35 Burst results for "Scranton"

"scranton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"scranton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Scranton area as well as Pittsburgh. The really, I think key thing to watch there is it's going to take a while to get results there because election officials can't actually start counting mail in ballots in Pennsylvania until polls close. It's going to take a couple of days, probably to get real results there. So don't be fooled by a quote unquote red mirage in Pennsylvania where you start to see a lot of Republican votes tabulated on election day and then mail in ballots that probably skewed democratic in the next couple of days. Is mail in a tipping point this time around? Is it where pre voting is an amateur I'm talking? Is pre voting now dominant? I think it's definitely growing in popularity. I think it probably won't reach the same levels that we saw in 2020 when people were voting more from home because we were in the throat. Exactly. But a lot of people see that and see how easy it was and then realize they don't want to go back to in person voting. So it's probably somewhere between 2018, 2020 levels. Don't be a stranger tomorrow. And thank you so much for joining us. So we're really driving forward our election coverage. And a shout out to Greg churro as well. I read every word of is just because he's got the he's got the granularity like Paul Sweeney does. It's a Paul. I got to shift here in the final minute to Disney, which is earnings tonight. I believe you'll be with Carol master, where he vanished by that. This afternoon. But you know, I believe you mentioned in our conversation, Disney parks as well. Disney, this does well. It's just about the failure of the streaming model we're all enjoying. Well, I think as geetha ranganathan mentioned, most investors believe that when this all shakes out, that Disney will be one of the two, three, four successful streaming platforms left standing, but it's just a question of, how much is it going to cost in the interim? And right now, Disney is saying, hey, we'll break even on our streaming business, maybe next year. So people are going to be looking to see if that guy didn't still hold here. Are they going to maybe push it out another year? So that's kind of the concern here. Stock's about 35% year to date. This is very exciting for Paul Sweeney and Carol massar and their coverage through the day that you'll hear on Bloomberg radio are special coverage with David Weston's leadership this evening. It is election day in America. We will join you tomorrow, Bloomberg surveillance at the ungodly hour of 6 a.m.. It's rumored I'll be there. We are produced by Richard

Paul Sweeney Pennsylvania Greg churro Disney Scranton Pittsburgh geetha ranganathan Disney parks Carol Paul Carol massar Bloomberg radio David Weston America Richard
Dr. Mehmet Oz: Who John Fetterman Really Is

Mark Levin

01:35 min | Last month

Dr. Mehmet Oz: Who John Fetterman Really Is

"And you know it's interesting You're running against basically Jell-O Because the man is impossible to confront directly He's impossible to have an exchange with directly He's surrounded by sycophants and surrogates who speak for him or make apologies for him including in the media But his record is still coming out Doctor Oz is record of supporting the release of murders his record of not showing up for work when he was lieutenant governor his record of a radical left economic agenda which is killing this country with inflation and so forth It's your message resonating and is the truth about John fetterman getting out despite the millions that are spending to try and recreate him Without question And it's evidence at the simplest level when you ask people in the front lines what they think about him So I was endorsed by the paternal order of police not just in Philadelphia or Scranton but also the entire Commonwealth And it was unanimous because they don't feel like John federman has their back They feel like they're undermined continually That prosecutors don't do their jobs that federman who's been supportive of cashless bail which means that everyone just sort of revolving door People get arrested a hundred times There's no real penalty to pay for it And violent individuals can then reoffend So you build on top of that to sort of broad narrative of federman that is more interested in the criminals than the innocent that they're hurting

Doctor Oz John Fetterman John Federman Federman Scranton Philadelphia
10 people, including 3 children, killed in Pennsylvania house fire

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

10 people, including 3 children, killed in Pennsylvania house fire

"Reporting a firefighter says as many as ten people are feared dead in a Pennsylvania House fire A volunteer firefighter who was among responders says as many as ten people are dead after an early morning house fire in northeastern Pennsylvania and the victims were his relatives Nazca peck volunteer firefighter Harold baker told the times tribune of Scranton that the victims expected to eventually be found include his son daughter father in law brother in law sister in law three grand children and two other relatives The fire was reported around two 30 a.m. One person was found dead inside the house shortly after emergency responders arrived and two other victims were found later in the morning Authorities say the victims ranged in age from 6 to 70

Nazca Peck Harold Baker Pennsylvania The Times Tribune Scranton
It's Election Day in Pennsylvania; Who Holds the Edge?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:34 min | 7 months ago

It's Election Day in Pennsylvania; Who Holds the Edge?

"Morning, glory, America, don't go high candidate who you at live inside the beltway on this election day in Pennsylvania, Tuesday, may 17th, polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. today in Pennsylvania. I've heard all over the state from Scranton and all the way up in the northern northeastern corner down to Philadelphia. All the way over to Pittsburgh and up to Erie, and I encourage everyone to go and vote for David McCormick for the United States Senate. I also think Lou Bart, let barletta is a much easier to elect candidate. I don't think mister mastriano can win. I know David McCormick can win. I don't think any of the other people can win if you're going to vote for Kathy. Barnett, or Doctor Oz, I think you were throwing your vote away because they can't beat John fetterman. And this election matters so much because if McCormick doesn't get the nomination, we're going to have a very hard time getting the Senate back. In Republican hands and then confirmation of Supreme Court Justices will remain in Chuck Schumer's hands. The opportunity to break the filibuster will remain in Chuck Schumer's hand. It's vitally important to elect David McCormick. The bronze star recipient graduate of West Point grew up outside of Pittsburgh. He built business in Pittsburgh, built jobs in Pittsburgh. He's a Pittsburgh. And so this goes against migraine to say nice things about a Pittsburgh Steelers fan. I mean, steelers forever with McCormick, but Dave McCormick's a great American and when you're a West Point graduate and you receive the bronze star for valor in the 82nd airborne in the first Gulf War, you can trust the character.

David Mccormick Lou Bart Mister Mastriano Pittsburgh Pennsylvania John Fetterman United States Barletta Scranton Chuck Schumer Senate Erie Mccormick Philadelphia Barnett Kathy West Point Supreme Court Pittsburgh Steelers Dave Mccormick
Joe Biden's Approval Rating Is 36% Because Nobody Trusts Him Anymore

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden's Approval Rating Is 36% Because Nobody Trusts Him Anymore

"The big Moe's turning against them Another reason the big mow is turning against Joe Biden and momentum is going against It was not just because of his dreadful policies But nobody trusts him anymore Folks the guy I can't say this enough He keeps telling his autobiography autobiographical story and it's in the fiction section of the story He just keeps making stuff up every day So it's bad enough that his portfolio of policies is failing based on every available metric Labor force participation inflation consumer sentiment GDP growth It's gone down since he's gotten to office based on every single available touchable feel about metric Joe Biden is losing But Democrats usually run cover for Brad Democrat presidents when their policies blow it So why is Joe Biden at a uniquely low 36% right now approval rate Well not just his policy suck but the guy can't get out of his own way when he's telling his own life story and nobody trusts the guy anymore Listen folks one of the most damaging political narratives out there is a political narrative that changes a preexisting thought about who you thought a candidate or a person was You know it's why I make the case to you during the 2016 campaign that all stuff I came out about Donald Trump You know everybody had already heard it before They'd heard it before It didn't change a preexisting narrative about people already heard it before They already understood it all Think about Biden as Biden ran in 2020 against Trump as a stability agent As a guy who was going to level off these emotional peaks and valleys the country was going to under Trump That's what he ran on there He ran as like a man of integrity as a lunch bucket Joe was a Scranton kid Folks the reason this guy's approval ratings are 36% is because none of that's

Joe Biden Brad Democrat MOE Biden Donald Trump Scranton JOE
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"It is full of inspirational and formative and fun talks with other filmmakers about their projects and their journeys, Scranton talks is part of the independent film creative hub, based in Scranton Pennsylvania with hosts loose cabrales and myself does raise linsky, who founded the independent film creative hub, which is geared to help filmmakers for each other potential in becoming successful creative artists and I'm so happy. You can join us for another episode. So we just came off of filming my mystery box film challenge film luce and I and we had Danielle come up from Philly. We filmed on Halloween in nao park and Scranton, so that was pretty fun, dodging all the down, pores, and it was chilly. But we got the film shot and I'm in the process of editing my short film to the mystery box film challenge, which it's winding down pretty closely as I'm recording this podcast. We're in November already, which is crazy. So the mystery box film challenge if you're participating is winding down shortly. They have the regular deadline on November 10th in the late deadline November 30th. But for this episode of Scranton talks podcast, luce and I sat down with filmmaker and director Tony Susie. Tony is an art director, designer and filmmaker making funky projects of all shapes and sizes. His most recent films include the restaurant which won best of show for the 2020 mystery box film challenge in Johann a retrospective by Todd klemp, which both can be seen on the mystery box YouTube channel. Tony's kind of in my realm where I'm actually have a background in graphic design first, and then got into filmmaking later. So luce and I had a wonderful time talking with Tony about his journey into filmmaking and kind of the overlaps between him being in art director designer and filmmaker. So I hope you enjoyed this episode. Hi, everyone. Thank you for joining us. My name is Luz cabrales and on the cofounder of the independent film creative hub as well as Scranton films. Hi, everyone. My name is Denise Reyes Leslie. I'm also the cofounder of the independent film creative cloud. I also run the film society, a local filmmaking community here in northeast Pennsylvania. And I'm also the organizer of the mystery box film channel. We're very excited to be bringing you Scranton tasks or social media platforms and actually for the first first time live on air on easy TV channel 19. We will be announcing more content soon and we invite all creators around the area to reach out to the SRA and I through our independent creative hub, because we want to grow the creative and filmmaking industry in our beautiful and thriving area. And easy TV has given us a platform to make this happen. So we're going to work very hard in the next few months or years, whatever it takes to just bring that bring that filmmaking industry here because we know that it's already here. We have a lot of talented talented filmmakers and creatives, but this is our time. So our lead desire introduce our guest for today. Yeah, for tonight's grand talk we have Tony Susie here with us. Welcome Tony. Thank you for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me. It's super exciting..

Scranton luce linsky nao park Tony Susie Tony Todd klemp Pennsylvania Luz cabrales Danielle Denise Reyes Leslie Johann YouTube
Jen Psaki Avoids Peter Doocy's Question on Joe Biden's Intentions at the Border

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Jen Psaki Avoids Peter Doocy's Question on Joe Biden's Intentions at the Border

"Mark All right Peter doocy questions Psaki Of course lies like a rug and The White House a briefing today About Biden in the border Cut 20 go Does that count as a visit He said I've been there before You're saying he drove by for a few minutes Does that count What is the root cause Where are people coming from who are coming to the border Peter The president said that I'm asking you a question because I think people should understand the context Where do people where do people come I'm asking you Okay I'll answer it for you People come from Central America and Mexico to go to the border The president has been to those countries ten times this clever But he hasn't been to our country in the southern border So he goes to these other countries Why doesn't he go to the southern border To our country Why doesn't he visit our country Why doesn't he go to the southern border It's so obvious Go ahead There is a focus right now on a photo op The president does not believe a photo op is the same Presidents doing photo ops all the time So I was in Scranton the other day rambling there So I was in Michigan before that rambling there Photo op personal are you afraid of a photo op I believe he's president He does photo ops all the time but then that's not why People like me want him to to celebrate His policies on the southern border To talk to the people who live there Who are thrilled with the president to talk to the Democrats who represent the people on the southern border whether it's Texas Arizona New Mexico who are thrilled with the president of the United States We want him to visit all the little kids who've come into the freest country in the world who are being fed and being treated so beautifully In these holding tanks these aquariums or whatever you want to call them

Peter Doocy Psaki Biden White House Central America Mark Mexico Scranton Michigan New Mexico Arizona Texas United States
Big changes in White House ideas to pay for $2 trillion plan

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Big changes in White House ideas to pay for $2 trillion plan

"With the clock ticking toward a self imposed deadline the White House is offering to shift off a key component of how to pay for president Joe Biden's two trillion dollar social services and climate package the White House is prepared to keep the corporate tax rate at twenty one percent shelving a hike to twenty six point five percent favored by many Democrats for companies earning more than five billion dollars a year instead there would be a new tax on gains of those with more than one billion dollars in assets in his hometown of Scranton Pennsylvania Wednesday Biden was sounding confident this is been declared dead on arrival from the moment I introduced but I think we're going to surprise them but the clock is ticking democratic leaders in Congress want agreement by week's end Mike Rossio Washington

President Joe Biden White House Scranton Biden Pennsylvania Congress Mike Rossio Washington
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"I can't really stressing enough. Anyone can participate in the mystery. Box film challenge you. Don't have to be in scranton wilkes-barre you don't have to be in northeast. Pennsylvania you can be anywhere in participate. We've made it so we've made it really streamlined. Like keeping announcing the items online. And that's because of the pandemic it's like okay if you wanna do a challenge during a pandemic how we're gonna do this like we don't want to give out physical boxes and it's really not that conducive if you want to grow it so announcing the items was the best way to do it and it's it's really easy to it's just like people just have to go find the items if they have them in their house or they had the borrow him or if you wanna buy 'em yourself that's that's a really good we do. We're on facebook on instagram. We'll have a facebook group so you could talk to people this where we usually put the list of the requirements items prompts on. There's usually a document i to facebook page on the facebook group in the video is always there when we announced but this is the first year that the mystery box film challenge is on film freeway. That was a decision that i made that phone. Freeways really the premier place to find film festivals film challenges and i wanted just to get more is on the challenge because last year had lake. We had i think twenty one sign ups and we got twelve films back so usually are ratio is lake. We get a lot of sign ups in usually we get about half of them to submit a film which was amazing during a pandemic all types of films different genres like first time filmmakers season professionals to it's it's everybody you can do it. You can totally participate in this challenge. It's so much fun. And it's just a great way to connect with people in network with filmmakers in your area and asking for help and we're always here he always email us if you need help or have any questions but yeah all our items in prompts and requirements and specifications are on our film freeway page. If you searched the mystery box challenge on film freeway and like i said before you have two months to make film they need to be wanna ten minutes in laying that includes your credit entitles. They can't go beyond ten minutes Ill should align with the pg thirteen rating. We don't allow our crm teen films. These are short films are not gonna be feature films. So it's pretty good for that. And then you have your technical specifications as well and we do the emission on phil freeway as well. We used to have people email us. They're finish phones but we're not doing that. Everything is going to be through film freeway We do have a submission fee this year all past years. The film challenge has been free but with Just doing the challenge. It's a lot of it's like. We want to do a lot. More marketing in the marketing costs money. And we want to give her filmmaker swag like shirts and stickers and It better prizes in that costs money so like we have a regular deadlines mission is five dollars and then we have a late deadline for this year. So regular deadline for this year's film challenges november tenth. You still have time You can do a filming day you can edit and day and do whatever and are late. Deadline is november thirtieth and that will be a ten dollar fee early We kind of Wanted to do the challenge between like late summer and fall on we try to pretty close to one the northeast. Pennsylvania film festival has a festival. The festival usually is in march But it's just a pain the butt film in the winter. that can't be done. It's just a pain in the butt to film in the winter so we had the challenge earlier this year so it was. We kicked it off on september first skinner complete in the end of november to give people that end of summer fall timeframe which is still pretty nice to film. It's actually unseasonably warm now. Still which is awesome northeast pennsylvania. So i hope everyone can participate in the film challenge. It's a really great challenge to be creative and to just get yourself out there and start making films it's a real catalyst for people on lake like this is like if you wanna skies the limit if you want to do any type of film you want and have all the requirements inc for the challenge. I wanted to participate in the challenge. One year i actually wrote my script. And i just couldn't get anyone to get enough pete. I couldn't get a crew and actors together to do it. But i was like i'm going to keep the script and i'm gonna keep working on it and i'm gonna eventually produce it so i wrote a script. Siro my script for the mystery box challenge. This call fallout. And so i kept working on it and working on the script editing. I had my colleagues rita the detailer with me at lunch. They gave me feedback. So i just kept the script that i wrote for the mystery box kept working working working at and i gave it to my friend bridget. She edited it for me. Give me feedback. I kept ending it in editing. It got to a point where i thought it was good. And i just didn't then the pandemic again the pandemic hits and i just haven't i have not produced the film yet but i do want to. It's not really conducive to film during the pandemic. Because it's all takes place in a basement so really. The premise of fallout is. There's a group of friends who are hunkering down for an impending nuclear attack. While one of their friends is outside could be dead could not be dead Who knows and they're really freaked out in steph happens in. I don't want to give too much away. But i decided to submit that script to a couple screenplay competitions recently on film freeway in. It's gotten right now. It's gotten six official selections for six different vessels which is pretty awesome Just to get it out there in get it recognized which is pretty cool and it's like all right. This is really something. So i really want to film this. But it's like don't have. It's a catalyst. The mystery box film challenges are really creative. way to really get into filmmaking. Answer really start making something i i mean. I find a lot of people even myself included you. Stop yourself sometimes. If you wanna make film you stop yourself. It's like even. I wanna participate this year. Even though i'm the organizer. I still want to participate in writing my scripts and like i know what i to ride. And it's like okay. Who am i gonna get. Who is like the crew and stuff like that and making it simple so we can get it done in a day and i can edit it on time and get it in. So it's it's in own if you don't end up if you write something you end up not making it to the deadline to keep your script and keep reworking it. I mean you know. They asked for help. Get your parents involved. If the if you need to be can't find anyone you know you don't need to have a professional camera you can. Have someone help you edit or you can try editing yourself. I mean it's just anyone can participate. So i hope you guys Take some time to go to our website. The mystery box film challenge go to our film freeway page. Take a look at the list of items and problems in specifications and requirements and see if he can get a film. We would love to see your film. And you'll get them will be the premier's gonna be at the northeast pennsylvania film festival. We don't know what they yet. Um that'll come close when it gets to march but I'm so glad you guys can join me to for the une boxing. The mystery box film challenge. And i hope you guys participate. If you have any questions you can email the mystery box. Film challenge mystery box any p. Mail dot com. The mystery box challenge is on facebook. Instagram follow us. And we're also on youtube where you can find pass emissions to get some inspiration They're really talented. People who cemented in any type of person. Like if you're just new to filmmaking you for professional like everyone's got some great stuff and it's on youtube for everyone to look at so thank you guys so much for joining us for our scranton talks podcasts. About the mystery box film challenge. To go and participate. There is still time. We're on the halfway point so so go on our phone. Freeway patients admit to our film challenge. It's gonna be awesome. I can't wait to see you guys. And i hope if you do submit You get to join us at the film festival for the premiere of the films in copa. Get to meet you. That'd be great and get to network with other filmmakers as well in scranton So the the film festival usually happens downtown. Scranton in pennsylvania so i hope you guys can participate. Thank you so much for joining us for grand talks podcast. Be sure to subscribe to our podcast to get all the latest episodes. We upload episodes once a month Be sure to check out our facebook instagram. like i said again and we do our scranton. Talks live on facebook and on electric city television. If your local once a month our next Interview is gonna be on october. Nineteenth live on our facebook page on the independent film creative hub. Electric television will be talking with bridget. Lamonica she's a local filmmaker from northeast pennsylvania. Who actually is living and working in atlanta now. So we'll be talking to her about her projects what she's been doing Like working in the film industry. She's fully in the film industry a freelance basis working atlanta. So we'll be talking with her on october nineteenth at seven fifteen pm so i hope you can join us for that and thank you once again for joining us on this episode of scranton talks Be sure to check out the independent film creative. A website at www dot com are creative dot com where you can check a directory of pete filmmakers. Who are on there if you need any help finding actors and crew. That's the place to go for the with. You're looking for your crew for your mystery. Buxom challenge in. It's free to sign up so you can make your own directory on there so go there and check it out. Thank you guys so much again. Be sure to tell all your friends about scranton talks. Podcasts can't wait to hear from you on the next episode.

scranton alinsky northeast pennsylvania pennsylvania
Ep4: Unboxing The Mystery Box Film Challenge

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 1 year ago

Ep4: Unboxing The Mystery Box Film Challenge

"I can't really stressing enough. Anyone can participate in the mystery. Box film challenge you. Don't have to be in scranton wilkes-barre you don't have to be in northeast. Pennsylvania you can be anywhere in participate. We've made it so we've made it really streamlined. Like keeping announcing the items online. And that's because of the pandemic it's like okay if you wanna do a challenge during a pandemic how we're gonna do this like we don't want to give out physical boxes and it's really not that conducive if you want to grow it so announcing the items was the best way to do it and it's it's really easy to it's just like people just have to go find the items if they have them in their house or they had the borrow him or if you wanna buy 'em yourself that's that's a really good we do. We're on facebook on instagram. We'll have a facebook group so you could talk to people this where we usually put the list of the requirements items prompts on. There's usually a document i to facebook page on the facebook group in the video is always there when we announced but this is the first year that the mystery box film challenge is on film freeway. That was a decision that i made that phone. Freeways really the premier place to find film festivals film challenges and i wanted just to get more is on the challenge because last year had lake. We had i think twenty one sign ups and we got twelve films back so usually are ratio is lake. We get a lot of sign ups in usually we get about half of them to submit a film which was amazing during a pandemic all types of films different genres like first time filmmakers season professionals to it's it's everybody you can do it. You can totally participate in this challenge. It's so much fun. And it's just a great way to connect with people in network with filmmakers in your area and asking for help and we're always here he always email us if you need help or have any questions but yeah all our items in prompts and requirements and specifications are on our film freeway page. If you searched the mystery box challenge on film freeway and like i said before you have two months to make film they need to be wanna ten minutes in laying that includes your credit entitles. They can't go beyond ten minutes Ill should align with the pg thirteen rating. We don't allow our crm teen films. These are short films are not gonna be feature films. So it's pretty good for that. And then you have your technical specifications as well and we do the emission on phil freeway as well. We used to have people email us. They're finish phones but we're not doing that. Everything is going to be through film freeway We do have a submission fee this year all past years. The film challenge has been free but with Just doing the challenge. It's a lot of it's like. We want to do a lot. More marketing in the marketing costs money. And we want to give her filmmaker swag like shirts and stickers and It better prizes in that costs money so like we have a regular deadlines mission is five dollars and then we have a late deadline for this year. So regular deadline for this year's film challenges november tenth. You still have time You can do a filming day you can edit and day and do whatever and are late. Deadline is november thirtieth and that will be a ten dollar fee early We kind of Wanted to do the challenge between like late summer and fall on we try to pretty close to one the northeast. Pennsylvania film festival has a festival. The festival usually is in march But it's just a pain the butt film in the winter. that can't be done. It's just a pain in the butt to film in the winter so we had the challenge earlier this year so it was. We kicked it off on september first skinner complete in the end of november to give people that end of summer fall timeframe which is still pretty nice to film. It's actually unseasonably warm now. Still which is awesome northeast pennsylvania. So i hope everyone can participate in the film challenge. It's a really great challenge to be creative and to just get yourself out there and start making films it's a real catalyst for people on lake like this is like if you wanna skies the limit if you want to do any type of film you want and have all the requirements inc for the challenge. I wanted to participate in the challenge. One year i actually wrote my script. And i just couldn't get anyone to get enough pete. I couldn't get a crew and actors together to do it. But i was like i'm going to keep the script and i'm gonna keep working on it and i'm gonna eventually produce it so i wrote a script. Siro my script for the mystery box challenge. This call fallout. And so i kept working on it and working on the script editing. I had my colleagues rita the detailer with me at lunch. They gave me feedback. So i just kept the script that i wrote for the mystery box kept working working working at and i gave it to my friend bridget. She edited it for me. Give me feedback. I kept ending it in editing. It got to a point where i thought it was good. And i just didn't then the pandemic again the pandemic hits and i just haven't i have not produced the film yet but i do want to. It's not really conducive to film during the pandemic. Because it's all takes place in a basement so really. The premise of fallout is. There's a group of friends who are hunkering down for an impending nuclear attack. While one of their friends is outside could be dead could not be dead Who knows and they're really freaked out in steph happens in. I don't want to give too much away. But i decided to submit that script to a couple screenplay competitions recently on film freeway in. It's gotten right now. It's gotten six official selections for six different vessels which is pretty awesome Just to get it out there in get it recognized which is pretty cool and it's like all right. This is really something. So i really want to film this. But it's like don't have. It's a catalyst. The mystery box film challenges are really creative. way to really get into filmmaking. Answer really start making something i i mean. I find a lot of people even myself included you. Stop yourself sometimes. If you wanna make film you stop yourself. It's like even. I wanna participate this year. Even though i'm the organizer. I still want to participate in writing my scripts and like i know what i to ride. And it's like okay. Who am i gonna get. Who is like the crew and stuff like that and making it simple so we can get it done in a day and i can edit it on time and get it in. So it's it's in own if you don't end up if you write something you end up not making it to the deadline to keep your script and keep reworking it. I mean you know. They asked for help. Get your parents involved. If the if you need to be can't find anyone you know you don't need to have a professional camera you can. Have someone help you edit or you can try editing yourself. I mean it's just anyone can participate. So i hope you guys Take some time to go to our website. The mystery box film challenge go to our film freeway page. Take a look at the list of items and problems in specifications and requirements and see if he can get a film. We would love to see your film. And you'll get them will be the premier's gonna be at the northeast pennsylvania film festival. We don't know what they yet. Um that'll come close when it gets to march but I'm so glad you guys can join me to for the une boxing. The mystery box film challenge. And i hope you guys participate. If you have any questions you can email the mystery box. Film challenge mystery box any p. Mail dot com. The mystery box challenge is on facebook. Instagram follow us. And we're also on youtube where you can find pass emissions to get some inspiration They're really talented. People who cemented in any type of person. Like if you're just new to filmmaking you for professional like everyone's got some great stuff and it's on youtube for everyone to look at so thank you guys so much for joining us for our scranton talks podcasts. About the mystery box film challenge. To go and participate. There is still time. We're on the halfway point so so go on our phone. Freeway patients admit to our film challenge. It's gonna be awesome. I can't wait to see you guys. And i hope if you do submit You get to join us at the film festival for the premiere of the films in copa. Get to meet you. That'd be great and get to network with other filmmakers as well in scranton So the the film festival usually happens downtown. Scranton in pennsylvania so i hope you guys can participate. Thank you so much for joining us for grand talks podcast. Be sure to subscribe to our podcast to get all the latest episodes. We upload episodes once a month Be sure to check out our facebook instagram. like i said again and we do our scranton. Talks live on facebook and on electric city television. If your local once a month our next Interview is gonna be on october. Nineteenth live on our facebook page on the independent film creative hub. Electric television will be talking with bridget. Lamonica she's a local filmmaker from northeast pennsylvania. Who actually is living and working in atlanta now. So we'll be talking to her about her projects what she's been doing Like working in the film industry. She's fully in the film industry a freelance basis working atlanta. So we'll be talking with her on october nineteenth at seven fifteen pm so i hope you can join us for that and thank you once again for joining us on this episode of scranton talks Be sure to check out the independent film creative. A website at www dot com are creative dot com where you can check a directory of pete filmmakers. Who are on there if you need any help finding actors and crew. That's the place to go for the with. You're looking for your crew for your mystery. Buxom challenge in. It's free to sign up so you can make your own directory on there so go there and check it out. Thank you guys so much again. Be sure to tell all your friends about scranton talks. Podcasts can't wait to hear from you on the next episode.

Scranton Alinsky Northeast Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Facebook Wilkes Skinner Bridget Pete Rita Youtube Boxing Lamonica Atlanta
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"The items and technical requirements and specifications automatically. Get him we only do the judging for the best of show so he picked who has overall really did the best job out of everyone just to have bragging rights and just make it really fun but Yeah we do a lot of the stuff online we do alive. Qna round the halfway point of the challenge. We have one coming up on october fourteenth. At seven o'clock. I'll be going live on facebook. Really quick that night Answering anyone's questions they have about the challenge. A lot of you can find a lot of our information. Our website mystery box film. Challenge dot com. Like some of the questions is like is some people have asked. If there's a limit to the number of people that can have on their tenders no limit. You can have six. You could have one whatever you need to get the job done. The big question. I always get is like. Is this challenge. Only for those living in northeast pennsylvania. No it's not a he anyone. I can't really stressing enough. Anyone can participate in the mystery. Box film challenge you. Don't have to be in scranton wilkes-barre you don't have to be in northeast. Pennsylvania you can be anywhere in participate. We've made it so we've made it really streamlined. Like keeping announcing the items online. And that's because of the pandemic it's like okay if you wanna do a challenge during a pandemic how we're gonna do this like we don't want to give out physical boxes and it's really not that conducive if you want to grow it so announcing the items was the best way to do it and it's it's really easy to it's just like people just have to go find the items if they have them in their house or they had the borrow him or if you wanna buy 'em yourself that's that's a really good we do. We're on facebook on instagram. We'll have a facebook group so you could talk to people this where we usually put the list of the requirements items prompts on. There's usually a document i to facebook page on the facebook group in the video is always there when we announced but this is the first year that the mystery box film challenge is on film freeway. That was a decision that i made that phone. Freeways really the premier place to find film festivals film challenges and i wanted just to get more is on the challenge because last year had lake. We had i think twenty one sign ups and we got twelve films back so usually are ratio is lake. We get a lot of sign ups in usually we get about half of them to submit a film which was amazing during a pandemic all types of films different genres like first time filmmakers season professionals to it's it's everybody you can do it. You can totally participate in this challenge. It's so much fun. And it's just a great way to connect with people in network with filmmakers in your area and asking for help and we're always here he always email us if you need help or have any questions but yeah all our items in prompts and requirements and specifications are on our film freeway page. If you searched the mystery box challenge on film freeway and like i said before you have two months to make film they need to be wanna ten minutes in laying that includes your credit entitles..

facebook wilkes scranton pennsylvania Pennsylvania
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"This past year a couple of years ago. So i'm trying to get all the films that we have for every year on our youtube channel for you to look at the inspiration You don't need to have a super high quality professional camera and you have a camera right in your pocket your phone so if you if you want to. If you've heard of the mystery box film challenge and you want to participate but you're not sure how to. I mean i remember someone last year was like i don't have a professional camera. Can i still do it and yeah you can totally do it like you can borrow. Someone's camera Ask someone who you know. Who might be into filmmaking. They have a camera to help you. Shoot it or you shoot it on. Your iphone lasts. What i did with mine film tenth dimension. We shot it all on my iphone. Iphones are a lot better than campbell. Is the newer iphones. So we funded all of my iphone. You have the phone. Your pocket your smartphone. So he can fill them on. Your iphone I it was a really windy day on tenth. Mention it was. It was february winter. Wintery day windy so we didn't really have a boom mic. Sounds very important When it comes to film that i've learned I didn't have a boom mike. We didn't have anyone doing sound on my phone. So i did a voice over for to dimension which helped it would have been really bad sound if you were trying to do it at the phone that recorded because of the wind was really bad. Yeah i think the with tenth dimension for example a the voice over was the last thing. I did it last thing i did when i edited it. But it's like. I use the voice memo app on my phone for recording voice overs and stuff like that and if you can find anyone who can help you do sound with a boom and equipment. That's ideal i know. Sometimes it's hard but there's a ways there's ways around it and i mean i use. I moved to films. Even though that's not really the premier professional wave. That doesn't really matter. I use eye movie. 'cause i'm used to movie Lot of people use premier to edit or final cut is. What's come for we or you can find someone who can help you edit if you're not really good. Editing i mean with finding crew and actors directories if you have a film office Telephone office pennsylvania. Where i'm from and live for example. The big film offices are philadelphia. Or pittsburgh..

youtube campbell pennsylvania philadelphia pittsburgh
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Chooses Wokeness Over Art

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:30 min | 1 year ago

San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Chooses Wokeness Over Art

"Okay. I want to read to you. And i'm gonna try to take jim in scranton by the way just for the record and i want to read to you. A letter sent to the members of one of the leading orchestras of the country. The san francisco symphony orchestra. I have friends in many of the top orchestras of the country because of my interest in involvement in classical music dear. All i won't read the whole letter as we start the twenty twenty one twenty two season allen when i say alan on the air you know it's serious. I wanted to take a moment to address some questions about the nature and future of our d. e. I work together. i will note after many sentences. Something the assumption is the members of the orchestra. No what the diversity equity and inclusion so there have been some questions will. Who is the person here. The person who wrote it is matthew. Spivey interim ceo of the san francisco symphony orchestra. 2-0 one van ness avenue san francisco over the last three years. The san francisco symphony has been on a remarkable journey of learning self reflection and change. The entire letter is pablum the entire letter it is unworthy of adults. It is or william pablum. The san francisco symphony has been on a remarkable journey of learning self reflection and change The journey there the symphony orchestra is on a journey and of lot learning self reflection and change. All of that is a euphemism for over the last three years we have made the san francisco symphony orchestra. More and more awoke.

San Francisco Symphony Orchest Scranton San Francisco JIM Spivey Allen Alan William Pablum Matthew
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Survival mode. <Speech_Music_Male> When you go into survival, <Speech_Music_Male> what happened? <Speech_Male> Shut down, right? <Speech_Male> You shut down all <Speech_Male> the motions. <Speech_Male> I told my own mother <Speech_Male> that I was seeing a therapist. <Speech_Male> And she said, <Speech_Male> you don't need to see <Speech_Male> a therapist. <SpeakerChange> What you need <Speech_Music_Male> to do is see a preacher. <Speech_Male> You got Jesus. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> You don't <Speech_Music_Male> need anything else. You <Music> know, just buck it up. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I feel like for us, <Music> there's so much <Music> leg. <Music> <Music> There's <Music> so much like generational <Speech_Music_Female> drama. <Music> <Music> In our VNA, <Music> just <Speech_Female> based on the history <Speech_Music_Female> of how we in particular <Speech_Telephony_Female> African Americans <Music> have <SpeakerChange> here. <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> You know, <Music> I don't think <Music> that even right <Music> now there has been <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <Music> any kind of record <Music> in east lane that I <Music> dealt with <Music> depression. <Music> So I don't <Music> even <Speech_Telephony_Male> understand. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> Sometimes. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <Music> I <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> think. <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> Maybe I'll <Music> call it a bit different. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> This <Music> thing is just <Music> a group of <Music> people. <Music> And for those <Music> who <Music> are neighbors, <Music> <Music> what Jesus Christ. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> That's great. <Music> <Music> But he <Speech_Music_Female> saw help <Silence> also. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> He talked to <Silence> describes. <Speech_Music_Male> He <Silence> talked to the disciples. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> He taught to <Music> people. <Music> You need to talk <Speech_Music_Male> to people. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> You <Speech_Music_Female> need to <Speech_Music_Female> say <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> I'm not okay <Silence> <Advertisement> right now. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank <Speech_Female> you so much for joining <Speech_Female> us for this <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> episode of our Scranton <Speech_Music_Female> pox podcast. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I hope <Speech_Music_Female> you enjoyed your time <Speech_Female> with us. <Speech_Female> Be sure <Speech_Female> to catch our next <Speech_Female> episode where <Speech_Female> luce and I talked <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> local art director <Speech_Female> designer <Speech_Female> and filmmaker, <Speech_Female> Tony Susie. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> His most recent films <Speech_Female> include the restaurant, <Speech_Female> which won best of <Speech_Female> show for 2020s <Speech_Female> mystery <SpeakerChange> box film <Speech_Female> challenge in Johann, <Speech_Female> by retrospective <Speech_Female> by Todd <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> clem. <Speech_Female> Which both <Speech_Female> can be seen on the mystery <Speech_Female> box film <SpeakerChange> challenge <Speech_Female> YouTube channel. So <Speech_Female> be sure to check out <Speech_Music_Female> that episode. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Also, you <Speech_Female> can check out the <Speech_Female> healing begins documentary <Speech_Female> trailer <Speech_Female> on YouTube, <Speech_Female> and you can follow trystan <Speech_Female> on Instagram. <Speech_Female> Be sure to <Speech_Female> follow the independent <Speech_Female> film creative hub on <Speech_Female> Instagram and Facebook <Speech_Female> to stay up to date <Speech_Female> on the latest projects <Speech_Female> in happenings we have <Speech_Female> going on. <Speech_Female> And be sure <Speech_Female> to subscribe to our <Speech_Music_Female> podcast to stay <Speech_Female> up to date on our latest <Speech_Female> episodes. <Speech_Female> And

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"That we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries you're working with younger people. I know that's ray had one of the last questions of the day. So we don't hold you up too much. And we try to ask that question to old filmmakers that come to the Scranton tax just to make sure that anyone out there, you know, maybe whoever is watching right now or whoever may watch the future because we're going to archive this conversation. We want to make sure that they hear what you have to say on that. And I know it was as far as the advice that's right. If you want to ask that last question and kind of like, we'll do a little plug on what you're doing on your website and what your next project is. I have two questions. The first question is, what challenges have you came across while you were filming your documentary? I'm sure everyone is experienced who has worked on a film so that some sort of challenge that happened that you had to overcome. And the second question is what Lewis was saying is that what advice would you give to those who are interested in filmmaking or advice that you would give in your younger self that was starting out? Yeah, so those are great questions. One of the challenges that I faced my documentary was negating how much time I wanted to calculate it to be. Right now, right now, I think it's a believe that 35 minutes or something, which is a nice cat, but like I said earlier, you know, rough and Rosanna and Lille were just dropping so much dollars to where, you know, I didn't want that to be like a snooze fest, you know what I mean? In a documentary, so I wanted to that was one of my challenges because that person was about 15 minutes and I was okay. Let's see what we could cut a doubt back on that. So that was one of my challenges that I created. And that's where hit me with that second question again. What would you give to those who want to get into filmmaking? What advice would you give them? Or if you want to give advice to your younger self that was starting out with what would advice would you give yourself? Yeah, my advice for people that want to get started and filmmaking is to just tell the story that you want to tell. Point blank period. You know what I mean? Put it on paper, having friends look at it. Think about it, you know what I mean? Thinking about it in American intentional type of weight when you do this type of work. And just do it. You know, like a short, why not? Exactly. So we have some questions on Facebook but let me just pull it up that way. Think to my mom. Thanks. They're from your mom. That's good. So we have so well, we have Brenda that's greetings from rockaway queens. Awesome. Awesome. Thank you for watching. And we have, do you have a personal views to help you with creativity? You have a personal music helping with creativity. Yeah, that's a good question. Miscarriage, Tristan. Beautiful question. My mother and my grandmother. You know what I mean? They're the ones that really guide me, you know what I mean all the way to steer me in a way of like, you know, you be your truth, you know what I mean? You tell your truth, you know what I mean?.

Chicago stony island Scranton ray Rosanna Lille Lewis rockaway queens Brenda Facebook Tristan
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Lucca RAS linskey Marcellus Winfrey alley theater ensemble theater Goodman theater Congo square t Oak Park festival luce Chicago Pennsylvania university of Houston Usa Lucy
Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 1 year ago

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Right. Hello, everybody. Again, my name is Lucy bralette and I run the independent film creative have along with despair and I am the founder of Scranton films advocating the arts in the area of parental Pennsylvania. We have created the independent film. Creative have as an outed for all filmmakers in the local areas granted and outside the area to basically make films, you know, make films collaborate and be an advocate for the arts. This way, here's what we should do a little introduction in what you can find us. And then we'll tell you again who we are interviewing today. Hi guys, I'm desert Raza lenski. I collaborate alongside with Lewis gorilla is on the independent film creative of. I also run the film society and the organizer of the mystery box film challenge here locally and across big advocates of bringing film here in the area. Yes, and today we have Tristan Tristan, we are going to tag to you about your new documentary in as well as view as a filmmaker. If you maybe want to introduce yourself and tell us just a little bit more about what you do and then we can start this is a very laid back conversation, nothing to be worried about. We're not going to drill you on anything, but we don't want to know what your process is as a filmmaker. So if you want to introduce yourself just a little bit just tell us a little bit more about yourself. What you're located. Yeah, hey, what's going on, everybody? My name is Tristan, Marcellus Winfrey. An actor writer and director and what are we talking about documentary, the healing begins that deals with mental health, you know what I mean and how we tell ourselves and go through these a combinations of what we go through as people. Right, right. And we're very excited to have you here, you are in Chicago, correct. Chicago Chicago. Exactly. Is that what it does the window city, right? You know, that's what we call it. It's actually one thing. Chicago has its days. One day it feels like summer wonder it feels like spray and then, you know, you put like a tundra one day. So we get an all type of seasons. But for the most part, we do hold ourselves accountable for being the windy city. That's good. That's good. So we want to talk to you about being a filmmaker. We're going to get into your documentary and what is all about because I believe that you have a very powerful message and but you're also a very powerful filmmaker in you have done films. You have that commercials. You're also an actor or a producer and I believe you're even a teacher and you are advocate. You're doing what we're doing as well in your own way. So tell us more about your journey as a filmmaker, what you get started as a filmmaker in just sort of when did you realize that this is what you wanted to do? Yeah, so the journey of being a filmmaker. I think it started back in 2018 when I produced my first short film called pain as the agent of change, which kind of like dealt with my all personal loss and grief of a brother. And, you know, do that channeling kind of like worked out what a script was, you know what I mean? And, you know, Biden has put this together, telling the story of personal my own story of life, you know, what it was that I was dealing with during that time. And so I kind of just, you know, got through, you know what I mean and got the filmmakers together and said, okay, I have the story. You know what I mean? I want to tell for a specific type of people. You know what I mean? Because so often, you know what I mean? When we talk about Greek, especially black green, you know, it's often kind of like just plastic on a new screen and that's how you hear about it. You have this different type of stereotype. So for me, it was like, well, I want to go beyond that, you know what I mean? Why are we not actually sitting down to talk to someone? You know what I mean about the things that we are going through within our own community? Because, you know, lose this thing of like right away, you know, why are you talking to a therapist saying, you know, you must be crazy and it's like, no way. You don't have to say it to where to go. So I just got really curious about my own personal care, so it's like I'm a child is and also take up therapy to learn about the things that I need to learn to better my own. And so how do you go about you in your own way as a filmmaker when you said, okay, I think this is a very powerful message that I want to convey. And let's talk about the film process first. For we started the independent film for filmmakers. The independent film creative have us an outlet for filmmakers that maybe are going through the same thing. You know what, what am I gonna do with my life or maybe I wanted to do this all my life and how do I get started, right? And you said, you got started a little bit later in life, you know, but you have done creative work throughout. So tell us about that in a sense. What made you say, okay, now I have an idea. Now I want to do a few more. And what was your process in that sense like getting actors? You yourself have an agent. So you kind of know a little bit of the behind the scenes, but now as far as the producer part in making it happen, that was more a little bit about that. You know, first things first summer after. You know what I mean? Active film and television. So the whole thing is that I know what a good script is. When is upon me? So that was the easy part of navigating. You know what I mean? I think the biggest part for me was kind of like finding a director photography. You know what I mean? And then 8 editor. Then a self personal like, you know, hover over me while I'm speaking these slides. Now that stuff was all formed to me because his actor, you show up to set, you can learn to lines learn and you do what you need to do and need you to help, you know, I need this one. This was a really technical aspect. And we knew nothing about, you know what I mean? So I kind of like you know, I was really green to this on my book they were all okay. What is a wise? What does a closer look? Right. So that you write your own script as well or do you have the E collaborate with anyone in that part of it? I wrote my own spirit, my Friends, you know what I mean? Who are other actors and all that I was like, okay, hey, can you read this? You know what I need to see if it is actually decent? And it actually turned out to be a really spectacular. So once I wrote it, you know what I mean? I put it in the hands of our DP and our editor and all that and what I knew was that it was true, you know what I mean? And we, you know, talk about different shots that we wanted to portray and different images and storytelling and all that. Okay, no. So that's really good because someone who's getting started like a desert and I just made a small film for the mystery box, which we were talking about it a little bit behind the scenes, but we're trying to encourage filmmakers to make their own films, whether it's something that they think is, you know, it's not up to where they want it to be. What advice do you think we can do when you say, okay, we're looking at actors. We're looking. And I didn't even say advice. I would say the process, right? Now you have your actors in place. Now you have to do it. How do you manage that being you yourself an actor? Because I think you.

Lucy bralette Chicago Raza lenski Lewis gorilla Tristan Tristan Marcellus Winfrey Scranton Tristan Pennsylvania Biden
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Welcome back to another episode of this grant and talks podcast. This is a podcast of inspirational informative and fun talks with other filmmakers about their projects and their journeys. Scranton talks is part of the independent film creative hub based in Scranton Pennsylvania. Hosted by Lucca RAS and myself, as a raised linskey, who founded the independent film creative hub, which is geared to help filmmakers reach their potential and becoming successful creative artists. I am so glad you can join us again for another episode and luce and I have been hard at work doing some many awesome projects. And we are so glad to bring you this next episode of screen talks. Usa and I had the pleasure to talk with director and filmmaker Tristan, Marcellus Winfrey. Tristan is a local Chicago writer, director, actor, producer, teaching artist and filmmaker. He attended the university of Houston downtown studying fine arts. He has had the privilege to perform a collaborate with theater companies such as the alley theater ensemble theater, pride film in place, Goodman theater Congo square theater, Oak Park festival, Chicago dramatist, LatinX theater commons in other companies. His film and commercial credits include pain as the agent of change short film. The helium begins documentary, the Thai bar, big break teen prevention, windstream kinetic energy. Tristan is a huge advocate for mental health awareness. He uses his platform to make a change in the world one step at a time. Lucy and I delve deep with Tristan on his filmmaking journey, and what has inspired him on the films he created, including talking about his recent documentary, the healing begins. Tristan, sums up the documentary with this point. We are in a new era of retelling our story as black people. The healing of ourselves and the world we live in will come when.

Scranton Tristan Lucca RAS linskey Marcellus Winfrey alley theater ensemble theater Goodman theater Congo square t Oak Park festival luce Chicago Pennsylvania university of Houston Usa Lucy
"scranton" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"By the intense flash flooding that met more than 50 people dying. In several Eastern states. Incredible. It's incredible. I'm surprised my is that and what otherwise you would not assume could generate a water height that went up in some cases almost in the windows. These homes. Past Joe You around for Hurricane Agnes. I know you were in Scranton. Did you ever travel to Wilkes Barre helped those people clean out their homes, like many of us dead. Or in West Pittston. You can see water at at, you know the type of a streetlight people's homes were completely under As vice president. Did you travel anywhere to visit people? And what did you say to the people who were running those cities about better evacuations? About better information to get to them that maybe they shouldn't be in a basement dwelling. Maybe they should be riding in a car and continue to travel when they can't see the bottom of the roadway. What did you do? Oh, is he toured Amanda, North, New Jersey and part of Queens in the city by connected that climate change to the historic flooding, as well as a stronger hurricanes and more intense wildfires in the Western US, saying it's become quote everybody's crisis. They've been warning us the extreme weather would get more extreme over the decade. And we're living in real time. Now. Climate change poses an existential threat to our lives to our economy, and the threat is here. It's not going to get any better. Question. Can it get worse? Even the climate Skeptics are seen that this really does matter. Well, you do know that the number of deaths over the last century from extreme weather has declined precipitously. Let's not talk about that, though we can't talk about that. Joe is on a roll. Now, everybody trusts Joe. He just gets the opportunity not to talk about Afghanistan. Is that what he gets or the Southern border? President visit Louisiana on Friday where Hurricane struck on August 29th category four Storm were killed 15 people there and what three times that up in the Northeast. May we had? What? Six people dead? Uh, yeah, just about 50. I think it was 48 in the Northeast. Something like that. Well as he runs for re election makes appearances at events with the potential.

Scranton Six people Friday Amanda 15 people Queens Louisiana Western US New Jersey Hurricane Agnes Joe West Pittston North Wilkes Barre 48 August 29th Afghanistan more than 50 people three times last century
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

19:36 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"So we come back from multiple callbacks, 'cause we were like, there's no way. Things don't work out like this for us. But it just did. And so casting was really, really fun. And everyone ended up just being local to Wellington. Because like you guys are saying there's so much talent outside of Atlanta. And LA and New York. There's so much talent in those places for sure. But the best roles at least for our film were right here. So. Yeah, exactly. And sometimes that works even better because again, like you're saying you got to have sort of a family on set because if you don't have that relationship that you're having fun, you know, because I think it should be about having fun being professional, but if you're not having fun, I mean, then it's not, you know, the production value is not there either. Long amounts of hours with each other. And very hot conditions. So we'll talk about weather, right? So when we were following it, I thought you would talk about hot conditions. There's always something that happens on the set. There's always a setback there's always something, so maybe you can, you know, most people talk about, you know, oh yeah, we had this, we had that, but you girls had something bigger, maybe you can tell us about that. Yes, because what's so funny, I'll tell you is that we had all the typical things like our grip truck got stuck in the sand, our ice cream truck broke down. And we rarely ever talk about those challenges because they are all, you know, I guess overshadowed by the fact that this film is about no rain and on day 12 of production we had to stop everything because a hurricane for hurricane that category four hurricane. It was headed towards Wilmington. And not moving. And he was coming right towards our city. So we had to stop on day 12 with an 18 day shoot and everyone evacuated to places like Charlotte or Atlanta. And we were stuck outside of our town for two weeks. I didn't know what we were going to come to when we came back. Because when Lincoln essentially became an island, it flooded everywhere. We weren't sure if our locations were going to be okay. And not even just for our films, but because those people who came our family do, and we didn't want their businesses to damage. There was a lot and I was also going out of the country during that time. So amazing Hannah, somehow put the Tetris of our crew to schedule back together and everyone was able to come back two months later to film. But then it was 44°. Okay. So one question about that, I mean, so when you have something like that, I said back. It's very hard on your motivation. It's very hard because now you're like, what am I going to do? And it takes a toll, especially if you're an artist, you're trying to create something that's meaningful, and now you have a big setback. How do you bounce back from that emotionally? You know, just say, you know, I just keep doing it. Keep doing it. Besides that you have the responsibility of finishing, but just more in the sense of like a personal, you know, no. The question. Hold on, but you think that's okay. Like, how did we do that? I think part of it is just we have invested so much already. And I think we could say just ourselves invested, but then when we look at our crew and our cast and all the people that contributed to this crowdfunding campaign and shared our film like when we are doing our campaign, it's like it didn't feel like it was our movie and felt like it was our communities movie. And so it had to, we had to finish it. We had to keep on going, even though we were tired, because not only us but so many people aboard their heart and soul into making this happen. And it just, it just wasn't really an option to be like, well, you know, we tried our best. And we had a lot, I mean, a hurricane was big, but we also hit some equally challenging things during that production after production before production. Just a lot of lifestyle, hard stuff in between. And so it's kind of like, I don't know. We just kind of had, I think also 'cause we're a partnership. So when one person is tired, the other person can lift them up and vice versa. Megan, what do you think? Yeah, the thing I was thinking of is a lot of times those setbacks I think we used as motivation to be like, this will not stop us. And it almost made us get more fire. Every once in a while it gets to you. And I think that that's when it's okay to call up your friend or like I got to just call it Hannah. And sometimes we're like, I can't do it today. Like today I take a break from the movie. Because maybe these are a can be at least a nonstop thing you're working on. You can really get burnt out on it. And the thing we didn't want to do is get so tired that we made a wrong decision. Out of just because we felt fired. So the process of making the movie took longer than I think some do, but a lot of that is in part because we allowed ourselves to take a breath if we needed it. Yeah, that's extremely important. I mean, you pretty much said it like you have to step back and do something fun, relax and then come back to it, right? I mean, that was guilty. I feel guilty. Exactly. Well, I mean, I was going to ask you about what your advice for filmmakers was, but I can not set out, but let me make sure that's where it doesn't have another question. And then I'll ask my final question that you girls go with just show the trader one more time do a little plug for Amazon Prime because I know that it's on Amazon Prime and then go from there. I'll check well also if we have any questions on our site. It was exploring your social media. And I was interested because you put it on your Facebook our hopes, raise autism awareness, brand jobs to our community, provide opportunities for women to live if you want it to elaborate on those. Yeah. I think it was really cool. We were able to pay our crew and we were really proud of that. It wasn't a huge amount. But we were also able to give them an interest in the film. So once the film makes money, our hope is that it does because we don't have investors. It is our crew and our cast and we can give that money back to them. In 2018 when we filmed our town was in a really big world for any filmmaking happening in the area. And it kept everyone energized. I think it kept. It gave people opportunities for roles they hadn't begun before. And now they've moved on to studio productions in our doing those roles. So I think got that goal and yes, number one is to raise autism awareness and acceptance in this film to get people talking about it. And to just promote the message that there is no such thing as normal. And we are here to accept each other but also ourselves. And then finally, from when it in film, you know, one of the reasons we set out to even write female characters is because we are actors first. And we auditioned for a lot of roles that were very grateful to audition for their typically very small and they could be like dumb blond or quirky white dress and we're like, ah, women are so much more than that. And so our hope is that people can see two female characters interacting that just have a family relationship and the complexities that come behind that. So those are our hopes. Thanks for reading those. I clearly asked about them. That's awesome with those goals that you have for this film. I was just amazing. Yeah, and I think that's important. That's very important to have goals. I mean, other than that, I think you have given great advice throughout the whole talk right now, which is really what we want to do. And I think you couldn't have said it better that, you know, you're doing this for yourself. Obviously, but also people get opportunities because they do a project. You know, like not a lot of times, you know, people are just doing something in the last 6 because something there's always someone watching, right? I always say that. There's always someone looking at your staff and then seeing what's out there and it's great that you're actors or maybe someone got a production somewhere out of that. And I think that's the most rewarding experience that you can get as a filmmaker to really see somebody in your film, making it as well. So we're going to do a little plug. How do we find your film? So I'll put it on the comments after the link, but yeah, so you can find drought on Amazon Prime. This week actually we're running a special where you can rent for 4.99 and purchase for 9.99. But then at the end of this week, you'll go back up to its normal price. You should just buy it then, right? You know? Yeah. And if you like it, it would mean so much if you guys rated it and murdered you. I'm an honest review. You know, that's really important to us. So yeah, it was on prem. Okay. All right. So this is I promise this is the last question, okay? So this is just if you were to tell yourself before you even started this project. One thing that you would have done differently, maybe just or you would have told yourself before you got this project going like that, maybe yeah, we could have gotten different at different ways. You know, like, oh, sorry, Meg's. You know, you go first. I was thinking you have sex. Okay. I feel like everything was supposed to happen the way it was. So I wouldn't change anything because had learned so much. The learning curve on this project was huge because every single role that Megan and I stepped into was new. But I will say if I could go back and tell myself something that I'll continue to tell myself for the next projects that we do, I really struggled on set and only Megan really knows this. As a director, because I felt like I was completely under qualified, which I was and still am. But I felt like I needed to know everything. Especially technical stuff, which I was not familiar with at all. And so I really got in my head when I was in director mode that I just was so inadequate and it made it was just really unhealthy. Unhealthy thoughts, you know, of like, I'm not good enough or like, no one's gonna listen to me, all that stuff. It's such a waste of time. And so what, maybe I don't know all the answers, but that's why you have a team. So I think I would go back and tell myself just chill. Just trust your gut. You know that other people are working just as hard, you don't have to know the answers, and that's why you have all these great people with you. So yeah, I think that's maybe something that I go back and tell myself. Intel others, you don't have to know everything, just take it one step at a time. That's perfect. Yeah. You know, it's going to sound cheesy. It's mine. It's about the same. I would think in my modes though if I don't know something, I try to learn everything I can about it. And sometimes you just don't have the capacity. I don't need to know everything that the gaffer is doing. As I do more or sound or the first AC or DIT, you know, I wanted to know everyone was doing. I think that comes from a good place. And I think what Hannah's talking about comes from a place of wanting to be a good team, team member. But being a good team member is sometimes releasing responsibility and letting people do what they're there to do. And as we do more projects or as you can do more projects out there, you'll learn more and more each time. And you'll feel, I think more like you have more knowledge of everything going on. It's okay if you don't. That's perfect. I think that's perfect by this way. I mean, pretty much what we've been saying and we're gonna keep saying it and we're gonna try to do this little segment as much as we can find filmmakers that are doing great things in this area and outside this area because I think we're all connected anyway. So maybe one, maybe one day we'll get to work in a project together, and definitely. Ladies, we wish are the best and the best of luck on your future and it looks like it's gonna be a pretty good one. I mean, you have a great movie that I think is going to inspire not only filmmakers, but just anyone looking to just be creative. Thank you so much for listening to our Scranton talks podcasts, and I hope you enjoyed your time with us. Be sure to catch our next episode as we chat with director and filmmaker Tristan Marcellus Winfrey about his film the helium against documentary. He is a huge advocate for mental health awareness, and he uses his platform to make change in the world one step at a time. Be sure to visit our website, WW our creative hub dot com. If you're interested in watching the film drought, be sure to check it out for rent and purchase on Amazon Prime Video. And be sure to follow them on Facebook and Instagram as well. And be sure to subscribe to the screen toxic podcast, to stay up to date on our latest episodes. And be sure to tell all your Friends about us.

Ep2: Chatting It Up With Drought's Hannah Black & Megan Petersen

Scranton Talks

19:36 min | 1 year ago

Ep2: Chatting It Up With Drought's Hannah Black & Megan Petersen

"So we come back from multiple callbacks, 'cause we were like, there's no way. Things don't work out like this for us. But it just did. And so casting was really, really fun. And everyone ended up just being local to Wellington. Because like you guys are saying there's so much talent outside of Atlanta. And LA and New York. There's so much talent in those places for sure. But the best roles at least for our film were right here. So. Yeah, exactly. And sometimes that works even better because again, like you're saying you got to have sort of a family on set because if you don't have that relationship that you're having fun, you know, because I think it should be about having fun being professional, but if you're not having fun, I mean, then it's not, you know, the production value is not there either. Long amounts of hours with each other. And very hot conditions. So we'll talk about weather, right? So when we were following it, I thought you would talk about hot conditions. There's always something that happens on the set. There's always a setback there's always something, so maybe you can, you know, most people talk about, you know, oh yeah, we had this, we had that, but you girls had something bigger, maybe you can tell us about that. Yes, because what's so funny, I'll tell you is that we had all the typical things like our grip truck got stuck in the sand, our ice cream truck broke down. And we rarely ever talk about those challenges because they are all, you know, I guess overshadowed by the fact that this film is about no rain and on day 12 of production we had to stop everything because a hurricane for hurricane that category four hurricane. It was headed towards Wilmington. And not moving. And he was coming right towards our city. So we had to stop on day 12 with an 18 day shoot and everyone evacuated to places like Charlotte or Atlanta. And we were stuck outside of our town for two weeks. I didn't know what we were going to come to when we came back. Because when Lincoln essentially became an island, it flooded everywhere. We weren't sure if our locations were going to be okay. And not even just for our films, but because those people who came our family do, and we didn't want their businesses to damage. There was a lot and I was also going out of the country during that time. So amazing Hannah, somehow put the Tetris of our crew to schedule back together and everyone was able to come back two months later to film. But then it was 44°. Okay. So one question about that, I mean, so when you have something like that, I said back. It's very hard on your motivation. It's very hard because now you're like, what am I going to do? And it takes a toll, especially if you're an artist, you're trying to create something that's meaningful, and now you have a big setback. How do you bounce back from that emotionally? You know, just say, you know, I just keep doing it. Keep doing it. Besides that you have the responsibility of finishing, but just more in the sense of like a personal, you know, no. The question. Hold on, but you think that's okay. Like, how did we do that? I think part of it is just we have invested so much already. And I think we could say just ourselves invested, but then when we look at our crew and our cast and all the people that contributed to this crowdfunding campaign and shared our film like when we are doing our campaign, it's like it didn't feel like it was our movie and felt like it was our communities movie. And so it had to, we had to finish it. We had to keep on going, even though we were tired, because not only us but so many people aboard their heart and soul into making this happen. And it just, it just wasn't really an option to be like, well, you know, we tried our best. And we had a lot, I mean, a hurricane was big, but we also hit some equally challenging things during that production after production before production. Just a lot of lifestyle, hard stuff in between. And so it's kind of like, I don't know. We just kind of had, I think also 'cause we're a partnership. So when one person is tired, the other person can lift them up and vice versa. Megan, what do you think? Yeah, the thing I was thinking of is a lot of times those setbacks I think we used as motivation to be like, this will not stop us. And it almost made us get more fire. Every once in a while it gets to you. And I think that that's when it's okay to call up your friend or like I got to just call it Hannah. And sometimes we're like, I can't do it today. Like today I take a break from the movie. Because maybe these are a can be at least a nonstop thing you're working on. You can really get burnt out on it. And the thing we didn't want to do is get so tired that we made a wrong decision. Out of just because we felt fired. So the process of making the movie took longer than I think some do, but a lot of that is in part because we allowed ourselves to take a breath if we needed it. Yeah, that's extremely important. I mean, you pretty much said it like you have to step back and do something fun, relax and then come back to it, right? I mean, that was guilty. I feel guilty. Exactly. Well, I mean, I was going to ask you about what your advice for filmmakers was, but I can not set out, but let me make sure that's where it doesn't have another question. And then I'll ask my final question that you girls go with just show the trader one more time do a little plug for Amazon Prime because I know that it's on Amazon Prime and then go from there. I'll check well also if we have any questions on our site. It was exploring your social media. And I was interested because you put it on your Facebook our hopes, raise autism awareness, brand jobs to our community, provide opportunities for women to live if you want it to elaborate on those. Yeah. I think it was really cool. We were able to pay our crew and we were really proud of that. It wasn't a huge amount. But we were also able to give them an interest in the film. So once the film makes money, our hope is that it does because we don't have investors. It is our crew and our cast and we can give that money back to them. In 2018 when we filmed our town was in a really big world for any filmmaking happening in the area. And it kept everyone energized. I think it kept. It gave people opportunities for roles they hadn't begun before. And now they've moved on to studio productions in our doing those roles. So I think got that goal and yes, number one is to raise autism awareness and acceptance in this film to get people talking about it. And to just promote the message that there is no such thing as normal. And we are here to accept each other but also ourselves. And then finally, from when it in film, you know, one of the reasons we set out to even write female characters is because we are actors first. And we auditioned for a lot of roles that were very grateful to audition for their typically very small and they could be like dumb blond or quirky white dress and we're like, ah, women are so much more than that. And so our hope is that people can see two female characters interacting that just have a family relationship and the complexities that come behind that. So those are our hopes. Thanks for reading those. I clearly asked about them. That's awesome with those goals that you have for this film. I was just amazing. Yeah, and I think that's important. That's very important to have goals. I mean, other than that, I think you have given great advice throughout the whole talk right now, which is really what we want to do. And I think you couldn't have said it better that, you know, you're doing this for yourself. Obviously, but also people get opportunities because they do a project. You know, like not a lot of times, you know, people are just doing something in the last 6 because something there's always someone watching, right? I always say that. There's always someone looking at your staff and then seeing what's out there and it's great that you're actors or maybe someone got a production somewhere out of that. And I think that's the most rewarding experience that you can get as a filmmaker to really see somebody in your film, making it as well. So we're going to do a little plug. How do we find your film? So I'll put it on the comments after the link, but yeah, so you can find drought on Amazon Prime. This week actually we're running a special where you can rent for 4.99 and purchase for 9.99. But then at the end of this week, you'll go back up to its normal price. You should just buy it then, right? You know? Yeah. And if you like it, it would mean so much if you guys rated it and murdered you. I'm an honest review. You know, that's really important to us. So yeah, it was on prem. Okay. All right. So this is I promise this is the last question, okay? So this is just if you were to tell yourself before you even started this project. One thing that you would have done differently, maybe just or you would have told yourself before you got this project going like that, maybe yeah, we could have gotten different at different ways. You know, like, oh, sorry, Meg's. You know, you go first. I was thinking you have sex. Okay. I feel like everything was supposed to happen the way it was. So I wouldn't change anything because had learned so much. The learning curve on this project was huge because every single role that Megan and I stepped into was new. But I will say if I could go back and tell myself something that I'll continue to tell myself for the next projects that we do, I really struggled on set and only Megan really knows this. As a director, because I felt like I was completely under qualified, which I was and still am. But I felt like I needed to know everything. Especially technical stuff, which I was not familiar with at all. And so I really got in my head when I was in director mode that I just was so inadequate and it made it was just really unhealthy. Unhealthy thoughts, you know, of like, I'm not good enough or like, no one's gonna listen to me, all that stuff. It's such a waste of time. And so what, maybe I don't know all the answers, but that's why you have a team. So I think I would go back and tell myself just chill. Just trust your gut. You know that other people are working just as hard, you don't have to know the answers, and that's why you have all these great people with you. So yeah, I think that's maybe something that I go back and tell myself. Intel others, you don't have to know everything, just take it one step at a time. That's perfect. Yeah. You know, it's going to sound cheesy. It's mine. It's about the same. I would think in my modes though if I don't know something, I try to learn everything I can about it. And sometimes you just don't have the capacity. I don't need to know everything that the gaffer is doing. As I do more or sound or the first AC or DIT, you know, I wanted to know everyone was doing. I think that comes from a good place. And I think what Hannah's talking about comes from a place of wanting to be a good team, team member. But being a good team member is sometimes releasing responsibility and letting people do what they're there to do. And as we do more projects or as you can do more projects out there, you'll learn more and more each time. And you'll feel, I think more like you have more knowledge of everything going on. It's okay if you don't. That's perfect. I think that's perfect by this way. I mean, pretty much what we've been saying and we're gonna keep saying it and we're gonna try to do this little segment as much as we can find filmmakers that are doing great things in this area and outside this area because I think we're all connected anyway. So maybe one, maybe one day we'll get to work in a project together, and definitely. Ladies, we wish are the best and the best of luck on your future and it looks like it's gonna be a pretty good one. I mean, you have a great movie that I think is going to inspire not only filmmakers, but just anyone looking to just be creative. Thank you so much for listening to our Scranton talks podcasts, and I hope you enjoyed your time with us. Be sure to catch our next episode as we chat with director and filmmaker Tristan Marcellus Winfrey about his film the helium against documentary. He is a huge advocate for mental health awareness, and he uses his platform to make change in the world one step at a time. Be sure to visit our website, WW our creative hub dot com. If you're interested in watching the film drought, be sure to check it out for rent and purchase on Amazon Prime Video. And be sure to follow them on Facebook and Instagram as well. And be sure to subscribe to the screen toxic podcast, to stay up to date on our latest episodes. And be sure to tell all your Friends about us.

Independent Film Hurricane Hannah Atlanta Amazon Megan Autism Wellington Wilmington Charlotte Lincoln LA New York Facebook MEG Intel Tristan Marcellus Winfrey Scranton Instagram
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Using his cars for picture cars, things like that. And so once we found all of that, we were kind of getting more and more ready for production. When we found our cinematographer Brad walker at lighthouse films, which is a production company in town. They generally focused on commercials, but also want to be in the narrative space too. So we talked to him for a while. I don't know if you want to give details about the casting or the crewing up. We didn't know any crew because on our own films, we just held the bim mic if he were in the scene. So we didn't know. It probably didn't hold it very well. Yeah, you gotta hold it at a certain angle or else you're not getting any audio right. I tell you being like, man, that's hard. Yeah, so once we got Brad walker on board, he really helped us crew up as well as Michelle roka who works at lighthouse as well. They really helped us find a crew that we needed. When we talked with Robert, like, hey, listen, we don't need the most qualified person for each role. We'd want the kindest person for each role. Is that was something that was really, really important to us. We wanted a really sweet sat where everyone's just working together. To make it happen, not everybody because Meghan and I definitely, we're not qualified to be directors or the late actors or any of those things. We never done any of that before. And so we felt the same way as far as bringing on crew. We just wanted the people that wanted the best for the project and being kind of along the way. So he really helped us find those people, and then what were you going to say? I just had a random memory to care about crew before you talk about cats. Please do. We found one creative member because we were posting on Craigslist to try to get an ice cream truck. Because we did not have an ice cream truck. And we were trying every means you could think of define one. And we posted out on princess and movies, being filmed in mommy time, we need your ice cream truck. And this gun and Johnson who had just moved to town was like, I don't know what this is, but I've got to make these people who are trying to maybe with an ice cream truck. And so sometimes you also come about people in a really random fashion. So that's how we found our gapper. Oh wow. It's perfect because someone who sees a Craigslist Adam is like, I want in on that. We're like, okay, you're a person. Here we go. It was great. So yeah, so crew for the most part, but we did have some fun little things like that or a second AC came on board and I hadn't seen this person since I was in elementary school, like second grade. And I was like, what do you want to tell adventures of the other? He was like, yeah, we did. I mean, just funny stuff like that. But as far as cascos, Megan and I also cast the film. Because why not? Yeah, exactly. We have something that's here in Wilmington. We've got more comfortable in that realm because we are actors first. So it was fun. And it was nice to be on the other side of the camera for once. Having actors come in and audition. For a couple of roles, we did do a nationwide searches. Specifically for the role of Carl, who's the lead, because we wanted to cast authentically. We wanted a Doctor Who was on the autism spectrum. And so and he also needed to be to look like Meghan and I because we're all going to play siblings. Right. So we knew that that was going to be just a little more will we thought. More tricky to find, but it turns out I mean, we have a ton of amazing actors audition for this role in particular. And we're so impressed, but the best actor for the role lives in Wilmington, which felt too good to be true, so we come back from multiple callbacks, 'cause we were like, there's no way. Things don't work out like this for us. But it just did. And so casting was really, really fun. And everyone ended up just being local to Wellington. Because like you guys are saying there's so much talent outside of Atlanta. And LA and New York. There's so much talent in those places for sure. But the best roles at least for our film were right here. So. Yeah, exactly. And sometimes that works even better because again, like you're saying you got to have sort of a family on set because if you don't have that relationship that you're having fun, you know, because I think it should be about having fun being professional, but if you're not having fun, I mean, then it's not, you know, the production value is not there either. Long amounts of hours with each other. And very hot conditions. So we'll talk about weather, right? So when we were following it, I thought you would talk about hot conditions. There's always something that happens on the set. There's always a setback there's always something, so maybe you can, you know, most people talk about, you know, oh yeah, we had this, we had that, but you girls had something bigger, maybe you can tell us about that. Yes, because what's so funny, I'll tell you is that we had all the typical things like our grip truck got stuck in the sand, our ice cream truck broke down. And we rarely ever talk about those challenges because they are all, you know, I guess overshadowed by the fact that this film is about no rain and on day 12 of production we had to stop everything because a hurricane for hurricane that category four hurricane. It was headed towards Wilmington. And not moving. And he was coming right towards our city. So we had to stop on day 12 with an 18 day shoot and everyone evacuated to places like Charlotte or Atlanta. And we were stuck outside of our town for two weeks. I didn't know what we were going to come to when we came back. Because when Lincoln essentially became an island, it flooded everywhere. We weren't sure if our locations were going to be okay. And not even just for our films, but because those people who came our family do, and we didn't want their businesses to damage. There was a lot and I was also going out of the country during that time. So amazing Hannah, somehow put the Tetris of our crew to schedule back together and everyone was able to come back two months later to film. But then it was 44°. Okay. So one question about that, I mean, so when you have something like that, I said back. It's very hard on your motivation. It's very hard because now you're like, what am I going to do? And it takes a toll, especially if you're an artist, you're trying to create something that's meaningful, and now you have a big setback. How do you bounce back from that emotionally? You know, just say, you know, I just keep doing it. Keep doing it. Besides that you have the responsibility of finishing, but just more in the sense of like a personal, you know, no. The question. Hold on, but you think that's okay. Like, how did we do that? I think part.

Brad walker lighthouse films Michelle roka Meghan cascos Wilmington Craigslist Robert hurricane Megan Johnson Adam Atlanta Carl autism Wellington LA New York Charlotte Lincoln
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Went on to continue to polish that or I'll just rewrite it like 7 or 8 times. Again, you know what we are doing. And maybe that's typical just for any sort of process for writing a movie. We'll find out for our next one if that's just our process. That's a lot of traps, but yeah, and so as far as sending the script because we do come from a small town, we didn't have any connections. We didn't know what to do. And so we decided to write like a companion or not right, but canyon short. Kind of pitch to investors. Because that's the only thing that we really had heard was a possibility until we found this scene inspired from town here as rally. Yeah. Yeah, that was the most intimidating part was coming up with a budget for shooting this film. We didn't even know what a line producer was. Much less no anyone who did line producing me were so naive and I think being naive as part of the magic of it because we didn't know how difficult things could be. We just went into it. Did you end the thing? And I can't understand people talked about getting investors. We find out where these investors were going to come from. But we knew we had to start with getting something together to pitch to them. To get their interest in the film. And so that's where we were started. She sent me a text message with a no film school article and just had 13 exclamation marks. And it said, Mark and JB plus one I executive produced your next movie. Let's do it. So the series part for those who are not familiar with it, can you tell us a little bit more about that? Yeah. Just as far as sure, there's crowd funding platform for artists. When we first found the platform, it was just a crowdfunding platform for filmmakers and now they've expanded to any kind of creators, comic books or novels or any kind of art. And you they help you so much with education on how to crowdfund. And also they run different contests throughout the year. And I think just like how we've connected, they build a really great community with filmmakers from across country. And how does that experience? I mean, so then now you have something that you submitted, your crowd founding, and then you see this article in I mean, that was itself a process had been. So as far as you ended up winning, you were one of the filmmakers I am not sure how many were there. I think they were like maybe like two or three, or two? Yeah. Wow. Yeah, so that's really, really good and you want about $25,000. Now, you just didn't win the money. You had to finish the film, right? So maybe like, 'cause a lot of people get confused on the fact that it's like, okay, so now I have this grant not have this, but we're all about, okay, now you have it. Now you gotta finish it. Maybe a little bit about the process on that. Now that you have a little bit of funding, do you have to get more? To get your film budget fun. Yeah, we so in that competition, we Meghan and I we raised a little under $25,000. And then we received our $25,000 note interest loan from Mark and JD plus. And so that was a grand total of $50,000. And that was what we used to make the movie. That was our budget. That was all that we had. And so we were prepared. We knew that it would be like a micro budget film. But again, I think the beauty of making a movie where you live in your hometown, you have a lot of materials or anything. Yeah, like relationships. Yeah. Yeah, that can really want to invest in help. You make this film that I'm sure maybe you get in LA or New York or Atlanta. I don't really know. But there is something about a small town, you know, where everyone wants to pitch in and help. So yes, her budget was very small. But we had a lot of people that wanted to come on board and help in other ways besides financially. So that was, again, make a movie where you live. It's awesome. Yeah, and I think that's right. I think you had a question about resources and just finding that through like they said relationships. Yeah, I mean, I think luce and I are always all about filming and Scranton Pennsylvania in the surrounding areas because we're just going to put a resources here and I'm sure it will make ten. If you want to explain how it was like trying to find your crew and your cast in Wilmington and what kind of you help support Wilmington and I know what the LA and New York maybe it's time seems like they're like, oh, not another production in my neighborhood. What you would Scranton, I think we had a film a pretty big film called a virtual so what the Anthony Hopkins film up here, they blew up an RV in Wyoming avenue. A couple like two years ago, which is pretty cool. But it's just like it seems like people are like, yeah, I want to help. This is exciting. What's going on here? So it seems like there's a lot of enthusiasm when something or production of a movie comes to a smaller town. But if you want to elaborate on how you found your cast, your crew and what you use in Wilmington. Yeah, we the first thing we did was I think Hannah, if I remember right, it's tried to find locations, right? We needed the places to shoot it before we could cast up and crew up. And that was me and Hannah driving around in my SUV and just going up to these locations and chatting with them about what our story was about and the heart behind what we were making, which I think is what attracted a lot of people to the project. They would hear, you know, the synopsis of the story and let us know it was similar to their own in some way. They felt a connection with it. And they wanted to be on board and we would let them know embarrassing small amount of money. We could offer them for using their location or, for example, a man who owned an automotive place that had old cars. We were just driving and we see old cars and let's pull in there. And we pull in there and ask about.

Mark Wilmington Scranton Meghan LA New York luce Atlanta Anthony Hopkins Pennsylvania Hannah
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

06:42 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Got my name. Let's go buy something from films, that's right. My name says rose linsky, I'm with me, but also society. And today we are with Hannah black and million Peterson. Thank you girls for joining us. They are the I think we have a writer and director as well from a drought and they also are in the film. So why don't we start with that Hannah in Megan if you want to introduce yourself and just sort of what we're here for today. Or I'm making Peterson and I am a co creator, co director, producer and actor in the film drought, which you just saw the trailer for. And here's my partner in crime in a black. I'm Hannah black. I'm a student slating. I was looking at black plastic. I'm hanging black. I am the writer co director producer in a place name in the film. So I did a couple things. And again, thank you for being here for those who don't know that's ray and I are teamed up to do the independent filmmakers hub. What that means is that we're going to have Scranton talks, which is this today, where we invite filmmakers from all over the U.S. and maybe the world who knows. Where we're going to be talking about how to make films in small towns. This girl's right here that you see, you've seen throughout that the trailer is now playing on Amazon Prime and we'll talk a little bit more about that. But we're going to have just a small talk about what it is that filmmakers can do to make their dreams happen of making films on small towns in this way and I are all about independent filmmaking. She could tell you a little bit more about what we do as far as having in working with in collaborating with filmmakers in the area so they can make films wherever they live. Maybe talk a little bit more about that and what are independent hub is all about. So we're luci and I asked since she just said, we teamed up to form the independent film creative hub. I'm within the film society. It's a small group here for more of these the filmmakers in the area involved as we've seen in northeast p.m. street. You've seen it moment that the results solid talent of filmmakers had the area to bring together into collaborate with each other on project together and bring film into our respective cities and states. Because there is some great work that's being made. Yeah, and maybe we can start with Megan, just tell us more about how this project came about. How, I mean, you seem to be very, very good friends. So that's a plus. If you just maybe tell us more about that. It's your hid yes, we are very good friends. I'd say best friends if you can have best Friends in your 30s. Even that in an acting class called meisner technique, it was a two year program and later we started creating short films with that small group of people. There are only 6 total students and our acting coach. And we realized through that that we really enjoyed making things together and that our voices were important. And we had stories that we could share with the world. And then brings me this idea for drought and when she did, I was like, you know, this is bigger than a short film, which is how we work familiar with. This story is definitely like a feature link. We had no idea what we were doing. We did not go to film school and, you know, the short films that we made were wonderful, but they technically weren't complex or anything like that. I mean, it is just going to be a lot more complex to do. But we took it on anyways. Well, that's good. Maybe, can you talk about the process of coming up with the idea, I see that you say you've been doing like short films. You girls are actresses as well, right? Yeah. Okay, so maybe we'll talk about what you did prior to drought and then just as far as the writing it had in that sense, just what brought you to writing something that really has I mean, it's a great story and it touches on a lot of subjects that many people go through in small towns and also we have the issue of having to deal with making a film. You know, in a small town, have you had any experience trying to send your scripts somewhere else or maybe a little bit more about that? Yeah, that's great. Well, Megan and I as far as I'll start with our short film experience was also very minimal. We in our tutor meissen program, part of that was making two short films after each year. With our class. And so we all would write the scenes together and then just shoot it all together. And so we did two of those, then once we graduated we did one solo Megan and I did. And then after that, that's when drought came to be. So really, I mean, our amount of experience with even making short films was incredibly small. So then when we started doing droughts, again, didn't go to film school or school for writing screenplays. We just tried to save the cat. And if you guys are familiar with that book or anyone out there, if you're not familiar with that book, it's a great starting place. Because it really just gives you the formula on how to write a screenplay how to break it down because it's very big thinking about how to do that. And it is, but the way they break it down is very manageable. And so we meet every Tuesday night and we do these note cards for each scene for each act. I'd go home. I'd write 5 pages a day, send it to Megan. Megan would look over it. We would discuss things that needed to change, et cetera. And then by the end of that first month, we had our first draft. And then for about two and a half years, we.

Hannah black rose linsky Megan Peterson Scranton luci Hannah meisner Amazon U.S.
"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"scranton" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"You can join us again for another episode of Scranton talks. Upon cast for anyone who's creative who loves films who loves the ins and outs about films, and who loves filmmaking, so glad you can join us. Lucy and I have been a little bit busy. At the independent film creative hub, as I'm sure you might have seen, if you follow us on Facebook and Instagram, even made some pretty big announcements on there and we've been a little bit busy developing programming for that. But we wanted to make sure that we got our second episode of the podcast up in running for you to listen. So on the second episode of Scranton talks, we'll be talking with filmmakers Hannah plaque and Megan Peterson of the film drought. Drought is set in 1993, and in North Carolina is experiencing a historic drought, autistic teen Carl, fascinated by weather, predicts that a storm will soon hit nearby, his sister Sam crafts a plan to help him chase the storm, stealing their mother's ice cream truck to embark on a road trip about family, forgiveness and following your dreams. A Lucien I sat down with Megan and Hannah to talk about their filmmaking journey and how to stay creative, looking for cast, crew, inclusivity. They were big on authentically casting and they're also big about filming in their hometown. They are awesome filmmakers who are all about spreading the world that you can make movies where you live, no matter how big or how small the town. They won the seat and spark hometown challenge back in 2017 and got into class brothers to executive produce their film. So we sat down with them and talked about all the stuff with filmmaking, including as I'm sure a lot of filmmakers know that you can encounter many obstacles while making your film. And this film was no exception, they even had a deal with a hurricane. Can you imagine that? So sit back and relax as.

Scranton Hannah plaque Megan Peterson Sam crafts Instagram Lucy Facebook Lucien Carl North Carolina Megan Hannah hurricane
Scranton Strangler (MM #3783)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Scranton Strangler (MM #3783)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I've always been fascinated a, we get attached to certain television shows people to this day even though the Big Bang has been off for a few years now, still want to know what Penny's last name was. It was never revealed. They're always certain little details of shows that people talk about another show. People talk about a lot is the office. It's probably more popular. Now in syndication now on Netflix or is it peacock? I can't keep track whatever it's going to be on and the one thing they talk about with the office is not Michael Scott, it's about the Scranton Strangler a little side bit that kind of ran through a few seasons. And somebody just recently came out with the fact that the Scranton Strangler could be David Wallace from the home headquarters and the actor who played David Wallace said, it could be nobody ever decided to the Scranton Strangler was going to be. It was just kind of a little side job story. But of course, the obsessed people who follow the show want to know, they won't be satisfied until they do find out. And then of course, they still won't be satisfied. That's the amazing thing about the television shows. We love how we stay, so attached for a long, long time.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Kevin Nation Scranton Strangler David Wallace Penny Michael Scott Netflix
Scranton Strangler (MM #3783)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Scranton Strangler (MM #3783)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I've always been fascinated a, we get attached to certain television shows people to this day even though the Big Bang has been off for a few years now, still want to know what Penny's last name was. It was never revealed. They're always certain little details of shows that people talk about another show. People talk about a lot is the office. It's probably more popular. Now in syndication now on Netflix or is it peacock? I can't keep track whatever it's going to be on and the one thing they talk about with the office is not Michael Scott, it's about the Scranton Strangler a little side bit that kind of ran through a few seasons. And somebody just recently came out with the fact that the Scranton Strangler could be David Wallace from the home headquarters and the actor who played David Wallace said, it could be nobody ever decided to the Scranton Strangler was going to be. It was just kind of a little side job story. But of course, the obsessed people who follow the show want to know, they won't be satisfied until they do find out. And then of course, they still won't be satisfied. That's the amazing thing about the television shows. We love how we stay, so attached for a long, long time.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Kevin Nation Scranton Strangler David Wallace Penny Michael Scott Netflix
Biden Snaps at CNN's Kaitlan Collins With Lies

The Dan Bongino Show

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Biden Snaps at CNN's Kaitlan Collins With Lies

"I'm not accomplishing what the hell? What do you do all that? I don't wonder. They say it was compromised. I said what I've said what? Let's go. It's great. I said, Well, we'll change their behavior is the rest of the world. Relax to them diminishes standing in the world. I'm not confident anything just stating the fact given hit Past behavior has not changed. Is that press conference after sitting down with you for several hours? He denies any involvement in cyber attack He felt like he would write could use this. He refused today unless the volume name so how did that It fell to a constructive me as you don't understand that. So there it is. The end. The answer is irrelevant. Why the answers around Because Biden, Bligh's all the time. He lies about everything all the time. I don't want to hear it anymore. He's a Scranton kid. He's you know, moderate Joe Biden fighting Joe like Notre Dame fighting Irish guy. I don't want to hear it. Please spare me the nonsense. Not interested. Tell someone else who gives a damn Because I'm not that guy. Biden is a liar. He's always been a liar. His family's corrupt. They've always been corrupt. They've leverage the family named forever to take money on overseas deals from corrupt the Kratz trading on their dad's name or their brother's name. In some cases, I'm not interested in hearing how he's the Scranton kid. He's a liar. The answer to the question about China is irrelevant. He's lying about that, too. He went around telling everyone you know me and president G. You know, we love each other. We're buddies. We traveled together on a plane. I know more. What do you tell him? I remember he said. He says he told Putin. You have no soul. We made that up. He's making this up, too. What do you tell President? She stared into your soul. And I know you and I bosom buddies. We're blood brothers. What do you think it's all crap?

Joe Like Biden Bligh Kratz Scranton Joe Biden China Putin
President Trump on Hannity Calls Biden More Radical Than Bernie Sanders

The Dan Bongino Show

01:27 min | 1 year ago

President Trump on Hannity Calls Biden More Radical Than Bernie Sanders

"Joe Biden right now, you know makes uh It makes Bernie Sanders look like an offshoot of Ronald Reagan. I mean, that's how left Joe Biden is gone. So President Trump rightly so. I was like, Hey, listen, if you voted for this guy, you got sucker sucker Sorry at Here's clip number two from Hannity last night, President Trump commenting on the leftward lurch to the Democrat Party. And by the way, I'm gonna show you again. The guy's not kidding. He's not exaggerated. We come back from this clip. I'll give you a story from the Wall Street Journal. That should have you frightened. You own a house house gone up in value. Well, you better not be a liberals. You'd be paying taxes on that suit. Check this out. They lied They You know they didn't talk to us. They never said this is a Bernie Sanders dream. What's happening right now? He can't believe it because this is far worse than Bernie was ever going to be. Bernie Sanders would have never even thought to suggest some of the things that are happening right now. We got the millionaires, the billionaires, and now he talks about the billionaires. We gotta stop those billionaires while Bernie You're a man. I know of a millionaire, but I'm talking about you idiots. Bernie said that isn't Bernie. Biggest fraud ever. Socialism? Always great for the top Socialists in charge. Everyone else gets screwed Pretty good. President Trump's not wrong. Joe Biden ran as a Scranton kids lunch bucket, Joe

President Trump Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Ronald Reagan Bernie Democrat Party Hannity Wall Street Journal Scranton JOE
AJ Shares His Biden Impression

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:24 min | 1 year ago

AJ Shares His Biden Impression

"A, I have a little bit of a Joe Biden imitation and wow. No, listen. Well, Trump said what's happening to the boys terrible. Joe Biden is to turn back everything I put in place. You go to the board of this filth. There's people, there's rapists, but the Biden thing, you got to get really calm and comfortable and be like a real sweet guy who's a fucking liar. And all I'm getting out of it is here's the best I can do right now, but he just like, he just said, gets in his own head. I'm going to say simply as I can. You know, my dad was a simple man. Worked in Scranton. We all lived in Scranton beautiful town. Mom will tell you the same thing. People say hunter had a gun. I don't know if that's the case. The pun is just, look, I can't. You might think it's a waste of time, but I'll tell you, some of you, daddy, for you, thoughts, maybe that's for the cookies, it's not the point. The point is there's people. We need to just get together unify. And I'll tell you, I'm not sure there's going to be a Republican Party. I'm not sure there's going to be a birthday party. I'll tell you right now what's going to happen folks. It's just stream of consciously nonsense. He gets that same old man frustration and my dad gets when you go, hold on to like he's watching TV and he's also got to do something on the phone and then somebody else calls. What? You can see like the frustration. Two things at once. So high fast. You can't do two things at once.

Joe Biden Scranton Donald Trump Biden Hunter Republican Party
John Krasinski Hosted SNL

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

John Krasinski Hosted SNL

"Favorite john krasinski your host of snl over the weekend and you know junkers linski from the office. And they did a skit based off of the fact that john wrote words to the theme song of the office. Because if you know the office doesn't have any words to it and these were the words that were cut out of the show scranton scranton scranton's sprinted scranton scranton's way air we work that's calculator airs. Heroes name hamlin. Pete davidson kissing. That was one of the heart of snl. That's all and by the way at the end. It was so funny. So pete davidson Was with a machine gun. Kelly's machine gun. Kelly actually jumped on pete davidson and the both fell off the stage right at the end of the show. I was like wait a minute. We were kept rewinding mapping

John Krasinski Scranton Scranton Pete Davidson Scranton Hamlin John Kelly
How Fashion Entrepreneur Camila Coelho Went from Working Retail to Building a Beauty Brand

Latina to Latina

04:00 min | 2 years ago

How Fashion Entrepreneur Camila Coelho Went from Working Retail to Building a Beauty Brand

"You are a self described. Nerd is pretty surprising. Simple when you chose not to go to college. What went into that decision. It's funny they say the word nerd because by teachers special maths teacher high school. He would call me a nerd. I was in love with math. And i actually was an honor roll student in high school throughout the four years and my mom was so sure that i was gonna go to college and be like the best student auto by three siblings. I think she saw me as the highest chance of being like the greatest student but when it came time for me to apply for college i remember thinking about so much. I did not know exactly what i wanted to do. And because i also knew that mima will probably help me go to college as well gave me even more pressure. I did not want to choose the wrong thing. I did not want to pay for college. Study for something in not love what i was doing at the end. I do not know what i wanted. I was sure that i do know. But i didn't wanna make the decision like i was just so scared and i remember i told my mom aside zig mom i knew she was going to be so mad that stated but i said mom. I don't know what i want to do. And i just need some time. I need at least six months to figure things out. i wanna move out of here out of scranton. I don't know what i wanna do. I need to figure it out. Like and she was like camilla. No you need to go to college right away. Grades amazing like you have to go to college. And i i feel like it was also a fear of hers. She didn't want me to end up like her. Depending on someone my mom did not go to college was housewife. I understood her. Fear by in my heart. I knew i needed to wait. I know for like an eighteen year old girl. It was a huge decision by. I followed my heart and i remember telling my mom i promise you that i will make you proud and i looked her in the eye and said that in i still get choose saying this to you because that stayed with me for so long there was a need and desire to make my mom proud after i left home so it was when i left bad. I got a job moved to boston. I had an aunt in boston. I lived with her for a couple months. And i want to get my own apartment. So i just got a job somewhere. Might on how he she in. The job was at a department store working at a makeup counter selling makeup. The counter was pushing to your. And i remember. I hated the retail hours. It was terrible working on weekends in all of that. But one thing i love about that job was the fact that i was working with beauty and i've always loved beauty since i was a little kid but second that i was in a way like transforming or effecting people's like self esteem people from different backgrounds with the for needs in different moods would arrive at the counter every single day after me selling them a product or putting something on them like ninety five percent of these women would leave with a smile on their faces and that would make my day. That was what at the end made me realize how transformative empowering the as in that experience was what made me want to become a makeup artist.

Mima Scranton Camilla Boston
How I Wrote My Book 'HTML and CSS: Visual QuickStart Guide 9th Edition' with Joe Casabona

How I Built It

05:18 min | 2 years ago

How I Wrote My Book 'HTML and CSS: Visual QuickStart Guide 9th Edition' with Joe Casabona

"I was honored to write for for peach pit because all of the books i bought That taught me web development. Where peach pit books So i was like in the ranks of people. Dan cedar home Which is amazing so Anyway i reached out to them to see if they'd like to do a second edition of responsive design with wordpress but they told me the book was going out of print apparently People don't buy that many wordpress development books i guess they looked to other online resources for that. But my editor my publisher. They offered me an alternative to rewrite from. Scratch the ninth edition of each tim allen. Css visual quickstart guide And i was really excited about this in. Html and css book has a much broader appeal to than than a advanced wordpress development book plus for a while i taught html and css at the university of scranton. And i used a book. But i thought man. I could update This classic textbook right. it's a popular. I mean a book doesn't get to nine editions without being popular right So i could update this popular classic textbook to fit today's students and one of the reasons my editor wanted to go with me or thought about me was i also make online courses. And now they're they're quickstart guides and and some of their other books come with a video section right away edition and videos for the course so i could tackle more interesting contests concepts and do more of a show and tell that might be easier than you know going in describing a a big long process with words so i agreed and then we had to get into a couple of things before i could actually start writing. The first is for many publishing companies or for many content creation companies really The original author is generally offered first right of refusal. So that means in order for me to rewrite this same title from scratch They would have to go to the previous author and get their approval or their refusal really so they had to offer the previous author the the opportunity to rewrite the book straight because a couple of things are happening here first of all. If i wasn't writing it from scratch the way the royalties are setup. Is i would essentially split royalties with the original author if i was just working off his or her work. If i'm writing it from scratch that means now that the author is forfeiting any any royalties for for later editions. If people still buy the eighth edition he or she gets royalties. But the ninth edition. They don't get royalties because again. I started it from scratch and the previous author did not want to do the ninth edition. So we we proceeded from there. I had to do a proposal at that point Because i was working off of an eighth edition. I had a general idea of what i was going to be writing but it. But you know my my editorial team kind of said you know making your own But i had to justify reasons why was going to write this book so You know. I touched on the important parts like the huge changes that have happened since twenty twelve in the in the web development space in both html ncis s in the browser space There's been a big focus again on performance on Accessibility and things like that. And i wanted to touch on those things in the book as well so There was a lot to cover. I also look at the competition now. The main competition and the book that i taught from when i was teaching at the university of scranton was actually html nc s by john. Duck it. i think. That's a really nice visual book It's definitely what. I what. I've come to learn a in writing. My book is that it's definitely more of a teacher's aide in my opinion. I think it's more of a teacher's aide than it is a. I'm a person who wants to be self taught because yes there are a lot of graphics and explains things really nice but there aren't deep explanations in it. I think. I i think in this book my book. I do some more explanation. Mostly thanks to my editor but So that was that was the first process or that was the first step right get approval from the previous author and then create a proposal and outline

Dan Cedar University Of Scranton Tim Allen John