we find in how the universe works, then they would remain constant. And and they haven't even from from the beginning of the twentieth century to the middle to the end in physics changed a lot. It continues to change right and we still it's still changing right guys like. Sean Carroll bringing back the many worlds theory for example. How does that work? That's a hypothesis because way can't be proved. Exactly right and the thing is I think ultimately. A lot of the stuff you can, you can get a best guess, but you never really achieve the right answer right because there's just so much data, we cannot crunch all the data. It's impossible. So I just called you out on something. I've been guilty of. In, the past, who somebody on one of our podcast episodes I forget, which one sent me.

Joe Rogan Richard Dawkins Kuroda Panspermia Sean Carroll
"sean carroll" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And on the show today shifting time white time can feel different at four AM from one day to the next and why time can definitely feel different to a physicist to physicist time is a label on the universe Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at Caltech and physicist like Sean think about time very differently from you and me to a physicist the universe is this thing it's full of stuff and it keeps happening over and over again and this goes back to you knowing to destroy numbers the earth revolves around the sun and it rotates around its axis three hundred sixty five times so the universe is filled with repetitive cyclic moments and time is just a label on those different moments those labels one day one month one year make up like shine other physicists call the arrow of time meaning that time travels in one direction that's why you were younger in the past why you'll be older in the future why you remember one and not the other but here's the problem that difference between past and future is nowhere to be found in the laws of physics because in physics there is no era of time when modern physics came to be with from people like Galileo and Newton up to Einstein we realize something very gradually which is that the deep down laws of physics don't distinguish between the past in the future they treat them completely symmetrically.

physicist Sean Carroll Caltech Galileo Newton Einstein
"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Space Time you can find links to that and more in today's show notes today's episode is sponsored by Capterra the leading free online resource to help you find the best software solution for your business would you rather be busy or productive it's time to save some time and upgrade the way you work with the right software and Capterra will help you find it fast at Capterra dot com slash curiosity with Capterra you can explore software in narrow down your favorite options in minutes with software guides comparison tools and more search more than seven hundred specific categories of software everything from project management to email marketing to yoga studio management software and if you're a podcast or like us even transcript in software with more than one million views of products from real software users you can discover everything you need to make an informed decision visit capterra dot com slash curiosity for today to find the tools to make an informed software decision for your business capterra dot com slash curiosity capterra that's C. A. P. T. E. R. R. A. Dot com slash curiosity capterra software selection simplified scientists have discovered something really really big in the middle of our Milky Way Galaxy in fact it's one of the largest structures ever observed in the region and by structure you mean something physical that's not a star or planet yeah it's a big bubble of high speed electrons whoa yeah an enormous pair of bubbles an hourglass like arrangement is sending out radio emission hundreds of light years beyond our galaxy and while scientists aren't sure how they formed there are some pretty cool theories the waves of radio emission probably came from interruption a few million years ago in a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way for a new study published in the journal Nature Astronomers peered at the center of our galaxy easing the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory mere cat telescope there they looked at radio emissions produced magnetic fields accelerate electrons to a rate close to the speed of light and that's when they spotted these huge structures the explosion that caused them was a dramatic moment and what was usually a quiet black hole yes I said usually once in a while the Milky Way's central black hole can flare up periodically devours massive clumps of dust and gas one of those flare ups may have triggered powerful outbursts that inflated this previously unseen feature and we probably never saw the huge bubbles before because there's a lot of radio emission coming from the center of the Galaxy it took a pristine dark sky and the incredibly powerful mere cat telescope sense even faint radio waves for us to notice this anyway back to what caused he's bubbles whatever triggered that huge eruption from the Milky Way must have been big as in a staggeringly powerful event that happened a few million years ago very close to our galaxy's central black hole one possibility is that interstellar gas fell into the black hole and triggered an enormous explosion another is a flare up join us again

million years
"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about why we don't understand how gravity works and how we can figure it out you'll also learn about enormous balloon like structures scientists have discovered in the center of our galaxy allergy and one of the world's most celebrated science writers his newest book is called something deeply hidden quantum worlds and the emergence of Space Time and in its argues that scientists need to start digging into the serious questions around the inner workings of quantum physics. Sean told us that we need to start asking those questions now if we ever wanted understand how our universe really works gravity we understand a lot about on the basis of general relativity Einstein's theory of gravity that we got almost exactly one hundred years ago and Einstein said that space time itself is curved it changes it has dynamics in response to the existence matter and energy and that curvature of space time is what you and I experience as gravity the bad news is that gravity is the one part of our the middle description of nature that we haven't successfully reconciled with quantum mechanics all the other forces of nature and all the particles that make up matter that make up you and me we can describe quantum mechanically but gravity we can't and my argument is that well why should we be surprised that we can't understand the quantum nature of space time itself if we don't even claimed understand quantum mechanics general I think we've gotten lucky so far or and then we've done as well as we have been able to do with the other forces of nature that's the surprise but until we truly understand quantum mechanics what right do we have to expect that we could understand quantum space time okay so of all the forces of nature gravity is the one that we can't explain using quantum physics and we're lucky we even understand the other wants Fortunately Sean has reason to believe we'll start to find answers soon I think that one of the interesting things is the technology has pushed us in the direction of trying to understand quantum mechanics better because in the old days there is a clear distinction between a quantum system by which you meant like an electron or electrons and a classical system by which you meant a big person or measuring device or something like that these days are technologies improved to the extent where we can see quantum effects in larger and larger systems and this is important for building a quantum computer for example so even some of the old fogy these are beginning to catch onto the fact that we should understand quantum mechanics better at a at a deeper level but I think that the real change will happen with the younger generation we need to teach our students a little bit more about the foundations of quantum mechanics let them know that this is a legitimate set of questions to be thinking about I think that doing that will greatly accelerate progress in understanding the fundamental nature of reality so what's your call to action to physicists or people studying quantum physics I what specifically needs to change about the approaches disorientation system urged that active researchers need to start to step outside the box and start to experiment with different new theories I think that the primary thing that I try to argue for in the book something deeply hidden is that we should at least take the problem seriously right like physicists who care about the fundamental nature of reality should care about getting quantum mechanics right and I think that you know five hundred years from now when historians science talk about what was happening in the twentieth century they will say wow it's amazing those guys were so brilliant that they could invent quantum mechanics and they were so dumb they try to understand it like this'll be a huge mystery to them and I think that there's no reason to expect whether it's quantum mechanics or any other d the question in physics there's no reason to expect that the theories that we end up coming to are going to make perfect sense to our intuitions because our into it nations are trained over our experience with a tiny tiny fraction of all of reality relativity doesn't make sense the Big Bang doesn't make sense compared to our everyday experience ends but we can kind of wrap our minds around them quantum mechanics is harder and this is part of the reason why physicists have not yet completely absorbed it but that's exactly what we should expect I don't think that should be surprising at all basically over the last hundred years or so scientists have started to close the gap between classical and quantum physics so now's as good a time as any to start to look for answers to hottest problems here are some final thoughts from Sean on why he's optimistic for the future well you know I think it's actually a very exciting time right now in physics for the ironic reason that progress has slowed in fundamental physics. You know we had this amazingly historically you know one representative period in the first half of the twentieth century where we invented quantum mechanics relativity the big bang all of these crazy ideas and because data experiments forced us into these wild ideas today the theory is that we have are good enough to explain almost all the data we have and so progress is slower because it's much harder to make progress when you're not faced with Puzzles given to us by the experiments but that gives us the opportunity to step back a little bit to examine the underpinnings to examine the foundations of what we're doing and I think that that will lay the groundwork for even more progress in the future it's all about perspective right don't think of quantum physics as a necessarily unsolvable problem think about it is an opportunity to understand our universe better again sean. Carroll is a renowned theoretical physicist and author of the new book something deeply hidden Quantum worlds and the emergence of.

Sean Carroll physicist representative five hundred years one hundred years hundred years
"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Time that's S. K. U. R. A. Style Dot Com the sponge seen on the today show that was called life changing that's scorer style S. K. U. R. A. Style Dot Com Promo code curiosity there are many Asians of you that literally exist that's according to an actual scientific idea called the many worlds theory and our guest today is here to tell you that this theory is more than just a far out ideas from science fiction in fact it makes more sense than a lot of other theories Sean Carroll is a renowned theoretical physicist the Californian Institute of Technology and one of the world's most celebrated science writers his newest book is called Something Deeply Hidden Quantum worlds and the emergence of Space Time and in the book he proposes a new way of approaching scientific theories that could settle some of the drama going on in the world of quantum physics research we kicked off our conversation by asking that drama all about quantum mechanics is the most successful theory that we have in all of physics right it's really the centerpiece of everything the modern physics does and yet we don't understand it we had this set of rules for doing quantum mechanics since the nineteen twenties but it's kind of a black box we can set something up and we can say it what's going to happen next but we don't know why we can't actually say what are the details of what is happening and for decades now physicists have been content with this they they seem to be satisfied with not understanding their best theory of Nature I personally think that is holding us back a little bit when we try to ask questions like how do you quantify gravity or what happened at the Big Bang so I think it's time to face up to the puzzles of quantum mechanics that seems so strange to someone outside of physics that people wouldn't want to dig into the details of how quantum physics actually works do you know what the reasons are for that I think that it's a complicated mix of things I mean part of it is just the historical fact that there was this debate between meals bore and Albert Einstein with Einstein saying you know quantum mechanics is great I helped invent it but it's not the final answer we need to really dig into what's going on and bore and his school at Copenhagen saying no you know we we know it well enough we should move on and do other things and board has much more persuasive in the popular arena and the other thing is of course we had other things to do you know? Physicists were fascinated by particle physics and condensed matter physics and astrophysics and so- rehashing the debates about the foundations of quantum mechanics seemed like a waste of time or at work I it was something closer to philosophy than to really doing physics the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is the reigning theory and it was largely devised by Niels Bohr verner Heisenberg in the mid nineteen twenties here's Sean with a quick overview of how it works and why it doesn't work so in quantum mechanics at a little system quantum mechanical object like an electron or some other elementary particle quantum mechanics says unlike classical mechanics there's no such thing has where the particle is located instead there is this cloud of probability that we call the wave function and the problem is that's fine the the electron located at some point so that's the measurement problem of quantum mechanics why is what we see when we look at it different than how we describe it we're not looking at it and Copenhagen says well there is a sudden random discontinuance change in the state of the electron when you look at it it was this big fuzzy cloud of probability and then it snaps into some location kind of randomly but this of course is kind of preposterous because what he gene look at it like well what counts is looking at it does it have to be a person if what am I just bump into it what if I look at it but not very accurately does that still count and no one is were able to answer these questions so many worlds comes along whoever it in the nineteen fifties said look what you should do is treat yourself as a quantum McKee medical system it's not just the Electron Quantum Mechanical Your Quantum mechanical to and you should just solve the equations of quantum mechanics Schrodinger equation by Erwin Schrodinger the same guy with the cat and you should ask what is that predicting and what it predicts is that you become entangled with the electrons and and you branch into a whole separate set of worlds in each world you saw a particular outcome but the whole set of worlds have outcomes still in that I am so glad that you said that about the measuring observing that is the one thing I've never been able to wrap my head around so you're seating that it is kind of like a vague thing it is extremely vague in the Copenhagen interpretation in many worlds it is perfectly transparent that's one of the reasons why many worlds as much under the many worlds theory sounds incredibly complicated but you say the book that it's actually the simplest theory why is that it is if you think about the what we teach our students we teach them quantum mechanics the Copenhagen interpretation there are two separate sets of rules for what quantum mechanical systems do one set of rules for when you're not looking at them which is to say that there's this equation the sugar equation and they just uniformly smoothly aww according to this equation and there's a whole nother set of rules for what happens when you do look at them when you look at a quantum system collapses there's a probability that he gets her KC and the entirety of the many worlds formulation just says erase all of those weird rules about observations just put them in right simplify the whole story just have the Schrodinger equation just have wave functions let them do their thing and what you get is exactly what we observe as long as you're willing to put up with the fact that there are many worlds out there so the underlying rules of the game enormously simpler in many world than in any other version of quantum mechanics. Sean told us that you don't actually have to take those many worlds into account when you're doing calculations still apply to these many worlds and universes is not like anything can happen in them he said there's no doubt this brings up all sorts of radical metaphysical questions about what it means to be person in about our identity through time but that's even more reason to spend time thinking about them again Sean Carroll's new book is called something deeply hidden quantum world working in socks on carpet and you get shocked by Your Door Knob now you know why there's the Rub and the many worlds theory says there are lots of different versions you and that's actually more simple explanation than the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics stay curious on the Westwood One podcast Network.

Sean Carroll Copenhagen Albert Einstein S. K. U. R. Californian Institute of Techn physicist
"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Minutes I'm cody golf and I'm actually Hamer today learn about how scientists finally solved the mystery about how Friction Causes Static Electricity you'll also learn from renowned theoretical physicist Sean Carroll why the many worlds theory could be the best way for us to understand the universe also known as tribal electricity and this new knowledge could have implications for electrostatic applications like harvesting energy in printing and for avoiding potential dangerous like fires caused by sparks from static electricity as reported by Futurity Northwestern University researchers created a new model that shows that at the Nanos sale all materials have rough surfaces with countless tiny protrusion 's when to materials rub against each other those protrusion bend and deform those deformations give rise to voltages that ultimately caused static charging this phenomenon is called the flexible electric effect which happens when the separation of charge in an insulator comes from D. formations like bending this work explains lots of experimental observations like why we get a charge even when two pieces of the sea material rub together the findings also do a remarkably accurate job of predicting experimentally measured charges the researchers say this is a great example of how fun dental research can give us new ways to understand everyday phenomena and how research in one area can lead to unexpected advances in another kind of Nice when different scientific discipline rub off on each other yeah and then and then make the other scientific disciplines hair stand on end and then and then they touch each other and shock shock each other other shocking. Today's episode is sponsored by scores style. When's the last time you replace your sponge your average kitchen sponge is pretty gross.

Futurity Northwestern Universi Nanos Hamer Sean Carroll physicist
"sean carroll" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Everyone welcome to the mindscape podcast. I'm your host sean carroll and today we have cosmologists on the show not just myself another cosmologists anthony aguirre who are not gonna be able to say this is giving you a typical view of what cosmologists think about because anthony i actually are much more sympathetic with each other in our view of what are the important cosmological questions than we are with other cosmologists out there but that's okay. It's my podcast. <hes> anthony's recently written a wonderful book called cosmological cohen's where he tries to introduce some of the mind bending features of our cosmological universe through the device device of telling little zen cohen's if you're familiar with the idea of a co on it's a little story that is supposed to bend your mind a little bit right. Make you think about things that are apparently paradoxical. This is how the world works. The world itself is not paradoxical but it can seem that way sometimes so thinking about those paradoxes drives as you to interesting places and as malla gis that drives you to think about things like entropy and information and what happened at the big bang. Do we live in simulation elation questions like this so those are the kinds of issues that anthony and i discussed in the podcast and we get to interesting places because entropy and information are behind things like the existence of life in the universe why you remember the past and don't remember the future so do we live in simulation. <hes> these become interesting in questions for human life as well as for studying the universe and at the end we mentioned the fact that anthony has gone beyond studying the universe to actually found some organizations that worry worry about human life and where it's going so it's a very fun conversation. We had to sort of bite our tongues because we wanted to rush forward because we know our common background around but i think that we did a pretty good job of explaining things <hes> let me remind everyone that <hes> this is a podcast you can review it on itunes which we always loved you can support it on patriots fan and you can go to the website to find all the show notes and transcripts and things like that.

anthony aguirre cohen sean carroll patriots
"sean carroll" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:21 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on KGO 810

"This is the John Batchelor show to French Albert chocolate. They are the subject of the new book, grave, Jesus scientist philosopher, and their daring adventures from the French resistance to the Nobel prize. That is all and under statement because this is a conversation about twentieth. Century science, Sean Carroll is the author Sean Carroll. Sean, is a twentieth and twenty first century scientist, the reason this book is compelling because it has a romance. That is unbelievable at the same time, it plunges all of us into the contest between political science and science done in the lab where you do not know where you're going where you're feeling through the dark. I hope I say this correctly because shawna's is found his way to my studio. And for the first time Sean, and I have been talking for many years, meet in person to talk about two dead Frenchman who are inspiring, Sean, a very good evening to you, the Hubbert commu and jock Giacobino. It's a pleasure because they won't meet. For many years, much like us to Sean, just like us exactly. It's worth away, though. The meeting comes somewhat into the story. So we'll begin with Albert Camus, who is a Frenchman by way of the empire he comes from North Africa from Algiers from Algiers, french-algerian, and his introduction into the world of, of letters in France is pre war. But just at the edge of the plunge into darkness. When our KOMO raw arrives in Paris, he arrives with some notions about what the empire is what France is, is he disappointed? Is he discouraged or does Paris inspire? But I know I think Paris's he feels very much alone. He feels that is very strange place. He gets a job working as a layout person on a pretty mediocre newspaper, but he's toiling on a novel in his spare time. And this is a novel that the world is gonna know years. Later as the stranger and he really calls upon that sense of isolated in Paris, his sense of not belonging in the writing of that novel. So he does not just immediately meld into the lively nights scene of Paris. However, he has the good fortune to live in interesting times, and the Germans are about to plunge the world into darkness. The lion, the lamps will go off again and twice in the same century. Now, our scientists are biologist, who is a soul mate of your Sean. This is in. No, they're both Nobel prize winners. But this is a Nobel prize winner in medicine eventually into the twentieth century after he survives the adventures in your book, Jacques mono. He is a musician as well as an experiment, or they're so bun. The musician part of him. I couldn't quite fit that into all these daring adventures how he could have become a conductor performer. What compelled him? About music. He was he actually was torn between deciding whether to become a professional musician or a scientist. Is he had a really interesting upbringing family that encouraged him to explore all sorts of interests, father was a painter, and he fancied himself as, as a possible, great musician and really spent his twenties, not being able to decide to between which course to take life. So he was thirty years old married with young twin sons. When the war broke out, any really didn't have a settled profession, even at that time. Remember the war for France was nineteen forty before the Americans get into it. This is the so-called phoney war. But the when it erupted into the real thing was when the Germans defying a logic for the French general staff, didn't use the Belgian wrote, Belgium, route that they use in the first war, but came through the are done, and one of the joys of your books, Sean, is that. You are a World War Two student as well as being a biologist and you could've would've should've been a French major, so this book, combines, all of your hobbies, it, it certainly does what I try to do in the book, especially in the first part is to put the reader in the place of these two men. The war was not expected in the sense that Germany was expected to lose again because France, very powerful. Army in Britain was on its side. And when Germany attacked people thought, okay, finally, we're going to deal with them. And we're gonna be over with this, but it was a matter of days when the tide was turning very badly for France. I'll one possible other connection that I got suspicious about because Sean teaches and Wisconsin university of Wisconsin, Madison. He's a biologist and his ahead of an institute of science education, and I learned that Minoza mothers from the walkie now is that it is it is every young biologist in Wisconsin who wants to be a French major drawn to mono. Is that what's happening? But isn't that an amazing thing and the re one thing that pays off? John is that his mother is American. She marries a Frenchman and as a young boy, shock monosso learns English from his mother, so that he is really fluent in English, very articulate, and that wound up being a great factor in his. Future success, because he could communicate science so well in both languages. So there you have it. Komo was born nineteen thirteen Manos born nineteen ten they will not meet until the end of the war. So we're watching parallel lives here thrown into the culture of the invasion, by the Germans, and the fall of Paris. Stay with mino- because that is your field, Sean. I'm gonna have be partial here for biology. Mino- is working at the subban and the Germans crash into Paris and issue, all kinds of edicts. They tear France and have the Vichy part of France, led by a couple of rascals pertain, and his, his, his colleague level mino- doesn't wanna be there. He wants to be at the center of things in Paris, though, that takes a risk, and he's working at the Serb on and immediately falls into the underground almost magically, and he's attracted to the most dangerous part of the, the underground what well. People in his circles, I think, were were so shocked by the fall of France. They just couldn't believe that this was going to be the fate of the country. I mean France with an incredibly glorious history, including being on the winning side and we're, we're one and as laws became more restrictive as France fell under the boot hill of the Germans, particularly intelligentsia scientists lawyers doctors they were talking to other saying what can we do? And they were listening to the BBC that summer is when the habit of listening to the BBC started in France. And that's where they were getting real information not propaganda from the Germans about what was going on in the world. And they were learning for example, that Great Britain was hanging on and not collapsing was expected. And so they wanted to share this information so they decided to start an underground newspaper, and mino- agreed to be one of the distributors of that newspaper. But unfortunately in the very early days mistakes were made and mino- almost got caught in his name was on a list. How does he avoid being executed? His name is. On the list for disturbing. I think what twenty one copies that. Yes. That's right. So the police catch some people involved in he's his name on a list of distributors. But when they search is apartment and searches lab. They find newspapers. And so they clear him. But others in his group were not that fortunate and seven of them wound up being executed. He is that when he moves from the serb-un to the pet store. No even later, he's still at the Sorbonne but he's trying to finish his his doctorate. He's, he's actually just before this break-up of this resistance group, he makes little discovery a little survey of little discovery, what is it? Well, it's he studying this is this is nineteen forty what we know about life is very little, and he's asking really simple questions like, how to 'Bacterial grow, and what will happen if I grow them under different conditions any observes a little weird behavior where bacteria pause for a while when growing in one sugar and then start growing, again when given another sugar and you might think what is that? What twenty five years later that leads to a Nobel? Prize for fundamental insights into how genes work is coli. He's working in working on E coli, and it's just a simple bacterium, that is easy to grow, and he's asking simple questions. And it was really he graft a result. And it just looks like to me. I've worked in the lab for a long time is sort of experiments go. I must have done something wrong because there was just a little bump, in his graph that little bump ones that being a phenomenon that's going to explode into wasn't happy without experiment knows when he got when he goes, doctor, they said the serpent has no interest in what jock minnows doing, and that's why he goes to the past. He goes to the pastor. Yeah. All right. Well, we come back, we'll pick up Albert Camus, because, remember, these parallel heroes for the French resistance, but they don't know each other's exist, work at this point, and they're big work is ahead after the war when they take on the Stalinist creature. The book is brave genius. Scientist philosopher, and their daring adventures from the French resistance for the Nobel prize. Sean Carroll.

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"sean carroll" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Work at a pizza place. Hey, and they were bragging one day about how them in one of the girls at the pizza place after work in their car. Two brothers and this one girl at the brothers more. Wear gloves at work. Now, you know, people better have been wearing gloves. All. Yeah. Me. What? Wow. The woman in the threesome was high on meth and heroin and started to pass out because she was high on drugs. So at that point the two men asked her to leave they asked they said, we don't wanna do this anymore. You need to go. Well that made cameo her name, though, she was only female three of the major very mad. Okay. She felt like she was getting kicked out of the threesome. And she was but she felt like he was getting kicked out. So she tried to bite off one of the guys. Joe? Oh my gosh. What nightmare scenario cops came cameo, barked grout and history them. And they wound up having the tasers. So that they can take. Yep. And then the guy has named Steven. He's the one that went to how does junk almost bitten off to go to a different hospital to be treated and the cops have not arrested cameo, but you could be facing aggravated assault charges. That is what could happen if you have a threesome funding game. I while I'm pretty sure my wife, Carol on meth or heroin. One though. No, what she said this jaycee said, okay. I will allow a threesome you can pick any of the any girls any girl, but you have to also have the reverse where she can pick a guy and you owe. So you get your fantasy. But you have to barter you have to make a barter you have to make a deal that means that the guy has to be with her and you at the same time, not you. But I'm saying you're both in the same room. No, she can have a three you, but you can have threesome, but she also gets to have a threesome of her choice of. Well, it can't be with somebody else. You your friend Sean Carroll fair? Oh. It's not just opposite for her. No. So you can have three some she can't though, it'd be ideal. We say your record. Seven five keys E L. Traffic alert anybody else confused that the real question. Okay. Anyway, traffic updates give us a call eight hundred six eight two one oh seven five you're one seven five zero forecast. Mostly cloudy today, although are gonna say the sunshine a little bit like we are. Now, that's the day. Hot eighty is for the high today. Clouds.

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"sean carroll" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sean carroll" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And two to three pm on NewsRadio KLBJ Markelle Melinda. Well, I brought my pocket copy of the United States constitution. President Trump is making news. He says that he can issue an executive order that will notify the babies born to illegal immigrants from getting US citizenship. The fourteenth amendment isn't really clear, they need to clarify. Exactly. What was meant this issue? Does need to be addressed. And we need a decision. Weekdays ten to eleven AM and two to three pm on NewsRadio KLBJ. You're listening to the best of George Noory on Costa Costa, and with the biologists Sean Carroll talking about his work.

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