20 Episode results for "Scott Warren"

Extending 'Zero Tolerance' To People Who Help Migrants Along The Border

NPR's Story of the Day

03:56 min | 1 year ago

Extending 'Zero Tolerance' To People Who Help Migrants Along The Border

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the almond board of California, researching new uses for almond halls and shells like strengthening recycled plastics, creating fuel brewing, beer, and more more about the almond communities zero waste goal at almondsustainability dot org. A trial begins tomorrow in the case of Arizona, man named Scott Warren. He works for a group called no more deaths. It provides water and food to migrants, who crossed the Zona desert, his cases, part of a larger trend of prosecuting people for helping migrants those sorts of cases have risen since two thousand seventeen when then attorney general Jeff Sessions told federal prosecutors to clamp down. Here's our story from reporter, Lorne Madeline, Thirty-six-year-old, college, geography instructor, from Ajo Arizona. It is scary to be intimidated like this and to be targeted, but there really is no choice. Warren was arrested in two thousand seventeen and faces three felony counts, including conspiracy to transport in harbor migrants in its complaint. The government's dates Warren was seen talking to, to migrants who sheltered Donohoe. He denies being part of any sheltering plan for the government. It's kind of been an expansion in the interpretation of what it means to harbor. The Pima county medical examiner has documented two hundred fifty migrant deaths in the area surrounding our ho- since two thousand. And one in the same timeframe thousands of died in the Arab Zona borderlands. It is life or death here, a decision to not give somebody food or water could lead to that person dying nine and a half hours away from our hope in the west Texas town of Marfa, another case is unfolding that pits the government against the four time elected city, and county attorney named Theresa Todd. She's under investigation for human smuggling after stopping to help what turned out to be three migrants. She described what happened on the night of February twenty seven as we drove toward the scene. Young man in a white shirt. He runs out toward the road where I am the man was pleading for assistance. I can't leave this guy on the side of the road. I have to go. See if I can help the mantle Todd his sister, Esmeralda was in trouble. I mean, she can hardly walk. She's very dazed taught stalked. She called and texted a friend, the legal counsel for the US border patrol here. Asking for advice, the migrants took shelter in her car before she got a reply a sheriff's deputy showed up them a border patrol agent was soon. Reading Todd her Miranda rights, a week later a homeland security investigator came to our office with a search warrant and took her cell phone. It makes people have to question. Can I be compassionate the sheriff of Presidio county, Danny Domingus, who's deputy called the border patrol defends the action against Todd? He says anyone with undocumented migrants in their car risks arrest. Todd response I feel like I did the right thing. And I don't feel like I did anything wrong. Morello. I'm really grateful to her. She says talk she spoke by phone from the migrant detention center at Sierra Blanca, Texas. She said doctors told her she was on the brink of death by the time she got to the hospital. Figures confirmed by track, an immigration records, clearinghouse at Syracuse university show that in fiscal year twenty eighteen there were more than four thousand five hundred people charged for harboring migrants. That's more than thirty percent increase since two thousand fifteen with the greatest rise coming after sessions order. Ranjana Natarajan is the director of the civil rights clinic at the university of Texas school of law with these prosecutions. The government is saying, we're extending our zero tolerance policy to good Samaritans people shouldn't be helping migrants, even if they might be at threat of death after nearly two months. Theresa Todd finally got her cell phone back from homeland security. She's waiting to find out if she'll be indicted for human smuggling, and Scott Warren. Well, he's facing up to twenty years in prison if convicted for NPR news, I'm Lauren model.

Theresa Todd Scott Warren Esmeralda Donohoe Zona desert Arizona Texas attorney Jeff Sessions California Ranjana Natarajan Presidio county Marfa Pima county NPR university of Texas school of Lorne Madeline Ajo Arizona
Whitewashing History

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

1:00:19 hr | 1 year ago

Whitewashing History

"Mr President walking back to meet the press. Thank you. We start right in. You have secret. But you don't wanna tell me Chuck look, dead people. Is listen for one sec ensure their jug speak to Bush, John McCain. I think he's real. I don't think I know I think that they know that you're one of these very rare, people can see the site need the help them, you know. No, they're stone cold crazy every gift, be a blessing. The sixth sense. Mark. This is intercepted. I'm Jeremy scale coming from the offices of the intercept in New York City. This is episode ninety nine of intercepted. Fracking for Ron were done not going to need an exit strategy. I don't need exit strategies. Your letter determined Cam, just a nice letter, back and forth. He wrote me, a beautiful letter birthdays, my birthday, if there has been one overarching theme to the often, vile rhetoric emanating from Donald Trump and his administration. It's been violent gas lighting the whole make America great, again, framing. It's an umbrella under which a seemingly endless series of lies and historical revisionism reside, we see this on issues of race economics, gender climate women's health war, even history itself, this whitewashing of US history, the reverence for slave owners, who served as presidents of this country, it's not an invention of Donald Trump almost all politicians in this country throughout history have engaged in this revisionism masquerading as patriotism, but under this administration under Donald Trump, it is out there in the extreme open. It is a source of pride last week. The author and intellectual Tana hussy coats, testified in front of the US congress on the issue of reparations for black Americans and hope everyone listening to this show has taken the time to watch that testimony or century after the civil war black people were subjected to a relentless campaign of terror campaign that extended well into the lifetime of majority leader McConnell, it is tempting to divorce this modern campaign of terror of plunder from enslavement, but the logic of enslavement of white supremacy respects, no such borders. And the God of bondage was lustful and begat many as data's ties and convict leasing vagrancy laws in debt pans, redlining, racist bills, poll, taxes and state state-sponsored terrorism. We grant that Mr. McConnell was not alive for apple Matic's, but he was alive for the electrocuting of joy, Steny. He was alive for the blinding of Isaac Woodward. He was alive to witness kleptocracy in his native Alabama and a regime, premised on electoral feft majority leader McConnell cited civil rights legislation yesterday as well. He should because he was alive to witness the harassment, jailing and betrayal of those responsible for that legislation by governments want to protect them. He was alive for the red lining of Chicago and the looting of black homeowners of some four billion dollars victims of that plunder, are very much alive today. I am sure they love a word with the majority leader that was kinda hussy coats testifying before the US congress, and that hearing happened at a moment, where there is still debate in this country over the true story of the civil war, and the nature of the confederacy, it somehow with us always these days from Charlottesville to the issue of civil. A war, monuments and beyond. But many of those people were there to protest the taking down of the statue of Robert Lee. So this week, it's robbery Lee. I noticed that stonewall Jackson's coming down. I wonder is George Washington next week and is Thomas Jefferson the week after you all you really do have to ask yourself where does it stop one of the best sources for dissecting all of this, that I found a great podcast called uncivil? The show's producers described their program, as telling stories that were left out of the official history of the civil war, ransacking America's past and taking on the history, you grew up with they say, quote, we bring you untold stories about resistance covert operations corruption. Mutiny. Counterfeiting antebellum drones and so much more. And we connect these forgotten struggles to the political battlefield. We're living on right now, the story of the civil war, the story of slavery confederate monuments racism is the. Story of America. This is an easy one for all leaders to get up and say, this is not this is not us. I hear that all the time now. But the fact is, this is us, America's always been divided. From Gimblett media disease, uncivil. I'm joined now by the co host and co executive producer of uncivil. Chenjerai kamenica. He is a researcher journalist a hip hop artist. He is also an assistant professor at Rutgers University in the department of journalism and media studies. Chenjerai welcomed intercepted. Hey man, thanks for having me on. And we saw Tun of coats and others testify in front of congress last week on the issue of reparations. I just wanna get your big picture view of this issue, and what you think should happen. I appreciate it. The way that coats frame things in terms of. You know, America thinks about its history has to account for these other things that don't fit with the sort of patriotic narrative. Right. I think that it's good that we're talking about reparations. I think that's a conversation that we should be moving into. But I do think we have to move into it with caution. I think there's a lot of perils that we face. You know, one of the things that is a part of the HR forty proposition is putting together a body that would really do a full accounting about how we would even think about reparations create Commissioner studied history slavery in America, the role of the federal and state governments, and supporting slavery and racial discrimination other forms of discrimination against the descendants of slaves and the lingering consequences of slavery, and Jim crow on African Americans and this was part of coats argument in his article was that, that, accounting, it could be that winds up being the most most realizable part of the whole call reparations because there's a lot of complicated things. In terms of figuring out and sorting out the different kinds of planes. The different groups might even have how you even figure out who gets these things, etc. But we're also in a political moment where the terms of the Democrats, all out of these different candidates, sort of loosely signed onto the idea of reparations. It's precisely because it's not really defined. And so, in a way reparations, which would appear to be like this really radical demand become something that in the hand of I think democratic politicians away, they can perform their racial politics without committing to anything really substantive. And also think that if we look at how reparations played out and the discussions around the two thousand sixteen election with many people, challenging Bernie Sanders, essentially, people say to Bernie Sanders, do you support reparations and Sanders. Kinda says we have got to invest in the future. What we have got to do is dress, poverty in America, something that very few people talk about an especially poverty, and the African American community end the Latino community. And if you look at my record and if you look at my agenda, raising them in. A wage to fifteen bucks. An hour, creating millions of jobs or rebuilding our infrastructure focusing on high rates of youth unemployment. I think our candidacy is the candidacy talking to the issues of the African American community. And I do think that at times the way enders has talked about it may have sounded dismiss. But I do think that if you do not transform the way the capitalism functions if you don't transform the way that American period functions you can't really have any real conception of Justice, so, and there is a way in which you can have a kind of reparations that operates within a market system doesn't threaten it. But in the context of the two thousand sixteen election, I think this is really important reparations actually functioned as a way to paint. People who were to the left of Hillary Clinton as class reductionist, who didn't have a racial analysis right in, I think it moments it may have even appeared to. Make Hillary Clinton who had sort of surrounded herself with mothers of the black lives matter movement as like more of a racial ally than Bernie Sanders, which is absurd. And I think that's the danger that we have to revisit this time while pushing very clearly for reparations. So I think that when you look at people like sandy Garrity and many others who are thinking and creative ways about revelations could meet for one, the sort of reckoning with not just slavery. But the ongoing forms of what might be called different types of racial capitalism, you know, car surrealism, environmental racism, you know, voting suppression red lining, all these things that emerge after slavery. Right. So I think that the research about that, and the sort of public reckoning with that in a real way, which we've never had any United States is, is really. Necessary part of this. But then I think that we have to begin to creatively. I mean listen, I'm never going in America. I'm never going to argue against people color and black folks getting check, you know, giving him out of billions and trillions that have been made on our backs. Right. And the way that I see working class people struggling, I'm not gonna go out here and public and ever say, like no don't cut its don't cut us a check. I'm most excited about the ideas that where you might be able to make a demand on our systems that might actually force it to change. How can reparations be combined with something like a green new deal? I think with our creativity, and our magin nation and our revolutionary magic nation. We can do that. I think a part of this also are a big part of it is that this country has never been forced to confront the transatlantic, slave trade. Tens of millions of people snatched, and brought in horrifying conditions. To the western hemisphere to serve as totally unpaid forced laborers. The country has never reckoned with the fact that it ran a systemic multimillion person kidnapping operation that ended in people being enslaved building up the white man's profit centers in the United States. Absolutely. There's never been a reckoning with that. And when it's been mentioned it's almost mentions as kind of a side note with Edward Baptiste's. I mean, the so many other I mean, really even before Edward to so many other scholars in the black radical tradition. Eric Williams and others have said, no, you know, slavery was at the center of capitalism. Right. With creek Wilders book every an Ivy slavery was at the center of actually building up the university system in the north. Slavery was not like this southern problem. That was like just a few sort of southern racist people, you know, mean really had some issues with bigotry, so they decided to make black people's, like none of that. I mean that's. That's and you'd be amazed how, how many mainstream journalists accounts. See how many people are, you know, otherwise intelligent, people buy into a narrative that basically slavery happened because, you know, some southern white people didn't like black people or something like that. I mean, there's no economic analysis of the institution and its legacy which is still ongoing. You know, I mean, even institution like New York life right where, you know, they literally were ensuring slaves, right? I mean, that's just one among many examples, the civil war it permeates, so many political debates in this country, whether the participants in those debates even realize that they're doing it or not. It seems especially with Trump now in power and you have this controversy over the civil war monuments, many of those monuments were built decades and decades after the civil war as a direct provocation to black residents of cities across this country. For people who may not fully understand the nuances of the civil war in the United States. Just give your broad overview of the conditions that lead to what we refer to as the civil war, and what the root issues were involved with it, really what you had leading up to the civil war was a tremendous transfer of land from. Working class people, some of whom were racist white people in the south to elite plantation owners who also gained tremendous power in government and began to essentially capture the state there was so much land that had been converted to for use for cotton in the south that there was worries about a crisis of food production, actually that's the level of land transfer for the purpose of a small essentially a handful of southern landowners, now that's not to say that it was only those southern land owners who participated in slavery, right? I mean, there was a slave leasing there was all kinds of ways at this was deeply central to the economy, but I think that there were desires to expand the slave trade right into the west and actually even beyond the west into other parts of what folks hoped would become the American empire. Why you have that going on? Right. You also have essentially an abolition movement. You have also the American colonization society who is basically seeing slavery, as a problem, the presence of African Americans on American soil as the problem. You also have essentially mostly northern industrial capital that's gaining power. You know, wanting to sort of look at the south and begin to change the way that the economy works. Now, let me just say to, you know, I don't I really wanna avoid the painting of a century like the northern industrial capitalist forces that were opposed to slavery. There were a lot of businessmen in New York who were very much reliant on slavery for their businesses. Right. And the president of New York life was actually one of those people so much so that they actually, you know, implored Lincoln not to. To try to go to war with the south, when the south seceded you have a group of southern states, who said they're going to succeed because they really wanna maintain their rights to slavery in the battle over the fugitive slave act, Lincoln basically side with this out and says that slave owners can come back into the north and remove slaves when the southern states all give their reasons for secession. Right. They all produce these sort of succession documents the declare the reasons why they're seceding and in each one of those documents, they all mentioned slavery, as the only reason, really that they're seceding, so they write other things, but they're clear that the reason they're seceding is because of slavery in aftermath of the civil War, I different narrative took shape where the south, you know, started to change the Daichi and the reasons for why they succeeded to be about something called states rights. They started to promote the myth that slavery would have withered away on its own. And all kinds of other things that sort of confused in mystified. The actual reason why they succeeded. It's remarkable several of the things you just cited just feel so contemporary first of all the historical revisionism about what this country was during that period in time and continues to be in many quarters. But also the notion that none of this is really about race. All you identity politics warriors out there. You know, this is just quackery basically. And the real issue was always just liberty. It had to be liberty and the maximum liberty is when the states have rights and the federal government is not imposing its will. I mean, that is a huge part of the, the current political dynamic, particularly among the maga- crowd. Absolutely. The fact that so many people have no understanding why the south seceded, no understanding of why the civil war was fought isn't a way of victory of the confederacy that they were able to rewrite history over period of a hundred years or so. And. And their version of history has become in a way the dominant one that people know where, you know, they don't they don't think it had to do with slavery, and it really works well in a time when you have politicians who sort of want to maintain a certain kind of color, blindness as the dominant way to deal with race in America. I mean, because I think that, you know, what one of the things I think that we're, we have to wrestle with Jeremy, and this is, you know, I think for people listen to intercept this is like a basic point, but is race really just the sort of issue about personal attitudes right in people's individual biases and bigotry, a kind of psychological mode of thinking about the problem of racism or is it something that was deeply baked into the structures and economic systems of this country? You know, not even just the culture, but the economic systems like this country has had to have racism because racism, essentially are white domination was built into the economic modes of slavery. Right in the economic mows the currently drive the society. Right. We look at the civil war when you look at the documents of succession, and you see the things that they said about slavery. When you go back to some of the founding documents of the country, right? Three fifths compromise and other other things. If you read my friend, air dunbar's, wonderful book on, on a judge George Washington at one point, George Washington was rotating, his slaves from Philadelphia to an other state, just so that he could avoid them becoming free after the six month residency in Philadelphia. I mean this is the president. This is the first president of the United States who's actually hacking the law in a way to preserve slavery. Right. So there's a way that racism is structurally baked in and I think that certainly conservatives are invested in a psychological individualistic mode that doesn't require us to transform structures right. The doesn't require us to challenge capitalism, and, you know, sadly, there's also quite a few Democrats who are signed onto that. In fact, we just saw Joe Biden waxing nostalgic about how, you know, he had his civility with racist, segregationist senators, he goes through this whole thing, where he's like, well, you can say whatever you want, but in the end of the day, you just beat the system, and then he emphasizes, you don't have to like people in terms of their views, but you just simply make the case, and you beat them you beaten without changing the system, Biden, really, really seems to be campaigning, as Dixie crat in a lot of ways, Neo Dixie crat, and the other thing that now, people are starting to learn some of this history, because we're in campaign mode. But in nineteen eighty eight Joe Biden called Jesse Jackson boy, when Cory Booker the New Jersey Senator who's running against by in for the democratic nomination released a statement criticizing Biden, for praising these segregationists senators Biden's response to Cory Booker, saying he should apologize for framing compromise, essentially on the backs of black people in this country. His response was Corey should apologize. Course should apologize. He knows better not a racist bone in my body. I've been involved civil rights, my whole career and then you take Joe Biden's legislative record, whether it's a crime Bill and all of the other things he said that we're at a minimum racially insensitive, and it's hard to understand how anyone who's about Justice can look at Joe Biden and say, Yep. That's my guy. It really is. And this is why we have to really think carefully about race in this time because Joe Biden is able to. Render himself adjacent to a bomber right? And so what you see, is that, first of all inability to have a critique of Obama is a problem to really understand his policies in a substantive way his foreign policy. The overall impact of his failure to whole Wall Street, executives accountable, all kinds of things ways that we could has robust critical questions about Obama's policy. The failure to do that allows Joe Biden to symbolically position himself in his adjacency and work with Obama as some kind of racial solidarity with black people. Right. And then we also don't look at Biden's record in the ways that you just indicated people who do are very vulnerable to being seen as people who are, ironically, somehow, not committed to an anti-racist politics. You were talking about George Washington and his involvement with slavery and being the first president. I mean obviously Lincoln was assassinated. So it's hard to figure out how to frame, this has history been too kind. To Lincoln, the history that is taught in this country about who he was because a lot of it just boils down to Lincoln was an abolitionist. He freed, the slaves, he signed the emancipation proclamation, and that's generally just the vibe about him. And that's why these charlatans like Deneche Sousa and others can hold this out of the Republicans have always been the, you know, the party of freedom, and we were the ones fighting slavery. And they you, they weaponize that simplistic history, but directly, just asking you has that history is to kind to Lincoln on the issues were discussing about slavery, abolitionist and civil war. Yes. Absolutely. We're offered a mythical understanding of history in which Lincoln is just a sort of racial white savior. We don't really hear about the movements the slave rebellions, the hundreds of slave rebellions building up to the patient, proclamation. I think that's embodied in the Friedman's memorial statue in Washington DC where you have Lincoln. Ending their in this black person at his feet in chains. And I think that stands in as a visual for how Lincoln moralizing the national memory, one of the biggest problems we have in this country in terms of understanding really how anything works is that we're deeply not historical. And this is one of the great things I love about intercepted is intercepted as a really historical show. That says, essentially, you can't understand this issue. You can't understand these foreign policy issues. You can't understand issues with data or with you know economics without understanding these relevant facts about history, you know, and once we understand the history, we can form, maybe, you know, analysis, don't all have to line up, but you have to contend with these facts, and that's something that I think is deeply missing in this country. And so when you have a more rich history you see one Lincoln growing, right? Lincoln starting out like not at all interested in emancipation Lincoln is somebody who is. Is essentially interested in preserving. The union was fully okay with first preserving the union maintaining slavery. And then he also is Lincoln colonization is, so he believes black, people can't exist on the American soil, along with Waitz after Mansa patient. He tells this to Frederick Douglass he goes, you know, y'all going to have to get outta here. Right. And then Frederick Douglass, you know, challenges that needless to say, but those kinds of things and I think even bigger than that the idea that one man, you know, bypassing, this law can somehow transform this oppressive structure. Right, which has all kinds of layers of oppression built into it is also part of a deeply a historical way of thinking about history. You've talked a lot about the dilemma as you put it that many black intellectuals in this country face. And you've said this need to navigate the dominant understandings of race in this country, which suffers from deeply impoverished understanding of history labor, and capitalism and imperialism explain what you mean. I'm somebody who's really just always still trying to learn about this stuff. You know, that's kind of intimidating. I think when you're someone who has a public life because I think there's a fresher for all of us to sort of appear as fully formed the main political in historical people do you the ocean all the time. Of course now wonder if in particular in the social media era, where everything is kind of reduced to, like, somebody trying to come up with a slick tweet me included. Right. Like I spent a lot of time trying to think of slick tweets, but where the idea of being a student and study that was has been central to so much political work. Right. That was crucial to labor. Organizing in the south and in the civil rights movement. I mean we talk about the Black Panthers the Black Panthers were students, you know, they had study groups the idea that we're always learning, and we don't understand everything the room that then creates for us to develop a stronger analysis and politics in public life. I worried that that's gone that that's where we're losing that as I kinda I started writing. I was writing about race and I was taking on a lot of the basic myths about race which, which I would basically characterize as. Most people think races about individual attitudes and bigots and clan members with hoods on right. Like why people won't acknowledge that there's racism going on unless somebody's literally wearing a hood? Right. And then I was challenging that and saying, there's other more, you know, structural aspects of race in that actually, the structural aspects are more important, right? For us to take on, even though I'm not saying the bigotry explicit bigotry is good. Especially in a time when you have the growth of hate crimes. Right. We have to take very seriously, but that ultimately we have to transform structures here. We have to look at voting rights. We have to look at economics. We have to look at automation. We have to look at all those things tend dry Kamenica, I wanna thank you so much for being with us and for all the work you do. Thanks so much. Thanks, man. Chenjerai Kuma nica is the co host and co executive producer of the really great podcast uncivil. He's also a researcher journalist and a hip hop artist. He's assistant professor at Rutgers University in the departure. Of journalism and media studies. The people that came into the country illegally that there is because everybody knows that. Of course that this way, even a little bit earlier than that. And they're going to start next week. And when people come to. And they come in illegally. They have to go out these threats from Trump highlight despicable actions that this administration has taken. They have criminalized those seeking asylum and the process of seeking asylum. They've taken the worst policies from Clinton throw. Bomber an expanded them doubled down on them. They put Silom seekers in crowded cages. They've ripped children away from their parents. Deported. The parents children are dying in custody. Doubt me. To make matters worse. Border protection has openly attacked to manitain efforts. There's an ongoing case right now of a man who gave basic care to suffering people and had the book thrown at him. I'm talking about Scott Warren, who gave food water and shelter to those in need to those who were seeking asylum in this country. Warren was arrested. And is now facing up to twenty years in jail on charges of harboring and conspiracy. My colleague at the intercept Ryan Devereaux has been following this case, extensively and reporting from the trial in Arizona here is Ryan Devereaux, Scott Warren is humanitarian aid, volunteer who lives and works in a who airs ONA about forty miles north of the US border. He was arrested in January twenty eight teen accused of providing food water and shelter to, to undocumented migrants who had crossed the desert. He was charged with harboring and conspiracy, and if convicted and sentenced to consecutive terms. He faces up to twenty years in prison. His track somebody left on the trail, not yours is yours. Not your. So January seventeenth twenty eighteen nor desk, put out a report detailing, the destruction of thousands of gallons of water in jugs that were left out in areas where migrants are known sti- hours after that happened border patrol setup surveillance on a building known as the foreign that humanitarian aid groups in all who have been using for years. They spotted Scott with two men, who they believe or undocumented pulled together a rating team descend on the barn took them into custody on. That's when Scott was charged. The morning before his trial, Scott. Warren went on democracy now. And here's what he had to say his own words, every day in the border region. Migrants, refugees people who are coming across the border, who are coming to the desert who are suffering, or risk of dying are knocking on people's doors in there in need of water, there need of food, there, Nina basic medical care, in basic necessities, and people all across the border region are continuing to respond by offering these folks glass of water by offering them some rest, or some food, and frankly, I don't see that changing a may twenty-ninth, Scott warrants felony trial started in Tucson, Arizona. He was facing charges of harboring and conspiracy with potential sentence of up to twenty years in prison. It was a dramatic week or so worth of testimony that then led to three days of deliberations jurors were essentially asked to consider one important question above all else. And that was intent. Did Scott in inten- divided the law or did he intend to provide humanitarian aid and after three days of deliberation? The jurors told judge Rainer Collins that they couldn't come to a unanimous conclusion, a mistrial was declared and now were left wondering what's going to happen next the US attorney's office in Arizona has not said, whether they're going to retry the case hearing scheduled for July second. And they said that they will come to a conclusion decision by then. To confront this border crisis. I declared national emergency crisis on the southern border is voter crisis. It is an invasion, you know, say invasion stops, this onslaught this invasion into our country. Obviously this administration has been talking about crisis for quite some time, and when they talk about crisis, they are talking about hordes of undesirable migrants, flooding over the walls, an invasion. I think that most people can can see what's going on there at the same time there is a kind of crisis on the border, and it's been unfolding for decades now as a crisis in which people are directed into the deadliest parts of the border. By design, and they've been dying by the thousands for years and years and years. We save our desert, but this desert right around our town, where we create house, fifty seven bodies Fifty-seven remains of human beings last year fifty seven. Do you find remains in your parks in your golf courses in your neighborhood? Playgrounds. What would that make you feel like beginning in the mid nineteen ninety s under the Clinton administration? The government developed a policy known as prevention through deterrence, the idea of the policy, is that migration flows were at that time. Generally concentrated around border cities, see idea was will push those flows into the deadliest most remote areas of the border, the thinking being that people won't cross when they see how deadly this is they did move Gration flows away from the cities. But they didn't stop people from crossing beginning in the late nineties early two thousands, the Sonoran desert, southern Arizona, saw this radical explosion in in migrant deaths. The Pima county, medical examiner's office went from taking in a dozen or so suspected, migrant deaths a year too. Well. Into the hundreds at minimum that office has catalogued three thousand or so deaths since two thousand the real numbers, guaranteed to be much higher. Some estimates say that the true total could be three or four five times that, and that's just an era Zona. We went from finding human rains every other month to, like, finding five sets of human remains on, on a single trip, I think feeling valley and then going back, you know, week later in finding two more sets of remains and then on a single day of searching, finding -ly, eight sets of remains in bodies of people who had died in Jason areas of the bombing range Cabeza, create to seduce this like scale of this crisis of humanitarian crisis. In the missing persons crisis bully wide open. This crisis of death and disappearance is exacerbated by policies that this administration has embraced in last two years, which include turning away asylum, seekers at ports of entry, forcing them to wait and wait at ports, increasing the likelihood that they will turn to the desert, this administration is turning away asylum, seekers, and sending them back to Mexico back to areas where they are at tremendous risk. We've seen asylum-seekers murdered as a result of this policy. It's only going to get worse. Always been walking the desert people always been finding ways to, to come here to the desert. But what happened is it was turned into a major industrial scale operation in the nineteen ninety s and early two thousands as they really pushed people out and. Places like these these desert mountains. What had been really small scale thing local organizations that move people and goods to the desert small handful of choice agents that might go out and try to interdict people or might be involved in finding people who had died or local residents who respond the people who needed food and water that all just completely mushroomed into this massive massive industry. Posse of prevention deterrence that began in the nineteen ninety s sort of centered on this idea of kind of state of exception. This idea that on the border in these sort of unwashed places. Anything goes and migrants can be treated in ways that would be unacceptable for any other population. With the family separation crisis that we saw last summer. I believe that we saw an extension of that logic. This idea that you can do something to this group of people that would be unthinkable to anyone else that is you can take children from their parents throw them into a bureaucracy with no word of where they're going how they can be reunited again. You can only do that. If you think about population is less than human. And that, unfortunately, is in new when it comes to US border enforcement policy. It's been this sort of undergirds philosophy for two and a half decades. No, I guess, every time I look at Scott, I think of my own son, and it's unconscionable to sink. That he's been charged with felonies for doing what as a parent. I would be so proud of what he done. Scott warns trial occurs against this larger backdrop of border crackdown. That's been folding for the last two years, just this week. We saw President Trump tweet that ice was preparing an operation that would result in the deportation of millions of undocumented people. There's a couple things that are important to keep in mind here. Particularly since this sort of announcement is kind of designed to creating Zeidan and fear and one of the things that we need to remember is that I doesn't have the capacity to do with the president is saying that it's going to do as an agency. That said it's also important to sort of step back and think about where we're at right now where president is issuing essentially threats to criminalise population via Twitter on the e. Eve of his official renounced -ment of his election campaign. We've seen this play out over and over throughout this administration, an attempt to terrorize people in an effort to rally the base and show, the we're doing what we said we were going to do. To his gun dealers. Knows. The video seen this nine. Ryan Devereaux is my colleague at the intercept, he spoke to our associate producer Elise. Swain, you can find Ryan's reporting on Scott Warren, as well as our series, the war on immigrants at the intercept dot com. We end today's show and, in fact, this season of intercepted with some stories and music from South Africa like the United States, South Africa is a country, whose history is inextricably, built on state violence and the systematic oppression of people of color. Both countries are scattered with statues and place names that function as monuments to white supremacy. But both countries are also home to movements aimed at tearing down these monuments of oppression from New Orleans to Cape Town to decolonize land, and to reclaim their own history for an economy, South African artist who resides in London, this decolonisation came from within as he struggled with Christianity. And how he says, it repressed his identity and his sexuality Macon's record, you will not die was released in the US earlier this year and tells the story of grappling with religion growing up, queer, and post apartheid, South Africa. And dismantling the history of colonization here is Nikon e. My name is Nicole. I'm missin monopolist. And i'm. Stood to go to the. Let's sting. Nice he too. Kind of Lou Barlow of I was born in a small town in the eastern. Cape Alice in a hospital called the Queen Victoria hospital. The Eastern Cape in particular was quite a British colony. And it's interesting. How come as a not battery, not anything new, the bed extend the legacy right? African defendant, mainly of a I men from Holland and the Lurs who followed them from France and England is their country. These are all African. And that goes down to the naming of places, you know, Queen Victoria hospital, Ellis's actually Quinn Victoria's daughter. Ah general had given it to her as a present the time. The fact that rivers named and towns and chiefdoms destroyed an older things. It's like as if Cuba was just expendable under British guidance. These people grew and prospered today, that displayed loyalty and allegiance to visiting royalty spectacular and hot warning seen. These two Britain's monarch in probably world expressions of native loyalty, further cement, the bums of empire. The bond that unite Freeman everywhere. 'and and my Balaj at all opposite is under oath angle Todd and, and all that stuff and a group around that. And most of the is so steeped in western classical music, even let goes Africa, which is a national is based on him. See. Gee, also being told by my aunts, but the demo seven is over the time moved to put it as with. In a coma, I solar in school in primary sculpting silent night at a Carol evening. I can hear it now there's a video posted on Instagram of niece ING sense night and you can hear there's already containing happening here. I decided one of seven years old during that. So no, I made decision day to get my life forevermore. I knew that how is going to happen. I didn't know what kinda music is going to be a stilted in. No. But I knew that I wasn't dude for the rest of my life. I didn't actually really want to be an opera tenor interested in technique in interested in heart sounded photos beautiful. I wanted to sing Marvin Gaye songs. Electrical gave was how charging voice was. How high could be how the light, it could be. And then you spend time just in the car listening to Marvin Gaye records trying to. Piece together. I guess how he sang. There was only later that I actually wanted to be solid idea of being a songwriter. So foreign sim so impossible seem. So I am ratchet loose to be able to write a song. Casino. I change my life, and he showed me less, you can be out from the get-go. To make a big deal about your sexuality, and I found that really powerful and he was successful. It made music that I had never heard before my entire life up until that point where people only made village people music. Come out to my friends, and my cousins at seventeen no big deal, and then outta by next gopher. When I was nineteen big deal. It was so ugly at home when I came out that, but that three out and then going back into the closet, because mom took me to a prophet. Christian prophet, this just completely derailed me and I jump right back into the club. Fighting it now, and then go into much more conservative church after that, and being sort of a project for them and shame testimony, sometimes preaching about the fact that I had defeated homosexuality. The next full, five years, spent basically scrubbing. Everything all the politics that I'd learned up to the point. I remember being at dinner because I go to twice in Sunday, two to three bible studies a week and I remember one study evening having dinner with the. With the pasta and his family and his wife, saying, she doesn't care what I say the fact remains the black people was sinful, and they ways before why people came to Kalis them and that they were judgment upon them. Suss it. So you saying that all things have happened deserved. She said, yeah. And there's nothing are so. Flunks and so. Also in it. Shocked, but also weird still come syndrome because not only take care of this bridge to him of me financially, some time, you know, and you so you believe in this completely. 'cause if inflec- that's gonna go to heaven. Became homeless around two in five friends cultures. And for the first time in my life, those no under Miami to read my bible to take to bible study. And these are friends that I was told to give up because they were leaving me down the wrong path, but. And these are the ones that were there for me. When I had no place to move. Suddenly, the church. Disappear. And so took it upon myself to really Asmus, awesome questions, am I prepared? To deny myself for the rest of my life. And it was clear. To me that I was tired. I was Zo sted of hating myself. I was exhausted of being an example, being minstrel from and so. Fuck it. And the left. Okay. The wound is a film, based on a tosa tradition, boys going into manhood, and part of that mission to passage is sick mission no-one, who is not allowed in space the going to seclusion into the mountain and the circumcise that and spend about a month. Healing learning ways in how to be a man, so to speak. It's changed over time, of course, with technology with mixing of different cultures, but, you know, the fall come the center of it is still, which is manhood. But a lot of talk about it. It's a secret of passage. We went to cut them from about. It will put quick coaches and principal characters. The lead out of the three leads could be described as quill the phone came out, one slew of awards of the world is the most awarded film of history. And then things go to really ugly. Traditional leaders of the country, want to Bannet Fe cut the cord to give it basically opponent ING, which meant that couldn't shown in any cinemas people were talking people talking about toxic muscular, anti took home phobia, because the question was, what is it that we, we agree about the fact that? To be from about this angry about the fact that. From shows that quick, people exist myspace. I still Congo home as the Congo Eastern Cape. 'cause I don't know what capable of people still talk about the fact that if they were to see me kill me. But didn't leave because of that. Just two. I believe that if you've done something as disgusting as the people who were the custodians of white supremacy in colonialism than they deserve to be blotted out of history. The histories and buddies, the histories and the lives, we can do without them. You know, and when need to rewrite those stories. A lot of the people that seem as the father figures of labs were rapists, and mattress. In the still celebrated. The continents that a complete destroy because of that. The first time I went to Europe. I remember thinking that would be so excited to be the. So fucking pissed off. I remember working around power thing so angry and going back home. I'm so fucking angry. And he said, why I said. It's so beautiful, and it's so old. And they get to have that because I don't. Names of important. A point person is trans come up with differing that they chose and is none on the horde not what you said. But what I say about me and my life, a fund, the really beautiful. I thought I wanted to write about that. To the. Balance on the fuel. When a end those remaining of cities of streets. Anyone deserves to be a monument really build. And every time these look got got damn statue of you, and everyone is praying to the Neidl you know, they heard, and it's a trigger. The corners everything stuff from you, but also seeing, where was the names of the people who are not people who raised me. Up the women who would they you know who tuna, partly st-. And pre compartment. Who took care the families. The kids sits. You know, 'cause father's kill don't take into prison. Those people, and that's why I wrote my song, new Brighton, which is about that. Mcconnell album, you will not die is out now. He also stars in the new John Cameron Mitchell podcast musical. It's called anthem. Hunky lous. It was produced by topic here at first, look media, you can check it out at topic dot com slash anthem. Mcconnell spoke to our producer, Jack as Doro. And that does this week show and for this season of intercepted, we will be back with regular programming later. In the summer, you can follow us on Twitter at intercepted. If you like what we do support our show by going to the intercept dot com slash join to become a sustaining member. Intercepted is a production of first look media, and the intercept our lead producer jacked as Doro. Producer is Laura Flynn at least Swain as our associate producer and graphic designer our executive producer is Tom Alah. Betsy Reid is editor in chief of the intercept requ on mixed the show transcription for this program is done by nudie Marquez. Martinez music as always was composed by DJ spooky until next season. I'm Jeremy Scahill.

US Lincoln president America Scott Warren government producer Joe Biden Donald Trump executive producer New York City Mr. McConnell congress Hillary Clinton George Washington Arizona researcher Jeremy Scahill
June 13, 2019: Arizona Border Trial; 2020 Candidate Wayne Messam

Here & Now

42:25 min | 1 year ago

June 13, 2019: Arizona Border Trial; 2020 Candidate Wayne Messam

"This message comes from here and now sponsor indeed. If you're hiring with indeed, you can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast from NPR and WB. You are I'm Peter Odell. I'm Robin young. It's here. And now we still don't know who's behind the explosions onto oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman that forced crews to evacuate and ratcheted up tensions already escalated after that incident a month ago when four tankers were attacked off the coast of the United Arab. Emirates the US, and Iran accusing each other of aggressive or destabilizing behavior in the region and pears peer Kenyan joins us from Istanbul and Peter, these explosions seem worse than the last time with cruise evacuating. Well, in a way, they're pretty similar explosions on board commercial ships in the Persian Gulf disrupting transport of products petroleum products. In this case, this time, the US navy was nearby move to offer assistance as did other vessels as you mentioned. No casualties. All hands are safe. There are also no reports of any leaks. But as you noted something on the order of twenty percent of global oil consumption passes through that waterway every day. So when something happens to disrupt shipping in the Persian Gulf, a lot of people get nervous and calls for de-escalation growing. Well, prices, rose almost five percent after this incident. So there has been an affect already but just again comparing the situations a last week three countries submitted a report to the UN saying they thought it was likely frogmen who detached minds to those tankers again, a month ago in the UAE, or off the UAE, there are reports that there were possible minds in this incident of two tankers having explosions. Do we know anymore about that? We do not we're waiting for the evidence to come up, but there has been some speculation. Well, also speculation about whites happening. One of the ships was a Japanese owned ship the other Norwegian ship carrying oil products to Japan of the Iranian Foreign Minister called this timing suspicious because the Japanese Prime minister is in Tehran on behalf of President Trump negotiating an easing of tensions with the US. So just question. How unusual is that, that Japan is mediating, and what is your sense of the Iranians claim? Well as to why Japan would mediate, it's not really acting as a full blown mediator prime minister of a went to Tehran mainly to Mark ninety years of diplomatic ties between the two countries. Now he did offer to see if while he was there. He could also arrange talks between Tehran and Washington, so they could hash out their differences themselves about around said it didn't really view Japan as the right kind of mutt mediator at this point, so Ave, lower goals and said he'd just try to find. A way to ease tensions in the region. Generally in the end as you noted he was in Iran in a meeting as tensions with the US went the other way going up considerable at last month after that incident, the four tankers the UA blamed, an unnamed state actor, the US said that was a ran around denied that, and as you said, you know, US ships and we have increased visibility military visibility in the region after the attacks a month ago. They reportedly came to the scene of this attack, Iran claims that it came and help to help save these crew members putting aside. What, what really happened is, they're concerned that, you know, if this continues, you might have the US and Iranian military speeding to a very confusing confusing situation and somehow meeting there and not any well, well, that's always the concern when American worship show up in the Persian Gulf, or Iranian worships make a move out of the strait of war Moos and it. It's a, it's a small place with a lot of hostile countries that don't like each other, and the prospect of what a lot of leaders call a war that nobody said they wanted happening. Anyway, is certainly something to be worried about I know you don't want to speculate but I'm gonna ask you to get the sense of how others are. Speculating Iran denies they are involved in this who who else. I mean might this be terrorism. What, what who what relation is focusing in a couple of directions? Let's say Iran on the one hand or someone who wants everyone to think it was a run that could include regional rivals of Iran Saudi Arabia or the UAE. It could conceivably include the US or Israel. Now, we don't have any evidence of any of those people being involved at this point. But it certainly possibility Washington as you said, is blamed, Iran for the first batch of attacks in may two around is likely to be blamed in much of the west this time as well. And it's possible it was around. We're gonna have to see how it turns out. And there's a big question as to why as well. There could be. A lot of reasons. The bottom line is why now is not all that important in a place like the Persian Gulf, one of the most sensitive flashpoints in the world. There really is no good time for tensions to go up and just have a minute. What happens now? I mean President Trump tightened sanctions last month sent a worship what might happen now. Well, I wouldn't want to predict how the administration's going to react, obviously, there are in the administration, including national security adviser, John Bolton strongly advocating a hawkish around policy. What that means going forward after this remains to be seen. Ron is saying, let's talk Washington has been saying the only talks they wanna hold are about a tougher nuclear agreement with Iran. Something supreme leader says is not going to happen as long as this pressure. Campaign continues. NPR's Peter Kenyon in s Timbo. Thank you. Thanks, robin. And back in this country in Arizona the trial of an aid worker, charged with conspiring to harbor undocumented immigrants ended this week in a hung jury Scott Warren who volunteers with the group no more deaths was arrested in. Twenty eighteen after border patrol agents say they saw him directing migrants toward a route to avoid law enforcement, Warren's attorneys say he didn't attend intend to break the law and worn himself, put it this way the government's plan in the midst of this humanitarian crisis. Policies to target undocumented people refugees in their families prosecutions to criminalise humanitarian aid, kindness and solidarity. Warren is the first aid worker, on Arizona's southern border to face felony charges for human smuggling and more than a decade if he'd been convicted he would have faced up to twenty years in prison. Let's bring in Michel MAURICE go from K, Jay Z's frontier desk in Tucson, Michelle, welcome. Thank you. And you were in the courtroom for this trial. Have we learned anything more about why the jury couldn't reach a decision? No. We have it, you know, I it comes down and a lot of ways to the same issues that perpetuated a humanitarian aid work, and people dying in Arizona's desert for going on twenty years. You know, people have sympathy and see a real need for alternative ways, and methodologies for people to have their lives saved out there or they believe that it's the job of the US border patrol to pick that up. Yeah. Well, we mentioned that Warren had been accused of. Harboring people who had crossed the border illegally. Now they were at a place called the barn. Maybe you could explain that in just, you know, tell us how the prosecution tried to prove that Warren had broken the law. So about thirty five miles north of the air is on porter. There's a shelter refurbished old house called the barn that was sort of used as a migrant aid station in a waystation by the group, no more deaths. Scott Warren, was there when these two undocumented immigrants happen to show up he'd said he, he did not expect them to be there. But when they were he saw innocent, medical assistance, and, and he started trying to provide that over the phone from, from doctors, and nurses at work with no more deaths. Two days later, the border patrol was surveilling this property. They said because they had seen signs of undocumented immigrant activity in the area, and they saw warrant outside with two men pointing to mountain ranges, this was the crux of the. Argument during closing arguments. They actually tried to use the fact his geography professor to show that he had a special knowledge to be able to direct people in guide them between his two mountain ranges, in other words to guide them away from agents, who who'd be looking exactly. Yes, they said to get them around a border patrol checkpoint. He said he was just trying to keep them from getting lost in the desert. Warren's arrest came not soon after the former attorney general Jeff Sessions said in two thousand seventeen that the Justice department would be committed to prosecuting cases just like this. So this is one example of now several how else have we seen the strategy? Plano, along the entire stretch of the border and a series of misdemeanor charges of people like Scott, including Scott himself charged with misdemeanor crimes for littering charges. Trespassing charges along the border. And then there's also cases of. Immigrants of immigration attorneys, and journalists who have been accompanying immigrants asylum, seekers mind, you across the border, who, who themselves have been detained harassed, photographs surveilled by US border patrol in CB p officers along the board, a Jeff Sessions has gone, but is the policy is still there. The policy seems to not have shifted. It will be fascinated to see whether this prosecutor is supposed to meet up again, July second with no more deaths attorneys. They said yesterday, they will decide before that whether or not they're going to try to try Scott Warren again, I guess the question is and Michel, I'm looking at the weather forecast today. It said it's going to be one hundred ten degrees in the deserts of Arizona today. Is the government's policy deterring any of these groups from providing aid to the migrants as they try to make this trek north? I mean, are they still out there doing the work that got Scott worn into trouble? No more deaths started in two thousand four and that year we at two hundred forty known recovered remained on the how many people die every year would nominate found last year. We had one hundred and sixty eight eighty eight were found around the region, where Scott was arrested since they who was arrested these numbers haven't changed on the reality. Is that migration numbers go up and down the number of dead? Also do a net. Seems to be the only thing that changes, how many people die in resumes, desert's every summer and they are still doing the work, and they're saying that they're going to continue to work presumably, that number would be even higher if they weren't out there and to be honest, if the border patrol search trauma rescue teams weren't also out there, a rescuing people in pulling the amount of the desert, that's a mutual, Modise go from K Jay Z's frontier desk in Tucson Michel. Thanks very much. Thank you. Support for here now and the following message come from ember wave the revolutionary new personal thermostat. That's designed to help you find thermal wellness in any situation. Ember wave can put you in control of your comfort in places like you're freezing office uncomfortable, airplanes in restaurants or theaters after a workout at home and more. Learn more at ember wave dot com and use code NPR to save fifty dollars at checkout. Amber. Wave own your temperature. According to the American psychological association. One in seven women, experienced, depression, and anxiety during our after childbirth and most had hard to talk about, but not the L A based comedian. Angelina spicer? She's made her experience. With postpartum depression, a big partner stand up and become an advocate for maternal mental health. KPCC's Prisco Neely has her story. I am Angelina Spicer. I am a comedian and influence sir, and AXA dental activist year that last thing accidental activists, that's new and unexpected, but Spicer has testified before lawmakers in Sacramento in Washington DC. She talks about postpartum depression at hospitals in conferences. I didn't plan on this journey. It shows me before she became this accidental, activist Spicer was known for things like her spoofs of Tyra banks on America's next top model. Was nothing short of brilliant and satirical remixes of hit songs. My style before in hindsight was very superficial, but it was funny. Now Spicer is drawing from a much deeper well, and on stage. She keeps it really real. Race girl. Her evolution as a comedian began back when she and her husband got, pregnant, she says she was happy and hopeful. But when her daughter Eva, was born she faced a new reality. I thought that pushing the baby out was going to be the hardest part like, okay got do my yoga. Gotta get the EPA Doral but I was not expecting what followed. She says everything about caring for her new daughter was just hard and scary. And she was still doing standup shooting a web series. It was too much at eight months postpartum, that's when everything just crumbled like many new moms, Spicer struggled with sleep and stress. Her husband, Joe Trudell Leo says she kept most of it inside if you would have been around during that time you would not have seen that, she looked like she was holding together, but she was also overwhelmed by intrusive, violent thoughts. She told her therapist about this, so. I was essentially apologizing to my therapist for what I had done in my mind. That's when my therapists was like you need to go check into a hospital. She spent ten days getting care at a psychiatric hospital. This was three years ago, but she didn't talk about it on stage until just a few months ago. It took a while for me. This was so shameful Kona psychiatric hospital. She talks about it now because she wants to remove that shame after her hospital stay Spicer continued therapy. She started taking antidepressants and learned how to cope, I learned about, like how to envision my future. And it's just a miracle now to see she's person. Bumblebee. Eva is three now in Angelina. Just loves being her mom, do you remember when you were a baby? You do. Tell me about what you remember. Time you're in my tummy. And did we go on stage and do comedy when you are my tummy? Spicer said she didn't feel completely healed until Asia's third birthday. Her husband says he's proud of her bravery in sharing her story embrace it in. I think made a huge impact in a short time. Spicer recognizes that there's a delicate balance between being funny and being insensitive, but her audiences love her act. The response I get is like the new me too movement. Like, oh, finally, somebody said, she's raising money now to shoot a comedy special as part of a documentary, she's making on maternal mental health, and she's even figured out a way to combine her new message about postpartum, depression or p with her classic parody approach. For here. And now I'm Crisci Neely. And it's time for our annual salute to graduates. So grab your loved ones for Tom Russia's child song written by Canadian Murray mcglaughlin in the turbulent sixties. It's become our annual for grads, a warning grab your tissues as well. Tom one's told us, it was hard for him to even record this song. It's just one of those songs knocks you over a bid toughened up enough that I didn't burst into tears. Well, we read that mcglaughlin wrote it in the late sixties when he would have been at teen. It was literally his letter to his own parents when he left home for me. It's, it's one of those songs you know, Janis urge for going be a great song, as long as winter comes. And I think child would be a great song, as long as kids grow up and leave home. I think it also works as a child of parents who are growing older and leaving us forever. Good. Bye. Mom goodbye t to. Little sister, you'll have to wait a while to come alone. Goodbye to this house and all its memory. We just got too old say were wrong. I've got to make one last trip to my bit room. Have to leave some stuff behind. Funny. How the same old crooked pictures. Just don't seem the same to me tonight. They know us in shed, no more tears. No use shout net me. Pa. Can't live no longer with you. Fears. I love you. But that hasn't helped at all. Each of us miss do the things that matter. All of MRI would we can see? It was long ago. You must remember. You were once young and scared as me. I don't know how hard it is yet. When you realize you grow old. I know how hard it is now to be younger. Tread to keep me from the cold. Thanks for all you've done. It may sound hollow. Thank you for the good times that we've known. I'm fine my own road to follow. You will be welcome in my home. Suitcase. I must go now. I don't mind about the things you said. Sara, don't know where I'm going. Remember little sister, look ahead. Tomorrow. I'll be in some of the sunrise. Maybe I'll have someone at my say. Mama give you love back to your husband. Father. You've taught me well good. Bye. Goodbye. Good bad to you, too. And now, our salutes the graduates from our mother shift WBU are starting with high school Yussef Amer. That's not you Lilly. Kosta via Tom ago, Gordon, Jenny Gould, Michael Gorski, Madeline, Hartill Keat, Julian Sonus Alana Lear Yano Jacob marks, max Maga's, Logan McLennan and are college graduates. Matthew off, gyro, Sarah Borden, brianna Becker, Jamie clap off Christina car Conor Jackson, Sarah scien aid in Logan, Samantha McMahon, Noah Miller medicine, oaks, Lexi Pirie grace, robots ski Ethan Schroeder James tattoo ever, Tibo and Martin, Weiss, Kerber and getting advanced degrees Clara, Bellman just Coughlan, Sarah Harrison, Ian logo and dean, Russell fly away. The founder of a popular messaging app. Telegram says China is responsible for a massive cyberattack that disrupted at services earlier this week, it came at a sensitive time protesters who've been clashing with police in Hong Kong have been using the app to communicate with each other. The protesters are upset about a Bill that could allow criminal suspects to be extradited back to mainland China organizers are calling for Moore marches. The sunday. Robin Farzad is host of public radio's full disclosure, Robin, welcome a low Peter, so this is an interesting tech angle to a story that we've been following for a while now. But just I remind us why. There were so many people who are set about this new law in Hong Kong. Hong Kong street is interruption, because the Beijing government, there's trying to plow through legislation that would for the first time allow extraditions to China and protesters fear that could be used this enough out, any sort of government opposition. So the demonstrators who now numbered in the hundreds and hundreds of thousands. They stormed legislative chamber on Wednesday. And all of this is happening. Exactly thirty years after Beijing crackdown in tenement square. And as so often is the case these days in a modern protest people are using their phones. They're using social media, they're using these apps. So what was telegrams role in these protests, telegram, fast? It's ubiquitous, it's anonymous, you, you talk about the network effects, and everybody kind of signing up on this and being on. It media, I think, has always been a lubricant for these kinds of Peebles. You could think back to the cassette tape sermons, and the Iranian revolution forty years ago or Twitter in the Arab spring to start this decade when you are Hong Kong protesters living in the shadow of China's huge surveillance state, you're nationally gonna rely on cryptic message messaging services like telegram to avoid detection. So China knows that and they wanna crash the service. Okay. So telegram explained how the attack worked this way. I just I just read this thread on Twitter in a sense, it says imagine that an army of lemmings just jumped the queue at McDonald's in front of you. And each is or. Ordering a whopper. The server is busy telling the lemmings that they came to the wrong place, because, of course, Burger King, where you get a whopper. But there are so many of them that the server can't even see you to to try to take your order. So that sort of explains what happened. Guess that makes it more clear, but, but how did they know? It was the Chinese. It's called analysis paralysis, the founder of telegram, he explained on Twitter that these attacks had IP addresses coming mostly from China. I'm quoting him historically AllState actor Cise disruption of services of this size. We experienced coincided in time with protests in Hong Kong coronated on telegram. This case was not an exception close, quote China, says that it wants this law, only to extradite criminals, rapists, and murderers. But the protesters say, don't trust China. The target activists and journalists to. So if in fact, this cyberattack originated in China isn't that kind of proving the point that? Well, yeah, I think you could say Beijing is both haunted and guided by its experience at the square thirty years ago. Yes, it was brutal. Yes. CNN and others had their cameras shut off. But the moral hazard is, is China. Now government, it's a Konami its world standing since prospered and its billion, plus population has largely remained dormant. So that's the foremost lesson for them in quickly. Do you think they could do something, you know, like what's app in the US, if, if they wanted to target those I have no doubt? I mean, I have no doubt between their dominance and hardware and what they do for internet service providers everywhere, around the world that chips they make for smartphones and networks, and the garment very tightly aligned with national champions. Like while way you look at the two thousand sixteen election here already demonstrated. How vulnerable our social networks are to fairus behavior by foreign players. Rub and Farzad host public radio's full disclosure. Thanks as always take care. Today in our continuing talks with twenty twenty candidates. Wayne message, mayor of Miramar, Florida. He fielded. Some early criticism probably will make the fundraising cut for the first Bates but is still very much in the race mayor mess. And welcome. Thanks for having me. How are you? I'm fine. How are you because you've jumped into this race and you know, you're at the end of the pack of very low down in the polls. What are you doing this? It's very easy to look at the current circumstance. But the question is why the circumstances are such almost every candidate has been offered inoperability to go on a nationally televised town hall. Whether it's on CNN or FOX, I think, for the most part of them have qualified for the first debate because they have exposure to millions of Americans and my campaign has been requesting and at times demanding to same excess to no success. So the mic my hill is a lot steeper than others. Well as you well know, though, you're being more scrutinized probably than ever before because you've jumped into this spotlight. So let's get out at because you have been critical of President Trump or we're going to give you pretend to do that now. But that's focused the light on some of your own problems. People have pointed to the fact that after you left a high paying job in the pharmaceutical industry. You formed a construction company, there were charges that you hadn't paid an employee prior to that FedEx sued one of your businesses, this mess and consulting services and small claims court, you had a pay them a little over three thousand you and your wife hit were hit with foreclosure filing on your home, a lean from the Internal Revenue Service in two thousand thirteen against you and your wife for thirty two thousand some odd unpaid two thousand seven eight and ten taxes. You have said you struggled trying to start that construction company. But what about those who would say to you, look, your track record doesn't look so great either? I think what America's an actually, what I know a lot of what you brought out, is very old news back from the early years of them being in business. I'm actually an American success story. My construction management company is one of the fastest growing minority construction management, companies, and Florida. You can start a business on my almost lost it all it's no secret in the recession. We started construction company during the recession we use our savings on, and basically paid our employees to keep our company afloat. I'm so I stand by that record. And I think that inspires Americans on to see that they have someone perhaps, who have not been born with a silver spoon. And when you think about I've always defied the odds, my parents from Manchester. Jamaica my father was a contract sugar. Cane, cut it at came to this country seasonally for over a decade, then my, my father when he became a permanent resident one of my mother's I g. Jobs was as a cook to go out in those very same farm fields to feed the mom migrant workers out there. Well, what do you think of President Trump's proposal to prioritize highly educated immigrants in the in the, the visa system? I think that would be a travesty because obviously, if that process was in place when my parents were words knocking on the doors of this nation. They would be at the bottom of the list, I feel that this nation should open its doors to any person that would like to contribute to society. So you have this thriving now, construction company, and you are mayor, who's tried to increase development of Miramar, first of all, are you pledged to a kind of, you know, no conflict of interest guarantee? Oh, of course, I don't do business with my city, our laws ordinances prohibit that what about, you know, even construction period at this point. I mean, look at the area east of you along the coast, where people are wondering. If the answer is less development because of the rising seas, what are your thoughts about what Florida needs to do, because there's two things you may your it's not construction will always be needed. You will always need to renovate projects. Most of my work is putting in more high officiant energy systems, but climate change is something that is very real. I know in Florida sea level rise is a big issue in the heartland of this country. I'm impacting farming production and the west, we're seeing fires that are just destroying property, destroying lives, and we have to become more resilient and we must make our way two hundred percent on renewable energy and real plan to transition us their questions you for the green new deal legislative that is in the house right now. And also, how do you talk to those people in the mid west? Many of whom have been told the narrative that we know what this green deal means is they can't have cows anymore because they make method. I mean, it's been sort of. Distilled into this kind of false narrative. What do you say to them people who say, I'm afraid of what you mean? When you talk about confronting climate change. I'm afraid of what it's going to do to me in the mid west. Well, I think what the issue is, is that we have to define what the problem is and come up with practical solutions in terms of the green new deal. I support the urgency and Ingold of the green new deal. I would look to work with our climatologists economists to propose, my own plan and how we would meet those goals. Can you pick out one part of the green deal? A one part of what you propose should be done to avoid this climate catastrophe. That's coming, one part that you would present to someone who is worried. I mean, they're afraid that your plan for it just is not going to be good for them. Well, one thing I would say is this when you think. About the flooding that takes place on because of more torrential whether events that we're having which can be directly connected to climate change is coming up with an infrastructure Bill that prioritizes resiliency whether it's fortifying bridges levees, dams, the next thing I will say, is that we have to transition off of our dependency on fossil fuel by committing resources to renewable energy, and then we take it to these communities that could have an impact because they have some industry type two fossil fuel and retooling and retraining those individuals and providing opportunities to advance renewable energy and does sectors of the country, then now, people can now see where they can transition off maybe a job. And we still are acting on climate change way. Miss him again. Mayor of Miramar, Florida. How do you counter President Trump's argument? That poverty joblessness among African Americans has reached its lowest rate ever. Same with Hispanics? How do you do that? Well, I think that's a misnomer average everyday individuals, especially in the communities that you just mentioned. Many individuals are working more than one job. When you think about the quality of life of working those multiple jobs. It impacts the family structure, it impacts the ability to do other things that you would like to do. It's, it's no question that this economy has continued to show some economic progress them even from when President Obama was in office, but we really think about it, who's primarily benefitting off the Trump economy is their large major corporations. It's the wealthiest of Americans the benefit has not trickled down to most hardworking Americans. And that's how I gauge the health of this economy, though the unemployment. Rates that have fault that you're arguing that job. Quality of the jobs, wages, have not kept up with the cost of living mayor, where would you position yourself on this wide spectrum? Now of democratic candidates who have Joe Biden, considered a moderate, and some of the candidates have said kind of old school. You have a Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren in second and third place. Jockeying they're considered very progressive Sanders calls himself, a social democrat where does Wayne mess him. Fall. I fall as a progressive mayor that is passed the living wage in my city, I'm standing before you as a business owner, that knows how to create jobs. And fact, I was the first candidate that propose student loan debt forgiveness. The one point five trillion dollars in outstanding student loan debt, but other candidates have stolen my idea and not as aggressive propose their own plans, which is fine. But I lead on that issue. The question is why hasn't the mayor from a swing state? The first African American mayor of my city, and I've accent, I've demanded I'm a town hall have not gotten it other campaigns have launched since my campaign, all white males, and they were granted CNN town halls and many of them were not are not very known or not nationally known. So the question is, why we are happy to give you this real estate here today, and I would. Only add that you're also that former Florida state football player briefing, the NFL you could just like run through lines. I would imagine if they're if they're in your way. So we're happy to give you this time today, and we'll keep an eye on you. Mayor Wayne messin. Thank you so much. Thank you. And all are candidates conversation so far here now. Donald. An update on a story. We've been covering this week, the shooting of former Boston Red Sox player David Ortiz incentive Domingo on Sunday night. Authorities in the Dominican Republic say they've now detained six suspects, including the alleged gunman. Police are also pursuing four other suspects in connection with the shooting at a press conference yesterday authority said the man who coordinated the attack was offered an eight thousand dollar bounty to carry it out. They have not released information about a possible motive or who hired that gunman. Meanwhile, David Ortiz remains in intensive care at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. His wife, Tiffany Ortiz says he's making good progress. We will continue to follow that progress and the investigation. And now a story about Gulf, but not about tiger. Woods who is sure to generate a lot of attention at the US open starting today in Pebble Beach, California. There is another gopher quietly gobbling up major championships. The way would. Wants did American Brooks kept cut has won four majors since twenty seventeen. And if he wins this week at Pebble Beach, he'll be only the second man to win three straight. US Open's kept goes stoic demeanor has helped keep him under the radar. But as NPR's, Tom Goldman reports that will change if he keeps playing this well at the games, most important events, bricks KEPCO once told an interviewer if he can do it over again. He'd play baseball indeed. He walks golf course with a ballplayers swagger, all hips, and cool. There's a hint of Clint Eastwood in his steely is, but for only non emoting in certainty on a golf course and more to the point during major championships. Kept insists he's just a regular guy RV myself completely differently than than people view me, I still think it's weird. When I walk into a place and, you know, I can see is on me. You don't just for dinner. And I'm like, what's really staring at? With his win at last month's PGA championship as heard on CBS what everyone is staring at is an elite athlete who continues to make something very hard look very easy. Golf's majors are like Super Bowls, says PGA player Jordan, speak the best players toughest courses grandest traditions, speak, one a cluster of them a few years ago. He gets annoyed. When people say kept them merely as having a run of hot Gulf hate the word runs. I'd said this back in two thousand fifteen sixteen whatever when people are saying about me on Ron. It's like no, this is who he is. And he's going to be a force to be reckoned with for, you know decades. So get used to it. Kepco is not some vendor pinned at twenty nine he's a vendor older guy who early in his career gained a lot of experience and confidence playing all over the world. He doesn't lead a bunch of statistical categories on the PGA tour. But he's developed a knack for. Hitting his booming accurate drives and sinking. The biggest putz in those Super Bowls. He's only one six PGA tour events. Four of them are majors. And he's learning as he goes along from his clutch, putting during last year's US open victory. I think that was kind of a first moment for me. Okay. I can make pots when I really need to to his final round performance at last month PGA when he forced himself to stay positive after losing a huge lead. I was actually really proud of myself the way I spun that mentally turning negative into positive has become one of his most effective weapons to the point. He seeks the negative KEPCO has turned the classic athletes chip on the shoulder into an art when alerted on Twitter that a pre US open TV promo didn't include him KEPCO was on it. Then I just clicked on the Lincoln saw watched it. Just kinda shocked. So I don't I don't know. Somebody probably got fired over it or should. For the record foxsports reportedly made four promos. He was prominent in three of them. Thanks. Fans here at Pebble Beach have swarmed kept for autographs this week, Twenty-three-year-old Troy Mexa, topless loves kept ca style. Just got swag. I think he's, he's got a very under control. Nothing fazes him, but doesn't Mexa topless missed the emotion from KEPCO, the celebrate Tori. Tiger Woods like uppercuts that fire up the fans. I don't personally need the being gay. I like to just know the a witness to, to greatness. I'll do celebrate forum late Sunday. He may be called upon the buzz as this tournament gets underway is that kept Kaz power and distance may not be as effective on Pebble Beach, is tricky, sloping course with its narrow fairways and small greens that murmur of doubt probably is all the slight Brooks kept the needs. Tom Goldman NPR news. Here. Now is a production of NPR and WB. You are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Peter Odell Robin young. This is here now.

US NPR Scott Warren President Angelina spicer Iran Persian Gulf China Washington DC Florida Arizona Twitter Japan NPR Jay Z Miramar Beijing United Arab President Trump Jeff Sessions
Botswana Elephant Hunting; Arizona Migrant Aid Trial

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:53 min | 1 year ago

Botswana Elephant Hunting; Arizona Migrant Aid Trial

"This message comes from on points sponsor indeed. If you're hiring with indeed, you can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions, then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast. From NPR and you are Boston, I'm Meghna, chucker bardy. And this is on point in a world where elephants, one of this planet, most intelligent and impressive creatures are under siege by humans. The African nation of Botswana has stood out for its efforts in recent years to protect its elephant population. The numbers speak to their success home to one hundred thirty thousand elephants more than anywhere in Africa. But now but want us president has lifted the hunting ban in Botswana saying human elephant conflict is a real problem, but his hunting hunting the best solution. So this hour point butts wanna and its elephants, and you can join us, how would you balance the need of farmers with the need to protect elephants? Are you one hundred do you believe hunting those great creatures? Is a good way to protect them. And if not, what is the best way? Join us anytime on point radio dot org or Twitter and Facebook at on point radio and a little later this hour. We will. Erazo China where the trial of a university, instructor accused of harboring migrants along the border with Mexico ended in a hung jury this week that'll be later this hour. But first, let's talk about Botswana and its elephants. And joining us from Johannesburg South Africa is Pauline backs Africa. Reporter for Bloomberg. She's been reporting on the story of course, and we have links at on point radio dot org. Pauleen, welcome to the program. Hi. So first of all, explain to us why did Botswana decide now to lift its ban on hunting, elephants? Well, this was this was not an overnight decision. The government's prepared to the ground excuse me, by having a nationwide hair. He's about the issue. So last year, the new president came into office, who quit see matzec that was in April two thousand AT the one of the first things he did. When coming into office was ending a shoot to kill policy and withdrawing military weapons from their anti-poaching units. And that measure went by fairly unanimously approved, so there wasn't much to do about it. And after that, he flow today idea of lifting hunting, Ben not just on elephants. But then wildlife in general, and to prepare the ground, he organized, he set up a committee that would organize special hearings foreign white, so in, in small villages, and especially in the north where most of the elephants live to get people's opinions about the elephants, and after debts when it was clear that there was large supports for this lifting up to bend. They finally implemented. It's in April. Sorry in June. I see. And so when you say there was large support, especially in the north of the country. What form was that support taking what we're people they're saying? Farmers who are scared of elephants, and you have to keep in mind, they're extremely dangerous animals. They don't go around trampling people all the time, but they do destroy crops, because the north is an area where elephants live, but also where people grow most of the crops in the country, and so they come and eat them, and they look for water, and so they really trample people along the way I mean, not every day, but you could say almost every week, and so there are some Smoltz images where people don't go out at night for fear of running accidents, the into her elephants. And, you know, you don't always come out the life from that. So there was big support for the measure, especially on a rule people on the countryside. And so he decided to his might be good feet to do. And the other thing that I'm very mental. This have said, like look at this year, actually election year. So there will be elections in October. And this is a popular measure, that's been taking. And it might you know, help him to gain votes, especially on the countryside. Let's see. But how is it? That Botswana had been so successful in preserving its elephant population. Because as we noted at the top of the show, one hundred thirty thousand elephants in Botswana, more than anywhere else in Africa. How do they cheap that? Yes. So before Masisi came to office, there was a presence called, I'm comma, who is known as a quite fervent environmentalist, and he imposed a hunting ban on all wildlife in two thousand fourteen and the implemented to shoot to kill policy as well. There was already a large population of elephants, but it grew quite quickey two hundred thirty thousand day half. Now he also boosted tourism. So he may put on the map as a country, which was can come and observe like this amazing of life in youthful beautiful lodging. So he really boosted the tourist, the tourism sector and love people into I'm very happy about that. And the other thing is what's one of utes country. And there's not that many people, there's about two point three million people. So one elephant for every eighteen citizens about, so you would say there's lots of space for everybody, but that's not the case. Well Botswana's decision to lift the ban on wildlife. Hunting and elephant hunting has received global attention. So let's listen to Botswana's President mcquaid see Masisi answering questions last week about his decision to lift the ban. Here. He is never retain, so just wanted to exterminate elephants. And it's quite Roenick, because it is we who, what are the driest countries in southern Africa, who have homed the largest? Population in the wild in the world. That's what's want us president mcquaid. See must see see so Pauline. How are about swans reacting to the international response to their nations decision to lift the ban? Yeah. The government is very unhappy with the way it's been seved, even though they kind of knew it was coming, but they, you think that they should be able to handle their elephants the way they see fit, and what they've also been doing trying to seek some supports on neighboring countries that also have very large elephant populations like Zimbabwe who also it was improper, for example, self defense to China, because it says it has too many and to sort of rally support from countries around them and say, look, we, we can do this. You know, we, we know how to deal with these on the most, we've done his our entire life, we live with them. We know how to handle this. So feast, don't criticize us and keep coming as tourists because we still receive tourist in legitimate. You can still see, you don't kill them all what they will also do is invite trophy hunters, so that will generate more revenue than the usual safaris for tourists who come just take pictures. But they say they will only allow four hundred elephants to be killed intro fee hunting per year. So that's not a huge amount. Well Pauline, vacs Africa reporter for Bloomberg speaking to us from Johannesburg Pauline. Thank you so very much. Thank you. Well, let's turn now to Lommel Anthony Merima. He joins us from govern butts wanna he's a lawyer and political commentator for Botswana's national weekly paper, the weekend, post Anthony Maria, welcome to point. Welcome to you. Thanks very much for inviting me on the show. First of all, tell us polling backs had mentioned that there's an election coming up in Botswana, and that there may have been some political reasons for this decision to lift the hunting Ben is there truth to that. Indeed, the res the only cutting on in October this year. And you've got a candidate with the fact that his excellency president SEC has been making some decisions that would be regarded as a active to his political base one can conclude that, that is one of those projects or those decisions that I meant to, like, h he's a put it cut basin. They're forgetting votes in in the coming. Elections, especially considering the fact that these decision has been celebrated and related, especially on the row people, especially among the people whose livelihood mainly based on afternoons funding, etc. And that is the political that do really on a Democratic Party, rainy. She spun in tens of far elections. I see we'll Anthony. I wonder if do, but swan and see the international reaction to the president's decision as, as another moment in which the global community tells an African nation. We don't agree with what you're doing, but perhaps will not provide financial or institutional assistance to find better ways to manage the growing elephant population in Botswana. I mean how to Botswana and see that. In fact, they thought you in fact, one of the things that got one where it was when some government functionaries, I think you've independent themselves. It tried to who's the, the western interference cut, for example, to say this is one of the cases where western countries want to dictate tends to us indentify. We could better manage a while our resources something that has been destroyed to us by our gods. And that Trump cut has has got leverage amongst some people, especially like I said, just put he's got these, if you like in that God, which is why you see that most of the outcry what mainly by, for example, western bec- generalists, who are based here, it, western conservationists, who are based, and the media, for example, and a lot of people societal patients have not been keen in opposing the place. It has decisions. You might have seen recently. When the president was in USA, when one of the protests, spoke after question the headline from a newspaper that was covering these thirty day was who say president matzec shots Darwin. Coolest protests over yet. Lean seen routine that, that protest had no reasonable cost to question the, the president in that regard. So then tell me more. What do you think is likely to happen in the next several months or in a year regarding this issue of the elephants? In Botswana is, is the president determined to stay the course on this. To ease and as it Mike, what he stated Ilya because he knows he has support on that. I think one of the reasons why the plays into support on that is that this decision of innocent ban is, is associated with the former president who can general sorta come in, and you away that several people are against him now, mainly because of his departure from the Hulan, BDP, and his conflict, with Masisi. And that's like many of the projects that are associated to him. This is one project one decision, which many people said it, but the president Masisi having heaven resists invested. So one sees it continuing one physics, the president been placated overtly, because of Popolare I support him, but what will be done, which I've caught an economic Danny, but has been sent to the ordinary people that benefit from the disease. In the fall form, trust, and dude have hunting concessions and it could bring investments and that results in financial DVD's for them. So they Brit for that respect. Do Anthony Morina lawyer and political commentator for butts Wanda's national weekly paper, the weekend, post speaking to us from Gaborone swan a-, Anthony marina, thank you so much for joining us. We'll be back. This is on point. This message comes from unpleasant sponsor indeed. When it comes to hiring, you don't have time to waste you need. Help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions, then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs, new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast. Terms, conditions, and quality standards apply. A language was about to die. Once it gets wiped out. That's it. We will have nothing in our language to Pastora children and the people trying to save it, we're still learning how to speak it Amir to hurry up time was working against, as we were like hundred years late. You know it's code switch. Airlock of listen and subscribe, this is on point. Meghna chucker bardy. We're talking about butts Wanda's decision to lift its ban on. On wildlife hunting, specifically elephant hunting in that nation and the world's response to that let's actually go straight to the phones, Robert is calling from Baltimore, Maryland. Robert you're on the air. Hi, I just wanted to mention that I I was in Botswana about a month ago and on safari in visiting four different nature, parks and so many, many elephants, and their majestic animals, but they really kill a lot of trees and they eat the bark and we saw all four the different parks. Revisited many, many dead trees is result of what the elephants had done and the guides we spoke to where unanimous in feeling that they had to limit the number of elephants, because otherwise many more trees would be killed, and it'd be real danger to the national parks. So just want to add this to discussion, well, Robert, thank you so much for your call. So let's turn now to Richard Jero joins us from. Washington. He's wildlife conservationist and consultant recently retired from the US fish and Wildlife Service, after a twenty year career as a chief of the division of international conservation. He spent seventeen of those twenty years on the ground studying African elephants Richard Regina. Welcome to you. Thanks for having me. We'll so welcome to the program. And first of all, I before we get into the specifics of the impact that, lifting the hunting ban may have on elephants. I was wondering if you could actually just help us take a step back and give us a sense of the, the health, the numbers and the state of the elephant population in Botswana. Oh, that's a good place to start. Botswana should deserves to be recognized as certainly a, a world leader in conservation in many respects, particularly with elephants, as, as has been stated their population is very large, it has lived somewhat precariously with shall we say, neighbors in, that is local communities for a number of years, but Botswana is a tremendous country with fantastic. Tourism and is a country that is really quite, you know, going there, you get the impression of predictability, which when you travel internationally is a good thing. So Botswana should be recognized as a leader in conservation. And certainly as has been stated they certainly have a right and an obligation to manage their wildlife populations with elephants being the most important. Well, so when we say that the elephant population. In Botswana is very large that one hundred thirty thousand number. I guess the question is, is it too large? And is it too large because of human encroachment on lands that the, the elephants live on or farming? I mean, we were hearing about it in an increase in human elephant conflict there. So what's driving that? And those are two good questions that are nested the first one are there, too. Many in this is controversial because certainly as the caller robber Robert pointed out. It's obvious to see a great deal of vegetation damage trees are damaged in areas of heavy elephant, concentration, particularly and gathering points along the river in various watering points. And that is legitimate. However, biologically speaking, I think it's less impactful on the overall wellbeing of elephants into some degree other wildlife that depend on trees certain. It has an effect. So it's something to be considered. But I wouldn't give the Pat phrase that there too many elephants there and moving to a reason why there are, let's say so many elephants. Indeed. This is a very large concentration human activities, affect elephants in many ways their behavior what they do on a daily and seasonal basis. And so it's easy to understand that elephants would be affected in their occupancy, their seasonal movements by human activities. Those human activities can be agriculture can be poaching can be sport hunting can be tourism. So this combination of factors and, and let us not forget that bordering countries to the north of Botswana, have rather unfortunate, history, with elephants over previous decades where for example, and go ahead a civil war. There are many land mines, not much law enforcement and elephants, suffered greatly, and being smart mobile animals, who communicate very well with each other many decided to move to safer areas in northern Botswana in those areas have been made safe by the good efforts of the butts wanna government, particularly the butts wanna defense force, but the concentration is real and in the reasons for that concentration are some solutions. So I want to get to the solutions in a second. But it's absolutely fascinating to hear. You say that the elephants were responding to human conflicts and moving to safer locations, absolutely fascinating. But president must see see. Not only has he ended the hunting ban, but he previously ended but swan as shoot to kill anti-poaching policy. Right. Where the military was authorized to kill suspected poachers on the spot. I, I wonder I mean what is the greater threat right now to elephants? Is it poachers? Or, you know the four hundred or so elephants per year, that may be taken through newly legalized hunting. Well, I'll answer that backwards. A bit sport hunting for elephants is not going to be a huge numerical affect on the population and those numbers are quite obvious a fraction of one percent. But the devil in those details they're highly selected by sport hunters. And we can talk about genetic effects on the population of selecting the biggest and best bowls out of a population for a species, that is a dominance, hierarchy and were older stronger elephants. It's sort of monopolize the mating opportunities and therefore contribute, a disproportionate amount of genetics into future cohorts or generations. So, so, so that's, that's an important point. But. Elephants are, you know they're not buffalo who can be more easily managed by selecting. Let's say old and in the way bowls, and that is those that are on a decline and are no longer competitive enough to main contribute. Genetically elephants, aren't like that. And so that's an important point to consider also elephants are, as I mentioned in people, I think, well, no. Extremely intelligent social communicative animals who pay a lot of attention to people because they are smart enough and experienced enough to know that people are basically, their enemies that they kill them under certain circumstances, but wanna is a peaceful place, and they have much less poaching. Although it's been apparently on an increase in recent years, that's unfortunate. But in many other places in Africa, particularly in central Africa where most of my experiences. Elephants are so endangered on a daily basis by poachers. They understand that. And I do believe they've come to the conclusion that humankind is trying its best to kill every last one call it an animal genocide, if you will, and they react accordingly. And you can see the difference in populations that are not threatened in haunted versus those that are hunted. So these are profound effects, and so anything we do bit agriculture tourism land-use, planning providing water were denying it in a dry environment. All of those things have effects that may carry unintended consequences. So there are the genetic impacts as you were talking about earlier of an increased taking of the biggest most powerful male, elephants, given that the elephants are also very matriarchal, though, are there, any potential behavioral and social impacts in their societies. Yes, there are behavioral social ones as well. Not the same as for example, killing, a, a matriarch, for example, or one of the higher ranking females as you mentioned. They are matriarchal societies and after the bulls me know as a let's call them young teenagers. They get rambunctious and they're no longer quite welcome in the cow, calf herds. And so they're encouraged to leave in at some points. They, they get kicked out pretty firmly, and they go around in small groups of bowls or by themselves, as they get older and more competitive into a state cold must that's sort of like a rut, where they become in season, and they go, very far to their way to seek mates at that time, they become very aggressive and very dangerous when a large male that is perhaps part of the one percent of the population of elephants that would qualify for prime sport hunting. Trophy, a very high price. I might add, when that male is selected, of course, their genetic changes, and that's pretty easy to understand. But elephants. No every bowl, they know the big bowls, especially they no one one is killed that has affects on their society may be negative positive that's a judgment, but certainly on an individual basis in particular large, must Bill. Both are known frankly respected among elephant communities. Well, let's get some callers here. Let's go to sue who's calling from Baltimore, Maryland. Sue you're on the air. Hi, I'm lucky enough to have been on safari in Africa five times. And of course if seen Allison's each time and have learned a lot about them over the years. And the idea of sport shooting of these sentient, intelligent animals. Appalls me and I understand our metal consequences. If in fact, they're talking about bulls, and not metrics, I understand that different to, but my first instinct is to say, well, I won't go back to Botswana again. I will go someplace where they're working like Kenya where they are really working to protect the elephants, and Kenya also has a shoot to kill rule now about poachers. And I it, it sickens me that, that animals were these her sport. I would hope that I hope that the buds. Swan a government can find some other ways to raise money. Herds of elephants can be moved together because their family, I just think that would be a better solution. We'll sue, thank you so much for your call. Richard rijo. Now's the time to talk to what you see as better solutions here earlier in the program, we heard from Anthony Marimo, who was talking about the fact that farmers or community members, especially in northern Botswana support, this idea of opening hunting again, because they've been told that they can formed community trusts that they may get concessions from the, the sale of the hunting licenses. But certainly that must pale in comparison to the tourism dollars that come in to see the elephants. So what is a better solution than legalizing hunting while, I think a, let's describe it as a tool box that is various implements, various. Tools used to accomplish your goals. But first, we must define what are the goals of elephant management in Botswana. Secondarily, what would be the goals benefits, and perhaps on intended consequences of sport, hunting, elephants in these are decisions that can and must be made by the Botts want government? And I think they're quite capable of doing that. So to the second part of an answer to your various question. What are some of the means some, let's say, in addition to the tool of sport, hunting that can be implemented to improve the situation. Well. Certainly income to local communities is important, not only as an incentive to live with. Let's say pretty bad garden pests, elephants are not great neighbors, for people trying to grow crops, when people are very justified to apprehensive fearful and frankly, not to like, elephants very much. I think they respect them, but one can understand that they're not so happy to have them as, as neighbors during times of crop raising. Land. Use planning is extremely important. Some areas are vital for elephants in. They likely used them for thousands of years, and they correspond to seasonal movements in a very arid environment also easy to understand so doing a land use planning that allows for both the needs of people and of elephants is one of a long term solutions, and that's easier said than done also easier said than done are providing communities, and of course, the government that has the major responsibility to manage elephants, especially problem, elephants are deterrence, and there are ways of discouraging elephants. You know, unfortunately, they're smart enough to get around every deterrent. So you need an integrated system that uses more than one technique and can change up on the elephants to keep them away and keep them on their toes. What are some of those techniques while? People talk about beehives, and that's a legitimate way planting beehives around fairly permanent. Let's say gardens are farmed areas. B's don't get along. Excuse me. Elephants, don't get along with bees, very well day hear them. They know they're, they're in large quantities. They know that they defend their hives. And so they tend to move to areas they'll move away from areas with concentrated beehives, and so you not only get the benefit of deterring elephants. But also, you get Honey. I'm you can harvest that. And so that's a successful means but it requires support for communities to do that. It requires a level of capacity and competence to do that. Certainly the motivation would be there when they see it works. It does there are there ways fences are quite an obvious one. They are expensive. They can be affective and they frequently fail. And one of the major failure points is that they require quite a bit of maintenance, and a lot of times local communities who work very long hours in her out and fields. The last thing they want to do is spend a few more hours maintaining offense. And so it can work. But there's an if involved, there's conditions involve right? So land use planning deterrence nonlethal. You know, the, the sorts of. Things that are used on, believe it or not crowd control things. That flash bang rubber bullets cap space, and spray, that sometimes shot from shotguns, for example, in their shotguns all over the place. They can be used well, Richard jail. We just got a less than a minute to go. And I want to ask you one final question, because we have been focusing on Botswana, but, but if we zoom out across the continent, elephants remain under threat. I what does the future for this magnificant magnificent species? Continent wide had you asked me this question, a couple of years ago, I would have been much more pessimistic, due to the will certainly competition for common resources land water forage at cetera is always the case in human populations are growing. So that's still a problem. But the unfettered demand for ivory, particularly in Asia has been the primary cause of the decline of elephants, and because. China is making steps. They've banned commercial ivory sale in the country. And because the government has expressed their desire to limit this practice. I think people may be starting to catch on a bit. And there's optimism in that well, Richard Jero wildlife, conservationists and consultant recently retired from the US fish and Wildlife Service after twenty year career as chief of the division of international conservation. Seventeen of those years on the ground studying African elephants. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having me. We'll be right back. This is on point. Hey, it's been an Ameri, and we're the hosts of endless thread, the show, featuring stories found on the website, read it but you don't have to be a Reddit or to enjoy the kinds of stories. We tell like a couple experimenting with non monogamy or boredom that may have predicted the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Subscribe to endless threat on apple podcasts or wherever you listen. I'm Gregory Warner and this week on rough translation. We follow a rescue mission in real time after an Iraqi photojournalist goes missing on the front lines. We don't believe I don't believe it leaves his family and his friends to try to save him. When he said, who is this? Who are you? They respond. We are the Slavic state this week on rough translation. This is on point. I'm magnetized CRA bardy last year. Federal authorities arrested Scott Warren for allegedly providing food water and shelter to undocumented migrants near Arizona's Sonoran desert. Then they charged him with harboring and conspiring to transport the immigrants charges. They could have led up to twenty years in prison, Morin, however asserted, that he did not break the law that he was upholding religious and international compacts to aid persecuted people. He was put on trial in Tucson, federal court and yesterday that trial ended with a deadlocked jury. So what impact could this case have along the southern border? And we want to hear from you. What do you think about a trial against a person providing aid to immigrants in along the southern border? Joining us now from Tucson, Arizona, as Raphael Carranza. He covers the US Mexican border for the. Zona Republic and was at Scott, Warren's trial, Rafael, welcome to one point. Thank you so much for having been begged. So first of all, tell us deadlocked jewelry. I'm not sure a lot of people expected, that out of this trial, how much of a surprise was that it was as much of a surprise. I didn't you know, these were issues that came before a jury. But the evidence that was presented during the trial from the government was not very far there wasn't a lot of direct or indirect evidence that, that showed a Scott war in had committed a conspiracy, or had made any sort of green or plans to help lease to migrants. However, you know, the deliberation took about three days and on the second day at the very end. The jury sent a message to the judge that they were deadlocked in that they can come up with the verdict and at that point, the judge brought them back into the courthouse and ask them to try one more time. So they did that on the third day and then after about half a day of deliberation. There about four hours. They sent the same note again. To the to the judge who brought them into the courthouse once again. And at that point after asking them individually if they've felt that giving them additional time would help them reach a verdict all of them said. No. So he ended up dismissing them declared his trial. I see. So Warren belongs to a group called no more deaths, right? At what is it that this, this group does, and what was the basis for Warren's arrest last year? So this group has been around in southeastern Arizona for about fifteen years. And their main work is dropping off a water gallons and food as well in some of the most transited areas that migrants have used and in particular, they're, they're they've been targeting the an area. Call the APO corridor, which is, you know, a stretch of very remote and rugged desert, where there's very, little very little civilization there, you have a highway, basically that leads from the Mexican border to a whole, which is a town about forty miles north of the border. But in between it's protected wilderness. So there really isn't any way for migrants were crossing to these remote areas to find water unless they come across one of these water drops. And then also, you know, upset of other humanitarian aid groups also do, but that's, that's their main tasked with providing water for stranded migrant special. Rafael as you just said, this group has been doing this for fifteen years, and yet, what was the argument that the government was making that Warren had committed a felony last year. What was the argument they made in court? So they the, the arrest happened on January twenty eighteen and it was a result of a surveillance operation that border patrol had fed up on this. There's building call the barn. They, they were looking for to undocumented immigrants that in tracking them they have them to this location. I'm they had arrived approximately four days, prior, and Scott Warren was the person who had received them and he's in court. He's, he said that he had followed a no more deaths protocols, and you're doing a medical assessment and calling a doctor who recommended they say off their feet because they had a blisters on on on them. So he says, he's just he had followed that protocol, but the, of the argument from the government is that war and had conspired with a director of a shelter in. In the nearby border city of Asia, and that they had to work together or come to an agreement to help these two migrants. Kind of further themselves into the United States by just, you know, concilium from border patrol for few days. Okay. Well, let's listen for a moment to what Scott Warren himself said a little earlier this week when when the jury came back as a hung jury, he stood outside the courthouse in Tucson and read a statement defending his actions today remains as necessary as ever for local residents and humanitarian aid volunteers stand in solidarity with migrants and refugees. And we must also stand for families friends and neighbors in the very landed self most threatened by the militarization of our borderland communities. I received enormous support from family, friends lawyers, and my community that Scott, Warren, speaking in front of a Tucson federal court Rafael Karonga, hold on, for just a moment here because I want to now bring into the conversation. Mark cocaine of it. She's joining us from Phoenix Arizona. He's a former assistant US attorney in Arizona. He served under the Obama administration and for one year in the Trump administration, we should also note that Marco Kanna vich was one of more than one thousand former federal prosecutors who did sign a letter saying, they would have charged President Trump with obstruction were he regular citizen so more who can of welcome to on point. Thank you. Good to be with you. So I wanna lean on your experience here. A former federal prosecutor in the US attorney's office in Arizona. What was the basis for the government to want to charge Scott Warren? In with aiding migrants in the desert and were, they right to do it. Well, that those are complicated questions. This case from a broad perspective really highlights how desperately needed comprehensive immigration reform is because we have this humanitarian crisis at the border and our laws, don't match up well with the situation on the ground, the case that the government was trying to make also highlights problems with the immigration law, because harboring he was charged with conspiracy as we've heard in conspiracy to transport into quote unquote harbor aliens in harboring is defined in the statutes, or it's, it's included along with other things, and like concealing harboring or shielding from detection. Or any attempts to conceal harbor or shield from detection, a the, the term in statutes is alien, which is an interesting distinction. But it that can include, you can harbor or conceal in any building or a means of transportation. So if you look at that statute in a very broad light, it can include giving an undocumented migrant a ride in your car, or as in this case, providing food while they're in a building, because it's making it more difficult for the agents to detect them. Now every prosecution like your second question is was it right to do this? When you have a hung jury like this. It usually is a good sign that it's a tough case to prove four people thought that it was that he had committed a crime in the government had provided evidence beyond a reasonable doubt. But eight people didn't and reasonable minds can differ about whether or not a crime was actually committed. But when you have the number of people crossing the border that we do, and the number of people in the country that we do the choice about where to spend our limited resources in border enforcement. And how best to spend those is really being lost. I think win what we're choosing to do is prosecute people who are trying to prevent people from. From dying as they cross cross the border. So we'll just jump back you to referee Carranza for just a moment here because Rafael. Correct me on this if I'm wrong, one of the basis of for Warren's defense that his legal team presented in court. Was it a freedom of religion defense that he felt religiously compelled to aid the migrant across the desert that was initially part of, you know, the defense emotion that the defense, had argued along with, you know, a motion saying that this particular group that no more deaths have been targeted specifically? So they're gonna just selective enforcement this was argued in court. Ultimately the judge not allow that. So while it was initially part of the strategy in the end, it came very it came up, very, very few times. Call. Okay. All right. Well, I want to actually also just talk a little bit about how it, it seems as if this case is yet another highlight of change in approach that the Trump administration is taking for border enforcement here because just hours before Scott Warren was arrested in two thousand eighteen the. Group that he volunteers with no more deaths as we discussed. They actually distributed video footage of border patrol agents. This is footage. They did. They had obtained these agents destroying water bottles left in the desert by the group's volunteers. And so we have a moment from this video it's taken by border patrol agents themselves, and you'll hear the voice of one of the agents as he empties water onto the ground. Good shot, somebody left from fail. Not yours is yours. I can tell me. So that's the border patrol agent. Speaking as the embassy's emptied emptying water onto the ground. And a spokesperson for a border protection said at the time that the agency does not condone tampering with water or food sources left by humanitarian groups and that they seek to do their enforcement work as humanely as possible. But Mark, cocaine vich. Let me turn back to you here. Again. Are we seeing is this is this another outgrowth of, of a change in posture of in the Trump administration on, on how to best manage issues of migration across the border? I think there was a clear change in posture with Jefferson Beauregard, sessions, the third in his speech on, you know, zero tolerance and targeting humanitarian agencies and, and people who are providing water is a new tactic in his speech. He talked about how people are profiting from the harboring and transportation of, of immigrants and used the death of, you know, people in, in this country and citizens who have been victims of crimes for at the hands of undocumented immigrants. But of course, those are highly politically charged. But the, the number of, of crimes committed by undocumented immigrants is actually lower than as a percentage than people who are here illegally. And there are people dying at the border and dying in custody, now, too, which is really troubling that we have children who are separated from their families dying in custody. And that's something that I think all people of goodwill are concerned about, and frankly, both parties need to do far better at coming up with solutions to this problem because both parties have had the opportunity when they controlled the executive and legislative branches. Neither party did. If I could. I'm so sorry to interrupt there, but I do want to at least give one listener a chance to have her say. So let's go to Linda, who's calling from Silver Creek, silver cliff, Wisconsin. Linda, you're on the air. All right. My husband and I spend the winter down in RV park near ho, and we've got a fence. We boarder one hundred miles of desert, and what if you see how hot it is during the day, and how cold it is a night? It's just heart wrenching when somebody comes up to that fence, and, you know, asked you for drink a lot, or, or some food. And so I you know, no matter how you feel about immigration. You surely have to understand the desperation that these people go through to, to make that journey across the I mean, the desert is very unforgiving will Linda, thank you so much. For your call Rafael Carranza. Let me turn back to you hear what do you think the effect of the fact of this case that Scott Warren was arrested? Yes. There's a. Hung jury here, but the government certainly sent a message with this has changed the, the actions and activities of groups like no more deaths, or they continuing to try to provide water food and shelter for migrants trying to cross the border. They're very adamant in saying that their work will continue matter of fact, the same day that there was that the, the, the judge declared a mistrial because of the hung, Jerry. There was a group of volunteers with no more dad suicide driving out to a whole to do another water drop off. So this is something that has been ongoing, despite the arrest, and I also want to make a quick note that it's not just the jury she or the government has had some success in prosecuting humanitarian aid one and tears. This year is starting in January in additional eight volunteers were prosecuted for less crimes misdemeanors for entering a protected wildlife per while life without a permit sometimes for littering when they drop. Off. You know, some of the water gallons and the food and in four of those while in tears were convicted. So you know they were sentenced, you know to, to few months probation and they had to pay a fine. And then the other four volunteers of plant guilty to a civil infractions misdemeanor instead of a plea a plea deal there. So, you know, when we're talking about a government message. They're definitely they've had some success so far. And I think that's something that, that humanitarian aid organizations are going to keep in mind going forward on, we know now for fact that they have been using this building called the barn as prominently as they have before. And so they're also taking notice some of some of the issues that were brought up during the trial. And, and, you know, trying to analyze how move forward to address some of those issues so that way they don't they don't become more trouble on the. Speaking to us from Tucson, Arizona reporter for the Zona Republic covering the US Mexico border, Rafael, thank you so much for being with us. Thank you for having me, and Marcus cannon vigil, former US attorney in Arizona, sir, or assistant, US attorney, I should say serving under the Obama administration and one year into the Trump administration with us today from Phoenix. Mark, thank you so much for joining us. My pleasure. Bharti. This is on point.

Botswana government us president Scott Warren Africa Arizona Tucson Botswana NPR swan Johannesburg Rafael Africa Lommel Anthony Merima Trump Baltimore NPR Wildlife Service
Democracy Now! 2019-06-13 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-06-13 Thursday

"From New York. This is democracy now. Hong Kong police, actually fired teargas to worse, the crowd while. No people are showing any symptoms of attacking, so they're just doing it. We think that they're trying to oppress, our rights of face stressing, our, our opinion and actually missing. The freedom Kong is witnessing has starred protests against a proposed Bill to allow extradition of Hong Kong residents to mainland China on Wednesday riot police, deployed tear gas rubber bullets pepper sprays demonstrators attempted to storm the legislative council building, we'll get the latest then Arizona, where a hung jury has refused to convict humanitarian aid activists professor, Scott Warren, who faced twenty years in prison for providing water food, clean clothes, and beds, undock. Documented migrants crossing the Sonoran desert. The government's plan in the midst of this humanitarian crisis policies to target undocumented people refugees in their families. Prosecutions to criminalise humanitarian aid, kindness, and solidarity and outrage is mounting over the death of Laline Palanca a transgender. Afro lucky next woman who is recently found Dell in dead in a Rikers island cell. A war. Don't get it twin. We have been in a more black and Brown. Transpeople have been in the war since we were born a more on that continuously until the, we shouldn't fish until they actually make it still them. Don't exist. All that, and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot board the Warren peace report, I made me Goodman in the Gulf of Oman, the cruise of two oil tankers evacuated their ships today after reporting explosions that prompted fears of a conflict between the US in Iran and image shared by Iranian state television, showed a plume of smoke rising from one of the two vessels, east of the strait of Hormuz Taiwan's state oil refinery, which owns one of the two tankers said that suspected, it's ship had been hit by torpedo, Iran denied involvement and said through a state news agency, Iran's navy helped to safely evacuate forty four sailors from the stricken vessels, US, national security adviser, John Bolton whose frequently called for US military action against Iran. Blamed, Iran for a tax on oil tankers off the coast of the United Arab Emirates last month with. Out providing evidence the house oversight committee voted Wednesday to hold attorney general William bar and commerce secretary Wilbur Ross and contempt of congress for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas. The vote came just hours after the Justice department said President Trump had declared executive privilege in a bid to keep the documents from the public record Democrats are seeking information on how Trump administration officials sought to add a citizenship question to the twenty twenty census last month in New York Times, reported a senior Republican strategist who specialized in gerrymandering was secretly behind the efforts arguing privately that adding the question would benefit Republicans and hurt Democrats. This is New York, congress member, Alexandra Cossio, Cortez speaking at Wednesday's house oversight hearing. I want to know why it was why this question was magically added after we have seen that a political. Operative new and detailed an intent to intimidate racial and immigrant communities for a partisan purpose saying, this will hurt Democrats and help Republicans. That's what I wanna know. I wanna know why Wilbur Ross, why secretary Ross continued to meet with people of disturbing political affiliations after his own administration warned him to stop. He came right here. And I asked him, did you continue speaking with him after this? He told me. No, we had an Email, and he did Donald Donald Trump junior testified before the Senate intelligence committee in closed door session about an Email he received in the spring of two thousand sixteen from someone he believed to be a Russian government. Attorney promising dirt on Hillary Clinton, Trump junior accepted, the invitation, and scheduled meeting, Trump Tower with the official in June of two thousand sixteen. Meanwhile, President Trump said Wednesday he would accept damaging information on campaign rive. Vols from foreign actors and might not even alert the FBI about efforts by foreign adversary to intervene in the US election. Speaking with ABC news anchor George Stephanopoulos, and the Oval Office, Trump said, his son, Donald Trump junior was right. Not to inform the FBI about the two thousand sixteen Trump Tower meeting, much, she loves things over my life. I don't think my whole life of it my whole life. I don't you don't call the FBI. You throw somebody out of euro as you do whatever you gotta stolen briefing book. He called the that's different stolen breaching. But this is this is somebody that said we have information on your opponent. Oh, let me call the give me a break. Lifeless. Director says that's what should happen. The FBI director is wrong. President Trump's handpicked FBI director Christopher Ray told congress just last month that the F B would want to know if a public official or campaign was contacted by a foreign government seeking to interfere in election. President Trump dismiss the notion saying he would consider accepting position research of a foreign figure approached him. Meanwhile, President Trump welcome, polish precedent enjoyed new debt to the White House on Wednesday, signing a military agreement to station, an additional one thousand US troops in Poland, their announcement came as the US Marine Corps executed, a rare flyover of an f thirty five stove fighter jet over the White House, as President Trump and do the looked on from the south lawn. Trump said Poland had agreed in return to purchase at least thirty two of the Lockheed. Martin stealth fighter jets, the f thirty five program has been marked by multibillion dollar cost overruns with the Pentagon. Estimates putting the cost of maintaining the jets at nearly one point two trillion dollars in the coming decades in the Arabian peninsula, who rebels from Yemen attacked an airport in southern Saudi Arabia Wednesday injuring twenty six billions and the airport's arrival hall who spokesman called the missile attack retribution for the US back Saudi led coalitions continued aggression blockade against Yemen. Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill house, lawmakers grilled senior State Department officials Wednesday over the Trump administration's plans to circle, then congress to sell over eight billion dollars of precision guided bombs and other weapons to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates without congressional approval. Assistant US secretary of state Clark Cooper defended President Trump's decision in may to declare a national emergency in order to complete the arm sales, citing a threat from Saudi Arabia's regional rival Iran house, foreign affairs, committee chair Eliot, Engel coal. Trump's declaration, phony and an abuse of the law. This is Clark Cooper being questioned by Rhode Island. Democratic Congress member David Seleny, the vast majority arms. The administration wants to sell with respect to this transaction are -fensive weapons. Correct. It's not limited to that. There's sustainment didn't say limited, the vast majority are offensive weapon. There are offensive weapons. There are sustainment pack aspects you already are offensive isn't that correct, sir? A number of them are offensive. The US backed war and Yemen has killed thousands of civilians, and spark the world's worst humanitarian crisis, pushing half of Yemen's twenty eight million people to the brink of famine. Authorities in Hong Kong have shut down government offices, and postpone debate in the legislative council one day after riot, police fired tear gas rubber bullets and pepper spray at tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets to protest a Bill that would allow the extradition of Hong Kong residents to mainland China. This comes after as many as a million protestors marched against the extradition Bill on Sunday. The protests are some of the largest Hong Kong has seen since before Britain's handover of Hong Kong in nineteen ninety seven after. Headlines go to Hong Kong for the latest in Mexico crime, reporter, Norma Sarabia was shot and killed in the southern state of Tabasco late Tuesday, becoming the six journalists to be assassinated in Mexico this year. Police say two masked men on the motorbike shot. Sarobi repeatedly outside her home before fleeing the scene in the neighboring state Evita crews armed men, raided the home of journalists Marcos, maranda Cocco and kidnapped him on Wednesday, cog Koh's wife pleaded for his return noting. He's received death threats for years over his critical reporting on local government officials reporters without borders has called Mexico, the world's deadliest country for media workers outside of an active war zone. Elsewhere in Mexico to immigration activists known for their work assisting Central American migrants, who are arrested on June fifth. We're freed from jail Wednesday ahead of. There upcoming trials the arrests of Eranio Mahyco and Krista Sanchez earlier this month came as President Trump threatened to impose tariffs on Mexican imports unless the Mexican government agreed to crack down on the Silom seekers headed for the US Mexico border on Wednesday. A judge rule the payer should not be held in pre-trial, custody, as they await trial and human trafficking charges while he has worked closely with Scott Warren, the humanitarian aid, volunteer with the group no more deaths in Tucson, Arizona later in the broadcast. We'll go to Tucson Arizona, where federal judge has just declared a mistrial in a criminal case against Scott Warren, that could see him sentenced up to twenty years in prison for providing water clean clothes, and beds to asylum seekers in the scenarist desert in Uganda. Health officials say a five year old boy in this mother have died after falling ill with the Bola. The first steps among eight new suspected cases of the deadly. Virus reported and Uganda. The deaths came health workers, and the neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo. Warna massively bullet outbreak has become the second worst on record with over two thousand new cases and nearly fourteen hundred deaths since last August medical workers are struggling to reach infected people amidst ungoing, violence by anti-government militias, as well as widespread mistrust of foreign medical workers in South Dakota members of the Cheyenne. River Sioux tribe on Monday turned around a truck believed to be carrying construction equipment for the keystone excel oil pipeline and statement, tribal chair, Harold Frazier said quote any vehicles or personnel working on the Keystone Pipeline are not welcome on this reservation. This is suit territory. We will not stand for more encroachments and defilement of our land. He said the keystone excel pipeline has long been oppose. By environmentalists farmers and native Americans, if completed the pipeline would carry oil from Canada's tar, sands region and Berta to refineries, as far away as the Gulf of Mexico. Former Stanford University selling coach, John then damore has avoided a possible prison term for his role in college admissions cheating scandal that so wealthy and powerful parents spend millions of dollars in bribes to get their children into elite universities on Wednesday a US district court judge, and Boston sentenced, bend more to two years supervised release and ten thousand dollar fine after he pleaded guilty to Reckitt tearing conspiracy charges prosecutors asked for thirteen month prison sentence. They save on damore took over six hundred thousand dollars in bribes to fasttrack student applicants for Stanford sailing team. Funneling the money to the Stanford sailing program, the two students who received the bribes four did not attend. Stanford. Britain's Home Secretary has signed a formal request for WikiLeaks, founder, Julian Assange to be extradited to the United States where he faces seventeen counts of violating the espionage act in the first ever case of journalist publisher being indicted, under the World War, One ear law courts will now decide whether to honor the extradition request Assan just currently behind bars. London's Belmarsh prison for skipping bail in two thousand twelve after being forcibly removed from the Ecuadoran embassy by British police in April and Vermont Senator and twenty twenty presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders offered a vigorous defence of democratic socialism in a major address Wednesday at George Washington University vowing to complete the unfinished promise of FDR's, new deal and work towards economic rights for all. Trump attack socialism, IM reminded again of what Dr Martin Luther King junior said, and I quote, this country has socialism for the rich rugged individualism for the pool and quote. Embodies the difference between Donald Trump and me. He believes in corporate socialism, for the rich and powerful, I believe in a democratic socialism that works for the working families of this country. And those are some of the headlines says democracy now, democracy now dot or the warring pace report, I make then and I'm not mean shea welcome to listen view as around the country and around the world. We begin today's show and Hong Kong where authorities have shut down government offices and postponed debate in the legislative council. One day after riot, police fired tear gas rubber bullets and pepper spray at tens of thousands of demonstrators who took to the streets to protest a Bill that would allow the extradition of Hong Kong residents to mainland China on Wednesday demonstrators attempted to storm the legislative council building where lawmakers are debating the extradition. Bill Human Rights, Watch criticized Hong Kong authorities for using what it described as excessive force to suppress peaceful demonstrations protesters described the police using indiscriminate force. Hong kong. Police actually fired teargas to the crowd, while no people showing any symptoms of attacking so they're just doing it. We think that they're trying to oppress. I'll rights of expressing our opinion, and actually missing the freedom. This came days after as many as a million protestors marched in Hong Kong against the extradition. Bill sunday. The protests are some of the largest Hong Kong is seen since before Britain's handover of Hong Kong in nineteen ninety seven since then, Hong Kong has operated under a different legal and political system as mainland China setup known as one country two systems critics of the extradition. Bill say it would infringe on Hong Kong's independence and legal and human rights of Hong Kong residents, as well as the people visiting Hong Kong. We go now to Hong Kong where we're joined by Mary Hoy. She's a Hong Kong based writer reporter for the news outlet courts, she's reported on the extradition Bill and has been covering the mass protests. Welcome to democracy now. Mary, can you start off by talking about the significance of this Bill? That was passed just explain it. Show. And thank you for having me, Amy the significance of this Bill really is that it will threats in Hong Kong's price to the show and legal independence is as Chris Patten the foam. Oh, government said there needs to be a firewall between home cones legal system and China's and with this Bill should it be paused that firewall will be done away with, and it means that it is, it will be it will mean the death of white country, two systems because when there will be this fire will, and people will be there suppose ability that people will be able to be extradited to China's a face charges. They face fate as to whether they will face fair trial, or even have their human rights protected. Mary, who could you outline what the key features of this proposed amendment is our show? So as the low currently stands. Cohn has signed extradition treaties with twenty other jurisdictions US the US being one of them and what this lowest trying to do is to walk around that on the current law. The. People's Republic of China's actually explicitly ruled out as a place that people can be extradited to. And so there is no extradition, as whole to China under the current law and loss year. There was a mother case. The Hong Kong young home couple trouble to Taiwan. The boyfriend was accused of mothering girlfriend and fled back to Hong Kong. And because China sees Taiwan, this positive the People's Republic of China, there is no extradition between Hong Kong and Taiwan. And so the Hong Kong government has then come around and said, while there's this major loophole in that this suspected motor is able to face charges and face Justice. And so they took this opportunity to say we have to reform and the men. This Bill to make sure that this person can't this suspect military can face charges and be brought to Justice. And how do we do this? We plug this Leepo in the language of the government. By doing away with the restriction of the People's Republic of China and saying that there can be one off extradition agreements between Hong Kong and China. I wanna read a recent tweet from the exile Chinese writer, much in who on Twitter said at the Hong Kong, literary festival November friend accompanied me at all times for fear. I'd be secretly kidnapped and smuggled to China, if the extradition law passes, any critic of she's regime could be legally openly of -ducted. It would be the end of freedom in Hong Kong much Jeon said your response, Mary hallway. I think that is a very, very reasonable fear, and people all afraid of that, not just rises of Chinese the sense, but also foreign is Hong Kong, as a financial hub national media hope. There are lots of human rights advocacy groups here and for them if it means doing if doing that work means angering, China than they will very likely be accused of committing a southern crime, and China will be able to find a way to have them extradited to face charges in China in mainland China. And so what this means is that they will China with a useless Bill as retaliation against opponents. Whether it's Hong Kong Chinese or foreigners who watch hobbling to based in Hong Kong merica, to explain who's behind this proposed amendment, and why is it being proposed? Now. Yes. So really who's behind is the Hong Kong government, but who's behind the Hong Kong government is the Beijing government. The Hong Kong government has insisted that this is their own initiative chief executive carry lamb has repeatedly at least that this is home aching punk governments making. There is no instruction from the Chinese government, though, the official based in Hong Kong and the top Chinese official has made the unusual move of trying to persuade Hong Kong politicians to back the extradition, Bill. So as to whether they China really isn't behind this Bill is uncertain. And I, I'm doubtful that. Could you describe Mary, the kinds of the protests that are taking place and the violent crackdown by the police in Hong Kong against the protestors? So the protesters started gathering outside the central government offices on Tuesday night, local time here and overnight numbers grew. And so, by the time I arrived at the protests seen at about nine AM during rush hour traffic tens of thousands of people had gathered and take over just vast wops of this highway outside of the central government offices. And so from the looks of it, it was calm quiet for much of the morning, I was there until about two PM and really always Seoul was protest this being very well. Organized, they had setup supply stations. They were collecting umbrellas to repel against pepper, spray, and tear gas that they expected expecting to be five of them. They're collecting water and medical supplies. And that erecting barriers around the protest site. They were handing out mosques to pacify people. What insisting that? Take their mosques as a journalist, because they expected tear gas to be fide, and so people there was the sense of Moraga rate that wasn't too much really going on at that point at points that were, there was a sense of tension, as police and the protests. This just stood ten meters away from each of the frontline of protests, police and riot gear but really not much happen. And it was not until around three thirty local time kid that clashes broke out. I should say that by that time I'd actually left the protest site and going back to the newsroom for the rest of the day. So I did not personally see the clashes but from what I've seen online from videos. I've been watching it really does not seem like protests as the ones starting any kind of confrontation with the police the police watch that this bus them. And the up aggravating, the crowd according to the New York Times it's estimated one in seven Hong Kong residents took part in Sunday's protests and in the New York Times on Monday, Hong Kong's Commissioner to the United States. Eddie Mack outlined his government's position writing the Hong Kong government's proposed amendments to extradition laws seek to enable us to affectively combat serious crimes by sealing the legal vacuum in our existing mechanism for surrendering fugitive offenders, they do not pinpoint any particular jurisdiction, nor do they target common citizens, or the legal rights and freedoms of individuals. If you respond to that, and the fact that the what the Chinese authorities have done in the past. For example, the abducting of Hong. Cong residents five Hong Kong booksellers, and two thousand fifteen. Yes. There is there really is. No trust of the Chinese government with the protesters, I've spoken to the one thing relate that they've all mentioned when they ask them about the Hong Kong government's, amendments and the Sherwin says that you'll freedoms won't be trampled upon and time and time, again, the protest, tell me, we don't trust the Chinese Chinese communist policy, the Chinese government's, it's all a bunch of lies and so any assurance that the freedom of speech, the freedom of assembly as they exist in ho now will not be trampled upon. I don't think those assurances hold any water and those booksellers. And the booksellers, of course, there is that president of Chinese government coming in and essentially launching, this global campaign, not just in Hong Kong elsewhere, of state-sponsored kidnapping. And so with the book sellers, I think people have looked at that, and seen seen how the Chinese government will behave without an extradition, Bill, legalizing and legitimizing behavior. And so with the Bill, I think what will see is just this legitimising of states kidnapping as some people have called it Mary before we conclude what to expect to happen, next will this amendment poss and expect the protests to continue. So that the bait over the Bill in the legislature has been postponed until next week. Unshowy was a protest. This will come out. Again, though, my gut feeling is that if the is the continue and a vote is taken. And if a vote was taken, it will very likely poss-, given that the legislature is stacked with pro-beijing pro China parties and politicians should it poss-, I'm show, the annual boy over the popular annual boil over and protests out, again, to stand for their freedoms, Mary Hoya. Wanna thank you for being with us. Hong Kong based writer, and reporter for the news outlet courts reported on the extradition bills covering the protests will continue, of course, to cover all this is democracy. Now, when we come back, a professor, and our Zona is met with the response of a hung jury they refuse to convict him. For aiding migrants and the brutal Sonoran desert. Stay with us. Charles. Jeez. Lonesome valley performed by Shushi. Oh, this is democracy now. I mean he good men with nursing share in Tucson, Arizona. A jury has refused to convict humanitarian activists Scott Warren, who faced up to twenty years in prison for providing water food, clean clothes, and beds to, to undocumented migrants crossing the Sonoran desert in southern Arizona. Warren's trial and a Tuesday in a mistrial after deadlocked. Jury was unable to deliver a verdict jers thought Warren was not guilty for thought he was guilty a status hearing is scheduled for July second. Prosecutors have declined to comment on whether they would seek a retrial against Warren. Warren, briefly spoke to supporters outside Tucson's federal courthouse, where the hung jury was declared since my arrest in January of two thousand eighteen. At least eight bodies were recovered from the audio corridor of the Zona desert. We know that's a minimum number. And that many more are out there and have not been found. The government's plan in the midst of this humanitarian crisis policies to target undocumented people refugees in their families. Prosecutions to criminalise humanitarian aid, kindness and solidarity. And now where I live the revelation that they will build an enormous inexpensive wall across vast stretch of southwestern Arizona's unbroken Sonoran desert. Today, it remains necessary as ever for local residents and humanitarian aid volunteers to stand in solidarity with migrants and refugees. And we must also stand for our families friends and neighbors, and the very land, it self most threatened by the militarization of our borderland communities. I've received enormous support from family friends. Lawyers. And my community. Thank you. To everyone. And I want to say that I love you all very, very much. If you can know take a moment now and get some rest. But the other men, arrested move me that day. Jose suckered a good day could've St. on via the waiver. Have not received the attention and outpouring of support that I have. I do not know how they are doing now, but I desperately hope that they are safe, Scott one is an activist with auto Samaritans and no more deaths, which for years has left water and food in the harsh Sonoran desert, where the temperature often reaches three digits during summer to help refugees, and migrants survived the deadly journey across the US border when Warren testified last week, he told yours his actions were motivated by three intentions relief of suffering respect for human dignity, and the right to self determination. While presenting the case against Warren, US attorney of right said, quote, he gave them food. He gave them water. He did a bad thing. This is not a case about deaths in the desert. Scott Warren was arrested January seventeenth two thousand eighteen just hours after no more deaths released, a report detailing US border patrol agents had intentionally. Destroyed more than three thousand gallons of water left out for migrants crossing the border. The group also published a video showing border agents dumping out jobs of water in the desert hours after the report was published thirties, raided the born no more deaths aid camp where they found two migrants with sought temporary refuge. We're joined right now by Ryan Devereaux staff reporter at the interceptors closely covered Scott, Warren's trial, and the criminalization of humanitarian aid volunteers for more than a year. It's great to have you back, Ryan. You've just flown back from Arizona covering this trial that took about two weeks talk about the significance of the verdict. It's a hung jury, eight four Scott Warren, eight four against grew. It was no come the I personally was expected is expected, this was going to go one way or the other guilty or not guilty. The hung jury, which was. Came after three days of deliberation was not something I think anybody was really expecting quite turn to a case. It's already taken a lot of turns the story is not over for Scott, Warren and his defense team. This is not necessarily a defeat but it's not a victory either. We don't yet know if the government is going to retry this case as you mentioned at the top of the show, there's a status hearing coming in July, so a lot of the questions surrounding this case, it's significance the potential precedent, it could set are still alive. And that precedent includes the possibility of, of a broadened crackdown on humanitarian aid work in the desert potential, targeting of folks, who have undocumented people in their lives. Potential targeting of mixed status families in the United States. There's a whole lot on the line with respect to this case, those questions are still very much live. And you said a Ryan that crucial question for the jury was about Scott warrants intention. Explain what that means and the significant. Of that, for the fact that there was a mistrial know so nineteen months after this arrest, we've seen a lot of evidence in this case hundreds of filings. The government brought many witnesses as dude Scott's defense team. But what all really boiled down to was intent. Did Scott Warren intend to shield these men from law enforcement knowing that he was in violation of the law. If so, the government argued that he was guilty. Scott warns attorneys said that yet intent is critical to this and it's got warns intent in this case was to provide humanitarian aid, and that's been his intent along working in the borderlands for the last four years. So jurors heard about how Scott behaved, and what he did in the day hours days after these two young men arrived at the barn. This humanitarian aid station in Arizona. Scott Warren tended to the migrants feet. They had blisters on their feet. One was. Reporting sore ribs. He took down notes about their medical conditions. He called a doctor who the organization, no more deaths works with has worked with for years and award winning physician. He reported the conditions that these young men were in. He was advised that they should say up there in that they should rehydrate and volunteers should keep an eye on them for the next few days. The government in its arguments in court over last week, said that the notes that Scott weren't took during this period part of a cover up. They took these dotes nowhere does Scott in order to be able to say that they were providing medical aid. When, in fact, they were just trying to help these men, enter the country. They argued that Scott's real intent is to thwart the border patrol every turn. Let's go to Scott and his own words talking about finding the remains of migrants who have died while crossing into the United States. This is a clip from the intercepts many documentary titled let them have water. We went from finding human remains every other month to finding five cents. Of human remains on, on a single trip valley. And going back, you know, week later and finding t more sets of remains in on a single day of searching, finding -ly, eight sets of remains bodies of people who had died and Jason areas of the bombing range could create to seduce this scale of this crisis of the crisis in the missing persons crisis, just blew wide open, so that Scott Warren and the government says this isn't about debts. But since two thousand one at least three thousand migrants have been found dead in the southern Arizona desert thousands of others have disappeared activists say the numbers are probably much higher talk about the government saying it's not about tests. And of course, Scott Lawrence argument and the name of his organization, no more deaths. The government began this trial by arguing that this is not a case about humanitarian aid. And in the desert, this is case about Scott ward. It's got were. Actions. But what happened in the days that followed is the government put on many, many arguments about humanitarian aid, and said that what no more deaths in groups like aren't doing is a political project. It's onto humanitarian project. That's false. They're, they're entire goal is humanitarian aid, the government alleged that. In fact, these groups are political actors with political goals. It's important to keep in mind when we're talking about all of this, that the deaths in the desert or the result of a policy, the begin some twenty five years ago into the Clinton administration. It's called prevention through deterrence and under this strategy. Migrant populations are funneled into the deadliest parts of the desert increasingly in the last several years, that's been the auto court or where Scott lives and works and beginning in twenty fourteen. Scott brought together sort of network of humanitarian aid groups in the area to really start focusing on this region, and what they uncovered was just a pattern of death and disappearance that really rivalled anything else in the desert. So they started going out dropping water and looking often for people who are reported missing or bodies that were reported, and they contributed to a historic increase in the number of. Means bodies found in that region during that particular time period as that happened. The government escalated its crackdown on their work. Well, I just wanna turn to Amnesty International America's director, who's called for warrants charges to be dropped in light of the mistrial. She said in a statement, quote the mistrial in the case of Dr Scott warrants sends a clear message that there are people in the USA who refused to acquiesce to the government's attempts to criminalize compassion and humanitarian aid, as long as the USA in Mexico, failed to protect the lives of migrants and asylum seekers between the two countries. Human rights defenders like Scott more on must be allowed to continue their necessary and life saving work on hampered by politically motivated, harassment and prosecution. So Ryan, what do you think happens? Now will we, we see if the government is going to retry this case, but we should know that Scott warns prosecution takes place. Against a backdrop of, of targeting humanitarian aid workers immigrant rights advocates across the border, just this year this year, we saw lawyers activists journalists in Tijuana, San Diego area who'd worked with members of the migrant caravan targeted by a sweeping intelligence gathering operation carried out by ice and law enforcement in that area. So this is not confined just to Scott's cases, part of the broader crackdown on immigrants that we've seen the Trump administration or endeavor. Thank you so much for being with us staff reporter at the intercept where coverage immigration enforcement. The drug were national security must recent article, which we will linked to democracy. Now dot org felony trial of no more deaths. Volunteer Scott, Warren ends and mistrial, and may publish bodies in the borderlands and extensive investigation into Scott warrants case when we come back outrageous mounting over the death of Laline Polanco a transgender effort, not next woman who was found dead in a cell. L at Rikers island on Friday. Stay with us. But. Yes, I wish. Two. By a narrow suit, featuring pale is this is democracy. Now, I made me Goodman with their outrage is mounting over the death of lean Polanco a transgender afro Latin Latin necks, woman who was found dead in a cell at Rikers island on Friday Palanca was arrested on misdemeanor charges and jail on Rikers in April when she was unable to post five hundred dollars bail nearly two months later, she was dead of family friends, and transgender rights activists are now demanding answers for the conditions that led to the twenty seven year old's death. The city says the cause of death has not yet been determined Palanca was held in a unit for transgender women while jailed at Rikers but a week before her death. She was transferred to so-called, restrictive, housing and arrangement. Polanco's lawyer says amounts to solitary confinement leans Jeff came at the beginning of pride month. And just one day after the New York police department apologized for the first time for its raid half. Century ago on the stonewall in a gay trends. Friendly bar in Manhattan's Greenwich. Village in June of sixty nine the end was the site of a by police raid that triggered uprising and help launch the modern day LGBTQ rights movement, hundreds gathered in New York City. Monday, man Justice for lean Palanca and demand. Rikers be shut down immediately democracy now is there in the streets, this video begins with transgender rights activists Cecilia, gentilly speaking fully square. Love your. You couldn't get out of here. If she be. Of New York City. Has been the city. What led to these circumstances? We need to us for. Answers and we need to change the criminal. It is crazy people are, and before, like me people like most of us can end up. Of Rikers island for big than we need. And Brown trans women are not protected that elite through this current administration. And in this month of June. There was no pride in knowing that the injustice of transgender women of color, and the stakes violence continued to be perpetuated, and the death. The fat sent of women fans and the woman continue to be leading epidemic in our community, someday trests rights are human rights. People are people, we only of the bakery. And they think we are in a war. Don't get it twisted. We have been in a war black and Brown. Trans people have been in the war since we were born and a world that continuously tells us, we shouldn't exist until they actually make it so that we don't exist. And so if you are invoking, the name of Marsa, or invoking, the name of Philip, or major, more storm may or any of these tanks arm movement. Amanda malign and so many others. If you're not. The cost of firma sex Verka. I know I can imagine what she was doing those. I myself amend team made fun of being human Jim to go Kip. From the medication window, but how about picking up my commissaries about going to visit my duck more fun to floor? Have my family and my stuff for jeopardy to those fishes things that the police kids, I can almost imagine how see stuff human being changed going to personal health for how many grievances were probably overlooked. How many times the boards have Burgis these of death or death here? I appreciate everyone. So in this face in guests, but we're all we when we are living in briefing. I think I think. I back to talk book. How does this to me? Fill in. That was have Gonzales with the transgender legal defense in educational fund. For more, we're joined now in studio by two guests Raquel. Willis is transgender activists and writer executive editor of out magazine, and you'll worth Heimer is an attorney representing the family of Laline Polanco. We welcome you both to democracy. Now joel. Let's begin with you what happened to lane. Why was she in Rikers? So there's still a lot. We're figuring out about what happened. She was arrested in April on misdemeanor charges. We believe that did not have bales. There was another warrant outstanding she would have just released. She said, one dollar bail, which is technical thing. But she would have been released this other warrant had been issued. That was from a human trafficking intervention court, and that was only five hundred dollars and she wouldn't be in jail under the new bail law, which is supposed to go in effect in New York state in twenty twenty but prosecutors are still seeking bail. How long had she spent in jail just because she couldn't raise the five hundred dollars from mid April until the day she died. Over two months, just under and. Can you talk about the impact of leans death? I mean, she's one, just in a in a series numerous deaths of black trans women killed either by civilians or by the state. So could you talk about the impact of this on the transgender community? Absolutely. I mean it's been particularly heavy year there have been ten. Trans Lynn reported murder this year. We know that there are always probably more that go unreported. And it is just really heavy because of the fiftieth anniversary of stonewall. Right. This is our pride month, and so while they're so much celebration and excitement around the strives that we have made as a community. These are sobering reminders of how much further we have to go. And so, I think about lay leans case and how even the discussion of the murders and violence that happens to black, and Brown trans bodies. They're such an eraser of. People who are incarcerated or people who are detained and in respecting their humanity and why they should still be here. So in the very first day of pride month even before what happened today. Leeann there Zona Medina a translates, Latin ex persons seeking asylum, who was who died in ice custody on June forest. And so all of this is happening while in the background, there's these celebrations ignoring these reality. And of course, this pride month back to lay lean at records island. Why was she in solitary confinement? I mean this so much reminds me of Sandra. Bland, right. Who couldn't raise the five hundred dollar? She needed to get out. We still don't know exactly why she was placed in restrictive housing in. And the punitive segregation unit the department of correction has been Stony with us to say the least in a transgender unit at Rikers she was to begin with, that was Rikers is one of the few jails that actually has a transgender unit, but then was transferred to the punitive segregation unit, which is solitary or minimal freedom while you're while you're incarcerated. And how did she die again? That's still being determined. We, we have suspicions, but I don't want to speculate too much she did have epilepsy. She had Caesar seizure condition. And we don't know how frequently the that she was being checked on. So but we're still waiting for the medical examiner to determine the cause of death, but I wanna turn to New York City mayor Bill de Blasio who's now of course running for president speaking about Lillian Pelotas death on New York, one he was asked why she was in custody for nearly two months for two misdemeanor charges. Unusual, I don't know. I need to get an answer on, why that would be obviously, we've been moving consistently to have alternatives to incarceration jail. Population is down over thirty percent in the last five years that's about to go down a whole lot more because thankfully Albany, acted and did some important reforms on bail, but there's more work to be done on that front on several levels. So I need to get the facts about this case. But, you know, most importantly, she's no longer with us, and we have to find out why in may may I promise to protect transgender New Yorkers dedicating a monument to legendary transgender activists. Marsha p Johnson and Sylvia, Rivera so river. Cal your response to what the mayor said and what the mayor has promised. Yes. I mean I think that it's great that we are honoring these figures. Right. But we forget the facts of their lives. Marsha, and Sylvia were women who were fighting for people who are incarcerated for people who have had very difficult experiences and interactions with law enforcement and the state. And so while it's great, we have these monuments, we have to continue this fight, and of course, Sylvia Rivera back fifty years ago at the stonewall and we want it to end with transgender actor and model. India, more store of the FX show. Pose speaking at the New York protest. Monday to demand. Justice for Laline Palanca. I wanna find noting. The report is trends women and, and people who've been murdered. Most of which there have been no arrests, you know, they're known they're known lease. And as we all know our. Our papers, our cases are at the bottom of the pile. Always. Has been through the Ray as twenty five year old, Mexican turns of coda. As. She went missing the night of may seventeen authorities later found her head severed in colour outside of town hall, and four. Decapitated body was later found industry of Mexico. What about what a doggone five she was twenty nine year old transmit who was killed in El Salvador after being deported from the United States. Martin thirty one to transmit of color was found shot dead than her vehicle, and a roadside ditch about eleven him since Sunday. Six January in Montgomery. Alabama. Ashanti comer and twenty-seven, transcend of color slain by gun violence. In maryland. Clarify Gado Twenty-one of color shot in the head on April. Fifteenth argument broke out between for mother and a suspect in Cleveland, Ohio, she was defending her mother from someone that stole from her Malaysia Brooklyn. Twenty three. Transcend color was found shot and killed after six forty. Saturday, eighteen and Dallas, Texas. Shooting comes comes after a little more than a month since viral video that we all saw of her being beaten and dragged cost street. And. Her own community. By her own brothers. Speaking. I don't know if there was a rally or a media code correspondent thing, but I speaking, she's publicly saying this time I can stand before you, whereas and other scenarios were at a memorial, and now that's where family. That's now when family saw her a few weeks after she said those words. Where she was last seen by family, my show can make a Washington forty years old transom of color and longtime transgender advocate was Sean again by gun violence, Paris. Cameron twenty was shot in Detroit Michigan on Saturday. Twenty five and may on memorial weekend. By gun violence. Shimao Lindsey twenty six of color was found in white rock lake Dallas, Texas at five forty five on Saturday. I jones. She was a second trends, murder dollars following Malaysia, just two weeks part. Body was discovered only a mile away from where booker's body was discovered. Chanelle scarlet Twenty-three trans men of color was shot and killed him. Lumberton North Carolina. Her body was found in a field. Jazz, Aline wear a black trim, was found dead and have Memphis apartment in March landing Vonk, oh, the most recently, slain trans woman of color of black Allman. I looked up. This one of the, you know, when you're a young person, you have the trans women and people around. You look to when you imagine where you wanna see yourself and your life, baleen was one of those girls from me, this people are deciding whether or not, we deserve human rights, that must end, we cannot lean on the understanding or empathy of SIS, hetero people to protect and fight for our basic human rights our freedom to exist and access employment shelter, education, safety, health care, or anything else that we need to thrive should not be at the mercy to people who do not share our experiences or let alone believe we don't deserve to live or thrive. We need our government to listen to us in regards to our needs not listened to his people in regards our needs. We are all worthy of safety and protection everywhere, including in our own homes with our own families, and shelters, own neighborhoods, and churches and schools, and jobs and hospitals and clinics, and communities and cities and country and world. We are worthy of legal aid liberty Justice resources, and we are worthy of length worthy of love, if the set of using our bodies voices an our defined Sapone sestina, suppressive administration and the people who endorse it, and religions that are fighting for the right to dispose us as a spiritual practice and police prison and political system that is giving the World Commission to dispose of us, the stoves and frightened do more than are mysteriously dead bodies in the custody of Rikers island and ice in the side of us being. Beaten and dragged down up and down the grab of stuff the streets of our streets, and dentists and beyond showed up and decapitated on the stairs of city all in Mexico. We will not back down and rest in peace. No more. The trends actor India, more speaking at a protest on Monday time magazine recently named her one of the world's one hundred most influencial people of two thousand nineteen. She also recently became the first trans woman on the cover of magazine as she spoke unring, lay lean Polanco your final comment, Rocco Willis. To invest and black and Brown trans leadership. So all of the initiatives that are led by us and fighting for us needs to be supported whether that's donating volunteering or just elevating the work that we're doing. We're account. Willis executive veteran out magazine attorney Joe worth. I'm thank you so much for joining us. I mean he Goodman with Nermeen Shay this is democracy now.

Hong Kong US government Scott Warren China President Trump Hong kong Bill de Blasio Dr Scott New York City reporter president Hong Kong attorney Mexico Arizona
A tribute to the greatest generation

PRI's The World

32:37 min | 1 year ago

A tribute to the greatest generation

"The world is supported by legalzoom. We're halfway through the year but it's never too late to get started on things you want to accomplish legalzoom can help you complete some of the things on your to do list with their friends and family discount. For more information visit legalzoom dot com. One more tribute to the greatest generation today on the world. I'm Marco werman, many of those who survived the allied invasion of Normandy. Don't want us to call them heroes. This is how one d veteran remembers what he and thousands of others set out to do seventy five years ago today, new job we had to do a we won't do it. I'm not let anybody down. They definitely did not let anybody down also today terror grips residents of Sudan's capital Khartoum, as armed militias roam the streets, so it's huge contingency of these armed men just walking around weaking half on a killing spree. Plus remember tetris the computer game was a Soviet export and it turns thirty five today that's all ahead on the world. I'm Marco werman. This is the world. Military planes flying, in a special missing man formation. Over the beaches of Normandy, France today in honor of soldiers who died on d day seventy five years ago, President Trump and dignitaries from the UK, France and Canada, among others, were there, the world's Orla Barry, followed all the day ceremonies for us. Most memorable, she says, where the hundreds of veterans who served and survived the invasion. This is probably the most polygons aspect of all of today's events is because you do sense that this is the last time that we hear devices of this generation, so there was one gentleman, Frank bough. He's ninety five years of age and he was a signalman with the Royal Navy. And he was speaking at the Commonwealth war graves ceremony in bio in France. And he said, there are so memories of the day, that he can never get out of his mind. By the member of that day is you're seeing our boys. We been talking to the minute before they were cut down with machine-gun fire. They fall into the water. Floating face down. We couldn't get them out. We couldn't help them. Yeah, carries it with him his whole life, Kazumi, people have talked about this, this kind of heroism that they had that leap that they took from the landing craft into the water. But listen to this chap. Arthur hampson. He's very matter of fact about what they did to me, your hero show, Mody who does something. He doesn't have to put in danger in order knew somebody else good. We were there. We knew what job we had to do. We wanted to do it, and not let anybody down it really struck me all of the clips that I've seen today, amazing, the way almost every vet insisted they are not heroes. It's their fallen comrades. I said, almost to a man who are the heroes. It was so moving. Donald Trump was also at Omaha beach, where the us servicemen who died were remembered right, e-e-exactly. He was there with Melania and mR Macron, the French president and his wife. They estimate around nine thousand four hundred seven. This man u s servicemen and so women actually are buried there. So President Trump, he paid tribute to them to some of those sitting on the stage alongside them and also to some of those who died on d day. GI's who boarded the landing craft that warning knew that they carried on their shoulders. Not just the pack of a soldier. But the fate of the world is kind of interesting to hear a Trump thinking about the fate of the whole world, as you mentioned earlier. The French president Emmanuel Macron, was also with Trump, I gather he had some kind of pointed words for the US president. It was interesting at D dates seen is one of these great symbols of transatlantic cooperation between the nations and during his speech Macron, he tanked the US troops for their courage. But he also told her about the loyalty between nations. And during his speech, he kept on turning and looking at Donald Trump. At one point, he was saying the United States of America's never gray Scher the when it shows its loyalty loyalty to the universal values of founding fathers, defended, leaving Don to say this is, you know, we should never cease to perpetuate the alliance of free peoples. This is what the victorious sides did when they created the United Nations and the North Atlantic Treaty organization. Logan is shown you twitted. Let's not ignore. And as we know Trump has often described NATO as obsolete he didn't respond juries during Fresno Macron's comments. He gave a kind of an awkward smile but, but he said, little more interesting moment to make that point, the world's Orla Barry. Thanks for wrapping this up for us. Really appreciate it. Thanks. Marco veterans who served during d day and are still with us there in their nineties now and as we just heard from Orla some of them attended the ceremonies today, despite their. Age reporter Jake sagana row met with one of the last surviving. D day veterans. On Omaha beach in Normandy alone piece of concrete juts out of the sand. It's known as raise rock named after the former US army medic Ray Lambert at ninety eight years old Ray, Lambert is a star on Omaha, beach, people want to shake the day, veterans hand, people like Eric Morrow from gooey, Maryland. One veteran to another thanks very much for your service and everything you, did you. Well, thank you so much. Thank you last year, the town above the beach, Colville, sir surveyor, which is home to the American cemetery. Put a plaque on the rock with Lambert's name and the names of his fellow medics who landed here on June sixth, nineteen forty four Lambert and his men used the concrete mound to shield wounded soldiers from German gunfire seventy five years ago during the onslaught of the d day landings, I know that they're being remembered, those guys are my age today, so they have many of them gone. Of course, the name to here permanently now we'll ever be. And it makes me feel good Lambert grew up in rural Alabama. He and his brother Bill signed up for the army in nineteen forty. They went through two landings before d day North Africa in nineteen forty two and Sicily the following year. Ray Lambert was wounded in both assaults and awarded the silver star for bravery, then the brothers faced the Omaha beach bloodbath. Together. He had two machine gun bullets on the ramp like HALE. And so we knew when they're out went down that we would be machines on bullets would come in kill some guy when I went off it both something with through my right elbow, shattered the elbow. And so I would not do water to get away from the sheen gun bullets. Ray made it to the beach, but he was even more exposed to German gunfire as he tried to treat wounded comrades, and it was nothing for them nothing to get them behind. So I was looking around and I happened to see this rock, and I told my man that we'd have to try to get those guys behind this rock, Ray was wounded, again, this time in the leg and later woke up next to his brother in a military hospital, even though they lived through three invasions together, Ray says he and his brother Bill didn't talk about the war much when it was over. I realized that if I didn't tell the stories about my man that no, they couldn't do it. And I felt my responsibility and obligation to them to try to talk to people until people about the war and what they did. Bill Lambert died in two thousand ten and Ray says this will be his last trip to Normandy. But before he goes home to North Carolina. He wants to have one more glass of Calva, does the region signature apple brandy Natalie, the cure view, killed me. Sure. Which one the number of locals here who remember the day landings are dwindling, too. Up the coast behind Juno beach, Marguerite, and Remmy Casteel, served glasses of Calva dose at their home and central bouncer, mayor. Marguerite was seventeen when the allies landed she'd lived under German occupation for four years when explosions in the distance woke her up. Her father told her to go back to bed. Cd, but around three in the morning, she says the noise became unbearable my father told us, we had to go the invasion had begun. The family took cover in a trench. They dug then in a stable with neighbors today at ninety two cast, you'll still get choked up when she talks about what she saw Juno beach just after combat ended connect Yankee. Bahaji. We stopped at the wall. She says there were Canadians. There were bodies lined up, there was one he, he didn't have a face anymore. You cannot forget that. Since that day casting says she doesn't like going to the beaches, even though she lives just steps away for the world. Jake's again, Rossetto central bouncer. Mayor normandy. Trevor hill is not a Normandy veteran, but he does have an incredible day story hill was eighteen years old at the time and working as a radio engineer for the BBC in London on June sixth, nineteen forty four he was handed a package that contained one of the greatest secrets of the war, a recording that announced the allied invasion hill told the BBC what he remembers about that day. I was coming off night shift and the message. I got was, oh, he'll go and get the news studio ready. And then go outside and wait on the balcony and a vehicle will be arriving with a recording. The vehicle arrived out. I was handed this package. The vehicle had written on each af F s forces radio service. So I took the package to the studio. I'm packed it. It was a seventy eight disc and I posted it on the tone. Tables, take level. And I just heard this voice say people in Europe. A landing was made this morning on the coast of France by troops of the allied expeditionary force. This landing is part of the concerted United Nations plan for the liberation of Europe, made in conjunction with our great Russian allies. I have this message for all of you. Although the initial assault may not have been made in your own country. The hour of your liberation is approaching, and then I was told that a BBC, unknown. So we're becoming in to announce the event hill recognize the voice on the record general. Dwight D Eisenhower supreme Allied Commander Europe. So hill. Knew this was something big. They were security people, and they came and told me I was not to speak to anybody. I wasn't allowed to ring. My mother and say my nightshift had been delayed, and I wouldn't be home for a while I wasn't allowed to speak to any other BBC colleague, or anybody else because I had heard d day announced by journalism. How nearly four hours before it happened finally, the BBC announcer arrived, and the broadcast could begin. He makes announcement that hair is general. Dwight St. is in how to members of resistance movement, whether led by nationals, or by outside leaders, I say. Follow the instructions you have received. To patriots, who are not members of organized resistance groups is aid continue, your passive resistance, but do not needlessly. Endanger, your lives wait until I give you the signal to Reisen strike the enemy when I heard the recording I saw while giving off to all the waiting. Thank goodness. Well, now going to retaliate wagon to take some action. It's not going to be all the Germans bombing England to help. You know, we can stop it after the broadcast, the secret was out to the world and hill could finally go home for the day as for the actual seventy eight rpm record hill tried to give it to a BBC librarian and the librarian on duty that night sit to me. Oh, thank you hill. But this doesn't happen to be a ABC recording. So I thought, oh well, if the BBC don't won't Tom, I'll take you home. So is in house announcement of d day was take. Can and put in my dad's attic, that disk state in the attic. For nearly a decade eventually the beep did take the recording into its library. I mean, how could they not it's been stored safely there ever since on this anniversary of d day? You're listening to the world. I'm Marco werman. This is the world Venezuela has been muddling through a political crisis for months. Some would say years, even we were stunned in January, when an opposition leader took him president nNcholas Maduro, the handpicked successor of the deceased Yugoslavia's and then last month. There was an attempted coup. Dozens of countries backed it in the Venezuelan military seemed to sign on here on the world. We covered the attempted coup every day, and we're glued to social media for updates, but the new struck one of our former producers, Ruxandra weedy, even deeper. Street battles broke out in Venezuela today. Responded to the call by the opposition to this is the moment of military truck. Rammed into a group of protesters. I think it was about five AM my phone kept buzzing next to my bed, and it was a friend of mine who had just been sent a video of national guard in Venezuela, stopping traffic and other major freeways. Since I realized that there was a coup underway. And in my heart just stopped, because my father, stole there, he still lives in us. I was born in Cuttack us in nineteen seventy six by the time I was three my parents divorced, and I was raised by my mom, but so my dad on the weekends and growing up. My dad was the, you know, the popular hippie was always going to parties and, and his friends at the time looked up to feel Castro in Cuba. Back in this year since the seventies you were either looking to move to the US bore. You want it to stay in Venezuela, and had this, like, train of socialism, that Cuba had established for the rest of the region. Needles and I grew up hearing speeches by gusto. Like, like, we might listen to Dr king today. You know, like we just would listen to that, on the BBC in Spanish, you know, for for leisure for entertainment. So this was something that I didn't question in those years. Then in nine hundred ninety my mom got a fellowship offer in the states, I was fourteen years old at the time. And we ended up staying in the US. I kept in touch with my dad, so we wrote each other, these long handwritten letters. But after about five years in the states we started talking to each other less and less. By ninety eight I was finishing college. And there were elections in sweater and charges. One. Yes. My dad transferred all his adoration for feeding through to charges seem, he had faith that he would fix the country. He would do away with an equality, but, you know, I was wary of how China this came from the military, and that he seemed to, to want to identify his enemies wherever he went. So I started to become dissolution pretty quickly. Meanwhile my father was going in the opposite direction and he was consumed by charges. And I found it difficult for him to relate in any way to my life was like you're in the US, he would call it the empire in this is what himself would use to refer to the United States and before long. We had very little to talk about. We found ourselves arguing about everything and around those years around the mid two thousands. We became strange in, we only really spoke around our birthdays, or holidays. Five years ago, I moved to Kito Ecuador, because I wanted to see how Chavez's revolution in its influence were playing out in the rest of South America. And while I was living in Ecuador with a young kid. My father's only grandkid. He reached out to me, one day he asked to meet her, and I remember one of the first things we did after we picked him up at the airport is we went to the supermarket and my father started to weep when we walked through the supermarket because he hadn't seen that much food in, in a couple of years, it was it was very intense you know, he'd lost a lot away. He was considerably older, and he was he was enamored with my daughter. So which is simply got back into our relationship where we'd left off. You know looking back on it. I, I don't really know how our why things got so bad between my dad and me. There was a politics, of course. But there are a lot of other issues like I felt abandoned by him. I was upset that he didn't do more to support me and my mom financially and emotionally in there was, this huge guilt, that I felt about having left Venezuela, but having become Americanized almost like betraying him in his principles. It's a Sieff the chain just the radical changes that went on in Venezuelan society, were so closely linked and time to the changes that went on in my life. My own coming of age my shift in relationship with my dad. It's, it's hard for me to blame of course. Chavis or the revolution for that. But it's definitely all tied together in my mind. In my consciousness. So he stays at on really argue at all with my father anymore. I see my role more as the person that wants to hear him out. He spends most of his days in his room, the sinning to state TV channel and RT. That's Russia today in Spanish, and they're just broadcasting mother speeches. That Gus through speeches spreading the message that the revolutionist still alive that the recent why there's food shortages is because of economic war that the US is waging against Venezuela, and these are often lies fabricated, by the regime, but as it turns out on the day of the attempted coup, my dad explained to me how he knew this was coming that been saying. So on the state TV channel, and he's confident that this will happen again. And you know, I have to say I found myself agreeing with him. I think he's right. Think this is going to happen again. And I just hope that he. He has to strength to live through this. And I hope I'll see him again. Ruxandra greedy reflecting on politics and family. She told her story to the world, Sarah Birnbaum and Ian costs. The music you heard there was an unsolvable of Latin American musicians, featuring Venezuelan pianist. Gabriella monteiro. I'm Marco werman coming up. We meet volunteer, saving lives in the desert. They drop food and water along routes travel by migrants crossing into the US from Mexico since the third of January thirty six people died in the desert. But for volunteers can be legal consequences. That's still ahead here on the world. I'm Marco werman you're with the world where co production of the BBC World Service, PRI, and w h here in Boston, the Arab spring came late to Sudan, and now it seems to have stalled democracy activists in Khartoum say they're still in shock on Monday, paramilitary forces cleared out their main protest camp. They beat demonstrators and killed more than one hundred people in response. The African Union today suspended, Sudan from the organization, the perpetrators of the violence are known as the rapid support forces or judge a weed. That is the same Alicia that brought violence and mayhem to the western Sudanese province of Darfur more than a decade ago now Sudanese authorities have all been shut down the internet. But earlier today, my colleague Carol hills, managed to reach Khartoum resident Dalia ab- dealt mo- name Adumim, told Carol that in recent days, the judge militia have taken control of parts of the capital. The roads are empty. We could see member. The J we'd roaming the streets in my neighborhood in my area. They were reports of huge clashes between protesters at Jeonju, we'd forces or the rapid deployment forces, describe the rapid support forces, the former John job when you saw them, what were they doing? Yeah, they're heavily heavily armed. Some of them look like they had rocket launchers and. We were not able to get clear phone line back to cartoon. But abdominal sent to several voice memos describing the militia, she seen on the streets of her neighborhood. The ones that move on foot. They carry whips and they carry sticks trenches these sticks. They're fitted with, like electrical pods. So when the hit you with it, you get electrocuted. These are state of the art weapons that this force this, militia of thugs is using and has been using under four and they're now turned, and they're using it on us in the capital Medicare tomb neighborhoods, according to mow name, look like a war zone. Blockades literally on every street where it's a main road, or it's a side street or neighborhood streak. And then you also see the buck marks from burning see the broken glass, which is from the molotovs that some protesters have used. Against joe. He'd Adummim says, democracy activists like her are not backing down there. Hardening their resolve more determined that we're not gonna let the slide that we will not allow anyone to hijack our revolution. Be third parties who have an interest in the regime stinking place. Be it. The military council. The has. No. That is obviously not interested in giving power no sharing power with the civilian government. So we're more determined than ever and we're going to push through. There's a civil disobedience plan massive disobedience pan starting from Sunday, hopefully that will cripple the government systems and the government entities and most likely will also go back to the tactics that we use when reversed went out protests in December, which is basically small pockets of protests coming out in the neighborhoods barricades galvanizing people to come back. And I think once the shock wears off will see a completely different scenario unfolding in front of our eyes. We're not giving up we've come to far to give up now and this is a revolution. This is our fights and all those who've died haven't I in vain tomorrow, we get the long view of Sudan, and its people, they are desperate, desperate that their story be heard by the world scholar. Eric Reeves says the attack this week on Sudan's pro democracy. Protesters is a bad sign for what could come next the rise of the judge a weed, aka the rapid support forces is creating a split in Sudan's military, there's tremendous disatisfaction, especially in the middle ranks the majors colonels lieutenants, which stand up to the rapid support forces, and they would have superior firepower that divide could lead sedan back into civil war, and another humanitarian crisis which could be bad news for the whole region. This is a pivotal country in northeastern Africa and it stretches. From the Mediterranean to the equator practically if there is civil warrants. Dan? There will be flood of Sudanese migrants to the European continent. It will be very bloody very nasty and could be quite protracted. The crisis in Sudan that conversation tomorrow here on the world. Scott Warren is a humanitarian aid, volunteer in Arizona. He's also a criminal in the eyes of prosecutors. Warren is on trial this week in Tucson for felony charges of transporting and harboring undocumented migrants. If convicted he could get up to twenty years in prison activists like Warren work throughout the southwestern desert leaving food and water for migrants crossing through the harsh conditions there reporter Claire Mullen has the story. We start early in the morning in a who AirAsia just north of Mexico with John or Laos Gan, Victor Garcia, they're preparing their backpacks for a hike deep into the Sonoran desert s-. Cans of beans, that have popped up lids. That we also take trail snacks, granola bars power bars. High-energy food that we can leave and it's nonperishable. That's our Laskey. He's been doing this for years Garcia than stuff's plastic jugs of water into his pack were total. It's a lot of weight. Autoweek feels much heavier after the by the end of the day. We then begin a trek into one of the deadliest stretches of the border. When people die out here, it's often because dehydration. January. In the area, thirty six human remains have been found thirty six people have died in the desert in of near and around of since the year, two thousand more than three thousand human remains of migrants crossing over have been found along the Zona Mexico border. It's around eighty degrees when we set off and it hits ninety five by noon, or Lasky works with a group called the Samaritans. It's one that Scott Warren works with to Warren, a thirty six year old geographer who's on trial in Tucson, the government is charging him with felonies for harboring and conspiring to transport to undocumented, people Warren says he was giving the medical attention and never intended to break the law volunteers like our Laos key are closely following Warren's trial. They continue to do their volunteer work, and they make sure not to get lost out in the desert themselves. Lost. What we're holding that Garmin GPS device. So we have marked way points. We know where we're going and we'll follow it a little blue dot to get there. We had to one of the water drops about a mile, in at one point, the search function on the GPS stops working. We're gone. Okay. So we navigate using our Laos skis knowledge of the nearby mountains, we're going tween those two peaks this way, great. The path takes straight into thicket. This is some intense bushwack ING. We push through find the trail and the first water. But there's a surprise draw. Those. Water disliked everything else. Or Orlovsky also notes left and with missing at the drop a lot of so here, there's a bucket pool snacks. Some clean socks along with gallons of water. Indicate there's only been a couple of people that have come by here, based on the usage. And there's with really high TV traffic around here, ATV traffic from border patrol. This is not a common anymore. Or Lasky says volunteers are trying to keep up with water demand along new routes. By noon. We're back in Ohio, beautiful day of the desert, or allows ski is only among the few people in all who spend their Saturday's like this. I head over to talk with Kenneth freeze in eighty nine year old military veteran who's lived here for twenty years. He's also following the Scott Warren trial freezing. Warren, used to be on the same community council and freeze doesn't agree with what the volunteers do in the desert. I don't care if the water to them probably need it probably give them water to if they needed. But. Underlying thing here is we're encouraging them when courage in the illegals to violate our laws freeze hopes that Warren's case will set an example for others. If he gets convicted and he asked to serve time that should be in the Senate if to the people here to obey the long so far humanitarian aid groups say they'll continue working in the desert. Whatever the trial's outcome, but some people in a who do worry about the chilling affect Jose custody. Oh, is from Ohio. Some people call him. The town's historian I in the desert when my playground he's eighty now but he used to take water out into the desert to live in the desert you get through. Learn at eight to help people, it's got were in loses his case custody. Oh, thinks people might be scared to help migrants. AB loses. I'd be afraid to share. With your like I said, that's not you Manitoba. It marry when it. Could a world. I'm Claire Mullen, a ho Arizona, the prosecution of Scott Warren for helping migrants in the US has echoes, as something similar in Europe, the refugee crisis there spiked in.

us Marco werman Normandy Sudan Ray Lambert BBC Scott Warren Venezuela President Trump Khartoum France Europe Orla Barry United Nations Frank bough Jake sagana Royal Navy president Omaha Lasky
Democracy Now! 2019-07-03 Wednesday

Democracy Now! Audio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-07-03 Wednesday

"Ooh we we are in this is democracy now not how'd you want should wear uniform for the united states in any agency best response for this posting brought this great shame to cross the border patrol department of homeland security customs and border protection is open an investigation into the posting of racist and zena phobic messages by current and former border patrol agent private facebook group will speak to pro bowl safety thompson who broke the story that's national outrage then to tucson arizona where federal prosecutors have decided to retry the humanitarian aid volunteer scott warren with no more debt for helping migrants why do you not know what the government has hope to accomplish here i do know put you back about this has been in will continue to be raising a public consciousness a greater awareness of the humanitarian crisis in the borderlands more volunteers who wants to stand in solidarity with migrants we'll hear scott warren in his own words and speak to one of his colleagues with the group no more debt all that and more coming up welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report i'm amy goodman a damning new report port and shocking photos has been released by the department of homeland security's internal watchdog it's adding to the mounting outcry over detention conditions for asylum seekers along d u s mexico border acting inspector general jennifer castello is urging dhs quote take immediate steps to alleviate dangerous overcrowding and prolonged detention of children and adults in the rio grande valley the report notes migrants are being held without sufficient food or access to medical care some children had not received a hot meal since being locked up and beg not to be returned to their cells inspectors observed over twenty five hundred children who had been held longer than the three days permitted under a key court settlement known as the flora's agreement photos accompanying the report show extreme overcrowding including people huddled in cells and standing room only conditions some held there for months some photos also show asylumseekers holding up signs worthy inspectors one of which reads help npr npr reports dhs is currently on the hunt for news sites across several southern states to continue to detain migrant children meanwhile lawmakers continue to make their own trips to immigrants jails with florida congress member frederica wilson leading the delegation to this day that included congress member john lewis to visit the homestead facility in florida less than an hour from the first democratic presidential primary debates last week in related news another other central american migrants has died and you ask custody after becoming sick while locked up but houston immigration trail thirty year old honduran nato's any alexis ball but almost taught us was detained at the end of may before being handed over to ice in june he died in a houston hospital sunday after being found on responsible in his detention so the cause of death remains undetermined done an autopsy is scheduled a federal judge in washington state has blocked the trump administration plan to lock up asylumseekers while they wait for the outcome of their cases the policy which was set to take effect this month would have denied asylum seekers bond hearings they feel you which brought the suit alongside other rights groups welcome the decision saying quote try as it may the government can't circumvent the constitution in an effort to deter and punish asylumseekers applying for protection this ruling will provide much needed relief for people being detained and cruel and inhumane conditions while going through the asylum process see sale you said in more immigration is npr's reporting the department of homeland security has sent out fine to a number of immigrants for quote failing to depart the uss previously agreed the fines in some cases are as high as a half a million dollars elizabeth taylor and attorney for one of the recipients so the dhs fine told npr administration is issuing the fines to increase pressure on immigrant communities and maybe laying the groundwork for further criminal penalties she said quote i laugh because there has to be someone some basement in dc thinking oh what else can i do to mess with immigrants what else can i do to hurt them she said earlier this week trump said previously announced immigration raids will begin after the upcoming july fourth weekend if congress fails to pass new restrictions on asylum seekers again the trump administration said immigration raids will begin after the july fourth weekend nationwide protests were held tuesday under the banner closes the camps calling on lawmakers to shutdown immigrant jail defund detention and deportation and reunite separated families this is a demonstrator in new york city has i want to make sure that people know that not all americans americans are we are a country of migrants immigrant and make sure you are history and welcome generations are coming to build our country so it'd be against the year new jersey senator twenty twenty democratic presidential candidate cory booker says if elected he will virtually eliminate immigrant detention through executive authority as he unveiled his immigration reform plan to stay senator booker's plan would phase out privately run immigrant prisons and stop criminalizing immigration he's also going to restore and expand daca and other protected status programs reverse trump zero tolerance family separation policy expand legal pathway to citizenship and put in place accountability mechanisms for ice and cbp other twenty twenty candidates have also said they would effectively do away with immigrant detention including former san antonio mayor in housing and urban development secretary who leon castro last week senator bernie sanders said his first executive actions would undo all of trump's anti immigrant policies the trump administration's dropped its effort to include a citizenship question on the twenty twenty census last week the supreme court ruled the question could not be added to next year's form saying the administration's justification for its inclusion inclusion appears to have been contrived trump had originally threatened to delay the constitutionally mandated census after the ruling but the justice department confirmed to his day that they've given the green light to start printing the forms they fill you in seventeen states filed a lawsuit to prevent the citizenship question from being added census officials estimated six point five million people would not respond to the census negatively impacting areas where large urge immigrant communities success the house ways and means committee has sued the treasury department and they i arrest over their refusal to handover precedent trump's tax returns democrats issued subpoenas for trump's financial record's kurds in may trump's legal counsel dumped the lawsuit presidential harassment and said they would fight it in court in libya and overnight airstrike killed at least forty people and injured at least eighty others at a migrant detention center near the capital tripoli the facility house mostly african migrants viewing back government of national accord is blaming the opposition libyan national army led by the renegade general lethal halftime violence around aaa has been mounting since starts forces launched and offensive to capture tripoli human rights groups say both sides may have committed war crimes by attacking heavily populated civilian areas in israel members of ethiopian community took to the streets to stay to protest racism and the police killing of teenagers solomon tech in high five on sunday major roads were blocked sixty people were arrested as police clashed with protesters but he's released police orange learning there are criminals inside the police force and the police leadership is unable to condemn the and it creates not only damaged but also deaths in california usa navy seal special operations chief edward gallagher has been acquitted of murder after a jury found him not guilty on all charges except for the least serious charge of taking a photo over the dead body of a captive teenage it's combating in iraq gallagher was accused of multiple war crimes including shooting to iraqi civilians and fatally stabbing the captive teenager in the neck the verdict came despite several of his fellow navy be seals testifying as witnesses to be alleged murder during the trial a navy seal medic testified he not gallagher was actually responsible for the killing of a teenager throwing the prosecution's case into disarray medics said he is fixated the victim as mercy killing after gallagher stabbed him the prosecutors say the claim was fabricated to protect gallagher gallagher is set to be sentenced today in faces up to four months behind bars though his lawyer says he will not return person since he's already spent more than four months and pretrial detention in arizona federal prosecutors announced tuesday they will retry humanitarian activists and no more deaths volunteer doctor scott warren after a jury refused convicting last month for providing water food clean closed in bed stuy to undocumented migrants crossing the seminar in desert prosecutors have however drop the conspiracy charge against warren prosecutors were pete their case against him in front of a jury in november if convicted doctor warren faces up to ten years behind bars this is scott warren responding to the news to stay in front of the federal courthouse in tucson i do not know what the government has hope to accomplish here i do know what effect of all this has been in will continue to be a racing in public consciousness greater awareness of the humanitarian syrian crisis in the borderlands more volunteers who wants to stand in solidarity with migrants local resident defending their resistance the border walls in the militarization of our communities water water is wizard will have more on this later in the broadcast with catherine gaffney of no more deaths a black patient was arrested outside in illinois hospital last month he is now speaking speaking out about his experience twenty four year old shaquille dukes and his partner and brother were arrested while they were taking a walk near the hospital were dukes was being treated for pneumonia this is despite the fact he was wearing a hospital gown and had an ivy drifting in his arm at the time as he pushed the poll walking next to it in a facebook post stoop said hospitals security guard call the police and accused of stealing be ivy equipment to resell on ebay do since filed a complaint unfair unbiased conduct by responding officers nike has withdrawn a new independence day themed airmax sneaker design design which reportedly next after calling capper nick raised concerns about the use of the betsy ross flag a symbol associated with the american revolution in an era of slavery the flag has since been used by white supremacist groups capper nick the former san francisco cisco forty niners quarterback who many believe was iced out of the nfl for taking the knee before games to protest police brutality was featured in a nike ad campaign last year in response to a nike polling the sneaker arizona's republican publican governor doug ducey cancelled a one million dollar grant for new factory well texas senator ted cruz tweeted nike quote only wants to sell sneakers to people who hate be american flag senate majority leader mitch mcconnell connell criticize nike saying he would place the first order for the sneakers if nike reverses it's decision time so reportedly at the ready for trump's fourth of july celebrations in washington dc despite city officials objecting to the parade because of concerns of physical damage to the mall due to the massive military hardware trump is also ordered a fly over by military aircraft including air force one republican operatives are reportedly handing out vip tickets republican donors as well as general admission entry to attend trump's plan speech at the lincoln memorial the washington post is reporting nearly two and a half million dollars from the national park service will be diverted to cover the cost of the fourth of july celebrations chubb became the first major insurance company in the u s to announce it will no longer provide coverage for coal companies chubs move this week came after mounting pressure from environmental groups and will extend its coverage bantu companies that produce more than thirty percent of their energy from coal marianne head of the sierra clubs beyond coal campaign applauded the move saying they insurance industry risks being on the hook for trillions of dollars in damages linked to climate change from rising seas sees two wildfires and storms insurers are well aware of that danger and also well aware that the markets in the public are turning away from coal which could leave them holding the bag foreign absolute indus obsolete industry she said last month what's the hottest june on record's marked by a recordbreaking heat wave across europe which saw temperatures soar as high as fifty degrees higher than normal and parts of france germany spain italy meanwhile back in the uss recordbreaking he has gripped alaska exacerbating some three hundred fifty different wildfires across the state in recent days and accelerating the melting glaciers end in london climate activists with extinction rebellion marched on five major oil companies these headquarters to stay to call for an end to drilling during london climate action week this is organizer lola parent london time as i mentioned we know more people would rather brainwashed some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot or the warren peace report i'm amy goodman and i'm one gonzales welcome to all of our listeners and viewers across the country and around the world you us customs and border protection has opened an investigation into the posting of racist and zena phobic messages by current and former border patrol agents on a private facebook group more the ninety five hundred people a part of the group which was exposed by pro pulled a gun on monday the group's facebook page is filled with a racist homophobic anti immigrant and massage in this stick content sent the migrants as well as some lawmakers and other high profile people one post contain they photo shopped image of congress member alexandria ocasio cortez being sexually assaulted by president trump in another threat members of the group made fun of video of a man trying to carry a child to a rapid a river in a plastic bag someone commented quote at least it's already in a trash bag unquote ass by reporter respond to her depiction in the facebook post host congress member okasha cortez said it was quote indicative of the culture she observed inside the migrant persian sanchez visited and says she did not feel safe around of the border patrol officers why why would not have any comment about about you and they groom i mean i think it's just a memory on mundane members of the new york congressional delegation came together to condemn the postings and the private facebook group this is congress member nydia velazquez but here is the most chilling part the people behind these folks are responsible for their well being their most vulnerable among us children pregnant women families that end during vesper conditions on this poll suggests they literally in the hands of people who who engage in violence racist phone lines behavior well some more we go to berkeley california where were joined by ac thompson he's the man who broke the story the propublica reporter who covers border patrol and policing on the southern border as well as hate crimes in racial extreme that's his new pieces headlined inside the secret border patrol facebook group where agents joke about migrant deaths and post sexist means ac welcome back to democracy now why don't you take us on the journey first how you were alerted to this group that has what more than ninety five hundred participants you know i think what's important to note is there are people within the border patrol and the broader cbp agency who don't like what's going on there they say look the culture has gotten toxic in his got and dangerous and there are people that were in that facebook group who said i wanna alert the media about this is what's going on is absolutely unconscionable interestingly a about seven thousand people have left the group since we first did are reporting and i think that says something that people realize this is not not a group they wanna be associated with and what what's happening there was absolutely incorrect but talk about exactly what you found in this group in this on facebook group where people people saying i'll tell you i've been reporting on law enforcement from within twenty years and i have never seen anything like this i spent time with corrupt cops with cops who went to prison and i i just have not seen people who would post means joking about sexual assault apparently celebrating sexual assault in i have not seen a people you know sort of posting these things were burning to the folks at they're supposed to interact with with the migrants as as essentially trash or subhuman a and like i say mental lot of backups this is way outside of the norms of normal behavior weather in the civilian world of the law enforcement world there were means about homophobia about mocking anderson cooper sexuality there were means a questioning whether a migrants who had died a train across the river between the united states and mexico were actually if that actually happened referring to them as floaters and saying maybe it was all a skiing concocted by the democrats and liberals i i mean the the levels of antipathy for women a fruit from migrants and just people in general very very high ac you noted a that cbp agents who have posted this kind of vitriol online in the past have also been a a found to have been involved in a not in violence or illegal activities against migrants could you talk about that as well no i mean i think to me one of the things that's interesting concerning right is that we know that a by v agencies own reporting they get quote unquote hundreds of allegations of excessive force every year we know that they a by their own reporting discipline a handful of be agents and officers accused in those allegations of excessive force we know that just recently in california to guatemalan teenage girls a settled eight suit width a b agency alleging that they were sexually groped by an agent in eight border patrol station in texas be agency paid out about a hundred and twenty five thousand dollars to settle that case suggesting that it was not a case they wanna just take the trial and what we know what i can tell you is it appears that the agent in question has not been disciplined and is still on the fours in further that they see me did not seem willing to disclose his name to the lawyers who were litigating that case now we're talking about cb p s a law federal law enforcement agency that has already bigger than than the fbi's the dna it's the largest federal law enforcement i mean agency it also has an extremely high rector of agents being arrested doesn't it yeah that's that's pretty stunning right so this is the the nation's largest law enforcement agency and when you combined a customs officers with border patrol troll agents you're talking about around forty thousand law enforcement agents much much bigger than any other law enforcement agencies in the country of what we know is that for years now about two hundred and fifty a employees cbp had been arrested every year and that's a really high number of the charges ranging from the minor traffic stuff to you know serious allegations of drug trafficking of human smuggling of domestic violence cetera we're gonna go to break and then come back to our discussion with ac thompson the reporter who broke the story of this private the secret ninety five hundred member facebook group where will will talk about some of these issues that they talk about 'em will talk about epithets they hurl his new pieces headlined inside the secret border patrol facebook group where agents joke about migrant deaths and post texas means stay with us know when rations i so shame been strong he will run into is running through my mind we don't know run at my running out of time stockton assembly i prayed that the sunshine started from the bottom that underlying by the late senator ron sometimes don't define the reno man they run it through my mind my magic don't believe me there are no longer can be labeled a real somewhere down the line strom but we found on coleraine overpaying up along the way up through the night the bond no one to russians are running refugee featuring greg reporter uncommon says democracy now i'm amy goodman with one gonzales on monday members of new york congressional delegation came together to condemn racist postings by current and former federal a border patrol agents in his private facebook group this is congresswoman yvette clark of brooklyn as a member of the committee on homeland security i am extremely appalled by what has been uncovered by propublica as eight facebook page that is gathering post by over nine thousand current and former cbp officers this has come to an end those individuals must be identified much either resign immediately or being removed from their pope's there is no excuse for that type of behavior amongst the officers that protect us as a nation that are responsible for giving shelter care to refugee i've heard a lot of language about who these people are born our southern border let's make it clear they are seeking refuge in the united states of america we send funding around the world do refugee camp in nation that award dorn end here we have our own our own border the most horrific detention of humankind in this generation radiation in the united states of america we cannot abide with this we will not abide with this as as my colleagues have set waiver from donald trump that he sees these refugees as an infestation they should let me say that they infestation that we are witnessing is within the department of homeland security is among those cbp agent who has determined that they are going to see these individuals as less than human end that they will challenge members of congress who are only doing their job in seeking out the truth about what is taking place along the border am bringing light to what must be done to recapture our humanity as a nation as so let me just say this i will not sleep i will not wink i will be focused like a laser on uprooting all those within the department of homeland security whether they are in customs and border protection or they are in ice those who would prey upon the senseless individuals women and children who is seeking refuge in our nation must be purged urged from our federal service so that we can recapture who we are as a nation which is a nation who is welcomed the refugee a nation that is what welcome immigrants above all nations that is great cause of an immigrant tradition that was brooklyn democratic congresswoman yvette clark speaking with members of the new york congressional delegation on tuesdays not monday still with us is ac see thompson propublica his new pieces titled inside the secret border patrol facebook group where agents joke about migrant deaths and post sexist maims a ac in terms of a some of these particular around for instance a congresswoman alexandria okasha cortez that was that was a fat that you found on this facebook post but you talk about that as well yeah you know there's a particular a sort vitriol directed at the congresswoman so there were pose a depicting her engaged in sexual activities with migrants in detention there were supposed it's been talked about a lot of her being sexually assaulted by the president there were posts about hurling burritos at her and congresswoman veronica escobar as they visited a detention facilities in clint texas recently and there were derogatory a slurs and used against her and other congresswoman and i think that's one of the key issues here is is sort of hyper male culture of you know basically toxic masculinity they use a cliche but it's going on at the agency on monday night congress member alexandria cossio cortez tweeted there are twenty thousand total customs and border patrol agents in u s ninety five hundred hundred almost half that number are in a racist sexually violent secret cbp facebook group they're threatening violence and members of congress how do you think they're treating caged children and families later i always say tweeted just left the first cbp facility i see why is seeping cbp officers were being so physically and sexually threatening towards me officers were keeping women in cells with no water and told them to drink out of the toilets and this was them on their good behavior in front of members of congress congress member and is alexandria cossio cortez said a ac thompson if you could take this further and talk about this group this private secret facebook group how people came to be a part of it and as you release one story after another i mean this has to say the least you've gotten to the trump administration our cbp says are launching an investigation among other things on a if you talk about how are people coming forward more and more to you yeah absolutely and i think that's an important thing to note there people with in border patrol with in cbp who think this is awful who say look we have a job to do it's a tough job a it's very very difficult but but we also have a need to behave decently and that's what law enforcement does is even under tough conditions they behave admirably and that's not happening right now so people are absolutely blowing the whistle and i encourage anyone else who wants to come forward word to reach out to me and i think there are people within this agency who just say look this is what's happening here is not acceptable and i think that's what you've seen width be inspector general for homeland security to which is part of the broader a vhs unbrella saying a the conditions were seeing in detention or inappropriate the discipline and misconduct a patterns as cb p are inappropriate and this is something that were going to a report on a ac we've seen in recent months exposures of other types of social media group sub by by law enforcement officers in philadelphia and other cities where there was rampant racism and a a a and homophobia and goes police departments have begun to take action but as you have written a d m v customs and border protections discipline system which was investigated by congress a few years ago during the obama administration is not substantially changed much has another gonna be new hearings a coming up next week a over the this latest reporter viewers but what about this whole situation of the discipline procedure seizure within the agency well i mean i think there have been major changes 'em in the last several years what we used to see was a high number of shootings often cross border shootings at mexican nationals and that has dropped dramatically because of new policies that were implemented during the obama administration so there have been big improvements there but i think what you see is that you see a fragmented disciplined system where a lot of issues are handled at the local local level by station supervisors and watch supervisors it goes on a some stuff as handle a bye see me peas internal affairs other cases are handled by dhs says inspector general other cases may end up being handled by b f b i and finally the department of justice a oh yeah also there's dhs civil rights office so when you have this many different sort of oversight body is i think sometimes what happens is you don't really have effective oversight but there's turf battles things fall between the cracks and there's no sort of unified affective disciplinary system i think that's what we're seeing in general that agency ac thompson you write in your piece and propublica in early two thousand eighteen federal investigators found a raft of disturbing and racist text messages sent by border patrol agents in southern arizona after searching the phone of matthew boeing an agent charged with running down a guatemalan migrants with a ford f one fifty pickup truck the tax which revealed in a court filing in federal court in tucson described migrants squats as wild beep beep being nurse and subhuman the messages included repeated discussions about burning the migrants prince up now that's from over a year ago and if you could talk about how you think these rebel at what has been going on over this time at the connection of c m of the gina phobic racist massaging this language with violence at and talk about what's coming of this do you think this is a system that should simply be reformed or abolished no i think what you've seen over recent decades at border patrol a in the broader cb p is there been issues there's been a troubled history there but i think if you look back to the bush administration george w bush you look back bama administration a the tone from the top wasn't very different than what you're getting now and i think what you get and the trump administration is eight very demagogue tone a very divisive tone and i think the dad is affecting thing the sort of actions on the ground by the frontline agents and officers at cb p and i think that's a huge part of the problem that we're seeing now i think that's how things have changed would you like to see some of the white house press corps hopefully i asked president trump about his reaction to these posts a specially a pulse of him sexually assaulting a congresswoman ocasio cortez i absolutely would and i heard a question asked him about this yesterday i believe and he seemed to think that it wasn't a particularly important thing from what i could tell so your piece this coming out at the same time that the department of homeland security's office the inspector general has come out with this damning report saying the situation as is eddie critical crisis level and you have this series of photographs that were released i'm not talking about a walking castro inside with the hispanic congressional delegation you know actually using it figuring out a way to get video out of what what's going on inside which was also so horrific but these are pictures taken by the department of homeland security itself will be office of inspector general that show and been grievous scandalous overcrowding on the children the people were putting up signs that say help and reminded me of hurricane katrina with people on the roof saying help on major the pictures from inside the department can you talk about the significance of this report coming out at the same time that your important as kind of out yeah i think the conditions that we've seen in a detention along the border absolutely horrifying right i think one of the things that's concerning about this is that we've seen these surges in 'em immigration across the border at different times this is not a new thing we went through this phenomenon a during the last administration so this is something that an agency that says well funded as cbp shouldn't be prepared for this something that it's something that we know is going to happen from time to time a on the border and so you could be prepared and couldn't be ready to deal with this in a much more humane way then stuffing people in cages by the hundreds we wanna turn to the head of the house judiciary committee new york congressman vern jerrold nadler who also spoke on to stay here in new york along with other members of the new york delegation yeah majors we have seen in the last few days from the detention centers in texas obviously discussing these conditions under which women and children are being held are disgusting and amount and nothing short of child abuse and degradation the fact that immigrants that migrants within the united states can be subjected to such conditions such tortured such deliberate torture is a symptom and the consequences of the culture of contempt start at the top by the president's when the president's reverse the human beings things as infestation as if they were rodents not human beings this sets the tone and sets the permission peter people to be brutal and to be dehumanizing all the people who are in those detention facilities migrants they all claim asylum some of them are entitled under our law to asylum some are not all are entitled to humanity to decent treatment to decent judicial adjudication and not to be tortured or regarded as refugees all the people administration who have done this were permitted are guilty of child abuse which is a crime we prosecute the people you agents it's on facebook who express such contemptuous and racist attitudes are not to be there they ought to be fired but again they're not entirely to blame because they're reflecting the racism from the white house they're affecting the racism right down the line we have to put a stop to this that was a congress member jerrold nadler of the chair of the house judiciary committee a ac thompson united states wouldn't keep murderers a or a person's of war in conditions like this yet they're keeping right in our government is keeping a people seeking asylum coming across the border a and seeking gain asylum in these conditions what do you think needs to be done a by the by congress when end by the american people all over this situation right now yeah i think you're exactly right we've seen one court case after another involving following a conventional prisons and say you you need to hold people inhumane conditions and i think that's really what you were going to expect from the public from policymakers is that you just simply cannot hold human beings beings in these sorts of absolutely awful deplorable conditions that that's not what america's about that's not what what we expect from a institutions the taxpayers fund is to keep people and these kinds of conditions i think that's i think that this current situation just simply cannot hold people will not put up with the ac before we move on i wanna ask you about another story in virginia james fields a self described neo nazi killed actress heather higher and anti hate rally in two thousand seventeen was sentenced friday to life in prison fields plowed his car into a crowd of anti racist protesters in charlottesville at the counter protest of the white supremacist unite the right rally following the rally hires killing precedent trump claimed they were fine people on both sides chasing you were in charlottesville in two thousand seventeen and did they award winning frontline documentary documenting hate can you talk about the significance of the sentencing of james field on and also the work you did identifying the ku klux klan white supremacists who were marching perhaps scarier than if they were marching under under white sheet says if they felt comfortable to march with their faces completely exposed and you steadfastly have identified a number of these people so the significance of the sentencing of fields and the work you did there and if you see connections to what you're doing right now a a exposing this private facebook group from nearly ten thousand border agents yeah i think i think the the field case is a really important case victory prosecutors scooters in some of these other cases that we've seen coming out of unite the right at coming out of the the white supremacist violence that year prosecutors have had mixed results some of these cases have been tossed out by judges and this is one of the ones that have been really a very successful prosecutors and i think it's a key key message being sent there i think the thing that i see that's really disturbing right is when you go inside the the white supremacist chats there is this massaging neither is this a almost in the santa fe there's this anger at everyone in this discussion of all these different groups of people as subhuman when you go inside the border patrol facebook group the secret facebook the group a lot of these guys maybe most of these people are chicanos a lot of mexican americans and yet there's also this sort of massage any an a beach humanizing sort of language and sort of a sense that a one group of people migrants rv other and they're so different from us that they can't really be human and i i see that definite definite parallels between the two different sorts of a group the the white supremacist groups and what they're talking about online and then these border patrol facebook groups and sort of what they're talking about online even though a lot of the people in the the border patrol group are not white well are you gonna be testifying before congress i dunno i think i hope not but will see an also did you have any evidence of cbp customs and border protection or other agencies agencies and less government knowing about this private this what you call secret facebook page yeah yeah i i called secret because that's what is labeled as on base book it's not visible the outsiders or members 'em explain that explain the difference between private in secret right right so this is a people ask me like how do i find the facebook group and the answer is you don't find it in less you been invited to join it and it is labeled on the front page as a secret secret group it is not visible the outsiders at all 'em i don't know that this has been reported to any of those many different oversight body is cbp before this 'em i have to think it probably was at some point and that'll be i think a key thing to ask a policy makers an agency officials like hey dude anyone tell you about this because there were a lot of people in it and seemed like somebody do have reported this in the past and if so what happened to that report did you act on it ac thompson we wanna thank you for being with us say see thompson propublica his new pace headlined inside the secret border patrol facebook group for agents agents joke about migrant deaths and post sexist means will link to it at democracy now dot org when we come back we go to tucson arizona where federal prosecutors have decided to retry humanitarian aid volunteer scott warren or trying to ensure that migrants get water get food get clothing as they make their way into this country stay with us i love my son's latest tom ball so man oh man i guess a binary them don't get too little league it's going no no not bad in a win again about thrown scary known about gig god knows what else can say they cool little fluffy body did these men in my legs so now we've got a big seeming lovely lease new imploded does seem like a game did not know quinn stop by feels you won the blues buddhist to ice by the celia you can go to their performance at democracy now are interviewing them that democracy now dot or it i'm amy goodman with one gonzales this is the warren peace report we turn out a tucson arizona where federal prosecutors said tuesday they will retry humanitarian active is scott warrant on two charges is related to aging migrants along the us mexico border if convicted he faces up to ten years in prison this comes just a few weeks after a jury refused to convince warren for providing water food clean closing beds to undocumented migrants crossing the northern desert in southern arizona state jurors found warren not guilty for said he was federal prosecutors will make their case against warren again an eight day jury trial in november they dropped a conspiracy charge against scott warrant isn't activists with us americans and no more deaths switches help refugees and migrants survived the deadly journey across the us border by leaving water and food and the harsh and are in desert where the temperature pitcher often reaches three digits during the summer months warren responded to tuesdays announcement by pledging that work to assist migrant population would continue he was speaking outside the federal courthouse in tucson ten troublesome my friends and family and loved ones but all of us all of you a we've done our best can we really should take a moment to celebrate that as we prepare for this feature why do you not know what the government has hope to accomplish here i do know what these facts of all this has been in will continue to be raising public consciousness a greater awareness of the humanitarian crisis in the borderlands more volunteers who wants to stand in solidarity with migrants local residents defending their resistance the border walls in the militarization truth asian communities water water in the desert at a time when most thank you for all your support and i love you all very very much that scott warren he's strong support from elected officials human rights defenders faith leaders across the world and a letter last week fifteen you at senators urged the department of justice to drop charges against and saying quote providing humanitarian aid should never be a crime we go now to tucson arizona to speak with catherine gaffney inactive us who volunteered with no more deaths per ten years she drops of water almost every day in the snoring desert in arizona catherine welcome back to democracy now we spoke with you alongside scott warren right as he was about to go into this trial on he was 'em eight of the twelve jurors found him not guilty so many people thought the government would stop yesterday just as the photos those from the department of homeland security were released by the office of the inspector general within dhs the horrific conditions in the migrants centers we get this word that scott the uss government the trump administration will retry scott on can you talk about the significance of this sure thank you amy it's really unconscionable that the department of justice would continue to prosecute doctor warren along these charges 'em as you mentioned the prosecuting attorney's anna right and they know walters failed to convince a jury sent doctor warrants a prison in june and the fact that under the direction of trump appointee michael bailey a dui attorney's office in arizona has decided to retry scott 'em dropping the conspiracy charge but still pursuing the two counts of harboring really shows extreme measures that they are attempting to go to to criminalize humanitarian relief in the context of not only really a national conversation around a humanitarian crisis on the border and the suppose it government response a you know seeking to bring humanitarian aid to the border 'em in you know in a moment where there's a lot of attention being paid to these abuses and where we know that people are continuing today crossing the desert concert i'm wondering also on tuesdays if you could talk about amnesty international report that came out saving live is not a crime and talking about being politically motivated legal harassment of a migrant rights defenders by the usa here's america's because the director of erica gore vada cross us she wrote quote the trump administration is targeting of human rights defenders discriminatory misuse of the criminal justice system says it on a slippery slope taught authoritarianism oh you're comments that's right so a amnesty is documented cases of targeted a prosecution surveillance 'em harassment of human rights defenders immigrant rights advocates really up and down the border from california texas 'em including in the auto area where a doctor warren an end his a humanitarian aid groups work and what we really see that as isn't escalation of a long standing 'em tactic of a china criminalize 'em basin migration and a really cause this a crisis of a death in disappearances along the border 'em there's the longstanding voters strategy has been prevention through deterrence which deliberately seeks to make the border crossing at a deadly experience and so what we've seen in the last two years is really an expansion of that to become also an attack on a those who would seek to respond to the crisis of humanitarian amnesty report includes a section on scott lawrence case saying if doctor warren were convicted in imprisoned on these absurd charges amnesty international would recognize him as a prisoner of conscience detained for his volunteer activities motivated by humanitarian principles and his religious beliefs on that was what amnesty said i wanna turn to scott warren talking about finding the remains of migrants who have died while crossing into the united states this is a clip from the intercepts mini documentary titled let them have water we went from finding man every other month to like finding five set of human remains a on a on a single trip hiking shooting rally rally a and then going back a week later and finding more sets of remains in then on a single day of searching finding lay basis remains and bodies the people who died an adjacent areas of the bombing range and on the base of create a so just this like scale of this crisis of the humanitarian crisis in the missing persons so that scott warren in intercepts let them have water couldn't help but notice it yesterday when the federal prosecutors came out just say that they were going to retry scott warren this time the same time the photos came out that i motivating people all over the country their protests all over the country and this is a message from the trump administration to say don't you dare do this because this guy is going trial once again in the fact that when scott warren was first arrested it was also just hours after no more deaths had released a video of the border agents taking water that you and others had put in the harsh and are in desert gallons and gallons of water and dumping that water so back then scott's arrest and right after the video comes out of the border agents dumping the water now v office of inspector general within the dhs releases all these horrific photos of the scandalous conditions inside the migrant jails and the federal prosecutors come out and try to make scott warren the story again say if you dare try and deal this this is what we're gonna do catherine that's right and you know it really is no surprise or secret 'em that border patrol conditions are inhumane and abusive as early as two thousand eleven eleven numerous put out a report culture of cruelty that documented overcrowding a denial of medical treatment and our food and water to migrants being held in border patrol custody so it's really not surprised and this is an agency that has shown that culture of cruelty t and abusive practices of not only under the trump administration but really for decades now 'em and you know scott a lives in auto lives in the same desert where actually the day after his trial tile ended the a girl car was found the six year old girl from india has died from heat exposure while her mother went out in search of water so he along with is not only other humanitarian aid volunteers but border residents are responding to a crisis in their backyards and scott did what anyone else would do when asked for help a by two people in distress which was he gave some food and water he made sure they had medical care and he didn't ask for their documentation before doing that catherine again catherine gaffney wanna thank you so much for being with us longtime activism volunteer with no more deaths that does it first show i'll be speaking july fourth in chicago at the hyatt regency mccormick place at seven thirty check our website at democracy now dot org nuts shang

united states arizona scott warren government facebook thompson tucson ten years million dollars four months twenty five thousand dollars one million dollar twenty four year thirty percent fifty degrees three digits
Democracy Now! 2019-09-02 Monday

Democracy Now! Audio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-09-02 Monday

"<music> from tucson arizona this is democracy. Now scott has does it feel to be coming out here to be part of water. Drop for the first time since your trial over a year. It's good to be back back out in the desert and having a presence at here again to be part of that i work that people are doing this against the law in these parts humanitarian aid is never a crime death-knell resistance on the u._s. Mexico border democracy now special we follow humanitarian activists scott warren lord and to the scenario desert arizona as he accompanies other no more disavowing tears leaving water and food for migrants making the treacherous joining warning north scott warren is currently facing a poten- years in prison for his humanitarian work in the desert where the bodies and bones of more than three thousand in people nearly all migrants have been found since two thousand one then a tour of the borderlands with tucson based artists and ceased sister creator of the projects where dreams died over the years. I pulled over everybody with the same uh-huh respect dignity so i wasn't very concerned with the names they were identified. Celebrate celebrate the coalition which and all that and more coming up welcome welcome to democracy now democracy now dot or the warrant piece report. I'm amy goodman today. We're broadcasting from tucson arizona. Just extender three months ago and unprecedented trial took place here amidst catastrophic immigration crisis at the border ongoing family separation separation and cruel and inhumane conditions that immigrant jails across the country the government put humanitarian activist scott warren on trial here in tucson his crime helping migrants who had arrived on the doorstep of a humanitarian shelter in a ho- arizona seeking help after repair lewis journey across the sonoran desert the government charge scott worn a longtime volunteer with humanitarian aid group no more deaths with three felony counts including conspiracy for providing food water and shelter to twenty three year old christiane peres via nova of el salvador and twenty year old jose sacramento die of honduras. All three men were arrested january seventeenth two thousand eighteen. If convicted on all charges warren faced twenty years in prison at the same time he another no more deaths volunteers also face separate misdemeanor charges for leaving water jugs and food for migrants on a national wildlife refuge the remote desert the trial here in tucson took eight days days warren and other no more deaths volunteers provided hours of testimony on desert conditions and the policies that push migrants deeper into the deadly region each year after hours of deliberation. The jury returned without a verdict eight of the twelve jurors found scott warren not guilty. The government will retry warren in november though they've dropped the conspiracy charges against him. We'll try him on two felony migrant harboring charges. If convicted scott warren faces up to ten years in prison as he awaits his next trial warren medicine the remote town town of arizona this weekend to show us firsthand the work he does with no more deaths in the treacherous narin desert just north of the u._s. Mexico sokaia border since two thousand one the remains of over three thousand migrants who died and southern arizona have been found. That's an average average of more than one hundred fifty dead a year but immigrant rights activists say the number may be closer to ten thousand sent. We join scott warren and other no more deaths volunteers for his first trip in a year as they made a water drop in the desert. We are in the center of town here. Just south of the plaza and we are at our newly opened <hes> humanitarian aid office. <hes> the office is really here to support. It's been a long tradition in this town in many other places in the borderlands <hes> of providing humanitarian aid water and food and things like that to people who are coming through our communities. So why don't we go into the office and i saw a mac there. Can you introduce yourself yeah. My name is page. Coach climb and media coordinator and i've been volunteering since two thousand thirteen. Can you tell us where we're going to go today. Okay absolutely so right now. We're in the auto aid office right here in the town of auto and we're gonna drive south out of town on and take a right on a road that starts darby well road but then turns into what is called the devil's highway and it continues all the way to yuma and it's pretty pretty well known road. There was a book written about it about some migrants who who died in that area but we're gonna follow the road south that's right here that book was the devil's highway by louise bachelor area and it was about a group of migrants that that actually died on the cabeza prieta national wildlife refuge so we'll be south of where that book took place so scott. Tell us where we're going. <hes> we're headed out into <hes> organ pipe cactus national monument and we're going to do a big loop and <hes> <hes> check on some water drop locations that we maintain out in the desert and water drought or <hes> water drops the places where we leave food and water and other humanitarian supplies for <hes> people who are walking to the desert and <hes> <hes> would otherwise is being without those things cook scott. Can you describe what's happening. We see boarder patrol <hes> van ahead. What is it <hes>. There's some border patrol activity in this area area which is not unusual <hes> definitely one of the areas of a lot of enforcement and areas that we've newark humanitarian aid work working so we're entering into the aller valley which is as big valley coming up here and that's also a very active area yeah so let's i h. Can you tell us what you're doing. Yes there's a rescue beacon right behind us and so we're just gonna leave a couple of gallons there so if anybody sees the beginning walks towards it they'll find some water what you re rescue okay so a rescue begin are these towers her made by border patrol and they have a button on them where if somebody goes goes up in pushes a border patrol will come and what they call a rescue but what is actually detaining them <hes> but the begins don't have have water at them so let me drive by them. We believe that if people see them they'll be able to get some water cheerleading water and and a couple of cans of beans so there's some food here as well rescue. Beacons are something that border patrol in all of the trials have really talked about as their efforts to save lives but they actually don't have any data showing how effective they are and we've actually the one time that they released data. It showed showed how many times the buttons were pushed and how many rescues there is often and in the sector rescue beacons were activated a couple thousand times and it resulted. I think four rescues news they <hes> this one. You can't really tell but some of them you can see there used to be a red cross on them on the sticker and the red cross actually told border patrol that they had to to remove that because bortles not humanitarian aid group that's associated with the red cross so as to have that kind of international symbol of help and it was removed <music> where an organ pipe cactus national monument and we're approaching the boundary with the cabeza pre at the national wildlife refuge and <hes> right on that boundary line between the the park and the refuge is <hes> what they call boundary camp which is a border patrol forward operating base. He's so attached to the <hes> border patrol station and they use this as a base in the wilderness here essentially actually to conduct patrols and this growl valley area. We've stopped here scott. Why why why aren't we going right into the refuge well. I can't set foot into the refuge right now and <hes> he mentioned amy. That's because of a misdemeanor charges is that i face <hes> that are related to the provision of humanitarian aid on the refuge and then i also face felony charges <hes> for the <hes> <hes> what the government calls harboring of migrants <hes> <hes> so we're here on the boundary will continue south through organ pipe and check on some water job locations in organ pipe cactus national monument but we won't actually go onto the supreme national wildlife refuge the government was forced forced to drop conspiracy charges against you for helping migrants but <hes> the felony charges helping them remain at shocked many because it was a hung jury eight of the jurors said they would have acquitted you but the government decided to move forward with this case so why do you persist. This is the first first time you've come out on the range. <hes> since your trial the first trial and yet you're here with your group delivering water. It's part live just regular work that we do out here to check on these water drops and just to be a presence and into witness what's happening out in the desert <hes> it's it's very remote here. <hes> <hes> and one of the things that we do is just being a presence out here in case we do run into people <hes> and to <hes> be witnessing presence as well is really important so being out here. <hes> is is is a good thing and <hes> <hes>. It's just something that <hes> <hes> those who live in our who and do this work <hes> really feel compelled to be this time of year especially as we drove here and we're right next to the <hes> border patrol forward operating base i mean it sounds like a war but <hes> so do the casualties no more deaths having encountered the disintegrating bodies of migrants the boons of migrants who had died much earlier not far from where standing right now your group <hes> <hes> that's right you mentioned the casualties here. <hes> both the the people who have have died <hes> migrants that <hes> i'm really have been forced out into these remote and rugged areas had for decades now as a result of <hes> prevention through deterrence the way that the border <hes> is enforced <hes> so there's a direct impact on people who have died people who've suffered out here people who have been disappeared appeared <hes> and then the ripple effects of of their families <hes> the trauma at that creates <hes> the traumatic experience needs of this <hes> is another way that <hes> it can feel like a conflict or like a war zone. I don't like the the war zone rhetoric that you typically hear politicians use because it's deployed to increase militarization and building of walls <hes> but it's appropriate when we think about the trauma that people have faced these areas in the trauma their families experienced and the pain so talk about this forward operating base of the border patrol who come out here stay for days in rotation <hes> actually this wasn't built during the trump ears but under president obama <hes> there've been different versions of a forward operating base on organ pipe cactus national monument for <hes> probably at least a decade or so but this one that you see here. It's very established dalgleish <hes> <hes> it's fairly recent probably within the last five to seven years <hes> it's built on <hes> <hes> organ organ pipe cactus national monument <hes> it's <hes> this is a military base built in a national park a military base built in a national park on <hes> he autumn land and territory native american territory on native american territory so the levels of dispossession are many here <hes> of the indigenous people <hes> have always lived here and this has always been there territory so it's layers upon on layers really of of dispossession and <hes> and pushing people off the land just as we got out of our car here just as we you know here. We are at organ pipe but we're not going onto cabeza prieta because that's not safe for you. A helicopter flew overhead significance of these helicopters who controls that claim those are helicopters u._s. customs and border patrol and they are out here looking for people and they fly really all all up and down this valley and through these mountains and in different areas <hes> and on the one hand they can come across people who <hes> want to get rescued skewed. They wanna get apprehended. People might set like a signal fire or something or be desperately trying to to signal <hes> <hes> because they've run out of water and they <hes> <hes> they want to be <hes> at that point <hes> you know <hes> they've come to and and and the the there are <hes> doing everything they can to get themselves rescued <hes> there's helicopters are also part of prevention through deterrence so they will also end up scattering groups of people <hes> they can chase groups of people further sort of disoriented folks <hes> and <hes> that's really the brutality of it is explained that the scattering i mean <hes> there's the famous book the devil's highway and if you can talk back then what happened and how that continues to today it's part of a larger <hes> enforcement horseman strategy of the border which is <hes> <hes> prevention through deterrence so to really increase hardships on people with the hopes that people will basically give themselves up so on the sort of biggest scale of the border that looks like building walls and fences in urban areas and pushing people out into the galley valley road in remote places like this where it's very difficult to cross on more micro levels that can be like. We're talking about with helicopter that might cause career. What does that mean that means seen group of people and flying close to them flying low to them <hes> <hes> and they scatter but what does it mean for them for the migrants for people who are scattered by that <hes> it can mean if you could quickly summarize is your actually facing <hes> you're involved in two separate trials right. Now that's right yeah. I have the <hes> facing misdemeanor charges. <hes> resulting from humanitarian aid work that we did particularly in the summer of two thousand seventeen <hes> providing water and food and doing search and rescue and recovery work on cabeza create the so the charges and facing with that include operating a motor vehicle in a wilderness area <hes> and <hes> abandonment of property and the other charges. I'm facing are from separate incident and that's those are the felony charges of harboring <hes> which resulted from a incident happened in january of twenty eighteen when i was arrested with <hes> two men from central america hosing don <hes> at a property and i'll ho called the barn and so they charged in christiaan with illegal entry and they charged me with harboring so the jury was hung jury on that that's right yeah the jury was hung jury in the first trial and then the government <hes> <hes> <hes> initially also charging with conspiracy and they drop the conspiracy charge and now <hes> they're just pursuing the two harboring charges by dragging out these two cases are they in fact whether you're acquitted or not in these two cases getting what they they want preventing you from speaking fully or going to all the places that you went to help migrants yeah. It's it's a good question. I don't know what their purposes <hes>. Frankly <hes> you would have to ask ask them. What what sort of the goal of all this is. It's really unclear i think but <hes> <hes> certainly you know i've i've been affected my life and my partner and my family and my friends and at the same time there's a lot of awareness and a lot of <hes> of people that want to help because of of <hes> because of the level of awareness around this as well so it's <hes> ironically had the effect of also <hes> <hes> bringing a lot of people here who want to do something to help. It clearly looks site. It's across the political spectrum about humanitarianism. I mean all of this happening against the backdrop of separated families of the children dying in border patrol custody one by one. I mean since you were i. I charge scores of migrants have died. What is the count from something like two thousand two now. Three thousand migrants have died. That's averaging <hes> what i two hundred fifty migrants here right and that number is four arizona for <hes> what we now <hes> border wide including south texas and california. It's much much larger and those are the numbers of people who have been found. Can you describe gripe this border patrol then to us that just passed <hes>. That's a pretty typical <hes> border patrol truck. That's been used <hes> here and there they're rigged up in that way to to carry um people they've apprehended detainees with that cages <hes> on the back i can see uh. I don't know how many people are but that's what they're for. Also at this forward operating base. We see a cage so explain what happens from cage to cage. That's right yeah. <hes> people will be apprehended in the field typically and then put into a truck like that or another vehicle and then they can can be brought here to this forward operating bates and <hes> there's a garage door enclosed fenced area <hes> where they can be offloaded and then put into the <hes> facility inside which is a detention facility and then from there <hes> they get taken to the border patrol station which is probably another <hes> one to two hours drive under roads to get back to the highway <hes> further process there and then from the border patrol station taking to the tucson sector headquarters so this forward operating base. Tell us how many border agents are here and how has it grown over time in all who <hes> stationed there something like four hundred five hundred agents <hes> that work out of there and <hes> it's grown significantly in the early nineteen nineties there was something nothing like two dozen agents at the border patrol station and that station has the capacity of up to nine hundred agents so that could be the number that could be there. I suppose <hes> it's grown significantly in the past couple of decades. So what do you plan to do from here. On in i mean you face a trial and you face this other cases. He says well <hes> unfortunately it's become somewhat normalized i think <hes> this litigation and sort of waiting for trials and and so <hes> <hes> we'll continue to wait and <hes> <hes> i'll do what i can and <hes> i'm being just held in carried by so many good people <hes> and so much support and <hes> <hes> so i'm extremely lucky to have that <hes> as i face <hes> a felony trial. I think i'm probably the most supported person that's ever been in a situation like this. We're joined right now by gina jackson whose with no more deaths gina talk about this terrain and what this means sounds for migrants sure <hes> so where we are in this desert. It's one of the hottest and driest parts of the country. I mean of the world and because of government policies like prevention to deterrence migrants who are crossing the border actually funneled into some of the deadliest parts of this rain <hes> where we are right now is kind of and emblematic of the mountain ranges in this area. These are the grammar mountains over here and then what we're standing is actually the valley. It's really flat and there's not much signs of any other humans civilization so to get lost in this area. There's not a lot of <hes> places to go for help. And where do people come over the border to get here so it varies a lot of people start at a town just south of luke vilson i._d. Crossings does the town in mexico in mexico yeah in sonora and some people leave from the town itself and some people are dropped off our walk some distance outside of the town from sunita which is pretty close to the u._s. Mexico border about forty miles north. There's a checkpoint and then there's a ton of our whole and another forty forty miles north. There's another checkpoint and that's the only paved road in the area so <hes> migrants leaving from are not just walking outside of the little a bit of border wall that is outside of the city centre and then pushes people deeper into the desert but then people also walking deeper into the desert to get around the checkpoint not just the first checkpoint but to check points. The second checkpoint is about eighty miles north of the us mexico border which makes this journey over one hundred miles and tell us where we are are south of right now in the significance of the kind of final mountain and the growl arrange where that is from here to where that peak is is continues to be cabeza prieta national wildlife refuge pass that peak starts the barry goldwater bombing range which is shared by the browns and the air force. Yes and it's an active bombing range and also <hes> proving grounds out there. This is named after the senator the former presidential candidate yes so past that peak in the distance which is the last really distinctive peak that we can see from here <hes> then begins the the bombing range which has no public access and which are humanitarian aid organizations have only gotten access to once in the many years of doing this work <hes> and when we get access to that area we found many human remains in just a couple of hours we had in the land use diction explain so they're in this area we record the human remains that are found. It's not a good indicator. The total human lives lost but just the human remains that are found which is limited because of our limited access to this area. This is the only public access road would until all the way up there on the other side of the mountains. That is the next public access road that you're even allowed on. We can hike in this area with permits from cabeza prieta in june in july twenty seventeen cabeza change their permits to add a clause that specifically said that leaving food water blankets medical care <hes> specific language to our work would now be in violation of the permit so it's put us on a place where to do our work. We need to violate a say wildlife refuge permit. The bombing range is completely closed to public access in one incident another search and rescue group <hes> <hes> got permission to be escorted onto the range to do a search and rescue with a bombing range escort and just a couple of hours. They found over ten human remains on on the bombing range. If you look at the maps of recorded human remains there are no recorded humaines anywhere on the bombing range which we know was obviously not true because has in the few hours. We've had access to that land. We found a dozen so it can be presumed that many many people have lost their lives on that land and <hes> we we can't recover their bodies or even like know just how great this humanitarian crisis is the journalist giancarlo spray alleges. There were mass graves under the gold order bombing range. Yeah i would agree with that. I mean just in this area. When we first started exploring along the west side of this range i mean days will go by. We'll find three four human remains just in one day after spending many many days out there hiking the loss of human life is immense and the number of people people in the u._s. and other places have disappeared family members and don't have any closure of knowing what happened to them is also massive but for where we are now in the garden valley this this is still south of the bombing range. So if there's that number of human remains here in this valley we can only imagine how many more people are dying forty miles further north gina jackson as we stood in the sonoran desert and southern arizona when we come back she page coach climb and scott warren go on a water the drop. It's scott's first time in more than a year. He faces in november retrial for helping migrants last year. Stay with us. They ask they make bond borders day. God the details all raise. They build a wall by architects. This is democracy now. I'm amy goodman broadcasting from tucson as we continue our journey into the sonoran desert cert- with humanitarian activist scott warren and no more deaths deep into the organ pipe cactus national monument just north of the u._s. Mexico border scott scott and two other volunteers gina jackson page coach climb hiked into the desert over the weekend to leave food and water for migrants scott. Has it feel to be coming out here to be part of water. Drop for the first time rain since your trial in over a year. It's good to be back <hes> in the desert and it's good to be having a presence at here again and to be part of that part of the work that people are doing. What are your plans right now. Where are we the end. What are you gonna do. We're an organ pipe and we're heading in to check on some water drop locations that are just up in these hills here okay so we're working in to check on those areas and how do you know about the presence of migrants in this area <hes> who spent several years now in these areas doing search and rescue search and recovery and doing water drops and so so we know that people are moving through these areas and <hes> they've been living through large numbers for a while take these mountainous areas oftentimes. There's trails that people <hes> and so it's easy to find those trails and sort of find evidence silence of where people were gone before and that's where we try to try to get humanitarian supplies to people. Have you found bodies or bones in these hills yep yeah. We have <hes> unfortunately <hes> where we're going in fact there's been several recovery's that we involved in searches and people who have died in this area. Can you describe this area yeah. We're walking through sure an area. That's <hes> from here. We're probably maybe fifteen miles north of the border as the crow flies and racking into these mountains on the west side of organ pipe cactus national monument which is he catch them land and territory and sonoran desert can be really difficult to walk through because does even these areas might look like they're flat. There's actually quite a bit of terrain and topography because there's these washes to oftentimes just a flat easy. Walk is like really strenuous because you're dropping down into these deep washes and then climbing back out and then going again and you're going going into wash and climbing back out again so they can. It can be really difficult through here. Can you say washes little gully goalie. Yeah it'll have water in it when it rains <hes> but most of the time it's right this is one way where we know where to drop water which is around these trails that are pretty distinct and are used by my parents what were they created by but people migrants just walking walking through here over time and establishing this past so as you drop make this water draft i mean we are standing here. It's it's over one hundred degree weather just walking for half an hour. It is so beyond pleading for migrants some of them walk for days and it can even be hotter than this. That's correct yeah days in this weather can't carry enough half water you know even if you're able to carry like four gallons of water he'll you go through that and so people are dependent on finding the that few water sources that do exist in this desert which sometimes you get to a watering hole and the water can be dirty or it can be dry so it's a it's a really really risky uh-huh louis water gallons we rate messages on them and just simple things for people to find partially so that folks folks know that it's not border patrol like putting out water. That's does a trap and sadistic. Kinda show a level of care and solidarity with people for making a really dangerous trip so we just like write little notes on them and then lied those for people to find. What are you going to write <hes>. I usually write kind of religious note so like vehicle enough where so they use or open camino which means go with the strength of god or may god bless your journey gene. Can you describe what you're writing on that one. I wrote anymore and moving go and see safeway and words of <hes> words strength i don't. I don't know we've asked some of our patients before what would feel good to read on the gallon or what would be like a nice message or what <hes> i don't know what makes the eh watterson more trustworthy and a lot of people have said like just stuff and a lot of people have said animal so junior year now laying out canned beans why beans so we have the candidate top top so that people can open them pretty easily easily and we want to put out things that have calories in them and also salt <hes> drinking water is not enough a lot of dehydration and electrolyte imbalance so <hes> <hes> you need like sodium in addition to water so we want to put out salty food or beans have calorie and as like starchy has sugars as well yeah just for some caloric intake in addition to the water and you're putting this in the shade yeah well so we want to protect the pop tops because you can't get in the beans can very easily if you can't get into it so a lot of times put them upside down so that birds won't pack shiny part and break the pop top and also if it rains we don't want water to collect in their little rust the pop top so we put those underneath here and then we just want the gallons to be in a shady area just to protect the plastic so it doesn't disintegrate into quality of the water but we'll come back and check on these drops within one week two week three weeks and then can can swap out if anything's gotten older if things are used we'll pack up the empty gallons and leave fresh ones is this against the law in these parts humanitarian aid has never crime it is a humanitarian imperative to trainees the death and suffering in this area and regardless of government agencies trying to prosecute humanitarian aid workers. We maintain humanitarian aid is never a crime as you watch the scott what your colleagues are doing from no more deaths. Do you get to describe this in the courtroom. I'm just noticing the energy of this moment and i think maybe because all of us are here and and hearing here my friends described the messages that the writing on the bottles it's a routine for us that we do this <hes> that <hes> even i forget like how how important and like aac how beautiful and and really kind of sacred it is <hes> for us and and it's it's an honor for us to be able to be out here and do this work. I think that was scott. Warren with no more deaths. It was his first time and more than a year accompanying a water drop in the desert. He faces the november retrial for helping migrants last year gum aw the sidewinders a tucson band recorded in nineteen eighty nine this this is democracy now. I'm amy goodman. We're continuing our special broadcast death and resistance on the us mexico border the bodies and bones ends of more than three thousand people nearly all migrants have been found since two thousand one in the treacherous nor in desert in arizona recent changes is to asylum proceedings under the trump administration have diverted more migrants to deadly portions of the u._s. Mexico border we turn now to the two son based artist pissed off and see so every week he drives and hikes to the exact locations in the desert where migrant remains have been found in places across there to honor honor their lives and make visible the death so often ignored the columbia born artists has built an installed over nine hundred crosses throughout throughout the desert as part of his ongoing project called where dreams die we recently spoke to him at altar valley in the desert where four immigrants were killed in a car accident as they fled from border patrol agents we spoke as we walked through series called the altar valley because we have the bubble cubria mountains in that direction and we have this year read the mountains in this direction the migrants <hes> use this area here to go from south north from mexico which is about forty miles this way and they use the electric it took polls as a navigational point <hes> they're not far from the payroll in case they get into they don't feel well and they come out to the road and hope that someone will pick them up and with the border patrol you know at one point you know that you cannot walk anymore on and that's it so this is one of those <hes> he's not as is heavily used as much anymore because <hes> to many border patrol and too many helicopters into many things here who you came in here. You saw some tires on the ground on the border patrol use those stars dragged him to to clear the road so they come back. Can you see any tracks. They know that migrants have come through here and so they started looking for them but now the migrants carry these <hes> woody's he's made out of pieces of rug pieces of carpet and the clear you're saying the border border patrol smoothies sandy paths or they can see their footprints and they were and so some of the migrants wear kind of carpenter just about all arkansas. Where were these bodies that have carpet under the bottom another and alaska. You're sorta sweeps the sweeper pretty much. What is this area the author the valley we are close to to sun <hes> the the idea. Is that the more money that you have to pay the quotas. The less you walk the less money you have the more you have to walk so <hes> if you have enough money they will do will to two sandwiches that road that we came on our road and they'll get picked up there the ideas that you'll get picked up after the checkpoint but if you don't have enough money to going to have to walk another hundred miles eighty miles to interesting eight which is the road that goes to san diego and you know the jurisdiction of the border patrol now is one hundred miles is not just the border. It's one hundred miles in into the u._s. So you have to walk at least one hundred miles to be out of juiced up patrol border patrol jurisdiction but then ice takes over you know so it's always a layer layers layers of of of people. You have to live in the shadows. What kind of cactus was your new to worry about. These are the trump jumping toyota's they jump at you and you do the field any kind of warmth and he you know they will attach to you. Talk about what that means for migrant well at night you will go right into one of those and you get hundreds of those things and you cannot remove them and then they get infected in two or three days. You're infected did so the infection <hes> debilitates your body and the lack of order and everything and then you the city for a back in under a tree going to take a break you know but you don't get up. That's how we find them. Suiting their under a tree rattlesnakes the rattlesnakes you know they're they're about seven seven species of rattlesnakes here in southern arizona and at night. They are very active and they bite you and that's the engine on you. Can't you know who's going to take the hospital you know it's you know you lose your leg. You know what you're sergey depending on the kind of sneakers so this happens. It's not only eh migrants in the desert but to be safe. They wanna start moving at night and that makes it very very dangerous. Just and you know in the old days they used to carry this regular gallons of water but now that would have reflects at night so they started painting them with paint black and houston shoe polish and then people in in mexico side of making them so now you by blackwater bottles do not reflect any late. However black doesn't reflect light so that water gets very very hot and so you're drinking. Water is one hundred thirty degrees so you don't drink as much because it doesn't taste right but you start dehydrating. That's why we have these groups here like samaritans and no more dads who walked trails putting out there and and looking for anybody that may need assistance in some way so these are the remnants of migration of the year that the shirt or claw yeah sure was likely i guess it was shirt you die here and you don't last very long because the animals will get a jew very quickly and in two weeks you disappear. The animals begin to grab their parts. You know the voters very well here. You just see they're nice and fat put the first crossing about six years ago but at the time i was not not very experienced with a g._p._s. an idea and realized that they were there with three other people at that location so once i started revisiting some of the sites and looking at maps and looking at my batter then then it came up to three people had died here so i came back not too long ago and put was to be crushes so now this this this side is complete so it's across for each one of them. They were one guy. I was seventeen years old homeless nineteen years old and young people. You shouldn't be dying at out at that age you too young. Where were they from. I think mexico mexico guatemala. I recall correctly. They used to come here. Look you know economic reasons. You know finding trying to find a life for themselves and for their family early but now the american dream is no longer a plan you know they are fleeing violence. They're fleeing for the lives. They're fleeing from all kinds of things and even climate change. You know if you're a subsistence farmer and you buy seeds and you put them in the ground and doesn't rain for one year. You know you'll get wiped out you know. So what do you do you head north tucson based artist over on sea so as we walked together together and the sonoran desert we then sat down in front of four of the more than nine hundred crosses his created to honor migrants who've died in the desert back. We are here at a location where for migrants were found dead some years back <hes> these migrants died on the same day died altogether here. They were trying to get away from the border patrol. They were in a van and the van just rolled over and <hes> tumbled and they were collected here with multiple injuries multiple heading juries and i learned of this site about six years ago when i started putting out here at that had the time when i saw the red dot i thought it was going to be just one person and i lifted that then and that's where you built your first cross. This is one of my early crisis. This is very early algal. This is right when i got started that that was one person you learned about and you talked about a red dot. Where did this red dot. Come from when when i first came to tucson and i took this training <hes> an orientation for samaritans and the first thing they do is they show you this map of southern arizona with thousands of red dots on it and you know and i guess when you're a visual art is sort of react to certain things and don't read that immediately caught my attention listen because this read that represented a location where someone lost his her life. You know who at the end of an american dream happened to someone and so this was the <hes> so i decided to go to this actual locations you know because the map he's a map is not the territory and the red that is an obstruction on a map but i want to come here with the people are collected year put in bags and taken to the mortgage and who was the first person that you built across for the red cross will <hes> i don't have the names of these people over the years. I put over nine hundred courses here and to me at the time they were. I don't wanna say generic but the i i i i went to treat everybody with the same you no respect and dignity so i wasn't very concerned with the name so whether they were identified or not i was just wanting to put the cross there to celebrate the honor to celebrate the courage of someone who came here looking for what you're looking for for fifty years ago that opportunity. How did you learn the story said lease for migrants well again. This is a database that is public but the database is limited. You get the name and the age asia and the place of oregon and that it was a in this case <hes> multiple injuries head injuries and trust injuries due to a a car accident and that's all i know describe how you came up with the idea india and who was the first person that you honored. I was looking for a way to mark locations where the american dream ended for someone and i was trying to avoid the cross because they had enough baggage already and i want to think of of of migration as universal thing that it happens all over the world and then want to use the christian symbol because he would limit emmett division of people you know when people saw this causes immediately what comes to mind on so i went to needed needed to be bigger than that so i was struggling with what to what how to mark this locations and try different things at the work but then and i said it pay more attention to the cross tonight i learned that the cross was used as a lesson east ferment of dead during the roman times the the the romans built his structures to kill people. They had them out there in the sun that anywhere until he died they want to you made it as painful as possible so people will see that you don't the roman empire. You know that you know that this is this is the price and this is actually what is happening here. You know people are dying because they don't have any water shade out in the sun until they died died. You always make an image or talk about these kind of icon. You have in the middle. That's different for every cross yes i i went to the crisis two bs unique as possible but to have something that they bring them together and i used used a red dot that i found on the map so i'm bringing the red dot into the desert where the actual tragedy took place the red dot of a migrant yeah the red dot that you see on the map you see your now under crosses so the crews are container to bring the red dot here. Can you talk about the pregnant woman who is making her way along the border here. In the sonoran desert i learned about that case of awhile ago and it was a baby who who was born by the side of the road and died by the side of the road and the fact that baby baby was born at the side of the road that made him un-american automatically because he was born in this country but he didn't have the opportunity to he died there and the more. We don't know what happens you got deported somewhere and when i saw that case cheeses have to make a special cross for this this baby all do i do. I need to do something with it and and i find it had gathered enough courage to go. Dan put the cross for this baby. It affected me big time. How could a baby died here you know and <hes> so i <hes> so i came up came on put across there and then <hes> i told people that are had put across for baby you know and then little by little you you know people started bringing toys and started writing poems and became a big shrine and everybody that came here. We'll have to step there. I we'll have a picture taken with the closet. Beqaa became the iconic symbol of of the strategy here but one day the cross disappear wiscon- and then everybody started calling me about well. The cross is no longer there we need. We need across because across it now now. We don't don't have anything to you know this was the symbol represented this whole thing so i went back and build another one so that that was a second generation across now is full of toys again you know and now there are people who maintain the area they pull the weeds and you know <unk> saavedra you also find bones in the desert i find bone said and dead bodies because i i woke areas areas that are so remote where migrants die because you know that's the way it is here in this desert talk about working with the pima county medical examiner how you find the link between the bones or the dead body in the desert and the family that has somehow how <hes> made it known that their loved one is gone. Sometimes i work with colibri center for human rights. They worked together with the office of the medical examiner. You know they they see me on television or they say they read an article about me so i got a call email from a from a family that they want me to put across and a couple of years ago. There was a family from peru. The the woman a woman from peru will disappear here and no one knew what happened to her and then one day a skull was found the cranium was found new took a couple of years to identify the cranium and they were finding were able to make the connection so d._n._a. Connected d._n._a. Connection so the family her two daughters her husband came and i put a cross for them and it was was magical moment you know. I don't think i don't happen in my in in my project. It's always an immediate you know it's always and and that was very very special. You know to be able to have the family there and meet putting a cross for her uh and but those are rare moments that you know i got an email recently for a woman who wants me to but of course for her father and i said well i'll do that. When i come back from from columbia. I'll do that and they asked me how much extra charge for this kind of service and i said no. I don't ask for money. You know this is this is what i do. This is my my work in the beginning when you know when i you know some of that sites from the early two thousand renew most of the names people people carried i._d.'s you know curry's hurt some kind of information and because they were found not too far from the roads you know but nowadays people do not carry any form of i._d. Because if you carry i._d. That exposes you to extortion from from organized crime. You know they can call your family and asked from one day. Kidnap kidnapper pretty much and what good is from guatemala from el salvador from one dudas. It doesn't do any good in fact in brand as you as a a semi legal person here. You know i say legal but does not. It's not a good word. You know trying to be somebody live. There's nothing illegal about that. Will you go on building these crosses for as long as i can you know the <hes>. The objective of the of the project has the has already been. You know the statement has been made. You know that there's there crosses how here in the desert the three thousand people have died and whole bunch missing but for me going out every tuesday he has become my my meditation my going to church my you know i'm i'm not i'm not a believer. I'm not a i don't follow any religion anything but but this gives me the opportunity to to connect with whatever spiritual thing it's happening here so this is my this is this has become buyer of my life tucson-based artists alvarado alvarez and see so he's created more than nine hundred crosses to honor migrants who died in the sonoran desert. He calls his project where dreams james die and that does it for today's show death in resistance on the u._s. Mexico border a democracy now special special thanks to maria tar cena <hes> libby rainy torino dora taos studio john hamilton and dennis moynahan. I mean good then. Thanks so much for joining us.

tucson arizona scott warren sonoran desert Mexico amy goodman scott scott cabeza prieta mexico gina jackson el salvador us columbia coordinator ho- arizona growl valley
Democracy Now! 2019-08-19 Monday

Democracy Now! Audio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-08-19 Monday

"<music> from tucson arizona this is democracy now now scott. Has it feel to be coming out here to be part of water trump for the first time since your trial and over a year it's good to be back out in the desert and just having a presence at here again to be part of that or the work that people are doing this against the law humanitarian-aid. It's never a crime then three months. After the government puts humanitarian activist scott born on trial here in arizona for providing aid to migrants in need we follow him and other volunteers on a water drop deep in the sonoran in desert where their group no more deaths regularly leaves water and food for people making the perilous journey north from the u._s. Mexico border scott dot warren's trial ended with a hung jury but the government will retry him in november. Meanwhile people are continuing to die here and the border lions at least three thousand people perished in arizona alone and the past two decades from nineteen ninety to nineteen ninety nine. There were an average of twelve remains of border-crossers brought to this office each year from two thousand and one through the present. The average is one hundred sixty four. What changed was u._s. Border policing strategies we'll we'll speak with robin reinecke co-founder of colibri center for human rights a nonprofit that identifies the remains of thousands of if migrants that have been found here in the sonoran desert all that and more coming up welcome to democracy now democracy now dot or the warren peace report. I made me goodman and afghanistan. A series of bomb attacks rocked restaurants and other public spaces today in the eastern city of jalalabad injuring at least sixty six people afghanistan is marking the hundredth anniversary of its independence today. Eh the attacks follow saturday's bloody suicide bombing at a wedding in kabul that killed sixty three people wounding around two hundred others. The attack was the deadliest this year in afghanistan. This is the groom from the wedding. I'm assads to one awhile nothing as i've lost. I hope i lost my brother. My friends who came to join my wedding party. The celebration of independent state does not matter to me anymore. I don't care whether the government is going to light up the city its independence night and it said to kid only to the rich people who celebrate it all those killed were laborers and poor people attending the ceremony rich people do not come to participate in poor people's ceremonies. The attack came as the u._s. And taliban are reportedly close to a peace deal after months. It's of talks between the two parties the afghan government however has not been a part of the negotiations afghanistan is due to hold elections next month in hong kong organizers say as many as one point seven million pro democracy protesters took to the streets sunday in the largest demonstration weeks protestors marched in the rain is the popular uprising which started eleven weeks ago showed no sign of slowing down despite chinese soldiers lining lining up on the border with hong kong and threats by local officials to jail protesters for life. No major incidents were reported after weeks of confrontations by police lease and organized gangs in the disputed region of kashmir at least two dozen people were injured and one man killed according to local reports as protest protests took place amidst an ongoing lockdown indian forces reportedly used tear-gas chili grenades and pellets dispersed the demonstrations which came almost two who weeks after india revoked the special status of the indian-controlled part of the muslim-majority region. This is a protester speaking out against the conditions in kashmir in the days of twenty four hours at which they ease the movement restriction for half an hour. I'm worried about my children and my family activists kavita krishnan who recently visited kashmir on a fact-finding mission said the region is under complete siege and even young children are being arrested as an act of intimidation pakistan has asked the u._n. Security council to intervene in the crisis. An iranian oil tanker seized by british authorities in gibraltar. Last month was released sunday. The a ship was released after travolta rejected a u._s. Request to keep detaining the ship which it says in breach sanctions because operated by iran's revolutionary guards art gibraltar said the sanctions however do not apply in the european union. Iran warned the u._s. against seizing the tanker departed from gibraltar. Israeli soldiers killed at least three palestinians in the gaza strip saturday night according to local officials. I'll just a reported. The men were believed to be militants but had acted independently according to a hamas source earlier on saturday israeli launched israel launched air raids on parts of the gaza strip prime minister benjamin netanyahu tanya who said sunday he was prepared to call a wide scale military operation in gaza back in the united states congress members ilhan omar and rashida to leave are set to hold a news conference to address the travel restrictions imposed on them by the israeli government last week. Israel barred to u._s. Congress members from entering during israel to travel to the occupied palestine after president trump took the unprecedented step of publicly urging israel to deny entry to the first two female muslim members of congress house speaker nancy pelosi blasted trump and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu for their quote weakness after the move in a statement to omar cold netanyahu's decision front while congress member to leave justified her decision not to make the the trip after she was granted a waiver to visit her grandmother on humanitarian grounds by posting a quote from anti-apartheid leader and nobel peace <unk> prize winner desmond tutu who said i am not interested in picking up crumbs of compassion thrown from the table of someone who considers himself my master are i want the full menu of rights to leave tweeted. Meanwhile two labs grandmother has spoken out since the news was announced. I don't make god ruined him. I was happy she was coming. I was excited that she was coming her grandmother to see her. The hashtag my palestinian city meaning my palestinian grandma trended on social media over the weekend as as users posted tributes to their grandmothers in palestine solidarity with congress member to lead hundreds of far-right protesters took to the streets of portland oregon saturday for what they have the end domestic terrorism rally. They were outnumbered however by counter protesters who gathered across the city kalisa escorted members of the proud boys patriot prayer and other right wing groups across one of portland's main bridges police arrested thirteen people throughout <unk> out the day and seized weapons but the day's events largely avoided the worst case scenario portland mayor ted wheeler said portland was prepared for one of the rallies organizers. I search joe biggs told reported the event was a success pointing to recognition by trump saying quote. Go look at president trump's twitter. He talked about portland said he's watching and tika. That's all we wanted. We wanted national attention and we got it. Mission success unquote earlier in the day trump tweeted major consideration is being given to naming and tif an organization of terror portland is being watched very closely. Hopefully the mayor will be able to properly do his job. The president tweeted this is a spokesperson from rose city on speaking at saturday's dueling rolling protests. We absolutely rejected the global. Terrorism anti-fascists are not domestic terrorists people who stand up our community and defend it from the people who want to you a number of republican politicians have called frontier for to be recognized as a terror organization republican congressional memo obtained by the tampa bay times site santita as violent group responsible for gun violence. Despite zero deaths being attributed to antifa the protesters the f._b._i. Found the majority of domestic terror in the united states is caused by white supremacists three possible possible. Mass shootings were thwarted in recent days. Ohio police arrested a white supremacists saturday after he posted a video appearing to threaten a jewish community center twenty year old james patrick reardon posted an instagram video last month showing man shooting a semiautomatic firearm arm as sirens blare and people scream the accompanying caption reads police identified the youngstown jewish family community shooter as local local white nationalist shamas reardon and tags the location of the jewish community center of youngstown the f._b._i. Raided his house friday seizing seizing semiautomatic weapons dozens of rounds of ammunition a gas mask and bulletproof armor. Meanwhile florida authorities arrested twenty five year old tristen. I and scott wicks friday after he sent text messages to an ex girlfriend saying he wanted to commit a mass shooting. One of the messages said quote. A school is a week target i._b. More likely to open fire on a large crowd of people from over three miles away. I'd wanna break a world record for longest august confirmed kill ever he said and in connecticut twenty two year old brandon walk show was arrested and found in possession of a cache of weapons and ammunition after a facebook post showed he may be planning a mass murderer gun control advocates rallied in cities nationwide this weekend can toco for congress to pass background checks on all gun sales and so called red flag legislation which allows family members to ask a judge to temporarily prevent and someone from owning a firearm if they pose a risk of committing violence there is a growing call for an automatic weapons ban a correctional actional officer in rhode island who last week drove his truck into a line of peaceful protesters calling for the release of asylum seekers has has resigned captain. Thomas woodworth rammed into a group of jewish activists with the never again action coalition sending two of them to the hospital hospital. Another three demonstrators were hospitalized after being pepper sprayed by correctional officers also on the scene at the four prophet wyant detention center enter the a._c._l._u. of rhode island called the attack quote an attempt to show the exercise of first amendment rights by hundreds of peaceful protesters unquote matt harvey spokesperson for never again action noted quote if this is what he's willing to do to a crowd of mostly white protesters in front of cameras just imagine what's happening inside that prison where no one's watching and the new york police department judge who recently recommended ended that daniel pantaleo be fired from the police force said pantaleo was untruthful and account of eric garner's death was implausible bowl and self-serving pantaleo killed unarmed african american eric garner in two thousand fourteen by using an illegal choke hold but was never ever convicted or even removed from the police force when questioned by investigators the officer denied using the prohibited move despite a viral rule video clearly showing that he did judge rosemary maldonado issued her findings in a legal opinion reported by the new york times the final final decision about pantaleo fate will be up to new york police commissioner james o'neill and is expected by the end of the month and those are some of the headlines insist democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report. I mean he couldn't today were broadcasting from tucson arizona. Just under three months ago and unprecedented trial took place here amidst a catastrophic immigration crisis at the border ongoing going family separation and cruel and inhumane conditions that immigrant jails across the country the government put humanitarian activist scott warren untraceable here in tucson his crime helping migrants would arrived on the doorstep of a humanitarian shelter in a ho- arizona seeking so help after a perilous journey across the sonoran desert the government short scott warren a longtime volunteer with the humanitarian aid group no more or deaths with three felony counts including conspiracy for providing food water and shelter to twenty-three-year-old christiane peres nuova of el el salvador and twenty year old jose godi of honduras. All three men were arrested january seventeen two thousand eighteen. If convicted on all charges warren faced twenty years in prison at the same time he another no more deaths volunteers also fe a separate misdemeanor charges for leaving water jugs and food for migrants on a national wildlife refuge in the remote desert the trial trial here in tucson took eight days warren another no more deaths volunteers provided hours of testimony on desert conditions and the policies sees the push migrants deeper into the deadly region each year after hours of deliberation. The jury returned without a verdict eight of the twelve jurors found scott warren not guilty. The government will now retry warren in november though they've dropped the conspiracy charge against him. We'll try him on two felony migrant harboring charges. If convicted scott warren faces up to ten years in prison as he awaits his next trial warren medicine the remote town of arizona this weekend to show us firsthand the work he does with no more deaths in the treacherous sonoran desert assert just north of the u._s. Mexico border since two thousand one the remains of over three thousand migrants who died in southern arizona persona have been found. That's an average of more than one hundred fifty dead a year but immigrant rights activists say the number may may be closer to ten thousand. We joined scott warren and other no more deaths volunteers for his first trip in a year as they made a water drop in the desert. We are <hes> in the center of town here. Just south of the plaza and we are at our newly opened a humanitarian aid office. <hes> the office is really here to support. It's been a long tradition in this town and many other places in the borderlands of providing humanitarian aid <hes> water and food and things like that to people who are coming through our communities so today today we're going to go into the desert with you and this is the first time you'll be doing this. Since the trial we'll go into the desert today. <hes> on a on a little tour and see some of the areas that people are walking through are migrating through and some of the areas that <hes> no more deaths in samaritans and various other humanitarian aid groups sir do their work in so why don't we go into the office and i saw a mac there. Can you introduce yourself yeah. My name is page. Korch climb and media coordinator and i've been volunteering since two thousand thirteen. Can you tell us where we're going to go today. Absolutely so right now we're in the aid office right here in the town of auto and we're gonna drive south out of town and take her right on a road that starts as darby well road but but then turns into what is called the doubles highway and it continues all the way to yuma and it's a pretty pretty well known road there was a book written about it about some migrants who you who died in that area but we're going to follow the road south here that book was the devil's highway by lose bertolli lereah and it was about a group of migrants that that actually died on the cabeza prieta national wildlife refuge so we'll be south south aware that book took place scott. Tell us where we're going. We're headed out into organ pipe hype cactus national monument and we're going to do a big loop and check on some water drop locations that we maintain out in the desert and in what trump or <hes> water drops are the places where we leave food and water and other humanitarian supplies for <hes> the people who are walking to the desert and <hes> <hes> would otherwise be without those things doc scott. Can you describe what's happening. We see a border patrol <hes> van up ahead. What is oh yeah we just <hes> there's some border patrol activity in this area which is not unusual <hes> this is definitely one of the areas of a lot lot of enforcement and areas that we york humanitarian aid work and so <hes> we're entering into the growlers lavallee which is as big valley coming up here and that's also a very active area so let's plus. H can you tell us what you're doing yeah so we're um. There's a rescue beacon read behind us and so we're just gonna leave a couple of gallons there so if anybody sees the weekend walks towards it they'll find some water rescue beacon so a rescue begin are these towers that are are made by border patrol and they have a button on them where if somebody goes up in pushes it <hes> border patrol come and what they call a rescue but but what is actually detaining them <hes> but the begins don't have water at them so let me drive by them. We believe that if people see them they'll be able to get some water cheerleading water and and just a couple of cans of beans so there's some food here as well rescue. Beacons are something that border patrol in all of the trials have really talked about as their efforts to save lives <hes> but they actually don't have any data showing how effective they are car and we've actually the one time that they released data. It showed how many times the buttons were pushed or how many rescues there is often and in the yuma sector <hes> rescue beacons were activated a couple thousand times and it resulted in. I think four rescues this one. You can't really tell but some of them you can see there used to be <hes> red cross on them like on the sticker and the red cross actually told border patrol that they had to remove that because boorda chose not humanitarian aid group. That's associated with the red cross so aides to have that kind of international symbol of help and it was removed. We're an organ pipe cactus national monument and we're approaching approaching the boundary with cabeza free at the national wildlife refuge and right on that boundary line between the the park and the refuge is <hes> <hes> what they called foundry camp which is a forward operating base so it's attached to the <hes> border patrol station and they use this as a base in the wilderness here essentially to conduct patrols and this growl valley ali harry. We've stopped here scott. Why why aren't we going right into the refuge well. I can't set foot into the refuge feud right now and <hes> it's mentioned amy that's because of a misdemeanor charges that i face <hes> that are related to the provision of humanitarian aid on the refuge huge and then i also face felony charges <hes> for the <hes> what the government calls harboring of migrants <hes> <hes> <hes> so we're here on the boundary will continue south through organ pipe and check on some water droplets nations <hes> in organ pipe cactus national monument limit but we won't actually go onto the supreme national wildlife refuge the government was forced to drop conspiracy charges against you for helping migrants but the felony charges of helping them remain at shocked many because it was a hung jury eight of the jurors said they would have acquitted you but the government decided it to move forward with this case. So why do you persist. This is the first time you've come out on the range. <hes> since you are trial the first trial and yet you're here with your group delivering water. It's part of just regular work that we do out here to check on these water drops and just to be a presence and to witness what's happening out in the desert. <hes> it's very remote out here. <hes> <hes> and one of the things that we do is is just being presence out here in case we do run into people <hes> and to <hes> be witnessing. The president says well is really important so being out here. <hes> is is a good thing and <hes> <hes>. It's just something that <hes> <hes> those of us who do this work. <hes> <hes> really feel compelled to be here this time of year especially as we drove drove here and we're right next to the border patrol forward operating base i mean it sounds like a war but so do the casualties. No more deaths having encountered the disintegrating bodies of migrants the bones of migrants who had died much earlier. You're not far from where standing right now your group <hes> that's right. You mentioned the casualties here. <hes> both with the people who have have died <hes> migrants that <hes> really have been forced out into these remote and rugged areas <hes> for decades now as a result of <hes> prevention through deterrence the way that the border <hes> is enforced <hes> so there's the direct impact on people who have died people who've suffered out here people who have been disappeared and then the ripple effects of of their families the trauma at that creates <hes> the traumatic experience of this <hes> is another way that <hes> it can feel like it conflict or like a war zone. I don't like the the war zone rhetoric that you typically hear politicians use because it's deployed to increase militarization and building of walls but it's appropriate when we think about the trauma that people have faced they crossed to these areas in the trauma their families experienced and the pain so talk about this forward operating base of the border patrol who come out here stay for days in rotation <hes> actually this wasn't built during the the trump ears but under president obama yeah <hes> there've been different versions of a forward operating base on organ pipe cactus national monument for <hes> probably at least a decade or so but this one that you see here very established on <hes> is fairly recent probably within the last five to seven years. Here's it's built on <hes> <hes> organ pipe cactus national monument <hes> it's <hes> this is a military base built in a national park a military base built in a national park on <hes> autumn land and territory native american territory art on native american territory so the levels of dispossession are many here of the indigenous people <hes> the have always lived here and this has always been there territory so it's layers upon layers really of of dispossession and and pushing people off the land just as we got out of our car here just as we you know here. We are at organ pipe but we're not going onto cabeza prieta because that's not safe for you. A helicopter flew overhead talk about the significance of these helicopters who controls does that claim. Those are <hes> helicopters u._s. customs and border patrol and they are out here looking for people <hes> and <hes> the fly really all up and down this valley and through these mountains and in different areas <hes> and on the one hand they can come across people who want to get rescued. They wanna get apprehended. People might set like a signal fire or something or desperately really trying to to signal <hes> <hes> because they've run out of water and they <hes> <hes> they want to be <hes> at that point. <hes> you know <hes> they've come to the end and and they they they are doing everything they can to get themselves rescued. <hes> and there's helicopters are also part of prevention through deterrence so they will also end up scattering groups of people <hes> they can chase groups of the people further sort of disorient folks <hes> and <hes> that's really the brutality of it is explained that the scattering i mean there's the famous book the devil's highway and if you can talk back then what happened then how that continues to today it's part of a larger sort of <hes> enforcement strategy of the border which is <hes> prevention through deterrence so so to really increase hardships on people with the hopes that people will basically give themselves up so on the sort of biggest scale of the border that looks like building walls and fences in urban areas and pushing people out into the grass valley inroad in remote places like this where it's very difficult to cross on more micro levels that can be like we're talking about with the helicopter that might cause acute scatter does that mean <hes> that means soon group of people and flying close to them flying low to them <hes> and they scatter but what does it mean for them for the migrants for people people who are scattered by that <hes> it can mean death. If you could quickly summarize you're actually facing <hes> you're involved in two separate break trials right now. That's right yeah. I have the facing misdemeanor charges. Resulting from humanitarian aid work that we did particularly in the summer of two thousand seventeen <hes> providing water and food and doing search and rescue and recovery work on cabeza create so the charges and facing with that include operating a motor vehicle in a wilderness area and abandonment of property and and the other charges. I'm facing are from separate incident and that's those are the felony charges of harboring <hes> which resulted from a incident happened in january of two thousand eighteen i mean when i was arrested with <hes> two men from central america housing theon <hes> at a property and i'll ho called the barn and so they charged jose in christiane with illegal entry and they charged me with harboring so the jury was hung jury on that that's right yeah. The jury was hung jury in the first trial and then the government <hes> <hes> initially it also charging with conspiracy and they dropped the conspiracy charge and now they're just <hes> pursuing the two harboring charges by dragging out these two cases are they in fact whether you're acquitted or not in these two cases getting what they want preventing you from speaking fully or going to all the places that you went to help migrants yeah. It's it's a good question. I don't know what their purposes <hes>. Frankly <hes> you would have to ask <music>. Ask them what what sort of the goal of all this is. It's really unclear i think but <hes> <hes> certainly so you know i i've been affected by my life my partner and my family and my friends and at the same time there's a lot of awareness and a lot of <hes> of people that want to help because of of <hes> because of the level of awareness around this as well so it's <hes> ironically had the effect of also <hes> <hes> bringing a lot of people here who want to do something to help. It clearly looks like it's across the political go spectrum about humanitarianism. I mean all of this happening against the backdrop of separated families of the children dying in boarder patrol custody one by one. I mean since you were i charge. Scores of migrants have died. What is the count from something like two thousand listen to now. Three thousand migrants have died. That's averaging <hes> what one hundred fifty migrants here right and that number is four arizona for <hes> <hes> what we now <hes> border wide including south texas and california. It's much much larger and those are numbers of people who have mm-hmm been found. Can you describe this border patrol then to us that just passed voiced <hes>. That's a pretty typical <hes> border patrol truck. That's been used <hes> here and there they're rigged up in that way to to carry <hes> the people about prohibited detainees so with that cages <hes> on the back you can see. I don't know how many people are gonna. That's four also at this forward operating base. We see a cage so explain what happens from cage to cage. That's right yeah. <hes> people will be entered in the field typically and then put into a truck like that or another vehicle and then they can be brought here to this forward operating base and <hes> there's a garage door <hes> enclosed fenced area <hes> where they can be offloaded and then put into the facility inside which is a detention facility and then from there <hes> they get taken to the <unk> station which is probably another one to two hours drive under roads to get back to the highway <hes> further process there and then from the border patrol station taken to the tucson sector headquarters so at this forward operating base tell us how many border order agents are here and how has it grown over time in the who <hes> stationed there something like four hundred five hundred agents <hes> that work out of there and <hes> it's grown significantly in the early nineteen nineties there was something like two dozen agents at the station and that station has the capacity pasadena of up to nine hundred agents so that could be the number that could be there. I suppose <hes> so it's grown significantly in the past couple of decades. So what do you plan to do from here. On in i mean you face trial and you face this other cases well yeah. Unfortunately it's become become somewhat normalized. I think <hes> this litigation and sort of waiting for trials and so <hes> <hes> we'll continue to wait and <hes> <hes> i'll do what i can and <hes> <hes> i'm being just held in carried by so many good people <hes> <hes> and so much support and <hes> <hes> so i'm extremely lucky <hes> to have that <hes> as i face <hes> a felony trial. I think i'm probably the most boarded person that's ever been in a situation like this. We're joined right now by gina jackson whose with no more deaths gina talk about this terrain and what this means for migrants sure so where we are in the sonoran desert. It's one of the hottest and driest parts of the country. I mean of the world and because of government policies like prevention to deterrence migrants who are crossing the border actually funneled into some some of the deadliest parts of this terrain where we are right now is kind of an emblematic of the mountain ranges in this area. These are the growl or mountains over here and then we'll first in news actually the valley. It's really flat and there's not much signs of any other humans civilization so to get lost in this area. There's not a lot of if <hes> places to go for help. And where do people come over the border to get here so it varies a lot of people start at a town on just south of louisville crossings does the town in mexico in mexico yeah in sonora and some people leave from the town itself and some people are dropped off our walk some distance outside of the town from sunita which is pretty close to the u._s. Mexico border about forty miles north. There's a checkpoint and then there's a ton of a hole and then another forty miles north. There's another checkpoint and that's the only paved road in the area so so <hes> migrants leaving from are not just walking outside of the little bit of border wall that is outside of the city centre and then pushes people deeper into the desert but then people also walking deeper into the desert to get around the checkpoint not just the first checkpoint but to checkpoints the second checkpoint is about eighty miles north of the us mexico border which makes us journey over one hundred miles and tell us where we are south of right now in the significance of the kind of final mountain the growl arrange where that is from here to where that peak is is continues to be cabeza prieta national wildlife refuge pass that peak nick starts the barry goldwater bombing range which is shared by the marines and the air force and it's an active bombing range and also <hes> proving grounds out there this is named after the senator former presidential candidate yes so past that peak in the distance which is the last really distinctive peak that we can see from here <hes> then begins the bombing range which has the public access and which are humanitarian aid organizations have only gotten access to once the many years of doing this work <hes> and when we did get access to that area we found many human remains in just a couple of hours we had in the land intersection explain so they're in this this area we record the human remains that are found. It's not a good indicator of the total human lives lost but just the human remains that are found which is limited limited because of our limited access to this area. This is the only public access road until all the way up there on the other side of the mountains. That is the next public access throw that you're even allowed on. We can hike in this area with permits from cabeza prieta in june in july twenty seventeen cabeza. Is it changing their permits to add a clause that specifically said that leaving food water blankets medical care specific language to our work would now be in violation of the permit permit so it's put us in a place where to do our work. We need to violate a wildlife refuge permit. The bombing range is completely closed to public access us in one incident another search and rescue group a got permission to be escorted onto the range to do a search and rescue with a <hes> bombing range escort and in just a couple of hours they found over ten human remains on the bombing range. If you look at the maps of recorded human remains there are no who recorded humaines anywhere on the bombing range which we know was obviously not true because in the few hours we've had access to that land we found dozen so it can be presumed zoomed. Many many people have lost their lives on that land and <hes> we can't recover their bodies or even like know just how great this meditating crisis is the journalist john carlos fray alleges. There are mass graves under the goldwater bombing range. Yeah i would agree with that. I mean just in this area. When when we first started exploring along the west side of this range i mean days will go by. We'll find three four human remains just in one day after spending many many days <unk> out there hiking the loss of human life is is immense and the number of people in the u._s. and in other places who disappeared family members and don't have any closure of knowing what happened to them is also massive but for where we are now in the garden valley. This is still south of the bombing range. So if there's that number of human remains here in this valley ali we can only imagine how many more people are dying forty miles further north sonoran desert. This is democracy now again gina jackson as we stood in the sonoran desert and southern arizona when we come back she page coach klein and scott warren go on a water drop. It's scott's first time in more than a year he he faces in november retrial for helping migrants last year. Stay with us uh-huh <music>. All how long do they make bond borders. They demand do sir. I came the they build a wall by architects. This is democracy now. I'm amy goodman broadcasting from tucson as we continue our journey into the sonoran desert with humanitarian activist scott warren and no more deaths deep into the organ pipe cactus national monument just north of the u._s. Mexico border scott and two other volunteers gina jackson and page korch rich climb hiked into the desert over the weekend to leave food and water for migrants scott. Has it feel to be coming out here to be part of a water. Drop for the first time since your trial in over a year. It's good to be back out in the desert and it's good to just be having presence at here again to be part of that part of the work that people are doing. What are your plans right now. Where are we what are you going to do. We're an organ pipe and we're heading in to check on some water drop locations that are just happen. He's hills here so we're we're hiking in to check on those areas and how do you know about the presence of migrants ness area we spent several years now aw in these areas doing search and rescue recovery <hes> and doing water drops and so we just know that people are moving through these areas and i've been living through in large numbers for a while also in these mountainous areas sometimes there's trails that people and so it's easy to find those trails and sort of find evidence of where people are gone before and that's where we try to. I tried to get humanitarian supplies people. Have you found bodies or bones and these holes yep yeah. We have unfortunately <hes> where we're going. In fact there's been several recovery's that we plan involved in searches and and and people who have died in this area. Can you describe this area. We're walking through sure <hes> an area. That's <hes> from here. We're probably maybe fifteen miles north of the border as the crow flies and riding into these mountains on the west side of organ pipe cactus national monument which is he bought the land and territory and and it's in desert can be really difficult to walk through because even these areas that might look like they're flat. There's actually quite a bit of terrain and topography because there's these washes to oftentimes seems like it could be even just a flat easy walk his like we're really strenuous because you're dropping down into the deep washes and then climbing back out again and you're going to wash and climbing back out again so it can it. It can be really difficult to hear. Can you say what a washes little golly golly yeah. It'll have water in it when it rains <hes> but most of at the time this is one way where we know where to draw water which is around these trails pretty distinct and are used by migrants. What were they created by people by migrants just walking through here overtime and establishing this path us so as you drop make this water draft i mean we are standing here. It's over one hundred degree weather just just working for half an hour. It is so beyond pleading for migrant. Some of them walked for days and it can even and be hotter than this. Yes that's correct. Yeah days in this weather can't carry enough water even if you're able to carry like four gallons of water you go through that and so people are dependent on finding few water sources that do exist in this desert which sometimes you get to a watering hole and the water can be quite dirty or it can be dry so it's a it's a really i'm really risky. We never really water gallons. We rate messages on them. Just simple things for people to find partially so that folks know that it's not border patrol like putting water. That's the trap and also just kind of show. A level of care and solidarity with people were making a really dangerous trip so we just like write little notes on them and then lied those people to find worrying right. I usually rate kind of religious note so like vehicle or katie leo's camino which means go with the strength of god or god bless your journey gene. Can you describe what you're writing on that bottle. I rode anymore and montiel and she's tip way and awards of an internet words strength. I don't know we've asked some of our patients at four would kill good to read on the gallon or what would be a nice message or what <hes> what makes the waterson more trustworthy and a lot of people plot said like religious stuff and a lot of you have said animal so junior now laying out canned beans why beans so we have the kansas top top so that people can open them pretty easily and we want to put out things that have calories reason them and also salt drinking water is not enough a lot of dehydration and electrolyte imbalance so you need like sodium an addition to water so we wanna put out salty food or beans have calorie and as like starchy and has sugar as well yeah just for some clerk intake in addition to the water order and you're putting this in the shade yeah well so we want to protect the pop tops because you can't get in the beans any can very easily if if you can't get into it so a lot of upside down so that birds won't peck at the shiny part and break the pop top and also it rains. We don't want water to collect in there because it'll rust the pop top yep so we put those underneath here and then we just want the gallons to be in a shady area just to protect the plastic so it doesn't disintegrate interpreted quality of the water but we'll come back and check on these drops within like one week two week three weeks and then can swap out if anything's gotten older if things are used we'll we'll pack up the empty gallons and leave fresh ones is this against the law in these parts humanitarian aid is never a crime and tom is a humanitarian imperative to try and ease the death and suffering in this area and regardless of government agencies trying to prosecute humanitarian aid workers. We maintain humanitarian aid has never crime as you watch the scott what your colleagues are doing from no more deaths. Do you get to describe this in the courtroom. <hes> and i'm just noticing the energy of this moment and i think because is all of us are here and and hearing here my friends described the messages that the writing on the bottles <hes> it's a routine routine for us that that we do this <hes> but <hes> even i forget like how how important and like how beautiful and and really kind of sacred it is <hes> for us and it's an honor for us to be able to be out here in and do this work. I think that was scott warren with no more deaths. It was his first time and more than a year accompanying a water drop in the desert. He faces the november retrial for helping migrants last year. When we come back we speak with robin reinecke mickey co-founder of colibri center for human rights. She identifies the remains of thousands of migrants have been found and the sonoran desert stay with us gum <music>. You crazy son by sidewinders banned from here in tucson. This is democracy now. Democracy now dot org the warranties report. I'm amy goodman. We are broadcasting from southern arizona. Since two thousand one. The bodies and bones of more than three thousand people have been found in the snarlin desert immigrant rights activists say the number of deaths could be alarmingly higher. We we end today. Show looking at how the culebra center for human rights here in tucson is working to identify the remains of the thousands of migrants who have already perished since two thousand thirteen colibri has received nearly four thousand reports from families in mexico central america and other regions searching for their loved ones who who disappeared while crossing the border in the past three years cola brands identified at least one hundred of them through meticulous forensic work and d._n._a. Data collection of migrants remains and family members who are live in two thousand eighteen colibri center launched the bring them back campaign initiative advocating for dignity and demanding justice for disappeared migrants and their families. This is felix gomez speaking about his brother. Pablo has seemed to gomez a native of guatemala whose body was found around after he attempted to cross the u._s. Mexico border into woman blew herself into gomez was my dear brother others. The last i knew of him was on sunday july twenty ninth two thousand. I was in eighteenth paycheck date that he decided to cross the border towns. We did find him but not the way we had wanted the d._a.'s that was to put on august tenth. We learned that the collaborate center had found his remains montecristo brother cross the border because in our country's relaxed so many things which makes us have to seek of the horizons three sons. My brother was a hard worker breath and really friendly personally and the and as for whether or not i have hope for the future of course course i do is put on. I hope that there will be better opportunities in our countries that people from countries have to risk their lives in the desert hazard and face the same fate as brother phoenix house into one felix alexa into gomez acceptable there would demand bring them back that was felix gomez speaking about his brother pablo sinto gomez a native kamala whose body was found after attempted to cross the u._s. Mexico border for more. We're joined by robin reinecke. The co founder of the colibri center for human rights research social scientists mantis the southwest center welcome to democracy now when he so the numbers are horrifying in the last less than twenty years. We're talking about the remains of the bones of some three thousand migrants found in the desert and southern arizona. Yes and those are the remains that have been found so we don't know how many had been yet to be discovered. We do know in addition to that. Three thousand thousands housands more remain missing so it clearly breeze database contains an additional three thousand names of people who are missing and how do you identify. How do you match up the families with their loved. Ones in the desert well. It's exceedingly difficult not only because of the desert environment but also because the families live remotely they face the various blockades due to vulnerability racism marginalization so really the desert is a horribly effective disappearing machine but beyond the sonoran desert where someone my stature could be skeletal within a matter of weeks families also face the problem that they tried to report law enforcement and they're turned away or they try to access the federal database and they're told you have to go to law enforcement and then they're referred to border patrol so the colibri center for human rights which i co-founded was founded locally in the space of the pima county office of the medical examiner to respond directly directly to family need to to recognize that the families needed to be received with respect and and honoring the fact fact that they're afraid that they're going through something very terrifying and that they have a human rights to justice and truth and information you work with the pima county medical look sean manure. Can you explain how that works. Yes the colibri center for human rights works very closely with the medical examiner's office in fact. The center was founded inside of that county government from an office which is something that we're very proud of. It's not only the activists and the nonprofit people who are responding humanely to those losing their lives on the border. It's also county officials so the pima county office of the medical examiner does a a beautiful scientifically rigorous job of examining the remains of examing meaning every single skeletal case found in the desert order lands the challenges that it's not their job to collect missing persons information and that's what cooley bree does so clearly focuses on the families we build trusting relationships with every single family missing someone searching for someone lost in that landscape deep. We collect all the physical information. When did they disappear what happened. How old were they. What were they carrying. What did she tell you. She was the nadu when she got there everything that we can we build a family profile and then we collect d._n._a. Groups like no more deaths often find bones or or a decomposing body. Does this help you in your work to as you linkup with families yes. The families are terrified. They're distraught distraught. They hate the idea that their loved one. Maybe deceased and languishing in a desert to be consumed by animals. If you can imagine thinking talking about your loved ones remains being left out to be consumed by animals would a horrifying thought that would be so no more deaths. <hes> <hes> has discovered a lot of remains have other groups like augie less <hes> and humane borders and many others and see so the artists. He's he's also discovered remains. We'll be broadcasting later this week. We just went out to desert with him to see where he plans his crosses. Can you talk about the the importance of this work and restoring dignity to people so often uncounted in life not to be uncounted indepth. Yes cooley bree. I've always felt i felt the spare in collecting these missing persons reports over the years to be honest with you and as i'm writing down the details and the names and the tattoos and everything that this family can remember about their their dear loved one is that were involved not only in trying to find truth for that family trying to find out what happened in the case of felix to his brother and we were able to successfully identify and give the family answers in some degree of closure but we're also involved in practice of witnessing with the family and recognizing that despite all of this horrifying rhetoric despite everything going on despite what ever their loved one went through the irreplaceable and they mattered grabbing radicchio in a thank you so much for being with us co founder of the colibri center for human rights special thanks to our democracy now team here in arizona buddy that if cena torino arena dura tamer studio john hamilton libby rainy and dennis moynahan and thanks also to arizona public media here in tucson democracy now is produced by mike burkina governor means shade karlo wills tammy warren off semi cough robbie karen honey masud training seurat tamera studio mike to fulfil and the gallon aguirre our engineers tune in throughout the week as we continue to bring you our series series <hes> death and resistance on the u._s. mexico border. I made me good thing in tucson arizona. Thanks so much for joining us.

sonoran desert tucson scott warren arizona mexico amy goodman colibri center president arizona cabeza prieta scott afghanistan portland united states gibraltar robin reinecke taliban kashmir
Democracy Now! 2019-05-29 Wednesday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:44 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-05-29 Wednesday

"I am Amy Goodman. If you're tuning into this podcast right now, you know that democracy, now is news. You can trust democracy now is independent, which means we're funded by you, not the oil, gas and coal companies when we cover climate change or the weapons manufacturers when we cover war and peace. Not the insurance industry when we cover healthcare. No, we're brought to you by viewers listeners readers like you committed to independent information right now. A generous supporter will double your donation to democracy. Now that means if you donate fifteen dollars, we get thirty dollars. Take advantage of this generous offer, and go to democracy now dot org to make your donation today. Thank you so much. From New York. This is democracy now. The courts don't step in, in Missouri. We are going to see for the first time since Roe v. Wade, a state that has had all of its abortion clinics, shut down and eliminated and that should be terrifying to all of us. And then there was none Missouri's only abortion clinic might be forced to close by Friday, effectively ending access to legal abortion, in the state, we'll speak with the ACLU as well as an abortion provider in neighboring, Illinois face just outside Saint Louis then we go to Arizona, where humanitarian volunteer with the group, no more deaths faces up to twenty years in prison for providing food water and aid to undocumented migrants. January twenty teen by more chill in charged with harboring in the fourth chill criminal complaint against me. They said that I was providing food, water beds, McQueen close to two. And so they charged me with. Scott. Warren goes on trial today. But will join us I all that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org. The warrant piece report, I made me then as states around the country ramp up their attacks on reproductive rights. The supreme court Tuesday declined to rule on an Indiana law that would bar abortions based on sex, race or disability of the fetus. The supreme court decision will keep in place, a lower court's injunction on the measure the supreme court, however, decided to allow Indiana so called fetal burial law to go into effect, which stipulates that abortion clinics must dispose fetal remains either through burial or cremation the measure was signed into law by then governor Mike Pence in two thousand sixteen in more reproductive rights news. The sole remaining women's health clinic that provides abortion, and Missouri says it could be shut down by Friday. Planned Parenthood, said it filed a lawsuit after Missouri's health department refused to renew it state license at Gioja scheduled to hear the case today. Day, if planned Parenthood's licensed to perform abortions is not renewed by Friday. Missouri would become the first state in the country without an abortion clinic since the nineteen Seventy-three landmark Ravi, Wade ruling will have more on this and other reproductive rights news after headlines. Meanwhile, net flicks is the first major studio to threaten a boycott of Georgia in the wake of its passage of a six week abortion ban earlier this month chief content officer, Ted Saranda said Tuesday, it would work with the ACO you to fight the law in court and would quote rethink net flicks entire investment in Georgia. If the law goes into effect, high profile filmmakers and production companies, including Kristen wig, David Simon, Mark do, plus Ron Howard killer films have said they will boycott Georgia a major hub for film and television production because of the new law. California Senator twenty twenty president. Hopeful Kamla Harris says if elected show require states trying to pass anti abortion measures that could violate Roe v way to get pre clearance through the federal government similar to the Voting Rights Act. This is Senator speaking to Lawrence O'Donnell during an MSNBC townhall Tuesday night, about her proposed reproductive Rights Act when elected I'm gonna put in place and require that states that have a history of passing legislation that is designed to prevent or limit women's access to reproductive health care that those laws have to come before my department of Justice for review and approval and until we determined that they are constitutional. They will not take affect a coalition of ill. GB T, Q, and reproductive rights groups are challenging a new Trump administration rule that would allow healthcare providers to decline. Abortions and other services for patients based on moral or legit beliefs. Ru lawyers argue the rule is unconstitutional, and intentionally confusing. A statement on behalf of the plaintiff says quote the rule is intentionally unworkable for healthcare facilities including hospitals and may result in these facilities doing away with reproductive and LGBTQ services, altogether to avoid losing government, funding, unquote, back at the supreme court justices decided not to hear a challenge to Pennsylvania, school districts policy allowing students to use bathrooms that correspond to their gender trends, and civil rights activists applauded the news, eight Stefan, oh, a transgender graduate of border town, high the school at the heart of the legal case issued the following response via the Hugh by the time, I graduated high school. I was using the boy's bathroom and participating on the boys cross country team. Team. I felt like I belonged and had the confidence I needed to continue with my education. I'm glad the supreme court is allowing schools like mine to continue. Supporting transgender students, he said and more supreme court news. Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell said Tuesday, he would move to confirm a President Trump appointed nominee to the supreme court, if a seat becomes vacant during next year's run up to the general elections in two thousand sixteen McConnell led a Republican effort to block President Obama's nominee Merrick garland to the supreme court following Justice, Antonin Scalia is death, arguing voter should decide whether a democratic or Republican president would fill the opening based on the results of the two thousand sixteen election. German Chancellor Angela Merkel said era must fight against the right wing ideology. That's on the rise in Europe and around the world in an interview with. C N, N's, Christiane Amanpour following the European. Elections, which saw some gains for nationalist parties miracle stress the importance of learning from Germany's own history days to this day, not a single synagogue to single daycare center for Jewish children to single school for Jewish children. That does not need to be gutted by German policemen. We have to face up indeed, to the spectacle of the past. We have to tell our young people what history has brought over us and others, and these horrors, why we offer democracy why we tried to bring about solutions. Why always have two selves in the other person's shoes on Saturday? Germany's antisemitism Commissioner advise Jews in the country to avoid wearing keep us or yarmulke 's and public because of the rise in antisemitism. German government figures show. Antisemitic crimes rose by almost twenty percent from two thousand seventeen to eighteen in Syria over twenty civilians were killed Tuesday as tax in the north western. Rebel stronghold of Aleve continued by government and Russian forces. Nine children were among the dead, according to the Britain based Syrian observatory for human rights, the United Nations is warning three million people and leave are caught in the crosshairs of the fighting and blasted the international community's lack of action in the face of the growing humanitarian crisis in Brazil, at least fifty five prisoners were killed as fights broke out across four prisons in the northwestern state of Amazon ass-, fifteen prisoners were found dead Sunday and forty on Monday, and what a thirty say were gang related riots. The deaths were caused by strangulation and stabbing leaders of the suspected gangs are being transferred to maximum security prisons, Brazil, as the third largest prison population in the world, according to a local human rights group, one of the prisons, where riots broke out with housing more than twice its prisoner. Capacity Brazilian president j or both Sinato who campaigned on law and order platform has said he would quote stuff. Prison cells with criminals. In more news, from Brazil nonprofit, environmental group is warning deforestation in the Amazon rainforest increased by twenty percent and just the last nine months. Experts say logging and land invasion, are to blame for much of the loss president both sonata when his environment minister have worked to open the Amazon even further to logging mining and agribusiness companies while violating the land rights of indigenous peoples earlier this month eight former environment ministers warned bull sonatas administration with systematically, destroying Brazil's environmental policies with one former minister saying Brazil was becoming an exterminator of the future. Malaysia will send up to three thousand tons of plastic waste back to the countries that came from an attempt to hold wealthier countries from dumping their use plastic under the guise of recycling Malaysia became the world's main dumping ground for plastic refuse after China banned import tation last year. The plastic smuggle unlicensed recycling plants from countries, including the United States, the UK, France, Canada and Australia, and it's causing environmental problems for surrounding communities. This is Malaysian minister of energy Yobe gin, sold the what the citizen of the UK believe that essential recycling is actually dumped in a country, Malaysia. Like any developing countries have a right to clean air, clean water, sustainable resources and clean environment to live in just like citizens of developed nation in the United States and nine. Eighteen billion dollar disaster relief Bill continues to stall in the house, as Republican congress member Thomas Massie objected to its passage Tuesday by demanding an official role. Call following a similar move last week by fellow Republican lawmaker chip ROY, the Bill passed handling in the Senate last week. But the objecting congress members cited the lack of border, whoa funding among other reasons for their opposition, the Bill would send relief funds to western states hit by walled fires. Midwestern states, dealing with flooding and hurricane ravaged areas in the southeastern Puerto Rico, as well as to farmers affected by natural disasters has majority leader, Steny Hoyer, said, Democrats will attempt to pass the Bill on a voice vote Thursday or failing that would pass the Bill after lawmakers return from their recess next week. Recent research shows e cigarettes, may pose an increased risk of heart attack. A new study in the journal of the American college of cardiology has found the sub. Abstinence used to flavour e cigarettes can threaten the survival and proper functioning of human cells. The study's author says the research refutes, the common perception of vaping as a safe alternative to smoking regular cigarettes the food, and Drug administration said last year. Vaping head increased nearly eighty percent among high school students and fifty percent among middle school students over the previous year. And in more public health news. The measles outbreak has now hit over half of US state, sixty new cases where I done to fight over the past week bringing the total to nine hundred forty cases and twenty six states. So far this year, New York has the highest number of new infections. According to the centers for disease control experts expect the number of cases to exceed the outbreak of nineteen ninety four in which nine hundred fifty eight cases where identified public health officials blame lower vaccination rates based on misinformation for current surge infected people. Meanwhile, main became the fourth. State, along with California Mississippi and West Virginia to end most non medical exemptions for childhood vaccines. And those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I mainly cookman on solace. Welcome to all of our listeners viewers across the country and around the world. This is not a drill. This is not a warning this is real and it's a public health crisis. Those were the words of Planned Parenthood presently on a win Tuesday. When news broke that Missouri's only abortion clinic might be forced to close by the end of this week, effectively ending access to legal abortion, in the state as Republican legislators across the country, attack, reproductive rights with a wave of antiabortion bills. This threat is coming from the state of Missouri, it self Planned Parenthood says that Missouri's health department is threatening not to renew its licence over a series of when reasonable demands, including interviewing seven of the clinics doctor's doctor, Colleen, mcnichols and abortion provider at the clinic told reporters, quote this harassment and attempted intimidation of doctors at the highest levels of government. Missouri is one of six states in the country with just one abortion clinic left, the others are Kentucky, Mississippi North Dakota south. Dakota and West Virginia. If Missouri fails to renew the license by may thirty first, it will become the first state without any abortion services since Roe v. Wade recognized constitutional right to abortion in nineteen Seventy-three. Planned Parenthood has filed a lawsuit to stop the clinic's closure a hearing scheduled for this afternoon in Saint Louis. This comes less than a week after Missouri's Republican governor Mike Parsons signed a law banning abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy with no exceptions in cases of rape, or incest. The law will trigger a total ban. If Roe v Wade is overturned the same day Planned Parenthood announced the threats to its less clinic and Missouri on Tuesday. The supreme court declined to take up provisions of Indiana law that bars abortions based on sex race or disability. The fetus decision keeps in place, a lower court injunction on the measure. The supreme court, however, decided to allow Indiana so called fetal burial law to go into. Effect, which stipulates abortion clinics must dispose of fetal remains either through burial or cremation the measure was signed into law by then governor. Now, vice President Mike Pence and two thousand sixteen. Well, for more, we're joined by two guests and Saint Louis Missouri. We go to Dr Aaron king OBGYN, and executive director of the hope clinic for women in granite city, Illinois. Which is about ten minutes from downtown Saint Louis, Missouri here in New York. We're joined by Alexa, Koby Molina senior staff attorney at the reproductive freedom project. She recently filed the ACLU challenge to the Alabama abortion ban. We welcome you both to democracy. Now let's begin with Dr Aaron king, you are minutes from the Saint Louis women's health clinic, that provides abortion, explain what is happening this week before we move onto the supreme court what could happen by Friday with Missouri's last REM. Meaning women's health clinic that provides abortion. Think excuse me, thank you for having me on the show this morning, we're really, really concerned here in Missouri. I'm a Missouri resident right now I'm sitting literally about a couple of miles from the last remaining clinic and the news that broke yesterday about the fact that the Missouri state health department is threatening to shut this clinic down based on unreasonable demands is most concerning for the patients in the state of Missouri. We are really literally in a crisis right now where the patients in our own state in Missouri cannot access safe. Reproductive healthcare as a Friday. So right now, I happen to be fortunate enough, not just to be gynecologist and provide abortion care, but to do that in Illinois. And I really will I really predicting seeing a high number of patients having to start to travel across state lines just to receive the health. Care that they seek and Dr king in terms of what you've already what your clientele already is Illinois. Could you talk about that? Because given the fact that there are, so there's only one clinic left in Missouri right now that can provide abortions, the help clinic for women where I'm the executive director and also a physician, we have seen patients for over forty five years. Many of whom are from Missouri. So we already see patients over fifty percent of our patients, come from Missouri in the last two years with a significant number of restrictions around abortion in Missouri. We've already seen a very, very high number of patients have to come over to Illinois to see us. I expect that number will increase significantly just yesterday as news was breaking about the health clinic, potentially being shutdown Planned Parenthood potentially being shut down on Friday. We already had a flood of phone calls a very panicked in frantic patients wondering what? What was going on where they can go where they can see care? So we're already really concerned that there's a lot of confusion around this issue. And unfortunately, not all patients can just pick up and drive across the state line to seek care. Dr king can you explain? What is happening by Friday, why? Suddenly, it seems we're just talking about licensing of the clinic, something that happens every single year. Now, your husband is also a portion provider, right in the Saint Louis Planned Parenthood clinic. Right. Correct. So what is happening is that every year? This is this is a law. That's in Missouri. Every year, the abortion clinic has to apply and be accepted for a new license as abortion facility, which comes with a lot of regulations above, and beyond the usual regulations around healthcare, and Missouri state health department has stated that they don't think that the plan Perry. Hood in St Louis can comply with these regulations, and they're forcing the doctors to go through interogations. They're forcing. I think you said the beginning of the program, so I don't wanna miss speak, but seven of the doctors to go through interogations just to get this licensing through the Planned Parenthood in St Louis are close colleagues of ours ho clinic, we work with them on a day-to-day basis. We know the healthcare, they provide is very safe. It is high quality is well, within the standards of medical care, and shutting down the clinic based on new allegations, and interogations just based on harassment and intimidation does nothing to improve the health or safety of the patients in the state of Missouri. I want to ask you what kind of problems do you confront it'd be able being provider, even in Illinois interns, potential harassment. Or, or do you have any fears for yourself your own safety, given some of the ongoing? Protests, even violence that have occurred against other abortion providers around the country. So I've been gynecologist for fifteen years. And I do a lot of different workers in colleges. I do work specifically doing abortion care. And I do feel harassment from protesters from people who believe that abortion should be illegal that has been a long standing issue. And it does feel scary to provide care that there are people that don't agree with you and have in the past been violent against providers who provide that care. I think this is a whole new level of concern where we are actually scared of our own health department in Missouri. I am also a licensed physician in Missouri. And it really is intimidating to think that our own state health department could suddenly turn on you for providing Vigo safe care that is well within the standards of medical practice. So I think this is a whole new level of concern. I'm concerned for our patients. I think patients are hearing in states. Across the country that their care could be criminalized our governor in Missouri on Friday, signed a ban into law that would prevent abortion after the eighth week of pregnancy. And I think patients themselves are feeling not just the harassment that the providers feel from the outside, but also from their own state. Friday that date that the clinic can close the last women's health clinic, that provides abortion and Missouri, it will be the verse state not to have one at all. Friday is the tenth anniversary of the assassination of doctor George Tiller, who was shot dead at the reformation Lutheran church in Wichita Kansas, may thirty first two thousand and nine but I wanted to take up that issue of the governor signing of the ban Missouri's Republican. Governor Mike Pearse parson signing that Ben and abortions that weeks of pregnancy with no exceptions in cases of rape, Princess the law triggering a total ban. If Roe v Wade is overturned during a debate over the new anti-abortion Bill, the Republican, Missouri state legislator, berry, Hovis said rape by a stranger should be distinguished by what he called, quote consensual rape. Someone goes out, and they have are there Raipur. They're sexually assaulted one night after college party because most of my rapes, were not the gentleman jumping out of the bushes that nobody ever met. That was one or two times out of a hundred. Most of them were date rapes or consensual rapes, which we're all terrible. But I'd set in court set in court when juries would struggle with those type of situations where it was a he said she said and they would find person not guilty. That's Republican state legislator vary. Hovis sang raped by a stranger is different from rape by. By consensual rate. Well, I also want to turn to the powerful words of Michelle Alexander author of the new Jim crow, she's now in New York Times columnist. She recently wrote about her own abortion and a column titled my rapist apologized. I still needed an abortion. She writes, I wondered how a rape exception to an abortion ban could possibly help women like me who did not want to report a rape to the police who could not possibly prove that a rape occurred. If the man tonight criminal cases, take months, even years to be resolved would abortions be allowed based on mere allegations of rape without any proof if not, what would a woman have to prove in a matter of days or weeks to get an abortion in the first trimester. How could she overcome the Neville denial? What men would admit to rape knowing that he'd face a likely person sentence? Those are the words of Michelle Alexander. In her recent New York Times column. I wanna bring in Alexa Colby. Molina senior staff attorney at the reproductive freedom project, your response to both Hovis, this bizarre, state legislator, and what Michelle Alexander said. No, I think that before this year we wouldn't have even seen abortion bans like this being proposed without a rape incest, exception. So what we're seeing now is just an unprecedented rise in the extremism in the radical nature of these bands before this year politicians would have been afraid to even introduce a ban like that. And now they feel emboldened, but nonetheless, I think, as Michelle Alexander's column really aptly points out at the end of the day abortion banned is an abortion ban and these exceptions for rape incest, for far too many people just provide no help at all, so really an abortion ban with, or without one of these exceptions is going to be just as damaging to people. I wanted to ask you, as you mentioned this, this onslaught now of legislation across the country. It's it seems almost a deliberate effort at just at this particular point by the Republican majorities in different state legislatures to begin a whole new culture war here on the issue of, of or to ramp up the culture wars, just in the in the in the run-up to a new presidential election to mobilize their own base. It almost it's so oppertunistic that at this particular moment, all of a sudden, all of these bills being passed across the country almost gore in a coordinated fashion. You're absolutely right. This is definitely a ramping up and is definitely a coordinated strategy since two thousand and eleven. We have actually seen more than four hundred restrictions on abortions passed in state legislatures. But what's happening this year is definitely a national, and concerted effort by politicians who have really been emboldened by President Trump's anti-abortion Ingende to really ratchet up a notch. And now go directly take. Direct aim at Roe v. Wade with abortion bans. So that's really what we're seeing. It's this campaign that has been developing over time but is absolutely ramping up and reaching a new stage this year. Of course, you took on the abortion, Ben Alabama, which is also no exception for Raipur incest. We're now talking about Missouri. One of six states with just one abortion clinic left. The others Kentucky Mississippi north and South Dakota and West Virginia on Tuesday. The supreme court declined to take up now this is really hard to understand declined to take up provision of an Indiana law that bars abortions based on sex race or disability. The fetus, the decision keeping in place, a lower court injunction on the measure, but Clarence Thomas supreme court Justice indicated a twenty page opinion. He supports the law writing enshrining constitutional right to an abortion based solely on the race sex or disability of an unborn child is Planned Parenthood. Advocates we constitutionalize the views of the twentieth century eugenics movement. Can you decipher what this is about? And also. What was a pilled in the case of the Indiana law that Mike Pence signed off on when he was governor and what the supreme court refused to rule on. Sure. So in the Indiana, like in so many other states again, we have seen just an onslaught of restrictions designed both at pushing abortion care out of reach, but also stigmatizing and shaming the people who access abortion care, so what happened yesterday was that. There were two laws in Indiana one, which has to do with disposal of fetal tissue and the other, which was really an unprecedented intrusive law, that tried to ban abortions based on the reason that the person was seeking the abortion, no such law has ever been upheld in any state. And so what we got from the supreme court was a mixed decision. The lower courts had struck down both of those provisions, the supreme court said with respect to the ban on abortions based on a person's reason we're going to let. The decision of the lower courts stand, meaning that law is never going to take affect. It was blocked. It was held unconstitutional. And that's not going to change the other decision on the other law was it's important to understand about that law that it actually wasn't brought under the Roe v. Wade line of cases so it really wasn't a direct challenge or not to the access to abortion. It was a there was no evidence that, that law was actually stopping the fetal tissue disposal actually, preventing anybody from getting an abortion or would prevent anybody so really while it's unfortunate because we know that the purpose of that law is really to shame and stigmatize people who, who seek abortion care, the supreme court's decision in allowing that law to stand isn't going to interfere with access to abortion. And of course, what we saw from Justice, Thomas's occurrence is really something that is just driving so many of these laws, which is just the utter. Distrust of people who choose to terminate their pregnancies, a belief that anybody who makes that personal and private decision that it's just not the right time for them. And their family to have a child could be doing something discriminatory. Could be acting as as as you Genesis. It just shows such a lack of distrust, and it's quite offensive to the one in four women in this country, who choose to have abortions for reasons that are entirely their own and really personal to their family and their circumstances, injunction just stands, and this will not go into a fit in Indiana. Exactly the injunction stands burial. Does talk about what that means the expense incurred, also what it means psychologically when you saying that the fetus must be buried or cremated. What about if you have a miscarriage, I mean, this was one of the irrational elements of the law, which I had been pointed out in the lawsuit. In which is why the lower courts had joined it. Obviously, when a person has a miscarriage at home. None of these restrictions would apply. Their only targeted at abortion clinics. So, again, it really goes to show you what the motivation here was. And this is, again, this is part of the just numerous restrictions. You heard from Dr king talking about the numerous regulate regulations and licensing requirements that abortion clinics have to comply with that really go above and beyond anything else, any other medical provider has to comply with. And so really this is just part and parcel of those burdens. And again, just going back to the these attempts to shame and stigmatize abortion care to really marginalize it from the rest of healthcare, which is exactly what it is filed. Challenge to the Alabama law. How do you see these various challenges of these this raft of laws across the country proceeding over the next year or two is likely that this is going to reach the supreme court and have a decision before the, the, the presidential election is more like that would happen afterward. It takes years, it can take years for cases to reach the supreme court. So I'm not sure that any of these cases are on the fast track to get up to the supreme court and, again, of course as we saw on Tuesday supreme court doesn't even take all the cases that come to it. So when it comes to these bands, like we've seen in Ohio, and Kentucky, Alabama, and Missouri and Georgia. I'm very confident that the lower courts are going to block these bands, and are going to prevent them from taking effect. And I think it's very important that people know that, that abortion today is still legal in all fifty states in the country. And you know, as Dr king mentioned, and as the providers, Alabama have found they are getting caught. Calls from people every day to the clinics terrified panicked that abortion is already illegal. So it's definitely very important. I think to get the message out there that these bands, they're going to be blocked at abortion remains legal in all fifty states. Final comment from Dr Aaron king, right there on the front line right over the border from Saint Louis, and Illinois, executive director of the hope clinic for women in granite city, Illinois, as this clinic is about close again, just repeating this on may thirty first unless the, the court case that's going to be heard today. Something happens with that again on that tenth anniversary of doctor George, Tiller assassination abortion provider and Kansas, how your ole protecting yourselves, Dr king, we are just trying to get the message out to patients that abortion. His legal that they still have access in that we're trying to let them know where they have access in how they can get the healthcare that they're seeking that is the best protection for our patients is giving them accurate information in trying to reach out to them in a compassionate way that d- stigmatizes the care that they're seeking Intel's them. There are people that care about you. There are people that will take care of you, and you'll get good high quality, medical care, and we're here to take care of you, Dr king, we wanna thank you so much for being with us. And we wanna thank Lexi Colby Molina senior staff attorney at the reproductive freedom project. This is democracy now democracy now dot org. When we come back, a man who attempted to provide water for undocumented migrants coming over the border from Mexico in desert so many have died faces twenty years in prison. He goes on trial today. Stay with us. Waiting Alice foam, and the system Crecy now I mean Goodman with one solace we turn out to southern Arizona, where humanitarian aid, volunteer is heading to trial today for providing food, water and shelter to undocumented my Scott. Warren of Arizona faces up to twenty years in prison after being charged with three felony counts for allegedly harboring on documented migrants warrant as geographer who volunteers with no more deaths and a whole Samaritans to southern Arizona based humanitarian aid organizations for years, two groups of left water and food, and the harsh Sonoran desert to help refugees and migrants survive deadly journey across the US border. Warren was arrested January seventeenth two thousand eighteen just hours after no more debts released, a report detailing how US border agents had intentionally destroyed more than three thousand gallons of water left out for migrants crossing the. Under the group also published a video showing border agents, dumping out, jokes of water in the desert hours after the report was published a thirties, rated warrants home and auto where they found two migrants who sought temporary refuge, and international and other human rights groups are now calling for the churches to be dropped against Warren. In a moment. Scott Warren will join us from to son, but I, I want to turn to a short documentary by Laura Sanders for the intercept about the work of humanitarian aid workers, including Warren on the border. It's titled. Let them have water. Favor, our desert this desert right around our town, where we create. How? Seven bodies, fifteen seven remains of human beam. Last year. Fifteen. Do you find remains in your parks, in your goal courses in your neighborhood, playgrounds? What would that make you feel like? The spirits of brothers and sisters walking easy. Eighty. Turn. Thank you. I'm scott. We're and geographer and of auto for about six years now, the moment that really changed for me got me in a big way was moving here auto and just experiencing the border a more visceral way being here in summer running into people in the desert who had walked across the desert more need of water meeting, other folks who were who were doing managerial aid. It just seemed like if not the most important one of the most important issues facing this place. For me to not be involved in that would be like not being fully engaged fully present in this place. So groups like no more deaths and Samaritans humane borders Oculus this year, though. And the for instance, have all provided humanitarian aid done search and rescue different ways here in the desert. We went from finding human remains every other month to, like, finding five sets of human remains on, on a single trip, hiking feeling valley, and then going back, you know, week later and finding two more sets of remains in than on a single day of searching, finding lay eight sets of remains bodies of people who had died and Jason areas of the bombing range, Cabeza Prieta. So just this like scale of this crisis of humanitarian crisis. Missing persons crisis bully wide open. My name is. And I'm the president of the search and rescue we've been doing these for almost six years. We're sticking to there for a long time. You know, this these works, really sorry for, for the families that are in need, while we're held. Where we're going to willa right now. I'll know that was out there. What you searching for body. Yeah. Just one that, you know of or. There's three actually, you know, one of them's the more recent. We hope to binding. It's pretty grateful to all these, these people. These woolen tear scores. We may be different companies we weren't our might not even be related to each other. But inside here we, we have to be feminine modest. I'm convenience and you're in your hands Lord, we asked this morning. Get what you hope reach the place where the people that need your help our. Do that, by the meal. But father we asked this, so that we can help them as the mission? We carry in our hearts. We Cup to be realistic, and in. No, that we have to be strong, you know, even though it breaks our hearts too to find these remaining, we have to be strong and keep on going because otherwise we wouldn't be able to do this job. They must have found the remains from a little boy of girl probably five six years. He's really said that thing one what they had to go through in Cali. And knowing that there won't be able to see them anymore. Really? But we have the. Putting this. Mask? I know where we're supposed to be used to. Give him give them coordinating. Once the cabin. That's. January twenty teen was arrested by board of chill in charged with harboring in the four chill criminal complaint against me. They. Said that I was providing food, water beds, McLean, close to two, and so they charged me with harbory when through border patrol custody appeared in front of judge was released on reconnaissance. And that was over a year ago, we've been engaged in various legal proceedings leading to potential trials time. Me Phillips, I'm to auto about fifteen years ago and. About eight or nine years ago, a group of us, again, a small version of the Samaritans here, I guess, every time I look at Scott, I think of my own son, and it's unconscionable to sink. That he's been charged with felonies for doing what is a parent. I would guess so proud of what he done. And I know is parents are proud. People have always crossed and area people always been walking in the desert people always been finding ways to come here to the desert. But what happened is it was turned into a major industrial scale operation in the nineteen ninety s and early two thousands as they really pushed people out into places like these, these desert's mountains, what had been really a small scale thing local organizations that move people and goods to the desert small handful of warp Chile that might go out and try to interdict people or might be involved in finding people who had died or local residents who respond the people who needed food and water that all just completely mushroomed into this massive. You reach a point where you say enough, you know, whatever the consequences are. Drivers with permits should come together to be able to throw Sean and everyone else. How many more bodies, it's chess not. Okay. You know, we're here, and we will leave the water and we are real community. That isn't a scary place to live. I think one important thing is that. People here who and other local communities in the border have always been providing humanitarian aid, and I've always responded to people being in need. People here have provided food and water to folks who are crossing the desert who are in desperate condition. They've responded to rescue people who are in the desert. They've found and recovered the bodies in the bones of people who have died in the desert. So that's when going on for forever. Basically has been a fact of life for people who live here. We're not. We'll take a Stephen. I've been. Eighty years, we are this individuals today, the reading of the names. Respond finished sympathy. When the name, it's called. Let them have water short documentary. But Laura senders for the intercept. When we come back, we go to Tucson to speak with Scott Warren, who is arrested in January of two thousand eighteen and our Sonal he goes on trial today. Stay with us. Not focusing. This is democracy now. I mean me Goodman, with Gonzales, join now in Tucson, Arizona by Scott Warren, the humanitarian aid, volunteer who's heading to trial today for providing aid to undocumented migrants faces up to twenty years in prison after being charged with three felony counts for allegedly harboring undocumented migrants. He was arrested in January two thousand eighteen at a location called the barn, which was used by humanitarian volunteers Warren is geographer, who with no more deaths and auto Samaritans joined in to somebody, another member of no more deaths, Catherine Gaffney. We welcome you both to democracy now. Scott one you lay out what happened on that day in January two thousand eighteen when you were at the barn as well as other volunteers, explain who exactly rated and what happened to you. There. Thanks. I was at the barn, which is a property auto that's used by a variety of. Sees me humanitarian groups. The stage stage, from that property to got in the desert and put out water and do search and rescue that sort of thing. On that day in January two thousand eighteen we were preparing for high school students to arrive. We're gonna volunteer to do some of this humanitarian work. It's a pretty common thing that student groups will tear and. On that day, a couple of border patrol agents had set up surveillance kind of cross the the way from the barn. In area where they kind of watch what was happening there. And at some point they said that they saw me speaking with two men. Who they somehow determined to be illegally present in the United States. And so they kind of an operation to raid, the raid, the barn. Through a thing called a knock and talk peration. And so about five thirty late in the afternoon early evening, kind of a convoy of border patrol and sheriff's vehicles entered the barn the property there. And at that point. Had informed them that they were on private property. Didn't have a right to be there. And they persisted and sort of. Went to the entrance of the barn. And by the time I kind of arrived at the entrance where they were. Kind of looking inside the building. They'd already had these two men who were they determined to be illegally present in the country, and they were sort of detaining them, and that point day informed me that they were going to arrest me. I was being arrested for harboring. And Scott wanted to ask you about this. Most people who are not familiar with your part of the country. Don't realize that the Arizona desert area is the most deadly place for migrants about what thirty eight to forty percent of all the deaths along the border occur in the desert areas of our Zona. Arizona along with south Texas or two of the, the worst areas really where we're finding. The most highest numbers of people who have died crossing the border, those numbers that you reference are really disturbing. But they're the, the numbers of bodies and human remains that we have found in the desert. So we assume that there are many more. All across Arizona. There are many people who die in the desert, who have died in the desert, the particular area where I live often called the auto corridors in south western Arizona, and it's particularly brutal. Many, many people have died there. And this is the area on parts of organ pipe cactus, national monument and Cabeza prior to national wildlife refuge in the Barry Goldwater bombing range where we have increasingly been finding. Many, many bodies and bones of people who've died while crossing the desert and ironically, southern Arizona with the center of the copper industry in the state of iris owner, for the entire the United States and for decades of migrant Mexicans from Mexico, where the was a work in, in many of these mind weren't they and were, they were legal, then to come and work in the minds. But now are suddenly considered in, in recent decades illegal to be able to come into the country. That's, that's a really interesting point that you bring up where I live auto. It's a, it's a former copper mining town of former company town, everything was controlled by the company, everybody who came in and went out. Sort of had to be vetted by the company through a bunch of the twentieth century, particularly early in the twentieth century, it was really these comper companies that determined who, who came, and who went and they were the ones that sort of dictated the nature of the border and sort of who was allowed to be there. So it's really fascinating to me to look at how even though so much has changed. My town is no longer a copper mining town, the mine closed in the eighties. Very much post industrial economy, but in that void the post industrial void, we've had this massive growth of the border security industry. It's it's enormous enormous across other near as across all the border. And by. By all measures it looks like it's going to continue growing Scott Warren. Let's talk about the timing of the raid in January of two thousand eighteen just hours after no more deaths. Your organization released a report detailing how US border agents had intentionally destroyed more than three thousand gallons of water left out for migrants crossing the border. The group also published a video that showed embroidery agents dumping out jobs of water in the desert, explain the significance of this, the timing that same day. This report released by no more deaths on the, the morning I was arrested. And the report was the, the second in a series of reports code the disappeared series. And this particular report looked at how. Humanitarian aid supplies left in the desert were being destroyed by border patrol agents. And there was a whole report that was associated with that. And a pretty detailed analysis that you mentioned the things that really went viral were a couple of those videos, the trail can videos and others that showed agents, destroying water and dumping out water. So this happened on the the morning. Of my arrest and. Through various. Measures now we've we've learned more of the story, but the report was released that warning. And then agents set up surveillance on the barn that afternoon and arrested me that evening and also, Catherine Gaffney eurobonds here with no more deaths. Could you talk about the crackdown on people who are trying to assist some of the migrants? So for humanitarian purposes, I think Syracuse university's transactional records access clearinghouse revealed. The report that there's been a thirty percent increase in two thousand fifteen in the number of people arrested annually, allegedly for harboring or assisting on documented migrants. But that's nationwide. What have you been seeing? That's right. And this is really a somber moment for us as we go to trial today. Scott is being prosecuted for as you mentioned, providing food, water clean, clothes and beds to, to people who asked him for help. So what we've seen in no more deaths recently is really an escalation of a longstanding war on the lives of undocumented migrants and documented communities in this country. The crisis of deaths and disappearances on the border has been ongoing. There's more than seven thousand known deaths in the last two decades in Scott said, that's vast under accounting of the true, number of people who've died or gone missing. But what we've really seen in the last several years is a ramping up of attacks. Not only directly on the lives of undocumented people crossing the border, but also on those who make it their work to stop and help people and try to prevent these deaths and suffering. And that's not only three humidity nature, such as no more deaths, and many other search and rescue and humanitarian aid groups at work in the borderlands, but frankly, on, you know, the, the daily lives of many people in the borderlands for whom it's a normal occurrence for someone to come knock on your door asking for glass of water or asking for help. So when we see the expansion of harboring statutes to criminalize such basic acts of human care. It's really concerning interpretation of the statutes, it sort of leads to the conclusion that if you're sitting down at the table with your family members who is undocumented and has a different satis than you. Do you need to check their papers before you pass them the bread? If you invite a neighbor over for barbecue, you know, d- need to set up a checkpoint before you can share food or water before we end. I wanted to ask you go on trial today, amnesty is called for all charges to be drafted. Judges refused to drop the churches your defense today. Well, we'll be really. Over the coming week and really outlining our case about the necessity the need for humanitarian aid, and the clear, the clear right, morally ethically, spiritually, and legally to give and receive humanitarian aid anywhere in, particularly in the borderland region. So we want to we're going to continue with part two at democracy now dot org. Scott Warren on trial today with no more debts, and Catherine Gaffney activists in volunteer with no Marquette's. Thank you so much for joining us from Tucson.

Missouri supreme court Scott Warren Indiana Illinois United States Roe Wade rape Arizona Mike Pence president New York Saint Louis Dr Aaron king OBGYN Amy Goodman Tucson West Virginia ACLU
311  Love Makes a Super-Team

Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

00:00 sec | Last week

311 Love Makes a Super-Team

"Jay I've made a decision. I have decided that Leach is the best morlock gunning hard for the mop vote icy. He's such a good kid. He really is and he and already maddox have an exceptionally wholesome friendship. Oh Man, they really do. Have they ever gotten to spend much time with other kids I? Know there was that time with the exterminators but that was decades ago. Well, let's see I. Know they were with generation x for a bit and then later on when Franklin Richards was at the Massachusetts exe-, your school wait Franklin Richards went to the existing school only for a little while his parents were dead at the time and his grandfather had to put him somewhere. You get kit around on conquests. Conquests Oh. Yes. See Franklin Dad is Reed Richards. Mister. Fantastic right and reads dad is a foxy. GRANDPA. King. Conqueror. I'm Jay added. Milestone folks, and we are here to explain the X. Men because it's about time someone did welcome to episode three, hundred eleven of J. and miles explained the X. men where we walk you through the INS the outs anthra- kinds of comics greatest superhero soap opera was it three eleven of bands from when we were teenagers does that ring a bell? It does not oh, I, think they were. They were out around the same time as eve six, another band of that era with a number in their name, and I mainly remember eve six because they were named after a concept from an x files episode about these Adam and Eve clones who were created by like I dunno evil scientists or something. I think it is remarkably both of you to assume that I am familiar with any bands who were popular during our teen years. That's that's true. We mainly listened to a lot of folk rock and obscure Gothi shed well I mean I feel like we're at least. Plugged in because you knew what was going on in the middle community but I was I was really really not at all. Okay. Let's be real. If by metal community, you mean Metallica and megadeath and that's about it then sure. But my horizons desperately needed to be expanded back then. Okay. Look that's still seemed like a wide range the mind I suppose. So anyway, that very much. Aside, we're a podcast about X. men not about megadeath that would be a weird topic for podcast. I don't know that you could get three hundred eleven episodes out of it So talk about some x men today. I'm kind of tired NAM tired to. Time. Travel and clones wait for no man or woman I mean by definition, the kind of do. I guess that's true. When you can travel through time, you have all the time in the world except when you don't do weird plot contrivances, it's complicated. The. Jane Miles. Explained the X. Men Story don't forget to wind your watch. Yes. Oh man you saw bill and Ted three right. Oh. You haven't seen it yet. Jay Haven't I haven't I'm sorry I mean opinions I'm sure vary but I loved it so much and I think you will to know I wanna see it might not having seen it as not through lack of interest it's just through having been exhausted, overwhelmed and ending up doing things going to sleep. That's entirely reasonable. Yeah. Oh, speaking of movies I realized something remember how we did the Hawk talk episode last week about autumn stuff than. Talking about horror X. Men overlapping with order I do indeed. I realized after we recorded that we entirely forgot the existence of the new mutants movie. I feel good about that. I don't know how to feel about it because I still haven't seen it 'cause you Kinda can't or But I feel like that's a victory I mean I I don't know I've I've I've read some reviews and I? I feel like just I feel like I might end up taking the same approach to it that took toward the enders game movie and the. The dark is rising movie just completely repress its existence. All I can't do that. I got to see my favorite teenagers onscreen. Even if it's a terrible movie, I'm just so excited about the opportunity to see a new movie. Well it's an academic question for the moment. Anyway. Very, very true speaking of questions. A question one could ask is whether we are still dividing are X. men and uncanny x men episodes in two different episodes, and at this point officially as of this episode, we're not. As, of about mid nineteen ninety-five X. men and uncanny x men were effectively the same comic Lake plotlines that would happen in one one month would be picked up in the next issue of the other that would come out it didn't exactly go back and forth, but they were pretty much happening simultaneously and sharing many of the same plot threads man I hate that. It's confusing and weird like I know some other books have done that spider-man's done that when there were a bunch of Spiderman books which are still are I'm pretty sure. Batman has i. just feel like it's such poor form. If you'RE GONNA, make it one book, make it one books which artists if you have to. But make it one like the idea that that people have to subscribe to two titles notice subscribe to titles to get the whole story. As an ongoing thing, not just for events and not just for crossovers annoys the hell out of me it makes things unnecessarily difficult and complicated, and if there's anything we've learned over three hundred and ten prior episodes of this podcast. It's the X. Men are really complicated enough without that. You are not wrong but that said I'm glad we at least know that we need to treat these two books as basically being one book because at least that way, it'll make more. Sense than otherwise would except when it doesn't except when it doesn't. So today we're going to be talking about just two issues, but they're both very long issues I think exactly sized we have X. men annual nineteen ninety-five. That is adjective X. Men, and then we have uncanny x men number three, hundred, twenty, five, which by virtue of being multiple of twenty five and also an anniversary issue we'll get to that later is itself double-sized Hey, lots of lots of issues here We've all got lots of issues. We do we. I think that's that's a state university comics readers really at this point. We filed them into our long boxes and into the dark recesses of our brains. All right. So we're GONNA start with with. X Men Annual Nineteen Ninety Five. And with its with its main story, which is titled a Sinister Heart. Guess who that's about. But before we jump in, you may have noticed that nine hundred ninety five is a very long number for an annual at actually only had a few prior issues. No, no miles. This is the one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, fifth annual of this title, I think we skip some comics but no, this year was the year that marvel decided to stop numbering their annuals one, two, three, four, five at Cetera, and to just start putting the year at the end of them which. On the one hand offense my sensibilities. But on the other hand, it does make it a lot easier to know where to slot them, and if you're doing read through comic, honestly for annuals I think that makes way more sense than numbering them. Yeah it's not so bad. Now, we also have lost some annuals in nineteen ninety-five. We had cable ducts force yes. They shared an annual had Wolverine Adjectives X. men uncanny x men and generation x but x caliber an x factor no longer have annuals. Yeah especially because like the Excalibur annuals back when they were excalibur special editions. A lot of those were great right those were really fun I depended on those for levity mud among the you know Adam Amax, the extremes although the same year that Amac the extreme came out in an annual soda. Chaos. With a K. and the excalibur annual I did love him. Exactly. That's my point. Well. Anyway let's actually talk about the comic. So who made this book? This story was written by John Madison Ralph Macho penciled by Terry Dodson and John Paul Leon inked by John Holder holders and Shawn Barton borough. And colored by Mike. Thomas with letters by Richard Stockings and comma craft. And this story is it's weird because like it doesn't matter but I kinda loved it. Anyway. Oh I love parts of it. So. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA Tangent briefly today I spent a while talking to college classes about the X. men and a new critical readings superhero comics. And in the second one, I, was in I was talking about excellent. I was giving this fairly serious talk about the mutant metaphor about the X. men and cultural context. And then I'm not sure how I got there but I had to explain sore on something came up such that I had to explain, sorry I'm talking about these these serious allegory versus literal representation. So Sore. On is, is that a man who turns into a territory and tiny George who eats people's months after hypnotize after him neighborhood? No, he doesn't eat their minds that heats their mutant energy after hypnotized them and I feel like that specific feeling. The same feeling I get when I talk about this story. which is about Cable Shitty Kid Kidnapping Jean Grey and an aging former radio stars defeat mister sinister by proving that sinister is capable of feeling love. I feel like if you throw in some bud pounding could be a great chuck tangle title. I feel like s accident has a really generally chuck tingle feel to it. You know you're you're you're not wrong although actually that's not fair because Chuck tingled generally actually has a fair amount of cazalet coherent plot structure in his books they're really weird. But you know stuff happens in in sequence and we get some degree of explanation even when it's it's from someone who was living in their own but and and Engaging multi-layer investments they're. Like you do I also want to take this moment to say that even in these shitty times, chuck tingle remains one of the few forces for unmitigated good in the universe and if you're not following him on twitter, I highly recommend it like seriously yes. He writes weird porn really weird porn, but his heart is so pure. Okay. But it's also really wholesome weird porn. And, it's really it's really socially conscious weird porn and he's really really responsive to readers asking for wider representation. He handles that stuff really consciously and he's generally he's like he's he's. The chuckle who was the performance there's the chuckle real person behind that. And either way he gives the impression of being extremely conscientious and extremely. Open and how he approaches his work in ways that I think. Honestly. The super hero world could learn from. We should all be buckle reuss who are so true. Yeah Yeah. Basically, like I'm not saying this just to be funny and SMART S I genuinely deeply appreciate chuck single voice in Literature. legit. He didn't raise this comic. Alas but. That would have been great I would read that comic will what is this version of the comic? That does not involve any at least on panel but pounding what's going on on it. Well so so the woman in question, the aging Ford former radio stars a woman named Fay Livingston and this woman who's mister sinister seduced in the nineteen twenties when she was a Hollywood radio comedian and he was basically sexy Hollywood Dracula he had imagined imagined in the Hollywood hills and he went around and Capes Like Just just being mysterious and throwing wild parties and he and fe got together and she thought it was load first sight and he insisted that it was because she had real good. I'm not. I'm not making this up like that was his reason. And Tom, then she inevitably walked in on him being mister sinister and he imprisoned her experimented on her and manipulated her for years and she finally escaped her let her go I. Don't remember which did not make an impression on me. After which she ended up living nursing home for the rest of her days but he still came to visit her semi regularly at least annually until. Tyler who is cables Shitty Kid? From. The. Future GROWNUP. Kidnapped her. So. Tyler Tyler kidnaps fe and and uses. Some kind of fancying mutant nonsense to to effectively D. H. her. So she looks briefly the way she did when when she and sinister I, got together she is a trap for sinister but for this trap to be completed, Tyler also has to snag Jean Grey. which he does eventually and goal here his entire goal is to get gene to connect fe sinister minds so that sinister will have to acknowledge that he's capable of feeling love. Before we get to how will that resolves a few things? This issue is actually one of the very first glimpse. We get of sinister in the far issue past thus proving that he's older than he looks. We're going to get a lot more information on that in the further adventures of cyclops and Phoenix miniseries, which interestingly enough actually has the same artist as the flashback scenes in this story. But most importantly in those flashback scenes I, really appreciate the while he's being Hollywood. Sexy Dracula. She still has that goddamn diamond on his forehead. She is not subtle at all like you would think he would want just blend into history like, yes as a rich playboy or whatever. But not with a frigging diamond on his forehead. I was thinking about this this and sinister in Hollywood and I feel extremely confident that if he had been doing this forty years later, he would unquestionably have been a regular in the movies of Edward D Wood Jr... Oh man that would have been amazing and I think you're totally right yeah. Yeah. Like he he would definitely murder Creswell at some point but that's that's a whole other thing. Yeah. Well, you know no pre cog role and your at these days. So there's that. But the other thing aside from Sexy Dracula Hollywood Mr with a diamond on his forehead and a newly opened chapter in his own history j you mentioned cable Shitty Son Tyler who's the one responsible for this aging kidnapping telepathically connecting plot to go up against sinister. And we've actually talked very little about tyler because he's a character that appeared almost exclusively in cables miniseries and ongoing series, and we have covered the miniseries. We've barely touched the ongoing Oh God. Oh, Tyler. Tyler Tyler, I feel bad for tyler because everyone always forgets he exists first of all the thing is he's not that interesting no, no, he's. He's not only not that interesting he's just not interesting. Well his deal. So he has tyler spring he's the son of cable and cable's dead wife a Lia or alley I'm not sure how you're supposed to say it who also went by Gen Scott or maybe gene Scott Anyway. They were married in the future in if you're the cable was sent to as a baby and that's where they had tyler tyler was. Abducted by strife who cable and his group were warring with and Tyler brainwashed cable eventually ended up having to shoot tyler to save a teammate that strife and tyler were attacking. We saw a little bit about that in the cable blood and metal miniseries in which we also confirmed cables lifetime love of enormous sandwiches. Yes. He does love big sandwich Olympic Sandwich to. Maybe I'll have a big sandwich after this episode Kinda hungry ran this morning. Anyway Tyler went back to the present day to ensure apocalypse as rise because it's complicated he disguised himself as a man named Mr Tala who you may remember being mentioned and ambiguously killed in early x force turned out that was just him faking his own death tyler got in a fight. With cable in escaped and more recently, he renamed himself genesis having decided to cut all ties including his name with cable declared himself heir to apocalypse who at the moment thanks to executioners song is dead and he then recruited close henchman the dark riders by being very intimidating and blonde woman you need to remember about tyler is that he was basically raised by strife. Is the second generation of strife. Like strifes parents didn't understand him than boy have you not met Tyler Day Spring Aka Genesis. So. Anyway. All that happens in it's nonsense and I don't really care very much about that part. What I care about a lot is that this is also a hank gene friendship story and this is one of my favourite friendships and X. men. Now starts with Hank and Jean hanging out in the cabin that Hank bought. So, that as a student so that he and bobby could take girls there. which strikes me as a very optimistic thing for teenage hank to have done and also something that inevitably ended up with he and bobby like playing d. at the cabin alone. To Hank and Bobby from the silver age remind you a lot of bill and Ted Speaking of bill and Ted. Oh, they really really do. Yeah. I, mean, yes, hank is brilliant and bobby is well, he's not bill and Ted but at the same time, there's just that understanding that no no our friendship is Kinda what matters we can have girlfriends, but we have to meet them at the same place and bring them to the same cabin because this is just how things are done. Oh, and they would unquestionably name their children after each other. They totally would I don't know if either of them would be a very responsible parent though I don't think they should have kids. Yeah. I. I think you know maybe people change over time but I I would worry. Yeah. Yeah. Although I guess since he came out bobbies been less irresponsible. Hank probably should never be responsible for anyone extremely vulnerable just in general. or the time stream hypothetically. Thanks to be responsible for anything. Well, nonetheless, beast may have terrible judgment especially as the Marvel Universe continues but here he is charming and I gotta say jammed. Mattis writes a great great beast like his dialogue is very much the bouncing blue beast era of beast where he uses twenty dollar were words while just having fun with his own diction and eloquence even just talking to himself and just being a big goof and I really enjoy that. Yeah and this is a hank who's frustrated and a bit self pitying but. Ultimately. Still very grounded in in that identity and yeah, this is this this feels like. A different direction that Hank could have gone long-term with really with the legacy viruses kind of a split point. I agree yeah, and part of me wonders if part of the reason he went rushing he did go is because during this time iceman was gone not for a super long time. But during a pretty critical time iceman off helping rogue after she absorbed a bunch of gambits memories and freaked out. Hoping is kind of a relative termeer. babysitting shopper owning. Yeah. I down as a rook sitting in here but And this is this was originally going to be original five hangup obviously bobbies gone. It was supposed to be four of them and Scott and Scott and were running a little bit late. And Hank is worried that there he by by just inviting batch of them he's leaving out the new kids but Jean disagrees. No matter how many bonds before with Storm Gambit Jubilee, we've five with the original x men. Back when he was also much simpler reminds me of that time toward the end of schism where iceman reminded cyclops that they were the. Beatles. They were the originals love that bit Oh God same things just a brilliant bit of writing at a really really good bobby seen in particular. Anyway. Hank is a character who tends to self isolate recognize it, and then pontificate about without really addressing which I appreciate and also identify with maybe a little too much. Fair. And he also gets the last word of the story which I really really like or at least of the sinister part of the story before it goes on. After sinister at least pretends to reject the love that he had for five Livingston. As tried as it saddens genie. Strength. Doesn't come from our mutant abilities. But from love. I mean, you're not wrong. If nothing else you can Nanakuli channel love into cyclops eyeballs and shoot them at a giant robot thumb. You can also use the power of gayness to defeat. Nazis. Oh. Yeah. Speaking of Excalibur special editions right but I. Mean That also reminds me of the you know the the the parts of the Dark Phoenix Saga whether the the the gene, you are love stuff and. Also. Just a lot of what brings me back to the X. Men because more than anything else I think the thing does better than any other comic is friendship it's Camaraderie. Love. Exactly yeah like these are characters who either by necessity or by choice have created family, they have found family. And that's not just a substitute for you know Oh, my parents aren't great. So I'M GONNA try to hang out with people and made me feel something like this is legitimate family in every way that matters. Yeah they've definitely been cloned in combinations, but also an pursuant a family and and the family are people who whom you love with their eccentricities. Scott Warren. Show up and and Warren Hank head off on a flimsy excuse clearly to give Jean and Scott time for some marital Hanky Panky and Scott, I first instinct is that left alone in this this this cabin, which is specifically the hookup cabin. what they should probably do is clean it which to be fair since it was mostly occupied by teenage Tankan, bobby might not be a bad instinct. There is bad there is that if nothing else, there's probably for everywhere actually wait no hank wasn't blue yet. But he was still Harry and that brings us to the second story and accident annual nine hundred, Ninety five words written by Scott Bob Dole with Matt Idelson penciled by Ramon Bernardo inked by p Craig Russell Hey p Craig Russell colored by micro quits and lettered by Richard. Stockings and craft. I WANNA start by making fun of how Brian Braddock is drawn in this issue because Oh man is that something that is taking place on the page. Perhaps. You could describe for our listeners what you're looking at. You ever seen the cover of a romance novel. I have imagined someone like took one of those and was like. Yeah. That's what men look like not pose and that's what their hair does. But then for the face, just like trace the real basic lines of it. I'm now I'm just imagining a bunch of romance novel covers and all the big burly dude with long hair look the same except they're wearing Britannic read onesie costume which he does not wearing this story. That's because you know it was he needed to wash it after wearing it on somebody romance novel covers. Anyway his hair is very long. It's very, very long I'm not sure it's Long anywhere else. I mean, I'm a noted appreciator of long hair on men. I'M NOT GONNA complain. Anyway. Somehow also being Britannic, has given him more patients than he is taking a break from weird adventure to read a letter from his sister Betsy, which he bafflingly expects to ground him in normalcy. Bryan. Have you met your sister? She's a purple Gilady in a different body or maybe a transformed body. It's confusing and she has butterfly psychic stuff and she turns that psychic stuff into the focused totality for psychic might, which is a knife that she stabs into your face. Also, she is writing here with degray of news. That she seems to be in love with none other than Warren Kenneth Worthington the third although she does have the good judgment to leave the Kenneth Out of the name. I actually really appreciate betsy tone in this letter like the sort of mock seriousness of the. No I'm afraid it seems to be love like that's the thing. Everyone forgets that about betsy because she got turned into a sexy Ninja and everybody focused on the sexy Ninja stuff but she has this very arch sense of humor that I appreciate. Oh. Yeah and that really comes out in in this issue and in this letter because she's very aware that she basically spent her life in upper class British boarding schools. She also appears to have have gained some sense of propriety from her fellow x men because she does include in this letter to her brother, a photo booth strip of photos of herself in Warren making out which the little weird. But still not quite as weird as the photo that Scott Madeline prior sent professor Xavier from their honeymoon. Oh, the one where they were lying in bed and there was like the big heart. headboard and you have to wonder who actually took that picture and why would you send that to your boss Dad I mean I think we established that we must have been sinister. That's probably true but I wanNA point out like okay. So clearly Cilacap Archangel are a couple at this point that's been built up for a while. Do you remember Jay what their first date was oh? Yes. It involved being kidnapped by shelby saw. Well. He didn't kidnap them. He invited them to the Hellfire club and tried to recruit them and ended up like they yelled at him and beat him up and then left. I'm sorry. I'm sorry admit involve them being briefly forcibly prevented from leaving by snoopy saw, right but my point is that was the moment that were there like you know we were Kinda hot for each other but maybe let's see where this goes. Forged in the fires of dealing with Shihabi Shaw's confusion about sex was born love. This is exactly like the Taiwanese hooked up with someone in the middle of the sailor moon marathon. Just because it was preferable to sailor moon marathon or. It was not entirely voluntary learned marathon. Ob Shaw hosting. No Nets probably for the best. I have I have since come to appreciate sailor moon I. I will say to forestall the flood of angry emails that people are already starting to type sailor moon is in fact excellent I, agree though like that's not how to get somebody into an anime this happened to me with Dragon Ball. Z. You don't just sit somebody down be like okay. Now, we're going to watch six hours straight of this thing. Well and we're staying in a place and I am the only one with the driver's lessons. Not Me the person who wanted to watch Hillerman was the only one of the car and driver's license. So there really wasn't another option like. It was it was it was I'm not gonna say it was a hostage situation but like. I can joke about having been a hostage situation. It was close enough. Fair enough anyway, what's up with Betsy and Warren and their new love we've been watching a lot of. Sailorman. And no seriously sailor moon is amazing and I feel like it could I could have been sold on it immediately if someone had told me. It's actually genre which what you think if they cute highschool magical girl story is actually a complicated go story and I would have been like Oh cool. With like magical golden eggs. Yeah. Yeah. No. Longer Moon is actually really good in the mangams also marvelous Oh that's my thought. That is my stance on the wholesaler moon. issue. Anyway, back to Warren and Betsy Betsy is inexperienced in romance apparently or at least claiming to be in this letter to her brother. and. Specifically with phenomenon of sexual tension or at least describing it. I. I can't quit now get this. We know she's been in sexual romantic relationships before. Yes she was with that one dude from the. In the captain Britain series way back when if nothing else and she was also a spy and I assume from what I've seen that spies get laid all the time. possibly. Possibly Anyway Warren. Betsy past their initial honeymoon phase and they're recognizing that they both still have a lot of issues that mutuality doesn't necessarily solve and I appreciate that they knowledge. Okay. It's our shared trauma. The fact that our bodies were invaded and corrupted by respectively the hand slash spiral and apocalypse that brought us together. But like is there something more than that and just raw chemistry? and. That's a valid question and I really appreciate that they're actually talking about it very directly. There's also a pretty marvelous bit. Of heavy-handed RIFFING ON MARVEL TIME CILACAP ASKS Didn't Scott and Jean find true happiness angel replies. Only after putting up with the equivalent of thirty years worth of obstacles and misery heck jeans apparent death is worth ten years alone. So I looked at up and between UNCANNY X number one and adjective lists excellent number thirty where Scott got married That was twenty eight years. So yeah pretty close to thirty years but from UNCANNY X men number one, thirty, seven to fantastic number two, eighty six, which was where it became clear that gene was actually still alive after after the Dark Phoenix Saga that was only five point five years that wasn't ten years clearly he's rounding up. Rounding Way Up Kenneth Now These two having gotten their sense of how relationships work from x men comics, which is not a great idea. Are Really concerned that if they don't terminally overthink it, they're just diving straight into a relationship and they'll end up just like rogue gambit. I. Mean if so we're very confused about various mutant powers I. I can only imagine that they're real concern is that they'll suddenly bust out in wild phonetic accents. That is a real risk and marvel comics anyway. Then they make out while flying, which is I guess kind of sometimes maybe how Hawks Dude Pretty much pretty much. I do really like betsy line at the end of the letter though. Whether our connections should be about a fortnight or forever that seems really healthy like they're not directly comparing themselves to you Scott and Jean. The one true couple who end up not being permanent well I. Guess they get back together anyway point being. Betsy just taking the relationship as it is their lives are very, very confusing but they clearly have something beyond pure attraction and incredibly complicated dramatic back stories. So why the hell? Not. And Brian is generally cool with that. Before we move onto uncanny x men number three, hundred, twenty, five, which itself has a great deal of background at draws from perhaps we can discuss what happened previously. So we all know that mutants are hated and feared by the world around them but the ones who can't pass as human have a much much worse. Govinda does include the morlocks. It's enough to make. You want to shun the surface world, start your own civilization in the sewers under new. York and name yourself after characters from an H.. U. L. story a very specific hypothetical. It's true. Everything was going okay for the morlocks until their leader Callisto decided to reenact barbarella queen of the galaxy and kidnap sexy Angel the Angel and question of course, happened to be Warren Kenneth Worthington the third who neither makes nor is love. So his x men allies ventured underground to rescue him. Leading to the historically pacifist storm to defeat. Callisto a ritualistic morlock duel to the death thus claiming leadership of the morlocks for herself. Yes. She Street Up Stabbed Callisto through the heart. It was pretty metal. Callisto is finding a sewer wizard. Years later, Mister Sinister sent his team of marauders underground to slaughter as many morlocks as possible une cool dude. Unfortunately the marauders were very good at this, and most of the morlocks were killed despite their absentee leader storms best efforts which to be generous fell into the general category of too little too late. Yeah. Yeah. The X. Men did not fare well in that crossover well. The storm really dropped the ball when it came to morlock leadership But. Wait. It gets worse for the morlocks men years after that Colossus has very powerful and very troubled brother Mikhail that jerk decided that taking over the morlocks and then using his ambiguous mutant powers to kill himself and all of them was a great plan. It was not. This was only one of the almost comically numerous family tragedies that led colossus to leave the x men to join their foe magneto and space. You've ever jude the obscure. It was kind of like that although actually less overblown. That didn't go well, either magneto had his brain raised in a fight with the X men leaving his office lieutenant accidents to take over his followers that didn't go well either. Just, like storm was unable to protect her morlocks from a group of horrible murderers, Exodus was unable to protect his followers from an angry space skeleton. I question the accuracy of this analogy locate not just like it but but still. The X. Men recently found out that Mikhail apparently didn't kill the remaining morlocks despite his best efforts, but sent them to another dimension where time flows faster. Now, the younger surviving morlocks all grown up of come back to Earth as the murderous gene nation that's gene with G NOT GENE WITH A J G nations plan is to murder lots and lots of humans. frigging millennials killing the humans being alive industry and they don't even eat at applebee's. I tell you. What if instead of being relegated to the sewers, the morlocks had just lurked applebees. They would eat thousands and thousands of calories every day without realizing it that can't be healthy either maybe but like imagine how different their civilization would have ended up in fact, in general imagine a civilized civilization that's built from scratch and abandoned applebee's restaurants. There would be so much flair. That brings us to uncanny x number three, hundred, twenty-five generation of evil written by Scott lobbed penciled by Joe Madureira inked by Townsend and Ryan colored by Steve Do Collado and electric Cran lettered by Richard Stockings and comic craft. And this issue has a not just gate fold cover but a double gate fold cover that is four covers worth of cover and the logo is foil and got double pages and it costs more and part of that is because like we mentioned earlier, this is an issue that ends with a multiple of five part of it is also that this was around the twentieth anniversary of when giant size x men number one came out. Did you feel kind of cheated by the double gate fold cover like I. Don't feel really live up to its potential. This one. Yes. It's just basically one simple picture stretched out but the concept of double gate fold covers I. Love that full image from x men volume two number one. That's that is a good use of fold. This is not. Yeah. Yeah. That's true. I mean Joe Mad Artists. Fun. But there's not a lot to know this is a novelty for the sake of the novelty it doesn't. It's not a more interesting cover. It's not better coverage just like Yep it got some folds in it. Well. Anyway. This issue is double sized to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of giant size, adjective lists accident number forty five, which will be covering soon also was and it occurs to me we got a tribute issue of giant size x number one for its thirty fifth anniversary where every page was redrawn by different artists if you had a chance to check that out yet. I have not. It's actually pretty cool. Great. I might be mispronouncing that does page that is completely in a different style than all the other artists but I love their style and so all of a sudden it's just giants has asked number one basically going into power pack I, feel really good about that thunderbird has never looked so cute. Good, he should get to look cute. This issue opens with something. We haven't seen in quite a while. Hey, it's the X. Men playing baseball. You know like they do actually less often than we assume they do but still it's very wholesome and sweet. Look, they do it occasionally I don't think they've ever finished the game though. And this is no exception. But first, let's talk about how it starts because the opening page of this issue is delightful and I suspect as a cyclops fan, you have feelings about it as well. There's this great picture of cyclops as the pitcher he's in this sleeveless hoodie these baggy jeans, a baseball cap is usual shades like pretty impressive stubble and very well detailed arm hair like Damn Joe matter era that is an attractive Scott Summers I'm kind of weirded out by how big he is in this era. I mean it's Joe Madureira, all the major pretty giant. Okay Fair Point. Jean agrees with my take on cyclops here I. Love How she's just blatantly delightedly checking out his but as she talks about the fact that she's checking out his but. You know. All of your heart. To cyclops but speaking of chuckle novels. So. This game isn't just the X. Men the X. men and generation x playing baseball together I dig that I really miss the old days when the accident and the mutant would hang out and do stuff together like it had this wonderful generational school slash family feel and it's nice to see that again. I, also liked that we see. Cannonball and jubilee as the two outliers in this as the the youngest of the expert and the kind of most experienced generation acts. And, of course, they're giving each other shit because they're them. It's delightful. It's it's just kind of pleasant and charming and it ends of course, ridiculously bishop tries to steal home and. It ends with a big pile of tangled bruised X. men all wrapped up in skin with an untouched Monet's sitting on top holding the ball and being somewhat baffled as to how on earth this can actually be. America's national pastime. You know I think the last time we saw the X. men play a sports game together was uncanny number three, oh nine that awesome tunnel issue right before Scott and Jean's wedding, and that game also ended with a big pile of bruised X. men. I mean again, they never actually finished a game although I would disagree with me on this point say America's national pastime is probably actually bigotry. Her Ray Baseball's more fun while Li- think. Baseball's more fun and I don't even I don't even like baseball I like baseball. Legit I played on a little team when I was young because I thought I was supposed to because I was a little boy. I never actually learned how it worked. I think I was a liability Kiddo imagining you with Calvin, the deep left field where you're so far out that you end up just wandering away. I, mean kind of that. Yeah. So my my because I say as if they're not all are in their thirties style. But. It's weird. They're also all taller than me, which is really unfair but they all played played baseball pretty seriously and. I don't care a lot about baseball is a sport beyond the cubs but I do care deeply about my baby cousins and so I went to their games and got really enthusiastic about it and I do understand the basic workings of baseball as a result of this. Excellent I feel like that's handy thing to know I've gradually learned over the years but. Some of the weird like situational rules still allude me fortunately for us. You don't actually have to know anything about baseball to follow the scene because honestly the X. men they're. Pretty much. And I love that Wolverine and storm after the game have station just reminiscing about when times used to be more like this. Wolverine. says. Laughing Roro used to happen more than a dozen. Now, you me the risky in the L.. Those were good times. True, it is nice to see us all smiling again. Even if it is just for today. When did happen row when life slamming so hard that we forgot how to laugh. Goddess only knows old friend. It actually kind of reminds me of beast and Jean talking about the old days in the annual we covered what it reminds me of most actually is the. Conversation that beast iceman have before they actually go out and teach my talks with lava and the true meaning of Christmas. You know I'm surprised. We don't reference that issue more. I'm surprised more people reference that. No, I'm not joking like at one point one of them is asking you know when did life become? So unremittingly bleak Oh. I wasn't I, wasn't. I wasn't being a Smart Act like legitimately reminds me of that conversation. I always forget that that was a real issue that somebody returned to mcso with. You say somebody like we don't all know that it was. well-done Kurt, we love you. And we love my talks with the lawman. Anyway, at this point Colossus, speak of the Russian Devil teleport's in with an unconscious Callisto and I should point out he's wearing his yellow and red x outfit I. Guess He got tired of wearing purple bathrobes out in space but this time his he's got the shoulder armor attached. That is just God damned gigantic like this is a guy who in his metal form probably already has to turn sideways to get through doors and now we have to like I. Don't know do it twice. He ends up still sideways, but it takes more effort. Yes to serve bend dimensions, Navy Maybe he's like A. ex-man Hound of Tyndall. Los Anyway. Colossus explains where he's been, which as we saw at the end of the fall of avalon story was space and then an article where he met up with Callisto. She needs a hand because. Although it's never released dated why she's unconscious injured somehow messed up and the exponentially only ones that he knows to turn to. Now he has not back to join the team and he's very clear about that. Oh it's heartbreaking like storm is so excited to see him and calls him little brother and he is just cold. He is just clearly dad inside it's it's so sad because the dynamic they used to have you know in the days that Logan was just talking about all. Honestly after the first you know. By six tenths of twenty twenty, I can't blame him. For his that? Well, Callisto wakes up from her unexplained unconsciousness to warn the X. Men about g nation who they kind of already knew about having fought them in two separate team configurations over didn't know the full scope of Gene Nations Villainy The first thing we learned from Callisto is that Mikhail Rasputin the guy that took them to the other world. He didn't make it there or something she doesn't really go into details. That's a lie. The second thing we learn is that G. Nation is in fact, the second generation who entirely came of age they're the older morlocks are you know significantly older? These are the kids who were kids and who grew up stories of what happened with the morlocks to get them there. and. Their leader is someone named marrow. And to make her point, Callisto just randomly shoots and energy blast the accidents gigantic wall size TV. It's like Gambit ripping out spaceships circuitry to make a point in gambit in the externals severe property damage as an exclamation point that is not a good idea. But so much less likely to cause mass death. I don't know if you blow up a TV that big probably somebody's GonNa get electrocuted or at least knocked over. Oh more relevantly exactly. Forty five minutes from when Callisto woke up it's going to be the anniversary of the mutant massacre the event that saw most of the morlocks killed by the Marauders G nation is planning to strike then killing one human for every morlock who died which, hey, wait a minute. Okay first of all. Nations said explicitly before that they were going to kill one hundred humans for every dead morlock and second. Humans didn't kill the morlocks that was the marauders were mutants. frigging millennials if they spent less time eating avocado toast and more wartime reading, old comic better plan you can do both of those things at once but also I kind of get it because while they were killed directly by other mutants, they were also still basically killed by systemic discrimination, which was human human bias based. Okay. So G. Nation kind of has a point I still don't like their plan. No. Meanwhile. Not Coincidentally Gambit about the X. men figuring out his secrets because remember at the end of the world he enrolled kissed thinking the world was ending. So why not and she absorbed a lot of his memories could those perhaps be related to the topic that the heroes were just discussing marauders? Is that why betsy were under to or worried about going into fast? Maybe maybe. Yeah. But anyway, gambit worries about this just in time for in fact, rogue to randomly call the mansion to see how gambit is doing. So it's time for him in a different x-men comic to track her down because he's freaking out he's wondering what she knows and it's time for sinister who hears about this to wonder if his Are bearing fruit is that a euphemism? Asks Chernobyl Shaw. I will not. So the x men go with Callisto she uses her weird technology that was developed in the time accelerated other dimension to teleport them in a housing project building which leads underground. This apparently is where gene nation is going to begin their murder weird place for it but okay. So, we've got team a WHO is actually on the ground that's that storm, Colossus Wolverine and of course Callisto. We've also got a team be as backup in the Blackburn, they don't matter at all. Yeah. Yeah you'd think they would arkhangelsk and he's thinking about the mutant massacre because remember that's where his wings were destroyed, which led to him basically dying which led to him becoming apocalypse horsemen of death. But now we don't go anywhere with that. Honestly this issue is basically is to giant size x men number one, the issue anniversary it is because it focuses on the team we got to know in that issue or well at least about half of them well, or at least three of them I. Think this might actually technically less than. Well. It's about Wolverine Storm and Colossus who I think are some of the more memorable characters from giant-sized but banshee was at the school playing baseball. He could come cyclops is up there in a jet he could come night crawler is okay. nightcrawlers often excalibur I guess it would feel a little too hackneyed if colossus showed up nowhere and nightcrawlers showed up out of nowhere can we assume that sunfire has joined and quit the team between panels? Probably yeah, and thunderbirds still dead. So there's that. Yes there. Definitely, only three of those team members on the ground here I? I question whether that officially counts in a module at that point. I don't know but that does seem to be the intent between that and focusing on very much a classic x men event the. Mutant massacre. Baranov. So the team on the ground is having trouble in the trouble starts internally with Callisto giving storm some well, deserved shit about how she took over the morlocks and then just a band of them. I mean pretty much. Colossus does defense storm saying that blaming storm for that makes much sense as him blaming Xavier for the death of Liana and the rest of his family which I mean he kind of did blaming Xavier for that also you can save your for a lot and be reasonably confident that you're accurate. Well, as is often the case, the X. men in their argument are saved by the bell by which I mean a human corpse nailed to the wall with bicycle parts with a message painted around because marrow is nothing if not consistent and I appreciate that in her message, she specifies X. Men and women. I mean, you know she may be awful. But as we know, millennials tend to have more progressive attitudes toward Gender Okay I realized that technically marijuana member of generation accident generation not the team and I myself am a millennial as are you Jay depending on how you look at it but the jokes are just so easy. But we're Oregon trail generation, which is either the oldest millennials or the youngest generation X.. So we're we're sort of an unlimited space relative to hear which I'm going to say means that we can make fun of both. Her Ray. As, you want to call edge eras are in general in this issue, like we've talked a lot in previous episodes just about what fun version of X. Men he draws, and even in this panel were there is a human corpse in like a bicycle outfit nailed to a wall with bicycle parts. It's gory ship and it's still somehow really fun panel it's a human corpse, but it's a fun human corpse. Exactly well, the baddies presumably recovering from their art project are waiting we have. We have vessel. We saw before that was the sort of swamp thing looking. Guy. Dr, Bone Hatton Nope. I mean sack and we have a new guy named reverb who looks Kinda. Like Sleep Walker from the old marvel trading card I have he's like a green dude and a purple cloak I don't actually know much about sleep Walker but God I, love this trading cards. After a brief ambush by Dr. Sack the leader of gene nation confronts both former leaders of the Morlocks Mero Confronts Callisto and storm and marrow very much remember storm from that I fight that storm and Callisto had down in the alley way back in the day. You Beautiful Callisto is ugly. He the Bright Lady, she, was Dr we. Had such hopes. Hope, that you would lead us from the tunnels into the light. Child Xavier night offered a place. A place where uproar. With the humans where we would be feared and hunted and heated. As leader you us more than that that you were too weak to fight for a city free of up worlders and since you could not would not did not. We decided to come back and do it ourselves. You get raised in Shitty dimension after having horribly unjust things done to you like I could see that leading to that attitude the murders a bit much but I kind of get Romero's coming from. Are. We officially just calling this Shitty dimension now? I'm sure it has a name but I don't remember it anyway point being marrow has dozens of captured humans from a subway car that passed nearby. It sounds like chained up with bombs attached to them. And then she rips open her chest a little bit to show storm that she's got a detonator attached to her own heart. If Marrow's heart keeps beating the detonator will activate and blow up all the humans what what the Hell's going on with his plan. Also marriage whole basis for this planet is yet. You don't have the guts to do this and look kid the last time you saw this lady, she literally stabbed someone in the heart like that's her signature move as far as the morlocks are concerned. Don't get me wrong. I'm all in favor of overly complicated villain plans, but this one is just straight up nonsensical. Yeah. This goofy is Al.. Well. It's dual time. So meritas in bone is over to storm and storm draws first blood and licks the knife which I imagine. Thing. was just in marrow's flesh I. Mean Jeez. Wolverine also POPs his bone claws a lot in this story and his healing factor is kind of burned out and all I can think is he is going to get the grossest sewer infections Oh man yeah. Everything about this is gross like everyone needs to get scrubbed down after this. And after lots of stabbings, storm Mero talks again about how storm let her down. You. Held my life in your hands. Bright Lady, you destroyed it. And in a bit of way too on the nose or should I say on the heart humor storm then literally rips out marrow's heart holds it in her hands and squashes it, and that's the the end of the fight. Okay. So there's a lot going on here but I like she literally just reach is into marrow's chest. That's implausible second. I want to take this moment to note that the sound effect of squashing a heart is apparently squeak. I'm kinda swift out by it. Same I i. feel it's a solid choice. So, Merrill will eventually be fine just like Callisto before her but I've a question Jay. So this clearly is no majdal classic accident stuff specifically to the story where storm and Callisto fight for leadership of the morlocks husbands worked for you. It doesn't. It really doesn't I mean that fight works because there's not precedent for it because it's storms just being like, yeah. I will totally stab someone through the heart. And in this one we know that and so there's not really any question as to how it's GonNa. End. Yeah. Like I get where this issue is going I, mean talking about those old days the classic x men era like, okay. That's a reasonable thing to do with big anniversary issue focusing on those characters that have such a ban from way back in the day but. I. Don't know like the elements work and then there's this part and this is the last part. So it's kind of what you remember when you finish the issue is the taste that's left in your mouth. And it's just it's simultaneously anticlimactic and over the top. Yeah So perhaps it's for the best the continuity just says Mero. Oh. Yeah. Check out the reason she survived if nothing else this story gives us that. Yes, spoiler she's got another one. Handy right. So. That's that we have dipped our toes back into the Olympic pool that is X. men. For all of its flaws. Story One thing Yeah I feel like it really kind of got to the heart of the banner. Nice. Anyway. We've got listeners and they've got questions. All right. This deity to ask I'm Tumbler. What's the best horror related x-men comic besides curse of the mutants and this this dat too i. think that is a really unfair qualifier because this means that I can't say the story with a vampire sperm whale and I resent you for that. That was a size barrier issue. Wasn't it? Yes and Gabriel Hernandez's Walter and it's beautiful and I love it. Beautiful. I would have to say the magic miniseries the only on arrest Butin. We have all the trappings of good horror in it. We have demons and torture and hell dimensions. We have friends dying or being corrupted in a way that's not just an illusion like the X. men that are in this story are just X. men from an alternate timeline and they are getting turned into horrible demons and they are getting slaughtered like the image of nightcrawlers but being killed Valley Yana the image of Colossus torn open like those stuck with me but most importantly, that story has stakes. It's not just about whether Ileana who starts out does this innocent little girl will escape limbo? It's about whether she's going to escape with our humanity intact. You know what other stories stakes curse of the mutants about Vampires Yeah but honestly the magic mini series in addition to just being a stellar miniseries, it's so good and so harsh. Like a lot of the best horror, it works a fantastical set of events and images as a metaphor for real life trauma. And that's effective when you do that in horror and this mini series I think does it very well and? A lot more tastefully than it could have. My answer is inferno. And I realized that's a very, very broad space to draw from. But I'M GONNA say specifically the UNCANNY X men issues at the edge of inferno and specifically the issue where Alex and Madelyn. Good at the Rainbow Room. Oh. Yeah. Those people go into the elevator and then when it opens backup, it's just blood and bones and madeline is changing and Alex doesn't quite catch on. That nightmare logic is so effective. Yeah. An anonymous listener asks Tumbler with a lot of other companies doing Maggio's knockoffs inspired by an accidental by timing X. men like titles I. Wonder if you have a favorite x men like title when I say the above description, I'm talking about a team of misfits possibly hated humanity that come together as a team not individuals to be heroes titles like doom patrol the one with a similar timing to the first few X men, books, dark horses, umbrella academy, and Balance Harbinger, for instance. So my answer is is a duality, a series of novels that was literally wrecked. Recommend to me as that I quote the best novels and I think that actually sells them short. So they are a deliberate image, you and a series that found find a lot of its foundations in the X. Men, and that is Bob Pros resident duality? Like. I said, they're very very direct Amodu to the X. men but pro takes that common foundation and he builds it in a strikingly different and I think in many ways more interesting direction and he does that with all of the intersectional diversity that the original has historically lacked and I just I cannot recommend these highly enough I read the first one accidentally about a week before the second one came out. And I don't think I've I've been more absorbed a set of books in. In a very, very, very long time they're just phenomenally good and if you're an X. men fan who likes the premise and wishes that it had gone and more daring in different directions, I cannot recommend these highly enough. I mean in general, they're terrific books. So even if you're not an X. men fan like them, but you're also probably not listening to this podcast so you know you do you. I really have to read those those on. Great. So I was thinking across media as well and man I have such a long list of movies that listeners and friends of recommended to me as scratching the each of the ones I remember specifically are the darkest minds fast caller and freaks not the one of us one of us one that the more recent one. I, don't watch movies very often, but I've heard those are all great and very X. men like it's not a movie but has anyone recommended you my hero academia A number of people. Actually it's definitely got some of that X. kids feel. Nice. That's exciting Also, in the anime ish direction I have a weird answer final fantasy three. Now F, F thirteen is a very divisive game. I personally love it but I think it really works. It's about a group of people with nothing in common who unite after being exposed to enormous power and brandon enemies of the world, and then they have to decide whether to save a world that hates fears them while learning to become found family with one another because they're so isolated from the rest of the world like, yeah it's actually very very X. men. It's also science fiction fantasy nonsense which is to say it's very, very axeman. Valid entirely valid I. mean add to the enemy list and say that be Star also has some some pretty x-men components and feel to it I've seen a lot of fan art from that randomly appear in places. I would not expect to see fan art and that's all I know about it. It's really weird and good I can wreck I recommend it. Okay. As far as comics go and actually as far as marvel comics, go I feel like most people who like X. Men especially if you like new mutants or generation acts our exports, runaways all the way with those kids, it's more their ties to their super villain parents rather than their own traits the complicate the relationship with society, but it checks all the boxes really well, and it does found family better than almost anything I've ever read. It's so good i. hope the comic comes back. It hasn't been around since the hiatus and that makes me sad and I'm also said the TV show ended because it was really good. I'll add on the comics front, and this is this is a series part of a world that I have a complicated and fraught relationship with. but I think be D has a lot of the same. Ensemble Dynamics that that Khalid Jimmy accident. The Hell spinoff. Yeah I would absolutely agree and it is a really, really good comic. We are fully listener supported podcast and certain levels of support come with on Eric Knowledge moment from various fictional characters and concepts. Tell us what you have to say angry Clermont's narrator. You thought yourself so clever Thomas. You imagine that you were at the top of your game on top of the world. You were so wrapped up in your own. So called victory, you never even realized that you weren't on top at all the Jack. Weaver was hovering. As always. Slightly overhead. Now. I had guesses as to to wear. This was gonna go from here and this defied all of them to the MIC to mice astonishment. Absence from here to sex Shinui Shaw. Archangel, in Ceylon first date was at my Sexy Hellfire Club party. And did I detect that I real spark between them when we all had sex in my sex basement? I'm definitely sure yelling and getting stabbed with a psychic knife is sex I mean one form of sex which I am an expert at. She'll be shy steps. You'll matchmaker I like the sound of that. Think of all the sexy connection I could bring into the world and all the opportunities for people to tell me what sex is I mean what it is to them. I already know all about all the recipes of naked grownup time and special Hud Matt Jones Missiel. Thank you both so much for coming to my home. Do you see what I did? Their did right. Good of course I think you'll both get along very well. But I how about a sexy little icebreaker game? It'll help us all get to know each other better every curve every. Every trapezoid now. Please yell at me about our Shilton troubling childhood until I cry I know we just met but you can fantasize and Matt stabbed me with the focused totality of your psychic might. What do you mean is that a euphemism? my friends everything is easy feminism. What is And with that Jay and miles explain the X. men is recorded sex in new fairfield connecticut in exile, from forest, hills New York, and Portland Oregon, and produced by the ever sexy Matt Hunter who also arranged our theme music. You can find more of Matt Sexy Compositions at Moon Hyphen Talk Dot Band Camp Dot Com. New episodes euphemistically come out most Sundays on itunes stitcher Google podcasts, spotify at explain the X. Men, dot, com, and injure no bichons sex basement checkout explain the X. men dot com visual companions for every episode, which probably include actual sex. Our show is one hundred percent sexy listener supported. If you'd like to help us stay on the air sexy and add free check out the Patriot link at the top of explain the X. Men Dot Com. Next week I'll be out of the studio, but Jay will be interviewing bob role about the resonant duality and what it means to right past the X. men. Okay let do this thing copy of so many episodes. This is it's too many. It's really upsetting I have written that this point over three hundred cold opens and It's upsetting that there are still topics for them. And WanNa be enough, right. Okay. All right right.

Jean Grey Tyler Tyler Gen Scott Callisto Betsy Betsy Warren Hank baseball Jay Colossus Callisto Scott Scott Warren murder Adam Amax bobby Richard Stockings Ted Speaking Jane Miles Warren Kenneth Worthington Ray Baseball
Democracy Now! 2019-06-12 Wednesday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-06-12 Wednesday

"From New York. This is democracy. Now. The judge put moola in president twenty eighteen when all polls show that will likely win the presidency, which is what naval Bolsonaro to actually win. That is primary adversary was imprisoned. And then he took the judge who put Lu imprison and made him. The Justice minister political crisis is growing in Brazil after the interceptor veal, the judge who health in jail. Former president, Luiz Nacion Lula Sova likely aid in the federal prosecutors who targeted him leaked documents also reveal the prosecutors had serious doubts about Lula's skills. I continue challenging Moto. And the court. Overview show the world and to show Brazil. Single piece of evidence of crime committed by me. To who the eastern T behavior of the judiciary, in this instance is a political form of behavior. We'll go to narrow to speak with the Pulitzer prize winning journalist. Glenn Greenwald up the intercept two broke the story, then we look at horrific conditions for immigrants. Hilton for profit detention jails around the country with these it was sad. It was sad for me for all of us, we cried and everything we suffered you know in our way of suffering suffering for everything we suffer a lot. I am strong but I feel like crying everything today, at least twenty four immigrants have died in the custody of immigration and customs enforcement under Trump. Now homeland security's own inspector general has revealed how detained immigrants or subjected to rotten foods, severe overcrowding inadequate medical care, and broken overflowing toilets. We'll. Get the latest from outta Bogado immigration reporter for reveal from the center for investigative reporting. All that, and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now. Democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I made me Goodman, and Hong Kong protesters and police have been clashing and the second mass demonstration in recent days against the proposed Bill to allow extradition of Hong congress to mainland China riot police, deployed tear gas rubber bullets and pepper spray against demonstrators in front of government buildings earlier in the day lawmakers announced, they'll postponed today's debate on the contested legislation. Critics of the Bill say it would infringe on Hong Kong's independence in the legal and human rights of Hong Kong residents in Arizona case against a humanitarian aid, volunteer who provided food water and shelter to undocumented migrants. Ended in a mistrial Tuesday after a deadlocked jury was unable to deliver a verdict. Scott Warren, from the group. No more deaths and a ho Samaritans faced up to twenty years in prison after being charged with two counts of felony for harboring and one count of felony conspiracy. Eight jurors found Scott Warren, not guilty. For said he was guilty. Prosecutors have declined to comment, and whether they'll seek a retrial against Warren, this is Scott, Warren speaking to reporters and supporters and the press that yesterday's mistrial since my arrest in January of two thousand eighteen. At least eight bodies were recovered from the auto corridor of the Arizona desert. We knew that's a minimum number. And that many more are out there and have not been found. The government's plan in the midst of this humanitarian crisis policies to target undocumented people refugees in their families. Prosecutions to criminalise humanitarian aid, kindness and solidarity. And now where I live the revelation that they will build an enormous inexpensive wall across vast stretch of southwestern. Arizona's unbroken Sonoran desert house lawmakers voted Tuesday to authorize the judiciary committee to sue the Trump administration federal court to enforce subpoenas for former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and Torney general William bar lawmakers, you're seeking documents and testimony from again related to the molar inquiry and possible. Obstruction of Justice by President Trump. The committee will hold off for now on an forcing bars subpoena after the Justice department agreed Monday to hand over some of the underlying evidence from the Miller report. Meanwhile, the Justice department revealed Tuesday, they'll. Recommend Trump use executive privilege to block contempt citations against bar, and commerce secretary Wilbur Ross over their refusal to hand over documents related to adding a citizenship question to the twenty twenty census the house oversight committee's voting on the contempt procedure today. Meanwhile, Donald Trump junior set to testify in a closed door hearing before the Senate intelligence committee today, the Republican led panel subpoenaed him last month after he twice refused to testify about his role in matters related to the Russian vestich in, including the two thousand sixteen Trump Tower meeting and the Trump Tower Moscow project in Moscow local reports say Russian police have detained nearly a hundred people including position politician, Alexi avowedly at a protest condemning police corruption over the recent arrest of independent journalists Yvonne Golan off goal. Enough was released Tuesday following widespread public outcry goal enough reported on corruption and press. Censorship was arrested last. Week and accused of drug dealing and what his lawyers and press. Freedom advocates say we're fabricated charges after police planted fake evidence. He has since been cleared of the charges, and the arresting officers, and the case have been suspended pending the results of an internal inquiry goal enough's reporting included investigation into the finances of Moscow's deputy mayor's family, the funding of public works in Moscow and efforts to suppress press freedom, Russian press, also rallied around Golan off with three major business. Newspapers publishing matching front pages. Monday to call out his arrest Russia ranks number one hundred forty nine in reporters without borders, two thousand nineteen world press, freedom index, which describes Russia as having a quote stifling atmosphere for independent journalists in Saudi Arabia who the'missile raid on an airport in the southwest of the country has wounded at least twenty-six billions, according to a statement by the. Saudi led coalition. A number of children were reportedly among the injured civilians who were taken to a nearby hospital. The attack comes day after Saudi officials said it intercepted to drones in the south of Saudi Arabia, no damage, or casualties reported from the attack the ongoing war in Yemen between the US backed Saudi coalition, and who the rebels has led to the world's worst humanitarian disaster. The United Nations estimates the combined death toll from fighting hunger and disease has reached nearly a quarter of a million since the start of the conflict in Sudan, protest leaders and the ruling transitional military council have agreed to resume talks following a bloody military crackdown on nonviolent demonstrators protest leaders say an ongoing civil disobedience action will be halted for now. The news was delivered by Ethiopian mediators and Sudan, a group of doctors involved in the protest movement say at least one hundred eighteen people have been killed since the crackdown at the process site. On monday. Doctors also, say paramilitaries with the rapid support forces committed at least seventy rape. Since the raid Sudan's military took power in April after a month. Long popular uprising led to the overthrow of longtime. Thar -tarian president, Amara Ashir, who's currently imprison in boats wanna LGBTQ and human rights advocates celebrated Tuesday as the country overturned long standing laws that criminalize same sex relations the historic ruling came after a twenty one year old student brought a case against the colonial era law under which anyone found guilty of committing homosexual acts could face up to seven years behind bars. A statement by the advocacy group lesbians, gays and bisexuals of Botswana said, quote, not only does the decision provide legal affirmation in recognition of the rights of LGBT IQ persons. But it allows an important space where dressing public health issues more efficiently we can. Finally start building a more tolerant society. They said back in the US acting homeland security secretary, Kevin MC lean and told congress Tuesday that sixty thousand children have been taken into DHS custody in the last forty days alone, critic, say, Macalinsan testimony is part of an ongoing effort to build up a case for more border funding his hearing came ahead of a plan vote by the Senate appropriations committee next week. I'm President Trump's request for four and a half billion dollars in emergency spending tied to the US Mexico border. Meanwhile, immigration and human rights advocates are continuing to raise alarm over the dire conditions in which migrant children are being locked up. We'll have more on that report later in the show. Meanwhile, immigration hard, liner, Ken Cuccia Nellie has soom the role of acting head of citizenship and immigration services. Several top. Republicans have come out against Kuching as temporary appointment. And Senate whip John thune warned the Republican controlled Senate was unlikely to approve a potential nomination for coochie LA to become permanent head of the agency, as a state lawmaker in Virginia coochie, Anneli, authored legislation, seeking to force employees to speak English in the workplace and he unsuccessfully fought to eliminate the fourteenth amendment's birthright citizenship clause. At an emotional congressional hearing Tuesday, Jon Stewart blasted lawmakers for their inaction, head of vote on renewing healthcare funding for nine eleven responders who became sick as a result of their work following the terror attack the comedian and former host of the daily show has been a longtime advocate for the nine eleven responders and is repeatedly called out proposed cuts to the fund, which is set to expire in twenty twenty New York Democratic Congress member Carolyn Maloney introduced legislation earlier this year to fund the program permanently. This is Jon Stewart, addressing the subcommittee of the House Judiciary panel behind me. Filled room of nine eleven first responders. And in front of me. A nearly empty congress. Sick and dying. They brought themselves down here speak. To no one. Shameful? It's an embarrassment to the country, and it is a stain on this institution. And you should be ashamed of yourselves for those that aren't here, but you won't be. Because ability doesn't appear to be something that curse in this chamber. In Alabama Republican governor Kay Ivey signed into law, a Bill mandating child sex offenders, undergo chemical castration as a condition of their parole. The law would apply to anyone found convicted of committing sexual offense with child under the age of thirteen six other states have similar laws for certain sex offenders, medical experts and human rights groups have raised concerns about the practice the Alabama and consider Liberties Union says chemical castration is unconstitutional as violates due process and privacy laws. The executive director of the Alabama ACO, you said of the new law, they really misunderstand. What sexual assault is about sexual assaults isn't about sexual gratification. It's about power. It's about controlled said, in reproductive rights news. Vermont governor, Phil Scott signed a Bill Monday affirming abortion, as a fundamental. Right. The law prohibits, the government from interfering with the decision to get an abortion and protects access. To contraception sterilization, and family planning a spokesperson for governor, Scott previously said, he would not sign the Bill passed by democratic state lawmakers last month, though, Vermont law would still have allowed the legislation to go into effect. Meanwhile in Maine, democratic governor Janet mill signed a Bill allowing physician assistants and some registered nurses to perform abortions, instead of just doctors which she says will increase abortion access for Mainers in rural areas. And in New York housing rights advocates are celebrating after state lawmakers announced an agreement that would provide the strongest tenant protections and over quarter of a century, the deal came just days ahead of the expiration of the current rent laws at the end of this week, lawmakers agreed to abolish laws, allowing landlords to deregulate rents on apartments after they exceed certain limit. They also will Kerr provision allowing landlords to raise the rent of rent controlled apartments after renovations, the laws expected to give me a polities. Round New York. More thirty to regulate rents and ensure greater access to affordable housing. And those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot or the Warren peace report. I made me Goodman, one Gonzales, welcome to all of our listeners and views across the country and around the world one before we move on with our first story all the nave reaching deal to toughen rent protection. Talk about the significance of this is this is a huge victory. Amy was back in the mid nineteen ninety s when George Pataki, Republican governor of New York was in office, and there was a extreme conservative of Republican Senate, and a an assembly, New York that was democratic but really control by the landlord lobby. And they really initiated this vacancy decontrol that resulted about two hundred thousand rent regulated unison, York City, being decontrol base did controlled means the landless could charge whatever they want. And so what happened filing? This this year and just in, in Albany is this extension sweeping extension of the regulations that will now eliminate vacancy decontrol that will also prevent landlords it used to be that an apartment, when it came vacant could oughta Mattingly, increase rent by twenty percent. That is no longer going to be allowed and that they cannot Jack up major capital improvement prices and then charged attendance for those improvements. So a lot of that has been eliminated, and most importantly, regulations were only New York City and Yonkers few suburban cities. Now any city and county in the state will be able to adopt rent regulations, this, like millions of people in New York state will now have greater protections from their rent rising above their ability to be able to pay. And what do you think that something for the country for places like San Francisco, while it's already happening in, in, in Newark? And in several other places in California, increasingly rent, because housing is a renter's has become so exorbitant more and more local governments are saying, we've got to regulate regulate rent. So this is just another huge push in the movement to protect tenants across the country. And of course, we'll continue to follow this well, political crisis is growing in Brazil after the intercept reveal that the judge who helped jail former Brazilian president Louis NAS, you Lula Silva likely aided federal prosecutors net corruption case in an attempt to prevent LA's Workers Party from winning the president's lead. Cell phone messages among Brazilian law enforcement officials and other data obtained by the point to an ongoing collaboration between judge said he'll Moro and the prosecutors investigating a sweeping corruption scandal known around the world as operation car wash Lula was considered a favorite in the. Lead up to the two thousand eighteen presidential election until he was put in jail and forced out of the race on what many say, we're trumped up corruption charges. The leaked documents also revealed that prosecutors had serious doubts about Louis guilt. The jailing of Lula help pave the way for the election of the far right? Former military officer. Sonata who then named judge said he'll Moto to be his Justice minister, the intercepts reporting is based on a trove of internal files and private conversations from prosecutorial team behind operation car wash the interceptors of the files, the secret, Brazil archive, as a result of the intercepts reporting Brazil's Supreme court has announced it will reconsider an appeal by Lula to be released from prison calls. Or also growing for Sergio Moro to resign as Justice minister, the Brazilian bar associations, cold. For more toe to be suspended and for all prosecutors involved in the car wash scandal probe to be disbanded. Moore has denied any wrongdoing claims, the messages have been taken out of context moral road. In a statement, quote, I lament the lack of indication of the source of the person responsible for the criminal invasion of the prosecutor cellphones, as well as the position of the site that did not contact me before the publication. Contrary to basic rule of journalism as for the content of the messages. They mentioned there is no sign of any abnormality or providing directions as a magistrate, despite being taken out of context, and the sensationalism of the articles. He said, Vermont Senator twenty twenty presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. Totally intercept today. It is clearer than ever that Lula da Silva was imprisoned in a politicized prosecution that denied him a fair trial and due process during his presidency Lula oversaw, huge reductions, and poverty, and remains Brazil's most popular politician. I stand with political and social leaders across the globe, who are calling on Brazil's judiciary to release Lula, an annot his conviction Senator Sanders said we go now to Rio de Janeiro Brazil to speak with the Pulitzer prize winning journalist, Glenn Greenwald of the intercept who broke the story, so Glenn lay out what you exposed in this three part series. Oh, the Kyle. Looks like Glenn is having a little trouble hearing us, so we're going to break and we'll come back to Glenn Greenwald in Rio de Janeiro stay with us. David locks and black monument on samba performing sounds like now, this is democracy now democracy now dot or the Warren peace report. I mean, he Goodman with one Gonzales, our guest is Glenn Greenwald Pulitzer prize winning journalist founding, editors of the intercept just published the secret, Brazil archive three-part expose revealing that the judge overseeing the case that put former Brazilian president Louis Nastya Lula da Silva behind bars likely aided the federal prosecutors and their case against Lula and other high profile figures lay out what you found in this three part report Glenn and how it's rocking Brazil right now. Sure. So as your audience likely knows because I've discussed it with you many times, and you've covered with other guests, Brazil is a country that has been swamped by multiple political crises, the impeachment of former Workers Party president Dilma Rousseff who succeeded Lou the ascension of this far. Right. President air Bolsonaro economic crises, and the like. But by far the biggest event in Brazil was the imprisonment last year of former President, Lula, just Silva, not just because he was such a giant on the world stage democratically, which he is because he was elected overwhelmingly twice in two thousand and two and two thousand six and his presidency was so successful in lifting millions of people out of poverty in transforming Brazil, that he lepers Zil and left office. I mean with an eighty seven percent approval rating, which is unheard of so to put somebody that in prison is an earth shattering story in and of itself. But it was made all the more consequential by the fact that all polls showed that Lula who was running again from president last year. He was term limited out of office. The first time was the overwhelming favorite was the massive front one or was a head by twenty to thirty points in every poll, including ahead of Bolsonaro. So to imprison Lula meant that he was rendered in eligible under the law to run. And that's what paved the way ultimately for gyro Bolsonaro essential to control over Brazil, which is the fifth most populous country in the world, with massive oil reserves, and the most important environmental resource on the planet, which is the Amazon, all of which is now in the hands of Bolsonaro this was done by taskforce prosecutors, and a judge Sergio Moro, who have basically been turned into superheroes into deities. By the Brazilian press. And by the world press Sergio Mora was. Terrel didn't around the world as some great figure. He was named to the time one hundred list in two thousand sixteen and went to the Golan York. He was had a huge profile on him on sixty minutes. That was a puff piece basically turning him into this noble, anti-corruption figure. And there's been almost no questioning of anything that they've done, even though they've been using highly questionable practices here in Brazil, there has been a long time suspicion that they in fact were abusing their powers for political and what they really were were right wing. I logged operatives who are abusing the law to destroy the Workers Party, one of the only leftwing parties and the entire democratic world that has dominated politics in a major country, and has succeeded in anti-poverty programs in order to usher in the pro right? Faction into power that they were abusing the law to basically put the leaders in prison too. Story the party they've always vehemently denied. This said, we have no ideology, we have no party preference. We have we don't care who wins. Elections were only neutral judges, and prosecutors applying the law the archive that was provided to us by our source, this massive trove of secret documents about their internal communications about their internal actions. Chat, there, audios videos, a archive, that as I've said is bigger in size than the Snowden archive was, which until that point was the largest leak in the history of US journalism bigger than that, finally enables us to see the truth about what they really did. And the three stories that we published on Sunday. The reason they shake in Brazil to the core is because Sergia Moro after both in our at one. Thanks, just as more pudding, Lula imprison became the second most powerful person. In Brazil, because Bolsonaro created what he called a super Justice ministry that Sergio more. Now runs he's the Justice minister of the country, it's like being attorney general, but on steroids controlling all law enforcement surveillance, police actions and what is materials shows are three key things number one. It shows that inside the prosecutor taskforce. They were talking openly about how they wanted to make sure the Workers Party lost the election, and we can talk about this Pacific, but in particular, there was a judge you authorize Lula to give an interview from prison twelve days before the election and they panicked. And they said, we need to stop this because if Lulu is allowed to be heard from he will there's a good chance. He will make PT win the election. And we need to put a stop to this. They said they were praying every day that PT doesn't return to power PT being the Workers Party. So. This five-year claim that they had, we don't have any preferences for parties. We don't care who wins elections was an absolute lie. They were talking openly and explicitly about how their top priority was making sure PT didn't win the election. Exactly what people have been accusing them of Secondly, just like in the US. A judge is required to be neutral a judge can't favor one side or the other. And there's long been suspicion that judge Moore when he was ruling on these cases like finding Lula guilty. Finding other left-wing leaders guilty and people from other parties guilty that he was in fact, collaborating in secret with the prosecutors to design the case they vehemently angrily denied this accusation the head of the prosecutorial taskforce. He's a national hero in Brazil Delton Donegal wrote a book in which he said, these accusations are outrageous. They're disgusting. We have video of judge Moreo being asked about this and he was so angry. About it that he actually scoffed at it with the smile saying, people talk about this, as being as though, it's judge Moro's prosecution or judge Moore AU's strategy. He said, people don't understand judges and Brazil have no role in prosecuting people are value is one of passivity. We simply listened to both sides. Listen to the evidence and make decisions what the conversations that we published show between judge Moro and the head of the prosecutorial task wars, is that judge Moore when fact was constantly, directing constructing designing the entire prosecution screaming at them when they were doing things that he thought were wrong telling them how to better fortified the case, not just against Lula. But against other people he was basically, the commander of the prosecutorial team. And then walking into court as though he were sitting judging Lewis case and others as a neutral arbiter, so ever. Everything that they vehemently denied to the public, they were doing in that. In fact, they were doing for years as these documents show, and then the third key revelation as you said, is that this specific case for which they prosecuted Lula, namely, the charge that he had received a what they call a triplex apartment in order to make sound very glamorous. When, in fact, it's kind of rundown shoddy, and Lou have the capability to buy one hundred thousand times over, if he wanted, but the charge wise he received this triplex apartment in renovations to it and exchange for helping this construction company get contracts that they knew themselves three days before they indicted him that they didn't have the evidence sufficient to show his guilt, or even to justify why this case belonged with them. But they just decided they were going to go forward anyway, because they knew they had a judge in judge Moore now minister, Moro singlemindedly devoted to the goal of. Imprisoning lula. And not just imprisoning him. But doing so in time to make him ineligible to run for twenty eighteen selection out of fear that PT would win the election. So the consequences of this revelation have been enormous because Moreo as I said, is the second most powerful person in Brazil after Bolsonaro, but he's by far the most respected person or at least was the most respected person, and even his most ardent and loyal defenders in light of these revelations have said, there's no way to defend this conduct one of the biggest right wing. Newspapers in Brazil dollars. Some Paulo that has spent four years praising and heralding and cheerleading for Sergio Moro came out and said he needs to resign and the head of the task force needs to be fired, just based on the first three stories that we publish, and that's indicative, and reflective of widespread sentiment and that's why. It's shaking Brazil to the core. Because Sergia more is crucial to the legitimacy of the Bolsonaro government, getting him to go. Join the government wise they crucial part Glen, I, I wanna ask you, because these obviously, very explosive conclusions that you restarted your reporting. Could you talk a little bit about the archives sources that you have? In other words, I can understand. The cell phone texts that say between different parties involved in this being leaked but you even talking about audio how, how is the audio compile with these people taking their own conversations or could you discuss a little bit, the, the nature of the documents that you have? Church. So when I say, audio generally, when what I mean is, and we haven't published any Audio's yet. So I'm reluctant to say much about them. But when I say, Audio's typically what I mean is not that they were taping their own conversations, but that they often communicate with one another using. Apps on telephones that enable you to either type out messages to people to tax messages to people, or you can leave voicemail messages for people, essentially, so instead of typing, some long message you just click microphone on your telephone, you speak at a monologue. And you leave a message that way on somebody else's phone, which is a very common thing to do for people who use what's app, or telegram, or signal those are the kinds of audios of I'm talking about. But because oftentimes, especially for complicated matters, you don't want to type huge paragraphs. You just wanna speak much of their communications, although it's not really technically taped you end up getting a huge part of their conversation because they're speaking to one, another in one to three minute monologues back and forth to one another those other kinds of audios we have. So I wanted to turn to video you tweeted Monday. Search Amoros speaking in two thousand sixteen he was a federal judge at the time. Little cloud over moving to. Let's make something very clear. You hear a lot about judge morals investigative strategy often see the public prosecutor's office, the federal police, and the subsidary buddies are the ones responsible for that. I don't have any investigative strategy at all the people who investigator who decide what to do, and such is the public prosecutor and the federal police the judges reactive, we said that normally cultivate these passage virtues. And I even get retained at times a see somewhat to criticism of my work saying that am a judge investigator, say, go ahead and. Identified that might judicial decisions decision where I determined the production of legal proof without provocation, most I put together some documents for the eventual testimony of a witness in this large call of criminal cases, that's practically nothing. And now I want to turn to former Brazilian president lewiston Osceola Silva, and its own words, appearing on democracy now and March two thousand eighteen just before he was jailed, bro. Vodka meeting failed now. If my vote out of the car walk innocence. Mentions. Proven Ben judge Moto should be the move from his position because you have a judge was lying the judgment and pronouncing guilty. Someone who knows innocent. He knows it's not my apartment knows that I didn't that. I didn't pay anything knows that. I never went he knows that I don't have money from. But is the thing is that because he? Himself to the media. Be said the first hearing with him. See no date on the full. You are not in a position to quit me because the lies have gone too far. And boss. They disgraced, gene. But is that? The one who tells the first continues lying lying lying to justify the first light and I'm going to prove that he has been line. So that is now jailed former President Lula NFC Silva, the Brazilian Boris association has called for more to be suspended and for all prosecutors involved in the scandal to be disbanded yet as you've pointed out, both Sinato made him a kind of super Justice minister bring together the functions of law enforcement surveillance, and investigation, which were distributed to several ministries, all under more rose. Super Justice minister position, making him as you pointed out, Glenn Greenwald, the second most powerful person in Brazil now. So what happens? So it's so fascinating because story minds me, so much of this story in so many ways one way remember that this note in story, essentially began when Snowden her James Clapper go before the Senate and just look at them. And just light of their faces when he was asked are you collecting data about millions of Americans, and he said, no, sir where you're not doing that? We have no such program, and it was shocking snowed in to watch somebody in that high of a position, so sociopathic lie. And that's the thing that finally drove snowed into to decide with finality. I need to show the true, that's the same reaction. I have when I listened to judge Moore. Oh look in the cameras and say I get irritated at the notion that I had any involvement and they'll prosecution when I've now read all of that year's worth of documents and conversations that we've a lot of which we publish and we'll continue to publish showing that he did. Exactly what he looked at the camera with this smirk and just so smugly denied it system. As ING, even though I guess it shouldn't be the willingness of people in these high positions with authority to so so sociopathic lie about what it is that they do. And then the second issue is, you know, just like in the Snowden story where people for years suspected that the NSA was spying, but we're called conspiracy theorists, or parent paranoid people, and then the evidence proved them. Right. Everybody or a lot of people in Brazil have long said, what Lula said namely that Moore got into a position where he was forced to convict Lula where he was single mindedly obsessed with it that Virgilio leads demanding that of him. And therefore, he was willing to do anything, including breaking rules, breaking laws in order to make that happen. They were called conspiracy, theorists. They were called paranoid. They were called left-wing liars, ideologues, who are only saying that to protect their leader. And as it turns out, what Lulu. Said in that interview is absolutely right. And of course, the conviction that Sergio more issue, not withstanding the fact that it was very quickly, very strangely quickly, affirmed, by an appellate court in time to make him ineligible to run is now called into doubt because we know because we've all seen the evidence that the process that led to his conviction was deeply and inherently corrupted, and the most basic way because the person who found him guilty was doing exactly that which is prohibited from doing and the supreme court will now decide whether that conviction can be maintained in light of what we've shown and glad what asked you in a broader sense, this, this whole issue of corruption in government, and prosecutors removing or being able to jail, remove elected officials or, or key political leaders of clearly in democracy in an industrial western amok, rec- there's two ways. Removal leader you voted out of office, or you get them, indicted, and jailed and removed with that way to, to what extent is this a signal to people around the world and other countries about the kind of skepticism that you should have about investigations coming at the top leaders? And of course, I'm sure there are people in the Trump supporters here in this country, who would point to the FBI agent, Peter Struck and Lisa page of the FBI counsel as they were attempting to help remove Trump from office. But to what degree do you, do you is this, a warning for people in other countries to be wary and skeptical even in the face of what seems initially to be damning evidence against political leader? Yeah. I mean, look one you know, as you know, 'cause you guys know I've been one of the people along with gnome Chomsky and Matt, Taibbi and a few lonely others on the laugh, who have been skeptical of the Russia gate story in part because we know that these agencies have a long history of lying, and the FBI in the and the NSA in the US were vehemently opposed to Donald Trump and wanted Hillary Clinton because they trusted her much more. And so there was a concern always on my part that they were abusing their prosecutorial powers to interfere in the domestic election in the United States in order to help the came that they wanted to win in hurt the candidate that they wanted to lose there were other factions in the FBI, by the way, who wanted Trump to win desperately and did their own abuse of power to hurt Hillary Clinton's chances and helped Donald Trump win. So there were two different factions inside these law enforcement agencies interfering in the US election by abusing their power to help the two candidates, they preferred which is incredible. That was the real meddling that was dangerous in the twenty sixteen election. And of course, the parallel is very clear, which is that in Brazil since two thousand to the center rate, the all Garcon class which, by the way got kind of comfortable with Lula and PT, but nonetheless still wanted the center right to be in power. And I asked about that. Why would the Alevi so opposed to you when the elite thrived under your presidency, even though you lifted millions of people out of poverty? You weren't a socialist. You weren't castor, you weren't Shahbaz the markets in Brazil, the rich and Brazil prospered under Lula. And he said, it was cultural, they hated the fact that somebody who came from poverty was in the presidency, who doesn't speak perfect Portuguese didn't read until he. Ten they hated seeing an airport people who used to be invisible in the Valez now able to fly to visit their family to be able to buy apartment. They hated it culturally. They felt like their Brazil is being taken away from them. And so they couldn't beat Lula. They couldn't beat the Workers Party democratically. And so they Beuys the force of law in order to destroy the party that they couldn't beat politically. And this is a serious warning and serious danger about why anytime people in power exercise power in secret. We need to be skeptical of them, all human beings. And I believe that these prosecutors began with good intentions, Brazil, really is a country that has been plagued by corruption on the left and the right for a long time. They're young people. They're in their thirties. I believe they began with good intentions, but they became so drunk on their own power. Nobody was questioning them the large media here in Brazil with the exception of folio one. Newspaper stop questioning what they were doing. Just a potted for them served as their tool. When you have those that kind of faith being put into you that kind of unquestioned power as I'm not hardly the first person to observe that kind of power corrupts people, and they got corrupted, they became politicized and they became drunk on their own belief in their own goodness that they thought they were above the law, and could break the rules because they're ends justified the means and it isn't important lesson to learn about power in general. And of course, they ousted impeached SAF before they imprisoned, Lula finally Glenn very quickly. You've got this three part series. It's rocking Brazil right now, calls for more to go down the super Justice minister coals for Lulu to be released. What do you think is the chance of this? And finally, you're saying this is larger than a Snowden cache of information. You have much more information that you haven't released. What are you doing with it? We are working feverishly to publish it as quickly as we can. Obviously, you know, there's a lot of desire to see more of it, but we have a responsibility like we did with Snowden case to make sure that we're publishing is done well, and professionally and accurately, because we make a single mistake they'll use that forever against us undermine the credibility of the reporting. But definitely more is coming very soon. So when you ask what's going to happen with more what's going to happen with a lot of it depends on how good of the reporting we do. And how much more we show which we have a lot more to show, but I believe even with just what we've shown, I'm not saying, you're is about to be put out of office, because he still has supportable are still crucial of the government. But certainly he's severely, damaged and weakened. And we'll continue to be more damaging weakened as we reveal more on not sure he can survive that. But I do think there's a good chance that this, the preened court will say that. That conviction of Luis Silva was a byproduct of so much impropriety that we cannot let it stand that at the very least he needs a new trial, and needs to be let out of prison. Wildest new trial. Proceeds, Glenn Greenwald one, thank you for being with us Pulitzer prize winning journalist. One of the founding, editors of the intercept has just published the secret Brazil archive will link to it tomography now dot org. When we come back, we look at too horrific conditions for immigrants and for profit detention jails around the United States without Abobo. Stay with us. The colors that you bring Damon locks and black monument on samba. This is democracy now. I mean me Goodman, with one Gonzales, we into the show looking at horrific conditions where some fifty two thousand immigrants held in four profit jails around the country and least twenty four immigrants died in the custody of immigration and customs enforcement, under the Trump administration, at least four more died shortly after being released now homeland security's own inspector general has revealed how detained immigrants are subjected to rotten food, severe overcrowding inadequate medical care, and broken and overflowing toilets in two facilities in particular data is processing center in California and Essex County correctional facility in New Jersey. The inspectors found quote immediate risks or agreed as violations of detention standards including nooses, detainee sells the inspector showed up at these four detention jails. Announced between may November two thousand eighteen in response to several concerns raised by immigration rights groups and complaints made by prisoners. The LaSalle ice processing center in Louisiana, the Aurora ice processing center in Colorado were also inspected three of the facilities are operated by the private prison company geo group. This comes as a separate inspector general report recently documented dangerous overcrowding of border patrol processing facility, and Paso, Texas. Meanwhile, the Trump administration's nounce to plans to hold some fourteen hundred immigrant children at a site on fort sill army base in Oklahoma, that was once used as an internment camp for Japanese Americans during World War, Two, the agencies already holding a record number of children in some one hundred sixty eight facilities and programs in twenty three states. For more, we go to Houston, Texas, where we're joined by outta Bogado immigration reporter for reveal from the center. For investigative reporting. She's been speaking with migrants held in a number of these jails out of welcome back to democracy. Now, there was not a lot of mainstream media attention on this inspector general report. Again, the inspector general for the department of homeland security talk about what it revealed. Good morning. It's great to be back the inspector general's report indicates what immigrants have said for years about conditions in various detention facilities. As you mentioned, the inspector general's report did surprise visits to foresights three of them are run by the private prison company GIO, and the other one is local to Essex County, New Jersey and it's hard to know where to begin, but, you know, some of what stands out are the photos, for example, from the bathroom facilities, where there is a unusable toilets, mildew and mold on the showers. The inspector general said that this poses health risks to the people who to the detainees who are being held there little to no access to recreation. Horrible food conditions moldy bread. Rod leaking chicken blood marked unlabeled food again things that we've heard about for years. And as you mentioned, this is the inspector general, and they found that there were multiple violations of ICES own detention standards and concurred with the one recommendation with which was to have increased oversight in, in some cases. They tried to make fixes right away such as replacing the kitchen manager at one of the facilities during the inspection. But with some other recommendations, they sort of indicated that they think about it, for example, the Aurora facility in Colorado has a space for. In contact visits which we know improves the morale of people who are being held in any kind of detention or prison environment, and although it has those facilities, it doesn't allow contact visits and the inspector general report cited that and I says, response was, you know, we'll, we'll think about it, but the standard isn't to have contact visits. So it's an interesting way to sort of skirt that particular issue, which was addressed in the report out of could you talk some about the geo group for those? Viewers and listeners who may not be familiar with it. Sure. So the geo group is a private prison contractor and for ice. It runs several detention facilities around the country and it does, you know. You know what it sounds like it holds people for civil immigration custody. Something that I think people don't always understand, is that people who are in immigration and ice custody. They're in civil custody not criminal custody. So it does have to do with any kind of criminality. It's people who are going through some kind of immigration process, one of the many immigration processes that exist in the United States. And I contracts with a few contractors, but particularly with with GIO and they're a large a large firm that holds a lot of people around the country for this agency. So can you talk about the significance of this report? And specifically also the number of migrants who have died during the Trump administration. It's both children a record number. I mean, I think the number was six from back to last year, and there hadn't been a death child death in immigration detention in ten years. And now you have this latest figure of what was the number twenty four migrants. These are adults who died in detention with another four dying right after they're released. Right. So something to keep in mind, as there are various agencies that hold immigrants asylum seekers migrants. So we have just been talking about ice immigration detention the customs and border patrol also holds people at border patrol stations which are often referred to as lead us or iceboxes by people who are held in them. They always described them as being incredibly cold. I spent time with a couple of girls who I, I reported on back in twenty thirteen and they described in great detail, especially one of them. You know what the icebox was like? And here we are years later, they, they have green cards. Now, they're looking forward to becoming citizens, and we when we went back to talk about the conditions in these border patrol stations. It was it was like. It could have happened yesterday. I mean, they just described how freezing they were how the one little piece of my lar- didn't feel like enough for either of them. And the older sister felt so bad for the younger when that she, she took it and tried to create a second layer for for her sister. And she was she was scared of sleeping through getting her name called because they say that they were told that if they didn't hear their name, they would stay in there forever. So, again, this is stuff that we've heard about for a long time unaccompanied minors than who who leave the border patrol stations, or they're taken to shelters around the country, which are run by the office of refugee resettlement, as are contracting facilies throughout the country. And that's a different department together. That's not the H S the department of health and human services. Some of what we've found is tremendous abuse, both accusations and proven allegations, as well as in some of some of these places. There is the use of restraints forced drugging, my reporting partner in. Patrick michaels. And I we've been investigating secret shelters in which the office of refugee resettlement. Without judicial oversight sends children to set catch facilities or residential treatment centers, and they're sort of off the map of the shelters that that we do know about. They're not contract facilities. And, yes, people people die. There are really horrible conditions and a lot of these places. And as you mentioned, there have been two dozen deaths during the Trump administration that accounts for the two hundred or so deaths since we've been keeping track, which is since two thousand three I believe, and then there have been four deaths immediately after custody. Those are also tricky to track. We think that it's for people who died immediately after being released they may have been in custody when they were taken to a hospital and then paroled essentially taken out of custody immediately thereafter. But these are these are pretty high number. There's and again, they come from places in which people have been detailing the horrid conditions for quite a long time out of the spent to general's report. From your own reporting, the sense that they're actually talking to the detainees or, or they just basically inspecting, the delivery of service of basic services and dealing with the personnel in these facilities. In other is mentioned in the report, where they, they cite that detainees said, such and such things detainees noted that, not having contact visits was difficult for them, for example. But that, that actual perspective is an included there no quotes from the detainees themselves in the report. And again, it's interesting, I think it validates what people have been saying for a long time. But again, you know, for immigration reporters whose sources are the people who experienced these policies, this isn't necessarily anything new, I think the photos do illiterate. However, exactly, what has been described to me and many other reporters for quite a long time, and now, the, the inspector general report author, John Kelly, not the General John Kelly who's gone onto the board of another for profit detention facility is. Resigning after this report is come out. But finally, the Trump administration saying it's going to suspend legal aid programs, recreational activities, even English classes all education for unaccompanied, migrant children jailed and federally run immigration centers, the move drawing condemnation from groups like Amnesty, International USA, which wrote, it's bad enough. The Trump administration is trying to normalize the warehousing of children. It's unconscionable that they would so blatantly, try to strip them of their rights locking children than denying them legal aid, -education, and even playtime is all part of this administration's cruel efforts to humanize people who've come to the US seeking safety. Those are the words of Amnesty International USA, and yet you have President Trump taking eight billion dollars to build a wall, and saying, he doesn't have money for kids, having classes. Yeah. Again, my, my reporting partner Patrick Michaels actually broke that story on, on Twitter recently. And it was surprising to see that memo that Email which internally stated, we're not providing English classes right now we're not providing football or soccer recreation services. And as you note, there is quite an irony in saying that there isn't funding available for something really basic like you know how much. We're gonna have their immigration reporter with Vail. I made me Goodman, with Gonzala.

Lula Brazil President Lula NFC Silva Brazil Glenn Greenwald president Justice minister United States Workers Party Scott Warren Goodman Brazil Pulitzer prize Sergio Moro Trump Moore AU President Trump prosecutor
June 12: Just say "yes" to drugs

As It Happens from CBC Radio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

June 12: Just say "yes" to drugs

"This is a cbc podcast from the brilliant might have mindy kaeling comes the sharp end timely comedy late night emma thompson plays legendary late night talk show host catherine newbury who's world turned upside down when she hires her first hand only female staff writer molly patel played by mindy kaeling originally intended to smooth over diversities concerns her decision brings about unexpectedly hilarious consequences as the two women who are separated by culture and generation become united by their love of biting punched by the darling of this year's sundance film festival late night also stars john lift ghana hugh dancy amy ryan in dennis o'hare and it's directed by vancouver zone michigan at joined is in theaters on june or to the very end very relevant now hello i'm tom allen is as it happens the podcast addition tonight just say yes to drugs and there's visory council says canada should adopt a universal public pharma care program and while it's inexpensive idea our guest as we can't afford not to do it justice delayed until them justice denies three sisters nbc accused of their cousin of sexually abusing them as children and he was found guilty but this week a judge ordered a stay of proceedings fighting trial delayed an equal and opposite reaction a woman on a hunger strike to protest hong kong's extradition ville says she's never seen police use force so readily or relentlessly as they did today elements of supplies in arizona man was criminally charged after he gave migrants food water and lodging by a jury couldn't agree on whether or not he was guilty of harboring undocumented immigrants her home away from home if you pay a visit to union hills on youth and lands bottoms ponds she can't invite you in because after a year of flooding her cabinet has floated away end the sum of all spheres a chinese teenager is first to admit she has a bubble tea problem after doctors discovered more than a hundred tapioca balls trapped in her stomach as it happens the wednesday edition radio the guest is she has a problem with hurting glove buell positioning system system a group tasked with charting a pathway for a national drug plan has written a prescription ended called for the creation of a universal single payer public pharma care system they advisory council on the implementation of national pharma care made the case in its final report released today among us recommendations is the creation of a new national drug agency one that in its initial phase would make a list of a central medicines and negotiate prices a fully comprehensive list would be established by twenty twenty seven the council says that could save billions in drug costs although it would come with a hefty price tag for the federal government doctor eric hoskins is the chair of the advisory council on the implementation of national pharma care we reached him in ottawa doctor hoskins is you know there was a big debate over whether you and the council would recommend a universal pharma care plan or eight fill in the gaps approach why did you up for universal single payer public macaire because that is the way that we are going to achieve major savings on a cost of drugs so part of the challenge we have is sustainability ever drug programs costa drugs are going up and up and up with each year this this allows us to as one negotiator everybody coming together negotiating with formative get the best possible prices so that's one of the huge advantages apart from the fact that it's just gonna increase access for literally millions of canadians when did you hear from him leave across the country what did they tell you well if there is one message that everybody agree to it was that we need to do better and we need to create a system where canadians have access to prescribe medicine is based on their need and not on their ability and what did they say about that specific stories around people are going to yeah i mean we had families that were planning to or even had moved from one province on one side of the country to another province of the other side of the country simply because the drug drug that was life saving for their child a wasn't available in their home province and so they were making decisions like moving based on that a or others who just the simplest of medicines imaginable but because they were are particularly vulnerable group or for they simply didn't have access and we learn where even small copayments having to pay a small amount for drugs out of your pocket can be a burden and a disincentive for some taking the medicines that they need you learn people sometimes well spent on food or other essential to pace the jags yeah so we found about a million canadians cut back on food or heating their homes in order to pay for medicines we found that roughly twenty percent of canadians a one in five struggle to afford their medicines people are taking out loans in order to afford their medicines i mean most of us probably know somebody who have heard about people starting go fund me campaigns to be able to pay for the medicine and they're a family member needs so we learned about seven and a half million canadians would come into the category of really struggling to be able to afford the medicines at are prescribed to you say any report that no other country whether there is universal healthcare without universal pharma care but there's a reason for that is in there because it's very expensive and it would seem that when this is the full cost of this is coming to play sometime in twenty twenty seven it'll be fifteen billion dollars so how do we how do we pay for that well were already paying for it right so if you can't afford not to do this last year a canadian spate of thirty four billion dollars for prescribe medicines it's projected to go up to over fifty billion dollars by twenty twenty seven and so with the universal single payer public program that were recommending he will actually substantially enormously reduce the costs that we do pay for medicines it will not in that first year it's decimated they will say five billion dollars you know what we found is provinces and territories a and canadians are really worried about the sustainability of existing program and the only way that we can make it affordable is by transforming it and that's why we arrived to the recommendation of universal single payer public is being the best model show that it will in fact remain affordable we talk about all the drugs at canadians need we moved into a narrow where there are extraordinary drugs they're very expensive offensive kundu miraculous things from people's live how could you be sure that you can create universality and not have a ceiling on that how do you balance out those really expensive drugs and make that universal well that's what doing today right so provinces and territories are forced to make those difficult decisions and individual canadians and families are even within within private drug plans they're putting annual capture a lifetime caps on the amount of money that a family or an individual can spend towards those drugs through their plan so what were calling for is a change to that where we create a canadian drug agency so whereas single negotiator we have a lot of quote with drug companies so we negotiate for the lowest possible price and then also the firms for some of those like hugely expensive drugs that you're referring to work calling for the creation of a national strategy on expensive drugs were rare diseases a in a dedicated stink pathway for approval and funding for those drugs because there are drugs out there today it can cost a million dollars a year if i understand you're saying they'll be universality even for those drugs cost millions of dollars each year people will have access to those expensive drugs matter who they are no matter how much they make if they're proven effective scientifically effective clinically effective and they change health health outcomes many of them are lifesaving right if not life changing and so that will be the job of canadian drug agency is to do that evaluation have those negotiations with the drug companies and provide canadian okay let's talk politics finance minister bill mono has already said that he intends to proceed any fiscally responsible way that they would expand coverage but wouldn't throw out the system we currently have so what are the chances this idea will be any kind as plank in the platform as a liberal government well i think i will have to wait and see we know it will be an election issue which is great i think it's a great opportunity for canadians across the country to participate in that conversation leading into an election to identify it is a priority to these parties that are vying going forward in the next election the liberal government has already made very substantial commitments is you know in the spring budget where they committed five hundred million dollars a year to expensive drugs rare diseases they committed to creating a canadian drug agency is well both of those were recommendations and are interim report and so there has been a commitment on that front will to see in the coming days in terms of has a politician's of every stripe a review the report a hand look to the opportunity i think they were at such a critical juncture every single report that is looked at the canadian healthcare system in the last sixty years has recommended committed national pharma care for now at a place where i believe we can make it a reality doctor hoskins i appreciate speaking this you thank you thank you doctor eric hoskins is the chair of the advisory council on the implementation of national pharma care which released its final report today we reached him in ottawa he sees a today in hong kong police fired tear gas water cannons and rubber bullets at tens of thousands of demonstrators injuring at least seventy two people to are in intensive care protesters were blocking the roads around the government buildings to try to stop lawmakers from debating a controversial bill that would allow people to be extradited to mainland china they successfully managed to delay the debate at least for today but the government is still backing the bill and protesters are still out in the streets many leads as part of a small group of demonstrators who are on hunger strike against the bill reached her on top of the bridge near hong kong's legislative council many i know that this hunger strike you're on has been twenty four hours the time they were speaking now how are you holding up a we're doing fine twenty four hours not that long so we're doing good and maybe tomorrow we will begin to a few weeks or so tomorrow there will be stopped her here to to monitor or a condition how many people are with you on the bridge doing this hunger strike at this low then a about ten how long do you think you'll you will continue we aimed at one hundred and three hours explain why that number because last sunday there were more than one million people 'em out there to protest so the number was one old three was a one million and three thousand thirty thirty thousand this is hard to be given countless numbers when you haven't eaten in a when he rose yeah how have they police responded from where you are there elsewhere there hasn't been teargassed there have been the tons police are are going after the protesters what has happened where you are we are on a bridge so they kind of look the bridge they want to clear all the protesters on the bridge so we were sitting on the ground in children dying as in front of us there were like thirty also bully armed we we were trying to stop them or at least serve as a barrier there so that they have to be worried about us before hitting feeding feeding the other protesters but later under the stairs show she i guess so we look us you were teargassed you've been you've had a a canister near you yes just riots behind us to at least to some being on a hunger strike being on the bridge with the teargassed it must be painful yeah we were so physically we were already week but we need to suffer from god and also the the threat that they may hit us they've been using rubber bullets as well have you been affected by that no so the rubber bullets let's was under the bridge did you hear them i heard a lot of those louts down like shooting but i couldn't differentiate whether it's yoga's off wrote that you know you mentioned about de police are saying that they are responding to a riot which is a very serious charge what what have you seen as far as protesters a throwing bricks bottles or your umbrellas police to me as was off from a riot it's just some peaceful protest they never attacked police spent actively is usually the reaction shoes police action so if the policemen tried to push them back they may do something like throwing the water bottles at so but for those policemen they were are fully armed so throwing a waterfall adam cat bailey are actually it's it's out of proportion you're saying yeah yeah the responses out of proportion you know that carey lamb executives chief of hong kong her response to the protesters were to say they were like spoiled children what do you say the carry them oh i was angry a bushy says if the protesters young people if they're spoiled children zone quarter parents is she implying that the government is is apparently the government is not responding to any voice from the society so how can you blame those affected the proposed law is a it's they are determined to go ahead and pass that law despite a all the people hundreds of thousands turning out to protest against it what do you worry what is your greatest fear for yourselves if that law should be passed on actually i was born in england china i know and i left there for twenty three years so i have known to well about how the law system is in china it's not transparent it's not just so i don't believe that people or being extradited to china would have a fair trial i know you were indie umbrella movement in hong kong in twenty fourteen we we we interviewed many people outside how does it compare to you the way the police are responding to you how does it compare to to that scene 'em is he occupy movement in twenty fourteen i would say that the police snus reaction is escalated compared to the umbrella so today i couldn't see any hesitation when they shoot those guys and they just keep shooting they use rubber bullets under the bridge and some students got shot right in choosy i there were like eating any people they beach and they don't hesitate to harm people i really feel sad and angry just finally this is all happening so close to the days of tiananmen square thirty years ago are people thinking about that and maybe even worry about that oh yes people just pray that june fourth would not repeat in hong kong minia we will leave it there we'll keep keep in touch to see how you are an that i appreciate it you would speak with us tonight thank you thank you all right now by many league is a sociology professor at the education university of hong kong she's on hunger strike on top of the bridge near hong kong's legislative council that's where we reached her merry band the band tend to be detained in in in in in in the to those relive on its banks bottomless pond in western new finland is starting just seem limitless as well last spring bring the pond began to flood which meant that cabins along the pond began to flood to now things have gone one step further the cabins are floating away you know oils at her husband melvin own one of the cabins on the pond we reached her in cormac newfoundland you know what does it mean that you're cabin is floating away means the end all kevin has slowed it off it shortly in god gone to the other side of the pond which is a boat kilometer okay i came off of its moorings it came off the foundation and just yes floated away everything pulled everything away unfolded off in as all the cabins there's five cabins around upon an all five of them of lesser mourn their shores in the hours and my brother in law will we were next door to each other just but thirty feet away both are cabinets across the other side in actually the cabin that was close to where our cabins are gum is now over on the flooding for my brotherinlaw's how how big these cabins mark heaven is will not all eleven fifty seven square feet so these are just little plays isn't no no they're not having a strict cabbages wow i mean all tavern a we are designed to sleep eleven people a two bathrooms we've got a full basement and a so mean and it's not just are tavern at this point as we've got a twenty two foot travel trailer but we have no idea have not had any idea since last year where it is a we think it came off the spot where it was on the slowed somewhere probably gone down on the bottom some moral now how much higher is the water from where it was originally how how how much is it creeped up were estimating above sixty feet a there is a school bus across from our cabin across the pond which is probably close to kilometer in that school bus one of the boys one of the young fellows one in a two months ago andrew alone put a hook download a magnet and said it was forty two feet and then when that water as rhythm all would say good twenty twentyfive feet since do you have any idea why the waters is too high just speculation nation a the paul is called bottomless palm it just call that for a reason there is no runoff from the pond there's no book leaving the palm a there's a whole we've seen the hold up in in the summer when the pond is at its all time low you can see in underwater the whole that they're it's about six foot or so in diameter and the water you could see what a water but the way the fan is never ending water goes down in the whole eight runs off on the hill be on our camman there's forestation going on or the was forestation going on in the initial end i don't know if they do it anywhere from canada but they do a thing called clear caught right they go in they take so many actors of land and they totally do a clear cut as not one thing standing nothing it's it's total oh it's it's like bad lana you watch a movie ends a survey the first trip but we made in once we found out that the cat the the water was rising there was one spot where there was a whole and blowing through the side of the hill and the water was just gushing and that whole is about ten feet and so were were figuring sedimentation that came with that went down upload the whole to this day there has been no investigation a inching why or how what will happen in the future if at all the holes boundary to just you know just are there any other properties if it's such a good a spring runoff is this you only a body of water you belong lakes around you are you the only one who has these levels are not sure how many lakes in harm's way calls upon the nixon there's there's new lots and lots and lots of them know they all got normal spring runoff this is not just happened this year this is the second year now that it's just an ongoing thing is just coming up up up up up up up receding what do you do i really don't know there's nothing we can do and then we did have insurance when we call the insurance company once we realized that what was happening insurance company told us that a this is an act of god it's overland flooding in insurance doesn't cover overland flooding my response to that was so i don't think this is and that got 'cause i don't think god is that childish you know it's just that well it's really interesting i hope you find out more about what's happened here property in debt and thanks for telling us the story by by by by you know oils has a cabinet is currently floating on bottomless pond reached call nine for most of recorded history humans have contended themselves with drinking things in one state of matter liquid end if you were pouring the liquid into your mouth these traditional consumption method and felt something solid you would immediately throw the drink out end end or up but in the eighties tea room in taiwan deliberately made a drink combining solids with liquids if it's called bubble tea in which smallest balls of tapioca are suspended in some kind of t a n ever since seems like people can't choke down enough of it now usually that's not a problem but a story out of china today suggest you can have too much of a weird thing a fourteen year old girl went to a hospital suffering from constipation when doctors looked at her cat scan they saw a number of what they called granular shadows the number was over a hundred and the shadows were tapioca balls also known as boba boba pearls turned out big surprise she drank a lot of bubble tea and now those doctors are taking the opportunity to point out that boba pearls can be difficult to digest especially if they're not straight tapioca buddy include additives so if you're an avid consumer drinks with hunks of stuff in them do yourself a solid and don't do yourself too many solid anger and for years judy poon he kept a shameful secret within her punjabi family end she would later learned her sisters shared that secret they had also being sexually abused by a family member we told you miss ponies story in april the vancouver woman was the subject of the national film board of canada film because we are girls at follows three sisters as they pursue criminal charges against their older male cousin for the sexual abuse they suffered his children last year he was convicted of four counts of sex crimes including sexual assault in april miss pony told carol why it took her years to come forward that girl it's something broke broke around the house when we were young we were punished so there is always that fear oh i'm gonna get in trouble compounded by the culture of what we had seen in the bollywood movies and what i had heard about other girls in communities being shipped off get sent back to india getting the yeah you get shipped off or you could be killed so that would have been my fate that was judy cooney speaking to carol this week a major update to her cousins criminal case following his conviction his lawyer argued that court delays meant he didn't get a fair trial hand on monday a bbc surpreme court judge agreed granting the so called jordan application he ordered a stay of proceedings we reached gd tony in vancouver gd it has been eight years since his criminal case began against her cousin how did you react when you learn the charges against him had been state oh well well it was a very disappointing just disheartening 'em i personally had a few years that tom naturally want it to come out and then a you know a couple of e b f words but 'em it yeah i after all these years and after a guilty verdict this is not what's one would expect from the system so it was a complete shock and 'em we always and you could go fifty fifty fifty you only know that and then one only hope for the best right when we spoke with you i just after they as the film because we are girls is coming out you talked about just what it took courage took to come forward with you and you're sisters to talk about what had happened to you is children with his relatives in your house and how what a relief it was to finally take it someplace so were you sisters with you when you learned about the decision monday well my sister was with me and my sister selection chose to continue on with her day gopher her exercise and take her mind off of this 'em she was with a with a friend when i personally called her but yeah like my sister kita you hug and she wasn't surprised because in her case for the two of the counts pertaining to her recused was found not guilty in my sister selection when i finally build the courage to call her she was shocked and for her she said that night like she was just numb and when i talked to her yesterday well she mentioned she she said it's like writing a big test and you fail at the end and he was able to fuller parents he was able to fool the court the judge and she knew that he'd get away with it is what she felt she also said that when i always told her oh don't worry now the police is gonna do something about this story now he knew what at least he's gonna have to go to court and be held accountable so in the end on his part there's no responsibility and accountability what does one say especially if he's been found guilty in court we when we spoke with you about the film can you remind people of what it took for you and your sisters taxi take this year family and to the public well back in two thousand and six some of my sisters and i saw something that made us believe he was still active so it becomes ones duty to do something about it and i have little girls and i want to protect them so we decided decided to tell her parents and then came a phone call from his sister to quash are voice to tell my sister's did just shut up and be quiet and we didn't we took it further when are parents didn't do anything about it we decided devoted the police and the police took four years so from two thousand seven when we first gave her police reports he wasn't charged until two thousand and eleven then two years go by the preliminary hearing was until twenty thirteen and then from there fast forward the trial didn't start in supreme court until twenty fifteen like what is going on end this is public tax dollars and i think all canadians in me to know not just i just older cousin this cousin manji virk is his name he what his lawyers have done is they've argued called the jordan application and it means that people who have had what they say unreasonable will delays in a being brought to child this is something that the justice system doesn't allow is unfair to be accused to have such a delay but you've said that it's unfair another direction of course because he asked for countless dern once why is every adjournment grunted dam and given how busy the defense lawyers all these are the next court they you know they say that have time for six months from now from now so somebody has to you know be responsible in moving the case forward in a timely manner and i don't understand all these delays i can't even tell you how many times it's my sisters and i flew up or drove up to williams like only here oh adjourned only the here and now they followed another application oh now we have the here this one so you guys can testify what message do think it sends to other victims of sexual abuse who might fear coming forward well i mean the decision itself is not going to send a positive message for those that have been raped or assaulted or harmed well we'll send a positive message is the resilience of me and my sisters and yesterday i addressed prime minister trudeau through my social media video but you have to go to the top end if there are loopholes if there if there's something that's not working then yes the system has to change you know last time we spoke before you said that you feel that since this cousin landed in your family in nineteen eighty and you were supposed to respect him in given the regard and then breaking his silence it was always about him before the film and coming forward it was about you is about the you and you're sisters you're bravery you're resilience does it feel now that it's about him again from me no it's about my truth it's about my sister's truth it's about are story it's about what happened it's about what needs to change so as disappointed end you know upset that i was initially when i heard the news it caused me to even do what i needed to do go move okay put up this video gold dress prime minister trudeau okay today interviews lined up so it's just getting the message out there more and more and more that the system needs to change so i don't see this as something where we got this decision and now that's it and my sisters and i were just gonna sit here and were done and poor us so there is a choice am i going to be this victim that poor me for me for me or am i going to be this person which is true to myself that okay here we are yes it's a setback but let's move forward gt is good to talk to you again and we will be following your story but thank you thank you so much by judy pony is the subject of a national film word of canada documentary that we told you about in april called because we are girls reached her in vancouver and for more on this story go to our cbc dot ca slash h i s or if you scroll through instagram right now you might see a video of facebook ceo mark zuckerberg in the cbs tv interview saying this imagine this for a second one man with total control of billions of people dole linda older secrets there live their futures i owe it all vector factors showed me that whoever controls the datta control the future or you might see kim kardashians looking coyly at the camera and saying this when in doubt many haters i really don't care because their data has made me ranch beyond my wildest dreams my decision to believe in factor literally gave me my rating an my fan base i feel really why they genuinely love the project manipulating people online at money kim kardashians and before that facebook's mark zuckerberg saying some pretty eerie things except it's not actually them these are deep fake videos that use artificial intelligence to make it look like people are saying things they actually are not the videos were made by bill posters and daniel how as part of an art installation in sheffield england called specter specter the videos uploaded to instagram on saturday which is owned by facebook end number posted just weeks after facebook announced it would not take down a video of you as house speaker nancy pelosi which had been amateurish lee doctored to make it look like ms pelosi was drunk and slurring her words given that many people wondered whether facebook's would feel the same about manipulated video of its own ceo today facebook's responded a company spokesperson told the bbc that the site won't remove the doctor videos end that quote if third party fact checkers market as false we both filter it from instagram's recommendation surfaces like explore an hashtag pages unquote i'll stress that that's an exact quote because of sort of like most deep fake creators i guess i don't want you to think i'm putting words in anyone's mouth mouth it was a complicated case so complicated that yesterday a federal jury in tucson arizona said it couldn't reach a verdict on the charges against scott warren inactive is near the states border with mexico in january last year mr one provided two migrants from el salvador and honduras with water food and shelter he was later charged with harboring end conspiracy transport undocumented migrants mr warren had faced up to twenty years in prison if convicted but after deliberating for more than fifteen hours the jury said they could not agree on whether or not he was guilty catherine gaffney is a longtime member of no more deaths the group scott warren was volunteering with when he was arrested she was at the courtroom yesterday reached her in tucson arizona gaffey what was the reaction on the part of scott were into this decision well there is a mixed feelings things outside of the courtroom yesterday on the one hand we are indicated that the jury declined to convince scott and on the other hand these charges are still potentially hanging over him as the u us attorney's office may decide to retry what did he say as he left the court scott i gave a short statement that really called attention to the people who have been will be most affected by these prosecutions which is migrants who are crossing the us mexico border land he mentioned it since his arrest in twenty eighteen eighty eight bodies have been recovered from that part of arizona desert where he was working is that right that's right and we know that with any account of 'em bodies he's encountered in the desert there and many more who have not been found and one of the effects of the recent crackdown on humanitarian needs work in that court or is a that fewer deaths will be recorded since are volunteers are austin the people who first encounter people who've lost their live scott warren doing when he was arrested well scott was arrested at the barn which is a humanitarian needs station in ohio arizona to undocumented migrants came up to him asking for help end he offered them help you give them food water clean closed and a place to rest call the doctor 'em these worthy acts that both the government in in scott agree happened in there the acts that the government is prosecuting him under the harboring statutes and he was working with his volunteer wis no more deaths in which is an organization that you are also volunteering for what do you do what what is what is the purpose of no more deaths number does the humanitarian aid group are mission is the end the death and suffering of migrants and refugees and along the us mexico border an everyday are volunteers go out into the remote migrant trails and leave food and water caches to try to prevent folks crossing through from dying if you hydration and exposure and we do a number of other interventions as well we operator free legal clinic or undocumented people and we have spent a lotta time documenting abuses at the hands of you us border patrol what did the prosecution russian presented in the way of evidence that he scott warren was guilty of these felony charges of harboring and conspiring to transport undocumented migrants what what's what is there evidence they're opening argument was that this is not going to be a case about humanitarian aid and that this had nothing to do with people dying in the desert they really presented no evidence other than what you know scott agrees happened which is to people ask him for help and he gave them food and water and medical care 'em end really their arguments throughout was that the work of art us in of other humanitarian aid is nefarious and should not be protected me mr warren his defense attorney you said that the government put on his best case it would have the full force of resources but these twelve jurors could not agree that they were for who felt he was guilty eight who didn't do what do you know as to why they couldn't come to a conclusion we don't know much about 'em internal workings of the jury 'em but i can say that you know both in the eyes of the law and in the eyes of the public scott is innocent what do you make of the timing you said you you and other volunteers in the store and have been doing this for some time why do you think he was arrested now well do you es border patrol was the focus of in abuse documentation report that no marta released on the morning of january seventeenth twenty eighteen and we don't think it's a coincidence that that afternoon you us border patrol agents decided to set up surveillance of of scott in the barn where he was arrested with the two migrants that particular report documented more than three thousand five hundred water yellen that were destroyed by usa border patrol agents and other incidences of them interfering with the provision of humanitarian aid and we also released a video of of you us border patrol agents destroying water gallons and otherwise interfering with aid video show they border patrol agents pouring out water in the desert that would be by those migrants slashing gallons kicking them off a ledge a quiet in manhattan in china offer it to a horse i think a lot of people were really horrified by a level of violence displayed in the end what we've really seen is that that violence is not a few bad apples but it's really a systemic culture and the agency to think this was revenge absolutely we think that this was a targeted retaliatory act against now marta it just happened to be the same day that we released that report which we know you us border patrol received interviewed that they decided to target a barn in artwork there i know you have reorganization said and others have said this is become more of a problem in more urban of a dilemma for migrants under the trump administration but this stretch of desert in arizona has been perilous some time how how did how why is it that they crossed it that particular place so since nineteen ninety four the official policy of usa border patrol has been something called prevention three deterrent which deliberately pushes migrants and asylum seekers in the most perilous parts of the border it across that bill clinton era border strategy to force him into that dangerous part of the desert that's right in it con sided with implementation of nafta a new free trade policies that i think the government knew would leads to really disenfranchisement of of many rural a latin american farmers and families mr warren's not only member of you're group to be charged what hope do you have the other volunteers may have de charges dropped or that day may be excused from these crimes in total nine number on here's her face federal chargers over the last year and a half 'em as well as scott and you know they're volunteers ceasing misdemeanor charges or a placing water gallon and in the wilderness area for those on on two years has been found guilty their cases are on appeal feel right now another four had their charges dropped but are demand throughout has been that these charges be dropped an enter prevention through deterrent we wouldn't need to be out there if there were these border policies causing these deaths and that is the root cause of the crisis that we will we will leave it there mitch gaffney thank you thank you so much really appreciate the time that was catherine gaffney a volunteer with the aid group no more deaths she's in tucson arizona the toes of nick griffiths have finally made it from his home in both in england dustin city yukon mr griffiths was not with them in the package which he sent by mail including a note i hope you get these bad boys okay last year mr griffiths frostbitten toes were amputated after he competed in the yukon arctic ultra endurance race but he promised descend back after learning about these territories cocktail challenge at dustin city's downtown hotel shortly after the toll removal mr griffiths spoke to care about why he was planning on recycling them here's part of that conversation from april of twenty eighteen so when i went into the hospital last week pretty operation and i spoke to the decision and he was quite happy to let me have them say put them in three jobs and currently there in my bedside cabinet so i'm hoping to see hotel that said i've got a tremendous just a case of a getting over that to the male tells the post yeah that's the thing i'm not ficials say a lot of email say you know they got their how i should go about well what what do you know about this hour toll cocktail and then the famous story of this of the bar before before i went to canada i i haven't out of it but she when as a hotel before the race in the lift that as a sign saying you know when you come make sure you visit the austin city hotel home of the famous our so called but i still haven't caught in douma they actually had a desire to challenge you tell people about that yeah so i i think it dates back to the nineteen seventies wherever i'm the guy 'em out of frostbitten tell you from i think the last century and they decided to put it in a cocktail so they my understanding is i strung drink whiskey or something and then they put the title and you drink drink drink and the title has slide down the glass and she'll lips and you get a certificate to say that you're now part of the solitaire cocktail club and all the fame well if you do go back are you planning to try and saratoga cocktail yeah definitely would definitely go up there in a sit there and say my old man that was nick griffiths who's amputated toes recently arrived in austin city he was speaking with carl last april and you've been listening to the as it happens podcast are show can be heard monday through friday on cbc radio one and on sirius xm following the world six you can also listen to the whole show on the web just go to cbc dot c h slash h and click on the daily early full episodes bleak x ray lewis new girl out around

mindy kaeling catherine newbury molly patel amy ryan dennis o'hare michigan canada nbc emma thompson staff writer vancouver tom allen twenty four hours two years five hundred million dollars thirty four billion dollars fifteen billion dollars twenty twentyfive feet fifty billion dollars five billion dollars
Future Hindsight host and executive producer, Mila Atmos

Podcast Brunch Club

00:00 sec | 2 months ago

Future Hindsight host and executive producer, Mila Atmos

"Hi and welcome to the PODCAST club podcast. My name is Adela and I'm the founder of PBC. Today, Augusta's meal atmos- host and executive producer of the future hindsight podcast. We listened to an episode of future hindsight as part of our delight twenty twenty listening list on conspiracy, which you can find podcast Brunch club, dot, com slash conspiracy. In the episode, we listen to Neil interviewed Nancy Rosenbloom about the idea of conspiracies. And how as a society we're living in a culture of conspiracy for nearly everything is seen with a lens of conspiracy with no evidence. Let alone theory back it up. Welcome, Ula I'm so happy you could join us today I'm so happy to be here. Thank you for having me on. Sure. So before we launch into everything, I just wanted to let you know that we we had a number of meetings that I actually went to this month. So we had our Chicago meeting and we had our virtual chapter meetings and I went to a number of them and people really enjoyed your podcast. So thank you for everything you do. I also did a poll on the facebook group to see like I always do this just to see what people's favourite from the. From the list was and your episode tied with wind of change. So It was one of the favorites. Yeah. Yeah. I want to share that with you but for those listeners who are new to future hindsight, can you just give us a little overview about the show? So. Future hindsight is a show that is an interview show interview people from all walks of life to inspire our audience to get civically engaged, and so we have people on our activists and. And sometimes, politicians but primarily, not politicians really we want to talk to people who have some expertise in the field of that you know an. that. Is Facing our society and a kind of examine those issues more closely from their point of view and I find in all of the interviews I learned something new about the issue that maybe I didn't know from reading the newspaper alone or watching news television so that I have a different idea of what I could do as a private citizen to make change in that field if I, so choose. But also to inspire other people who are listening these really good people out there who do this work and I really dedicated. Very cool. What. What is your background and why did you decide to start the show? So. This is a good question. How to answer Let's see. Well. I studied history in college and then I have a master's degree in international affairs and a I was always interested in general in how societies work and in which way society's thrive. and. One of the focuses for me in college was about nation building. So I studied. The. Formation of the German nation state and the Italian nation state away from having city state and becoming one country and what that took and. I'm originally from Indonesia, which is a very young country and. We always learn so much about what it took for. Indonesia, to become a nation state and so that was always a very interesting topic for me in general and. You know now that I live here, which is a very mature democracy I. thought that those questions are really relevant again today sort of like what does it mean to be a nation and what does it mean to be a thriving society and I think base this is my biggest curiosity and in the wake of the two thousand, sixteen election I thought you know I think The unhappiness from. Americans at large. Can Be rectified and address through more civic engagement instead of only watching the news or only reading the newspaper I think if we all. Jumped in and even a little bit it would make a huge difference. Yeah So, as you know, we listened to your episode about conspiracies them the discussion with Nancy Rosenbloom? So can you just for those listeners who maybe didn't get a chance to listen to the episode? Can you just say a little bit about what conspiracy is? So the way that Nancy Rosenbloom defines Ed is that conspiracy them is a departure from conspiracy theory in that it is a conspiracy without theory. Normally, conspiracy theory. Attempts to make sense of the way the world is unfolding and so. For, example. You know JFK was assassinated. So there is a conspiracy theory that the actor was not alone and then so there's all this research about. How there was somebody in a building or the angle of the bullet and this kind of stuff where there's all this research to back up. Their claim that there was really a different reason and what the conspiracy Zim that Nancy Rosenbloom talks about is is that it just makes a base allegation without having that theory without having any of the research in adjust accuses the other side. Of something nefarious or something that is you know not quite up to snuff on the surface. There's really something else behind it but nobody can be bothered or really that is not the point frankly to have the proof. So then how is conspiracy is different from dish information I think conspiracies, them is a form of disinformation and so for example, when you say you know Pizza Gate that is conspires ism there is nothing behind pizza gate there literally is no theory. There is nothing to back up this idea that something really happened at Comet Pizza in Washington right and so it just gives you an idea that something is wrong but nothing is really wrong and so by in. By giving you the idea it makes you feel like, Oh, well, maybe maybe something is wrong there and that's really all it means to achieve. Right? It's a plant. It's like planting a seed of doubt, correct? Yeah. Yeah. I mean some of the things that really struck me about what Nancy was talking about was. The idea of the that the loyal opposition as an integral part of democracy and like the keyword there is loyal and I you know I, I was never a political science major history major. I was never really into that but I've heard loyal opposition thrown out thrown around a lot. But never really until she talked about, it really thought about what does that mean? She did a really beautiful job of kind of breaking it down in that like it's It's integral to democracy because the opposition is seen as loyal and not treacherous or traitorous, and that that seems to be what is sort of falling by the wayside now and American democracy is that like the opposition or the Party and power or or you know the other side, whatever it is is pointing to the other and saying not only are you opposing us? You're also traders and not patriots and that seems so different than. Everything that has happened in the past. And and also talked about like this whole disorientation tactic and it just made me start wondering about how much people go through this whole like. Disinformation fake news conspiracy theory fatigue like. Fatigue around. Vetting their new source because everything is called fake news or everything is called this information or there's a war on the media or their these blanket statements of fact, when there's nothing to back them up and so people are just like well, I, don't even know what to believe anymore. So I'm either just GONNA. Believe everything or I'm going to believe nothing you know. And I, feel like it's just such a scary slippery slope. You know how do you feel about it? Yes Oh. Well, if you think about fake news and disinformation as being the bedrock of Authoritarianism it makes perfect sense because the idea is to create exactly this environment that you speak of where we are not sure what's true and And we cannot figure it out easily it takes a lot of work and even with all of that work, we can still get it wrong even for people who are well educated and read everything it still feels like it's a crap shoot you know and then. There are truly people who are hiding the truth rights then. Let. Me Say if you look at the media. I don't want to say that they're hiding the truth, but they often go along with reporting things that aren't true. So for example, if you watch a press conference with the president, if you tell the Lai nobody challenges him on the Lai even though everybody in the room knows he's telling a lie. So if you are somebody who just watching. This news conference live. Then, you just accept everything at face value and once it's in your brain, very difficult to dislodge even if you know it's not true. Right. So I just heard today that somebody said, oh. I think the virus is GonNa go away November fourth and it's like what? No of course not. But because she heard it in a press conference, she believes it. You know. So it's the kind of thing where it's it's really to sow confusion there is. An interview I did with. Lieutenant Colonel Travis travel as part of the post truth season and he. Really looked at the disinformation campaign, the fake news campaign from the Russian government during the two thousand sixteen election, and they have something called chaos theory. So the whole point is to create chaos in people's minds and the media pollute the information stream to the point where it is not readily discernible. What's true and what's not, and that's when an authoritarian type. Government can take over right it's propaganda to write like let's propaganda. There's a yeah it's quit scary and that I mean that brings me to my next point I was surprised that Nancy seemed so optimistic because I mean you asked her and she's like, Oh, I have a lot of hope and given what she had been talking about and how. Different it feels from everything that's happened in the past I was surprised. I was definitely surprised that she seemed very optimistic. I'm wondering how you feel. Are you optimistic? I'm definitely optimistic. I'm optimistic and the way that I think is very similar to hers and I think goes back to your comment about the loyal opposition. I think there are many people who are. Opposed to whatever government is in power in this country who love the country Justice March and we'll do the right thing. you know based on the circumstances. So just was listening to an interview with Stuart Stevens he wrote a book called I think it's all a lie about the Republican Party and he was a Republican Party operative for many years and he is definitely a never-trumper and. He spoke about. How The party became trump almost as a matter of course, because of its philosophy but that. This doesn't mean it cannot be reborn and really embraced things that we all thought stood for you know for a balanced budgets and you know a family oriented party. And What he argues is that really the Republican Party for many decades was just about gaining power and it just had this been Niran on but. He is certain and I and I and I think he's right that in fact, there are many people who do embrace a balanced budget. Type of party, and family oriented. Party and their millions of people out there who believed this to and who? Build a new. Let's say center right party or rebuild. The Republican Party. So I think that is really hopeful. AM also really hopeful that. So many people are now civically engaged in ways that I didn't think was possible. So I think that's that's really fantastic and people are really. Fighting back and they want democracy to work in this country. So there is much to be hopeful about having said that you know the government right now essentially as a its own people, and so I don't know whether we will. In the end prevail but. It looks like everybody's you know not everybody, but a lot of people are making a huge effort. Yeah Yeah I mean you bring up a really good point that. This. Kind of. I Dunno divisiveness as scary as it is it is bringing out. It's it is getting people to. To Act on their beliefs unfortunately sometimes those beliefs are terrible beliefs and people do like horrible damage and commit atrocities, which is what scares me the most but but it is good to hear that people are optimistic. But. I WanNa I. WanNa. Take a step back from the your episode and talk a little bit about the listening last as a whole I know that you listened to all of the episodes that we included, which was awesome. I mean awesome of utilise and not not poets me list itself was awesome. I liked it but it was good. I really enjoyed it. I recommended into a bunch of people. Good. Yeah I just wanted to hear how you felt like the future hindsight episodes sort of fit within it or diverged from some of the other ones and how conspiracy. Maybe you heard a little bit of like the whole idea of conspiracy in any of them. If you did, I'd love to hear your your takeaways while I think that. Especially through line and then the episode about forget the name but the one about the Secret Society and tell Yes fantail, both of them were so good and setting up sort of the way that we think about conspiracy theories in that we accept that conspiracy theories can be true and in fact, sometimes they are right. So there's a place for conspiracy theories. They do uncover things that are sometimes hidden by the government or powerful actors. Let's say and so. I think this. Without the culture. Something like the new conspiracies that Dancy Rosenbloom speaks about would not be possible. So I think because we are so deeply steeped in this tradition. We were. Crime to, be exploited. Say Yeah. Yeah I mean. I really appreciated sort of the. So some of the episodes, especially the Intel and like you said through line made me feel a little better about conspiracy theories because I was like Oh this is this is just like status quo. This is the way that it's always been like nothing new to see here you know and sort of made me feel a little bit about better about the state, the current state were an and. then. You're episode sort of put a little bit of a spin on that and really said, well, no, actually we're we're in a different sort of political era and that it's not the same old conspiracy theory where there is like you know the the theory doesn't exist there is no evidence to back up the theory. So it's just statements of like presented as fact with nothing to back it up. So I felt like a gave a good and. It sort of gave a good counterpoint of like. You know we can't be. We can't just sort of throw our hands up and be like Oh. This is the way it's always been right because like. The through episode told us about how America was founded on a conspiracy theory. So. We can't just be like, oh, whatever it's no big deal. This is always the way it's been so I don't really have to do anything your episode really said, no, it actually is a really big deal and this is how it's different and this is how it's different from the past and this is why we need to do something and this is why we need to vote and this is why we need to. Say. something. So that's kind of how I felt like it fit in. Would you would you agree definitely I agree yes I mean I really hope that this would come across that. In fact, this is a different thing that we than what we're used to, and therefore we must fight against and take action and stand up for truth which is incredibly difficult because very often like we just discussed it's not that easy to discern the truth, but I do think that even. A little bit goes a long ways I speak up all the time when people. Talk about some article they saw in the New York Post. Let's say which I know is not a true article and I'm not saying that everything the near Post. Publishes untrue. But there's some things we all know is onto you know look. Sort of like the National Enquirer, right? Like there's a flesh eating bacteria and whatever you you can dismiss that and you can't say if you're in a conversation with other people site something that is inaccurate. You can simply say you know that's not true and you don't have to get into a fight about it but I think it's really important to say those things as opposed to just saying nothing which is sort of what the press is doing right now Mary off and like I said, they don't challenge the president, but I think it's incredibly important even if. The president were to rebuff the media. Even if the person that I'm speaking to does not respond or gets angry I think it's important to say it out loud. Agreed totally. So, let's focus on the future of future. I know that you guys were recording this on August eleventh and I just got your press release that on August fourteenth your lot launching season eleven, which is wow season eleven good for you guys. It's amazing. Thank you. That's a lot of work. Tell us about it tell us about what the next season's about. So the next season we thought would be interesting to do something about. The election and so last two, two years ago in two thousand eighteen we did something that was sort of about voting electioneering and so this time he thought well. How can we think about? Having political power. So our next season is about building political power and we talk to people who are Building political power for different groups and so I start with a ton hirsch who wrote a book called politics is for power. And what he does, this is actually really perfect for our conversation today he he talks about how most of us in this country are engaged in something called Political Hobby Ism, which is that we are reading twitter all the time we're watching Cable News we shout TV or read the newspaper we get upset but really we don't do anything like if somebody were to ask us you know how to build political power. We wouldn't know if you if somebody said to you. Well, when the next you know community board meeting, you wouldn't know so he said. If you really want to build political power as an everyday person, you should really start paying attention to what's happening on a local level because that's where you can have the biggest difference and so I think that's a really great way to start the season, and then there was a person that he interviewed called drew cromer. He started a Democratic Party precinct in his college town Davidson Carolina. And he is our second interview. So I got to speak to drew. That's really exciting because he's really young. He's only in the second year was about to be in a second year law school and he started the Democratic Party precinct basically from scratch and it's the kind of thing where you think oh well, we don't think that we have this kind of power but need. And so he talks about that and then we have a bunch of other people talking about the tea party as I speak to Theta Scotch Ball. She's A. Renowned, political scientists at Harvard and She did a lot of research on the Tea Party in Oh nine and so she just came out with a book that. Kind. Of Compares where the Tea Party is now with. resistance movements, today, and. And how they're similar how they differ and it's really fascinating and and sort of you know what people do to gather. To build power, and that's really what politics is about is to work together in a group in a movement to ask of government whatever it is that you need and and I think this reminds us also and I like to remind people all the time that the government is us we pay for the government. We'd be the taxes we pay our public officials who pay the people work at City Hall, and so billy, it's up to us to demand. What we want government to do for us You know. It makes me think that. Have you heard or talk to anybody in your elevensies ends that works with young people and students like maybe at the high school secondary education level because I feel like that is really important I mean they can get involved in student government or whatever, and that's that's fine. But like released like. Narrowing on civic engagement and community activism. Have you talked anybody? Yes. So in fact, we have an episode with Scott Warren. He's the founder of generation citizen which basically teachers civic engagement he calls it Action Civics to middle and schoolers, and at the end of each term, they have something called day, which is kind of like a science fair for civics and they present they have these cardboard presentations than they tell you what their problem was like. There's one day that I went to where they wanted to the the high schoolers there they wanted to get the cafeteria to stop buying certain types of meats. and. So they basically did all the research on what kind of meats are being bought for their school and how they could make that change within the system which I thought was really interesting. So instead of being disrupted if they what you already doing these things, how about you do it like this you know instead of doing step ABC Andy, how just do ABC and Skip D. and don't buy the sausages or whatever it was. That they wanted it was really interesting and I thought Oh this is so clever. But essentially what this is generation civics, it teaches civics as a proper class, and so it's a mandatory class that you can't skip. It's not extracurricular and The teacher is I think what they call a democracy mentor and you learn how to put together a case to appeal to your local official or in this case to the people. who run the cafeteria and how you can have those kinds of conversations and what it takes to maybe change somebody's mind on the other side or help you get the thing that you really. WanNa do and work together with your classmates to get there. And is that where where? Is. Generally. What was it called generation citizen so generation citizen is in several states I. Think it's in Rhode Island in Texas I want to say Massachusetts New York definitely because I went to a civics day in New York, and there are a bunch of other states. I don't know I don't remember them now all on the top of my head I also spoke to Louis Do Bay who is the Executive Director of Ice Civics, which is an organization that was founded by. Sandra Day O'Connor and it's basically a gaming. APP or a gaming platform about civics. So there are games that you can play for example, the one that they just released this year is called win the White House. So you have to build a campaign you have to have a budget and you have to make ads and it's really fascinating and they're bunch of other ones there some easier ones some harder ones and they're very compelling and and one of the reasons that justice O'Connor did this because been she was talking to people in education they said, you know the easiest way to get the attention of young people is to. Make a game and so that's why they did that. Yeah. Yeah. I mean it's so funny. It's true of everybody right like everybody wants to have fun. You know like if you can make learning fun. It just makes it a lot easier for it to sink in and if you can make it practical to these kids. Are, affecting change in their own cafeteria as opposed to some arbitrary thing that. Not GonNa Affect them on a day-to-day basis if they can learn by doing something that actually changes that our Databa- life like I think that that's just going to sink in more. So yeah, that's really exciting. I love that Yup. There it's pretty it's pretty cool. It's cool there. So many people who do tremendous work out there and really trying to make a difference and getting people you know properly informed and engaged especially starting at a younger level, you can get it. You know you can set the example really early. Yeah yeah and I mean I, love that you're working to give that those people a platform and sort of highlight what they're doing. So I think you're sort of contributing to the overall. Good. So thank you for everything that you do. So I WANNA I wanna ask you one of our final questions, which is something I ask Oliver Gusts. And that is you know podcast Burns club is a podcast listener community. We love learning about new podcasts I wanna hear from you about whether or not. You have podcast recommendation for the community. I definitely have one It's maybe sleep orthodox I grew up in Germany. So I speak German and I've been listening to this really fantastic podcast called doth corona virus update, which is produced by NPR and it is with. The chief meteorologist at Charity Hospital and Berlin Christian Drostan. In fact, it was covered by NPR that this that this podcast is out there but actually a friend of mine who's German recommended to me before NPR covered it and it's really fascinating. It's really good. So for example, a few weeks ago when he was on, we were talk he they were talking about reopening schools and I think this is a really interesting question to ask and he said look you know if you're talking about reopening schools if your goal is to have corona buyer schools. Corona. Virus Free Schools Rather I'm like. Not. But if you WANNA have a virus fee school, then chances are you can't open school. But if you accept that there will be corona virus cases then you can think about this totally differently that's a different kind of question. You know if you accept that they're going to be some cases than what are you going to do when you have the cases and nobody's really having that kind of conversation. Yeah Yeah. Wow. Okay and that's in German right? Yes. German. Yeah awesome I like to I. Love the idea featuring some podcasts that aren't in English I mean there's so many out there. So thank you for that recommendation welcome and then yeah, and then just to wrap up tell tell us how people can follow you or get in touch with you twitter instagram on on for future hindsight and all that. Yeah so you can follow us on twitter at future without an E.. So it's F you've not. You are underscore hindsight or you can follow me at Milad Moss, all one word at M. I l. a. h. m. o. s., and then on Instagram we are future underscore underscore hindsight. I know so so tricky. And then On facebook where we're not reactive I'd be to have a presence. There is just future hindsight. That's speedy. Straightforward. Also follow us on Lincoln which I think is very strange, but I haven't following their which is cool. Yeah and so but I am very active on twitter and I think a lot of podcast. A lot of the podcasts community is active on twitter. Well, thank you so much for joining us. It was really a pleasure to talk to you and your episode was really fascinating. Thank you. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Thank you for listening and being a part of the podcast. Brunch Club community. Do. You have any thoughts on our discussion this month Send the message for voice memos to podcast at podcast Brunch Club. Dot Com. PBC as a passion project and we rely on support from our global community to continue bringing people together in person and online. So. If you feel like PBC has contributed to your life in any way, please consider becoming a patron or making a one time donation. Go To podcast Brunch club dot com slash support for more information. If you're interested in becoming an organizational partner, go to podcast Brunch, club dot com slash sponsors. A quick banks to our early partners pod beans. For. One free month of podcast hosting. Go to pod bean dot, com slash PBC. Hodge chaser the IMDB of todd calf listen notes. PODCAST, search engine. Critical frequency the podcast network for everyone else the van media a weekly newsletter for curious minds. Lead Williams and company podcast network telling stories in the themes of society. Finally, some credits for this episode. Katie Fury. Is Our audio editor music is from Chad crouch and Missile Ghana downloaded from Free Music Archive I'm Della founder of Podcast Brunch Club and as always thanks and happy listening.

Nancy Rosenbloom twitter founder PBC facebook Republican Party president Tea Party Indonesia Chicago Russian government Augusta Adela Colonel Travis executive producer NPR Neil Brunch Club community Intel New York Post
NPR News: 06-06-2019 6AM ET

NPR News Now

04:56 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 06-06-2019 6AM ET

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut to California from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online. Learn how Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. World leaders are gathered near the beaches of Normandy. France, marking the seventy fifth anniversary of the allied troop arrival d day. French president Emmanuel Macron is addressing President Trump and other world leaders at the American cemetery at Omaha beach where thousands of US troops are buried the leaders are commemorating the allied troops, who pushed into Europe on this day in nineteen. Forty four to began the major operation against the Nazis. Some two million tourists are also attending. There's a heavy security presence in place. President Trump says talks with Mexico on the subject of illegal, immigration or yielding, progress, but not nearly enough NPR's Scott Horsely reports Trump continues to threaten tariffs on everything. The US buys for Mexico beginning Monday vice-president Pence met with Mexican officials for about ninety minutes at the White House Wednesday. And while there were no breakthroughs the two sides have agreed to keep talking. The Trump administration wants Mexico to do more to stem, the growing tide of migrants from Central America more than one hundred and forty four thousand on author. Is border crossers were taken into custody at the US border last month. If Mexico does not act, the president has threatened to impose five percent tariffs on all imports from Mexico starting Monday. Those import taxes would increase every month until they hit twenty five percent in October. Scott Horsely NPR news, Washington. The Trump administration is scaling back on the cost of teaching English to migrant children illegally in the US department of health and human services is also cutting legal aid, and recreational activities such as soccer for unaccompanied, migrant children who are staying in federal contracting migrant shelters. The agency is blaming the increased number of migrants, who have recently crossed into the US it says it's reducing payments for activities that aren't directly necessary to protect life and safety. A high profile migrants rights activists has been arrested in Sonora the Mexican state that lies south of Arizona, from member station. K J. Z Z Murphy, Woodhouse reports from ammo CEO, UD nail Mujica, the head of the migrant group pueblos in front. Dennis was arrested by Mexican authorities just across the Zona border in Sona. We Sonora Wednesday afternoon, that's according to the organization and a shelter. Volunteer, volunteer. Carla Bettencourt said she's troubled by the arrest. Mujica was one of the shelters founders. I'll say good cuisine Plath, and she says, she's not sure what this means for the shelter and worries it could bring trouble in a Wednesday afternoon, tweet platelets in front Dennis denounced because arrest calling it quote clear reprisal by the Mexican government against migrant defenders Mujica has figured prominently in the ongoing trial of Scott. Warren, a US border activists facing federal felony harboring charges for NPR news. I'm Murphy would house. You're listening to NPR news from Washington. Automaker. Fiat Chrysler says it's withdrawing its merger offer for French automaker. Renault the combination would have created the world's third largest carmaker, but Fiat Chrysler says political conditions in France would make it impossible for the merger to succeed lawyers for the state of Oklahoma are accusing pharmaceutical maker, Johnson and Johnson of being a drug kingpin from member station. K. G. O U, Jackie forty-eight reports. It's part of Oklahoma's opioid lawsuit against the drug maker. Oklahoma's lawyers say that Johnson and Johnson did more than push its own pills until twenty sixteen. It also profited from the prescription opioid crisis by owning and selling the refined narcotic to other companies including Purdue, which makes Oxycontin attorney for the state. Brad Beck worth question, Johnson and Johnson's corporate Representative Kimberly deem Eshelman one to kill potentially since the beginning, there is a an abuse potential. There is if used inappropriately the state says, Johnson and Johnson made false claims that it's opioids were safe ineffective for the long term treatment of chronic pain, and downplayed addiction risk. The company denies any wrongdoing for NPR news. I'm Jacky forte in Norman Oklahoma in Sudan, opposition leaders are urging civilians to continue acts of civil disobedience such as blocking roads and bridges. This follows violence this week by the Sudanese military junta a Sudanese doctors group says the violence by the military has left more than one hundred demonstrators done. I'm korva Coleman. NPR news in Washington.

NPR US Johnson President Trump Mexico NPR Washington Scott Horsely Google Oklahoma korva Coleman Mujica Fiat Chrysler Sonora France Murphy Dennis US department of health Connecticut
Democracy Now! 2019-11-12 Tuesday

Democracy Now! Audio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-11-12 Tuesday

"From New York this is democracy. Now build this country with the same happiness that we built it when we governed this country. Him By dream isn't a solved my problems today. I'm a guy that doesn't have a job audible president without a pension and even at television in my apartment. My life is totally blocked. The only thing I'm certain of is that I have more courage to fight. They'd never before after nineteen months behind bars former Brazilian president Louis in Osceola Selva is released from prison. He's vowing going to challenge Brazil's far-right President J airfoil Sonata. We'll speak to Petra Costa Director of the new documentary the edge of democracy. Then we go to California to speak with San Francisco's newly elected district attorney Jason Bodine. Who won despite the Police Officers Association nations spending over six hundred fifty thousand dollars on ads attacking Han Progressive Prosecutor? Amy is not just about decarbonisation reducing racial disparities. And so on. It's also about making sure we were using the tremendous power and discretion of the District Attorney's Office to enforce the laws equally that means prosecuting corporate landlords. When they commit fraud it means prosecuting police when they commit murder or perjury? It means prosecuting corporations. When they dump Tom Toxic waste into our communities then to Seattle where a group of Progressive City councillors were able to beat back a one point four million dollar campaign by Amazon to flip the city council will speak to Seattle's socialist city council member Sean Savant our movement in has won and defended our socialist socialist city for working people against the richest man in the world? All that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report report. I'm Amy Goodman Longtime Bolivian president. Evo Morales says departed Bolivia from Mexico after stepping down Sunday. And what he calls a military coup. Who late Monday morale departed lapaz on the Mexican government plane? He's been granted asylum in Mexico. He announced his resignation Sunday. Shortly shortly after the Bolivian military took to the airwaves to call for his departure. Last month. Morales was reelected for firth term in a race. His opponents claimed was marred. Marred by Fraud Morales departure has sparked outrage and protests across Latin America with many saying he was the victim of a military coup. This is Danielle Menendez is in Argentina. Automates there have been enormous. Suspension all social indicators in Bolivia in the past fourteen years that bothered the privileged sectors is that hydrocarbons have been nationalized that basic income has been increased for the entire population. Despite all this I minority together with the Armed Forces or carrying out this outrage in this barbarity that has to do with a coup and policies that we thought had been eradicated from the region and that is why it's so important that popular movements throughout Latin America. Come Out oh through puja. This coup Ava Morales was Bolivia's first indigenous president on Monday video circulated of Morales opponents. Burning whipple. Bulla indigenous flags morale departure came a week after Bolivia's government cancelled a massive multinational lithium mining. Projects slated for Bolivia's southern highlands to see our coverage of the political crisis in Bolivia go to democracy now dot org in Immigration News. The supreme greencore will begin to hear oral arguments today on three lawsuits demanding. The trump administration preserve DACA. That's deferred action for childhood arrivals. The Obama era program that grants protection from deportation and a work permit to at least seven hundred thousand undocumented. People brought to the United States as children. This is thirty one year old Dhaka Recipient Mata crews a Barca. But this prerecord doesn't go on favor Uber of Dhaka. Basically it's it's GonNa be just for for me personally. It's just GonNa be an end this like I just go back to shadows and now continuing education personal in my dreams we coma criminal lawyer. The future of thousands of trimmers a not only a dreamer is split the American. US citizens are basically soclean in their hands. We Are we are just right there. In the limbo knowing what's going to happen with over lives on Capitol Hill televised impeachment hearings are slated to begin Wednesday into the inquiry into whether president trump withheld military aid from Ukraine rain to pressure the Ukrainian president to investigate trump's political rival Joe Biden Anna Sun. It's only the third time in. US history there have been televised impeachment. Richmond hearings on Wednesday the first two witnesses to testify. WE'LL BE JORGE CANTU. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and Bill Taylor a former ambassador and the top. US diplomat diplomat in Ukraine. Former Massachusetts governor deval. Patrick may jump into the twenty twenty presidential race. The New York Times reports the two-term term governor has spoken to Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and Democratic officials and is considering announcing his plans to run later this week. Divall is managing aging director at the private equity firm Bain capital which was co founded by Republican Utah Senator Mitt Romney here in New York longtime Republican in Congress member. Peter King has announced his retirement. King is the fourteen term representative from Long Island progressive. Lawmakers celebrated his announcement that he would not seek election in twenty twenty among the Minnesota Congresswoman. Ilhan Omar who tweeted quote. Peter King is an Islamophobe who held mccarthyite heart theat hearings targeting American. Muslims said there are too many mosques in this country and blamed Eric Garner for his own death at the hands of police. Good riddance since Congress member. Ilhan Omar tweeted in Los Angeles. Donald trump junior was heckled offstage during a talk by his own supporters WHO erupted in protest after he announced he would not be taken questions? President Trump's son was at UCLA. The University of California's Los Angeles campus Sunday to promote his book triggered how the Left Thrives on Haiti and wants to silence us but it turned out to be his own right-wing fans who ended up silencing and driving the author offstage with hostile chance of QNA QNA to the tune of USA USA. Say after trump. Junior said there would not be enough time for audience questions. The Environmental Protection Agency plans to restrict the scientific research that the federal government uses to write new public health regulations. That's according to the New York Times which obtained a draft of new WHO. Fica proposals that stipulate scientists would have to disclose their raw data including confidential medical records in order for the EPA okay to even consider an academic studies conclusions. Scientists say these measures would make it far more difficult for the agency to issue new clean air and water rules the Israeli military bomb the home of a senior member of the Palestinian group Islamic Jihad before dawn in Gaza. Today killing the commander Mander Baha Abu Allah and his wife Asma and injuring their children following the targeted assassination over fifty rockets were fired from Gaza into Israel injuring at least one civilian. The European Union has condemned the rocket attacks saying quote the firing of rockets on civilian populations is totally unacceptable optical and must immediately stop the Afghan government and the Taliban have agreed on a prisoner exchange which Afghan President Ashraf. Ghani says aims to facilitate direct peace negotiations. The swap will free American professor. Kevin King and Australian Professor Timothy Weeks both had been professors at the American University of Afghanistan before being kidnapped and Kabul in two thousand sixteen in exchange the Afghan. I've gotten government will free three senior Taliban members and that's how Connie Hafeez Rashid and had you molly con. The Chilean government has agreed to rewrite its constitution in order to replace the one that was written during Chilean dictator. Augusto Pinochet's brutal military regime. The rewriting of the constitution has been one of the key demands of the massive demonstrations that have rocked Chile in recent weeks. The Chilean authorities have killed at least nineteen people people and wounded thousands more since the protests erupted on October nineteenth in response to a subway fare hike and quickly grew into a revolt against stress. Sturdy and economic inequality over two hundred sixty people were arrested in Hong Kong Monday amidst escalating clashes between pro democracy student protesters and police. Some schools and universities across Hong Kong are closed today demonstrations continue across the territory story over three thousand people have been arrested since the protests broke out in June in Arizona Activists Scott Warren of the group. No more deaths is is heading back to court for a second trial today for providing water food clean clothes and beds to undocumented migrants crossing the Sonoran desert in Southern Arizona Warren's indicted on felony conspiring to harbor if convicted he could spend up to ten years in prison. A jury very deadlocked after his first trial. Five months ago in August Democracy Now accompanied Scott Warren into the Sonoran desert of Arizona as he at companied other other activists dropping food and water for migrants attempting the deadly crossing this Scott Warren. So there's the direct impact on people who've died people who've suffered out here people who have been disappeared and then the ripple effects of of their families the trauma that creates creates The traumatic experience of this is another way that I can feel like a conflict or like a war zone. I don't like a war zone rhetoric that you typically hear politicians use 'cause it's deployed to increase militarization and building walls But it's appropriate only think about the trauma that people have faced as they crossed to these areas in the trauma their families experiencing the pain former. President Jimmy Carter is scheduled L. to undergo an operation today to relieve pressure on his brain. The ninety five year old was hospitalized Monday evening at emory university hospital in Atlanta. Anna Georgia. The Carter Center said the procedure is needed to Due to bleeding due to his recent falls Carter suffered a minor pelvic fracture from full last month and broke hip and a separate fall and may got stitches in his head as well until just a few weeks ago. He was continuing to build homes for his project habitat for for humanity and in Texas. The father of touchy on Jefferson has died less than one month after police officer killed his twenty eight year old daughter daughter by shooting through the bedroom window of her own home and a case that sparked national protest over the treatment of African American women at the hands of police on Saturday. Atanas Father Marquess. Jefferson died after suffering a heart attack. The family spokesperson said quote. I can only I summit up as a broken heart attack. Tanna was his only child. She was killed exactly one month ago. October twelfth by white police officer Aaron Dean who is responding to a nonemergency wellness check called for by a neighbor who noticed Tatyana had left her front door open Dane. It's been charged with murder. And those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report. I'm Amy Goodman Juan Gonzalez us. Welcome to all of our listeners viewers across the country and around the world we begin. Today's show in Brazil where former President Lucie OSCEOLA silver silvas was freed from prison Friday after five hundred eighty days behind bars luna surprise release came after the Brazilian Supreme Court ruled two and the mandatory imprisonment of people convicted of crimes who are still appealing their cases. Lula has vowed to challenge Brazil's right when President J Yearbook Sonata in the two thousand twenty two elections during a rally on Friday soon after his release Lula warned about both sonatas ties to violent militias. This was democratically elected. We accept the result of the election. This guy has a mandate for four years now. He was elected to the Brazilian people and not to govern the militia in Rio de Janeiro. I want to build this country with the same happiness thinnest that we built it when we govern this country. My dream isn't to solve my problem today. I'm a guy that doesn't have a job. President without a pension plan uneven television in my life is totally blocked. The only thing I'm certain of is that I have more courage to fight than ever before. Lula was serving a twelve year sentence over disputed corruption and money laundering conviction handed down by conservative judge. Sergio Morteau and ally of current far-right Brazilian President J Bolsonaro. After that he became the justice minister. Lula has long maintained his innocence earlier this year the intercept except revealed motto aided prosecutors and they're sweeping corruption investigation known as operation car. Wash an attempt to prevent Lula from running in the two thousand thousand eighteen election. This cleared the path for both Sonatas victory at the time of his imprisonment. In April two thousand eighteen Lula was leading the presidential polls. Well for more. We're joined by the Brazilian filmmaker Petra. Kosta her new documentary. The edge of democracy chronicles the imprisonment of Lula. The impeachment spent of former president. Jomo who seth and the story of the dictatorship and the democracy about the same age as our guest the Brazilian filmmaker Petra Kosta. Welcome back to democracy. Now it's great to have you with US Petra. We last so you right before Lula was released at least it was a total shot. Can you respond yes. I was very moved by his release but also very worried because the abuse of lawn Brazil has been so consistent assistant over the last five years that it's hard to know how long this decision will last. It's a very necessary decision that goes back to our Constitution and eighty-eight which which says that anyone has the right to exhaust their appeals before they are imprisoned that was revised in two thousand and sixteen due to large pressures of operation and car wash. The corruption investigation led by judge moral and now the supreme court I believe influenced by the revelations of the League that happened and earlier this year. Which showed how politicized operation possibly was decided to come back to the constitution and grant Lula his constitutional right as well as the other resilience? Your I was GonNa ask you precisely that given the revelations that have come out about the tainted nature of his actual conviction that this possibly could have been easier way for the Supreme Court to go to actually overturn his original conviction. Call the entire current government into question because certainly now is the justice minister. Yes we are waiting for another ruling. The Supreme Court should do soon which will decide and whether the trial and the judge were actually in partial or not if that is decided that he was not impartial than in all the the process goes by Falls which means that Lula could even run for president in two thousand and twenty two because basically what the League showed as they mentioned was that. There's a possibility that the judge was coordinating every action of the prosecutors accusers influencing just before the election whether Lula could be a candidate or not was not allowed to be a candidate and if the it was done done differently it was possible that he would be president at this moment and explain who mora was in the trial and who is today motor. Was the the judge responsible for overseeing car. Wash Operation Today. He is Justice Minister of Bolsonaro with called superjet Justice Minister with more more than just a justice ministry but other ministries under his. What was that seen as a reward by Bolsa Nada to Moro for imprisoning his opponent? Lula of course. The poll showed he was far ahead in the race for president in two thousand eighteen. Exactly when you see it as overboard now are there any other people who are in jail who also be released as a result of this rule. Yes some of them who are researchers say believe and about two hundred from car wash and also people have committed petty crimes and Brazil has the third largest I car serrated population in the world. It's a huge crisis as similar to the United States. And we need an urgent today Sherry like Prison reform perform and share reform. That will make our system more efficient. I think the mistake that many people fall into thinking that constitutional rights can be abused for to have a more efficient system. The danger was that with that. Is that today. Lula's constitutional rights. X can be abused Tomorrow Blind Tomorrow Yours. And where do we stand as a democracy. I WANNA go to a clip in your film. The edge of democracy. This is is former President Louis in Osceola Sofa giving his farewell speech to the people on his way to prison in two thousand eighteen. They they could. They ordered my arrest the end. No it's no use trying to stop me from from traveling around this country because there are millions of Louis Bullets and Dilma Rousseff to do it for me. The there's no use in trying to stop my ideas Biden they're already in the air and you can't imprison them. There's no point it and trying to stop. My dreams is when I stop dreaming at eight. I'll be dreaming through your minds and dreams nobody uh-huh there's no point in thinking everything's going to stop the day. Little has a heart attack. Nonsense gets my heart will be beating through yours. I and there are millions of hearts with powerful. Kill one two or or a hundred roses fifty but they'll never stop the arrival of spring in our fight search of spring. That is Lula right before he went to jail now pentecostal. What is amazing about your film is that you are right there with him? Talk about the moments before he turned himself in. You didn't know what he wanted to more. Maybe maybe more significantly. He didn't know what he was going to exactly once his prison was declared and he immediately said that he was going to go to to the Syndicate the Union where he started his political career in the eighties. So everyone went there and I went with my camera not knowing if I would be able to get in slowly managed to get access and we were there for three days kind of hostage inside that workers union. He had no idea every moment someone would come and say he decided not to give himself. He's giving himself in and until the last moment he did not know until he decided to give himself in and when he declared that decision the crowd surrounded the union and started to try to prevent him from giving himself in holding the doors and the gates gates not allowing for the police to enter or for Lulu to leave was one of the most dramatic things. I've ever seen in decide to turn himself in. Because he believed moved it was necessary for him to abide by the Constitution. Abide by the rule of law to expose rather oh he was having a fair trial or not. Let's not the clip. That really conveys this moment. WE'RE GONNA try to go to that clip that conveys that incredibly powerful moment. Where Lulu where was he? By the way it's the workers union where he started his career in the interior of some. Follow some so. We're going to see if we have that clip for the climax of Car Wash mortar authorizes the police detain rule and force him to testify nine. Even though the former president had never resisted questioning mm-hmm suspecting was involved in the corruption scheme investigators look for evidence. An apartment allegedly gifted to him by construction company implicated in the car wash scandal. Although there's no formal accusation the spectacle of Lula being taken by force by the police creates an impression of guilt. That wasn't the moment that he was deciding. Rather go to jail. But explain what it was. Petrakov this is early. Two Thousand Sixteen when judge moral. Clair's that Lewis should be taken in an enforced coercion. Russian which is basically meant taking him to to an enforced interrogation which many said at the time was is in constitutional because Lula had volunteered to speak and many didn't know at the time. If you would be imprisoned or not immediately after this interrogation it would still take two years for him to be in prison and tell us a little bit of how you got started with this film why you decided to make it. You're relatively young for the leaders of this movement covering this movement. How you got involved? But I grew up believing that democracy was birthrights guaranteed from a lifetime the time of my parents struggle. My parents fought against the military dictatorship and dedicated their lives to kind of establish democracy in Brazil and when that was born was more or less at the same time as Brazilian democracy and as I was growing up I kind of took it for granted I thought it was a given until in two thousand sixteen. Gene started to become clear to me that that was not the case for many reasons one of them was the first time I took. The camera was to film a protest asking for Dylan's impeachment and I filmed the re the streets of real with thousands of people asking for domas impeachment but some asking asking for the return of the military the military that had killed hundreds and tortured thousands in Brazil. And I never thought I would see people asking for the return of that regime so I was clear to me. That new roses was boiling in Brazilian soil. And I wanted to understand where it was coming from and where it was heading. And that's when when I embarked on this journey that took a thousand one days. So let's turn to the trailer of your film Petra the edge of Democracy Brazilian democracy and I almost the same age. I thought that in our thirties would both be standing on solid ground. Time was nineteen when Lagat remember the exciting it felt like a huge step in democratic type. How people an employment to lowest number and history and Zil rises as a major thing? steeled talk to succeed. Him could choose as Juma who says becomes our first female president they start Lincoln changes they are social fabric started to change the counters inter divided into two parts and the small part corruption scandal. The greatest investigation in the consistory. It includes slavery even almost one president impeached another imprisoning. Our democracy is crumbling. The democracy was nothing but a short lived dream democracy. I want because you wanted to ask you in terms of the of the current situation with we're seeing in Bolivia we're seeing that continue conflicts in Venezuela one of the hallmarks of Luna's approach to social change has leadership is that he served his terms and then left office and pass it onto a successor on Whereas in Bolivia Morales sustained now for attempted? I'm just to stay for a fourth term. And in Venezuela with Chavez as well seeking to overturn term limits this whole issue of succession in a movement and and passing the baton onto other leaders wondering your sense of his Lula's impact by making that decision. I think it was essential and he deserves a lot of respect for his decision he lula and Dilma as well were very republican in the sense. Sense of the word that they were respected the institutions in Brazil and and the collaboration of the three powers and it should be seen as an example for other countries in the moment where that is becoming less and less I think we're seeing an abuse of the institutions nations and abuse of the Constitution where some are like putting it on the ground to stay in power for longer unto destroyed their enemies that is happening in the united nited states as well as in many places around the world and since we last saw you as you presented your film that's now on Net flicks In New ORC Yet another in fact several Environmental activists indigenous leaders in the Amazon have been murdered. Talk about the connection. Between that the far-right President Joe Yearbook Sinato and Lula's imprisonment. And what it could mean. Now that he's free. That's very serious The indigenous leader Paolina was assassinated and many killings have been happening in Brazil by by the police and by militias and in the in the Amazon by loggers and miners. And it's part of I believe an advanced unst of a savage unregulated capitalism that is seeking profit for all costs and and I think I think what we need. International attention is essential in this case in Brazil it. It helped a few months ago with the question of the Amazon. We've had a ninety percent increase in deforestation compared to the previous year and who is paying the check for the the impeachment and Lula's who is actually gaining from the impeachment that happened in Brazil and lose imprisonment. There are big corporations that are taking huge profit out of this. And could you talk a little about the change between the Dilma the Lula and Dilma eras and Bolsonaro in terms of the day to day lives of aw of working people of the of the racial minorities of women. In Brazil the economic crisis started with Dilma Rousseff. There was a huge stagnation nation and a huge crisis and augmentation of an employment then but it continues to rise immensely now. They're now thirteen million million Brazilians under the poverty line and The the question of women. It's far worse. I think since the election action there has been a huge spike in violence and feminicide and rapes and killings of people by the police. That is the most absurd served. There has been a twenty percent increase in killing in Rio. Justin real in Rio de Janeiro has more people killed by the police that the entire United States five people are killed per day and that has been incentivized by the government which says that a police that is only a real police if they kill that is a kind of a state lead genocide that is happening in Brazil at this moment. Let me ask you about the Brazilian in Presidential Your Bolsonaro. Lashing out at Brazil's largest media company global after it broadcast a report alleging link between between boats and auto and the two men accused of murdering the Rio de Janeiro Council member Muddier late Franko in March of last year global quoted a doorman who said one of the murder suspects the alleged getaway driver L. Cio de arrived at both scenarios gated community on the night did the murder and was granted access after calling bull sonars residents to cash then drove to the home of the second suspect in the murder of the alleged triggermen Ronnie Lhasa who who has a residence in the same area his railing against Globo he did when he was in Saudi Arabia. Abia in this meeting they had with both Sinato. Mohammed bin Salman Jared Kushner and others. What was called Davos in the desert assert and he just railed for many many minutes on television? Talk about the threats to the press and what this means About the murder of an significance significance of Mariella Franco. Well my uncle was assassinated last year. And they're still investigations into who killed her. Yes global did that report and both will not read them but there have been consistent attacks to the media. That have happened happened in the last months. And it's very serious and put real questions into what will happen to prison. In democracy there are also been the threats of re indications that there's a desire to reinstate the Institutional Act Number five which is the act that determined the closing of the Congress in Brazil and repression of any assembly and Brazilians. I am extremely fearful of what will happen in Brazil. I think think we have to be very attentive. And there's a recent remark by Bannon saying that Lula is the biggest threat to the populace right movement and that he's the biggest leader of Globe's. Yes Steve Bannon and that she lures the biggest leader of the leftist globalist movement. So I think the world has to pay attention to what will happen to Lula in the next month because his constitutional rights and his rights to a fair trial have to. We are of international interest at this moment. Well Petra cost. Congratulations on this deeply. Moving personal and political film The film the edge of democracy out on Netflix Petra. Kosta filmmaker and actor. When we come back we go to California to speak with San Dan? Francisco's district attorney. Elect chase a boo dean. Who won despite the police officers association or some might say because of them spending over over six hundred fifty thousand dollars on ads against him? Stay with US a Steve. But you think that uh-huh ooh chain to past Ma Prieta to say Mahto. Oh Hey guy who threw ooh quarrier. WHO's a kind? Hello so performing. Brazil at Columbia University last month he was on a panel talking about the edge of democracy. The new net flix film. This is democracy macro now. I mean he couldn't tell us well. In a stunning victory public defender Chase Abboud. Dean has been declared the winner of a hotly contested district attorney's race in San Francisco. Bodine is child of whether underground activists Kathy Boudin and David Gilbert who were both incarcerated. When he was still a toddler he learned the news at heat won the race by a razor thin margin while he was on a plane flying back from visiting his father who remains in prison in upstate? New York as the latest numbers Bodine had thirty six percent of the vote his opponent. Suzy Loftus at thirty one percent. Dean ran on a platform to end. Cash Bail Elon dismantle the war on drugs he was endorsed by Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. His Win sends a pointed message to the Democratic Establishment stablishment which had mobilized full force against his campaign San Francisco Mayor of London breed. California Governor Gavin Newsom and Senators Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris all endorsed boo deans opponent. Suzy Loftus the mayor. Even named Loftus Interim District Attorney just weeks before the election in a move condemned by the ACLU as an unfair tilting of the scales. The Police Officers Association. It also spent up to six hundred fifty thousand dollars all those on as attacking Team despite this after four days of ballot-counting he was declared the winner. Jason Dean is the newest addition to a growing number of public defenders around the country who vowed to use the district attorney seat to end tough on crime tactics and restore civil rights including district. Attorney's Rachel Rawlins Orlands of Boston. Larry Krassner Philadelphia. Crasner tweeted quote. Americans are more humane and compassionate than institutions created and controlled by the powerful few our Movement for truly just system that supports the wellbeing of all communities has a new technician in chase of Dean crasner. Set we'll chase. The Bodine joins assist now from San Francisco. California welcome back to democracy now. So how does it feel to have one and talk about when you learned. You had actually one one. Well thank you amy thank you want. It's great to be back and of course I'm humbled by the support we received by the outcome of the election. And buy the confidence that the voters of San Francisco putting me in my vision for making the city safer more humane place for all of its residents I was on the middle seat of Coach class ticket on my way back from the east coast as one said after a couple days of visiting my father at the maximum security prison where he has lived for the last thirty eight years years And we had it on the plane. We check the department elections website. We saw the news we saw that it was a a margin of victory that was insurmountable given the outstanding balance left account and we I was with my fiance. We did our best to celebrate their on the plane in the cramped quarters that we found ourselves in and then we began preparing for what comes next In many ways the the real work lies ahead of us We know we've been given a tremendous amount of responsibility ability And with that comes hard work in the focus of proving voters right and fulfilling the promises that we made throughout this campaign so You're celebrating by getting married Friday. I'm getting married this week. I'm going to be out of the country for a couple of weeks. I'M GONNA put in place a transition team and we're going to a lot of listening in a lot of planning It it's imperative that when I take office we have Really detailed plans and a team in place to execute those plans to make sure the structures Shire's and the staff at the District Attorney's office already to implement the policy vision that the voters elected me to put in place And that's GONNA take time. We don't WANNA WANNA make mistakes we want to move carefully judiciously. So we're working really hard over the next couple of months to put in place that transition plan to listen into law enforcement leaders to community leaders to merchants to go around the city and really sit down with every stakeholder we can and make sure their voices being heard as ed we go about. Transforming San Francisco's approach to criminal justice and chase it. Could you talk a little bit about that. The the counting process in in your election and The impact impact but sale of the of the campaign against you by the Police Officers Association. San Francisco has ranchos voiding voting. So there's an issue there how The House votes went through each cycle of the counting. That's right so there were four candidates in the race and every voter had the choice or the option to put as many as four choices in order. Many voters only put their first choice. Some put all four some put less You know I I was a candidate who had the most first choice votes. I was also the candidate who ended up with more than fifty percent of the votes After the ranked choice analysis which basically works as follows the candidate who gets the least number of first choice votes is eliminated and all of their ballots who are which put a second choice then get redistributed distributed and if no one has fifty percent which was the case in this race the next least vote. Getting candidate is eliminated and the ballots that have of a third choice or in some cases the second choice then redistributed to the remaining two candidates that happened in this race and It took several days of counting to to get through enough ballots before I passed the fifty percent threshold part of that is because in San Francisco Significant majority of voters vote by mail and Ballots can postmarked as as late as election day and so many of the votes that were necessary to be counted. didn't even arrive at the Department of elections until a couple of days after the election itself That process took a few days. We were watching the returns every day eagerly and we saw the trends and we realized A couple of days ahead of the final outcome that we were very likely to win. We understood the dynamics in a race in the neighborhoods. We need to have a strong performance in and I have to say it was a tremendous testament to people power to principal positive campaign. We made the choice not to do negative attacks Even in the face of the onslaught of of dishonest attacks from the Police Officers Association. I think that Strategy in combination with the real grassroots organizing led by local groups like San Francisco horizon like the hard working members of Seo you tend to one in the United Educators of San Francisco and the National Union of Healthcare Workers Workers. You know all of the groups Community groups and unions that stepped up to support those people powered campaign. That really made the difference in terms of the outcome. So it's it's it's safe to say that as ranked choice voting moves into major cities as increasingly doing a across the country that we should all expect our elections to take several several days if not weeks to to declare the winters no more election night the declaration of winners now with Ren Choice voting right. Well it it does. It does depend on the dynamics. This was a particularly close race For first time political candidates running for the same seat And also remember that a big part of it is San. San Francisco's use of vote by mail. I think that if we were A jurisdiction where most voters voted on election day. It would probably be a bit faster or to process the votes Then with look by mail but Certainly when you have a close race and ranked choice analysis has to be conducted. It can take take a few days for sure so chaser Dean talk about The this almost unprecedented police effort attack. On U Oh six hundred fifty thousand dollars an attack ads yet. You still win and it might not have been despite that it might be that. That infuriated created many people and might have turned them in a close race to support you. How do you now do with police? And also the many communities of San Francisco. Well that's right I mean you know. The onslaught of attacks all came in about a ten day period and the Police Union spent in that ten days of attacks tax. Pretty much the same amount of my campaign spent over the entire year. So it was a tremendously impactful last minute onslaught. But but you're right. That is hard to say what the impact was Certainly There were many many voters who rejected the attacks and I think it speaks to the ways in which the leadership leadership of the police union is really disconnected from the values of San Francisco voters. The attacks backfired both because they were dishonest and racist but also because voters simply didn't want that kind of interference or or tone in local politics and so you know it's hard to say specifically quickly whether I one more or less votes because of the attacks but what is clear is voters rejected the attacks and Sought through them. I think going forward. We have to be mindful of the fact that the police union leadership has been on the wrong side of so many issues and so many races for years in San Francisco politics. there's a real disconnect disconnected. I said but my job isn't to hold grudges isn't attack back but rather to roll up my sleeves. Sit down at the table with everybody. WHO's willing to talk talk and be willing to listen to them? So we can rebuild the trust between our communities and the law enforcement. That's supposed to serve and protect those communities if you look at the protests if you look in the eyes of you know the the parents have Alex and yet though Mario Woods other people who've been killed by police violence in San Francisco. It is clear that we have a tremendous mendes amount of work to do to rebuild that trust and I'm committed to doing it with everybody at the table and I'm wondering how did you get the normal congratulate turn phone calls from from all of the other political leaders in the State Gavin. newsom the two. US senators all of whom are originally from the San Francisco area. Aren't they yeah they are. I did get number phone calls on a airplane when the news broke so I landed and had a very Warm voicemail voicemail. From both the mayor London breed as well as from my rival candidate and interim district attorney Suzy Loftus. I have heard since then from the large number of local leaders The chief for police were scheduling a meeting the city attorney and many others including people who were on the other side of this campaign I have not heard from the US. Senator the governor yet so chase if you could lay out for us what your plans are right now. What you think are the more serious issues that you want to take on that you ran on that Really Unites You. Unites you with this new breed of district attorneys around the country. I do think that this election is a bellwether for what's to come in two thousand twenty and I'm tremendously hopeful. That in places like New Orleans and Honolulu Lulu and Arizona and Ohio and even right here in Los Angeles in Southern California. We're going to see more people running on progressive or foreign foreign platforms Win and I think it's a testament to the broad recognition that the tough on crime policies of the nineteen nineties and two thousands are. You're not working and voters rejecting them across the board. I'm excited to see that some of the specific policies To your question amy. Include ending money bail and that's a fight fight that I've been involved in in the courts for going on five years now through litigation. I'm excited on day. One to be able to put in place a policy that prohibits my staff from putting a price tag on freedom and any of the problem with money. Bill for folks. Who aren't familiar with it? Is that when someone gets arrested under the money. Johny bail system. They can buy their way out immediately if they have resources. And that's without regard to their risk or to their community ties so someone who's really dangerous but has access to wealth can be out of jail and back on the streets within a matter of hours while another person charged with the less serious crime with with weaker evidence against them and stronger ties to the community would languish behind bars simply because of their poverty. It's a system that actually undermines the integrity of the entire criminal justice system. And so I'm district attorney. WE'RE GONNA use risk rather than wealth to determine who's incarcerated pre trial trial. That's one of the policies that I think day one will make a tremendous difference in restoring trust and integrity to the criminal justice system and very quickly the influence influence of your four parents. Two sets of parents all were whether underground you have your parents raised you. Bernardine Dohrn Bill Ayers and your the parents were behind bars for decades your mom out now your father in for life the influence of growing up yourself in a sense behind bars or at least he's going back and forth to visit your mother and father right and that's been thousands of days of my life in prison visiting rooms and inside prisons and and you know the weather underground in that history was all way before I was born And so I remember the way that many people in my generation do through the history books looks primarily But why do remember is going through steel gates and being searched by prison guards and waiting in line metal detectors just to see my parents just to give them hug and you know one of the things I learned as I began studying. These issues is that I'm not alone. There are millions of Americans millions of children who've grown up in this country who've had to visit their parents behind bars it turns out that the majority of Americans have an immediate family member who is either currently or formerly incarcerated so while it's true that in my circles at Yale and Oxford as a Rhodes scholar my experience of having parents incarcerated made me an outlier. I'm firmly in the majority of Americans in sharing that experience experience and I think it's a critical perspective to bring to the difficult job of deciding who to send to prison in for how long I intend to lead the office of District Attorney with with compassion for everyone who's life is touched by the criminal justice system whether their children are incarcerated parents whether their crime victims or family members of crime victims or whether they're the people who themselves have committed crimes we need to lead with compassion with intelligence with data driven and empirically informed policies and we end this approach that relies was on jails in prisons as the answer to all of our social problems. Thank you for being with us. District Attorney elect of San Francisco and happy wedding when we come back. We'll look at another big election win in Seattle where group of Progressive City Councillor speak back a one and a half million dollar campaign by Amazon Amazon to flip the Seattle City Council. Stay with us most gummy donets throw so Okay okay got you a all all those good men with one Gonzales. This is democracy now. We're in today's show in Seattle. Where a group up of Progressive City councillors were able to beat back at one point? Five million dollar campaign by Amazon to flip the city council seven of the seats on the Seattle City Council. were up for grabs grabs and last week's election which was widely seen as a referendum on Amazon. The city's largest private employer and one of the most powerful companies in the world five candidates backed by Amazon on and other business interests lost their bids for council seats. Perhaps the most visible face in the political fight against Amazon is socialist. City Council member Sean Savant. Who has it's been reelected in a race? That pitted her against Amazon. Back candidate Ego Ryan Amazon poured nearly half a million dollars into that race alone. SHAMMA savante Seattle's socialist politician elected in nearly a century. She successfully pushed a number of progressive policies including making Seattle. The first major American can city to adopt a fifteen dollars an hour minimum wage. Shama savant. Joining us now from Seattle. Welcome back to democracy now talk about the campaign against you and your progressive slates victory. Thank you so much Amien one for having this very very important and indeed absolutely historic restorick. Even that has happened in Seattle. And you said a Rena major repudiation not only of Amazon John and Jeff bezos himself as the richest man in the world but also it has been a referendum on the vision for Seattle and I think Seattle is a microcosm for metropolitan areas in general. You know what what should our urban spaces look like. Should they should be playgrounds for the very wealthy or should they be places where ordinary people can live and thrive and I think it is Beyond any doubt that the voters in Seattle have spoken that Seattle is not up for sale. Our democratic process in the city than the elections are not up for sale. And it has. It has happened in this dramatic fashion. Where not only the Amazon Amazon is obviously the most visible player in the Out of attempted hostile corporate takeover that. They did this year during this year's election but it wasn't just Amazon. It was the entire might of the corporate elite of the capitalist class that we went up against so it's trillion in dollar corporation Amazon but also corporate real estate all the large businesses that fought viciously against fifteen dollars an hour for years ago and also the businesses that were completely against the DAX on big business that we adopted and then was repealed shamefully by the majority of the city gums last year. And so I think that this this shows what a tremendous opening there is not only for the left to seize opportunities. But as you have I've seen as a as a socialist movement we have a grassroots socialist movement went up against the richest man in the world and we were able to prevail a and also the neglect to mention there the role of the media the Seattle Times of course if you want to talk about their role in terms of this election and also the fact that the city council had suffered defeat a year earlier by when Amazon effectively forced it to rescind a tax on four affordable housing. Yes and in fact. The role of the media is integral to the whole political process under capitalism awesome. And it's you know diametrically opposite to what you do in on democracy now and that's why it's really really important that you're covering this analysis here. I mean just to give you an example apple the Seattle Times editorial board which has been a longtime conservative establishment pro big business and also pro right wing ideas spilled build so much ink not only this year against my campaign specifically against my Socialist Council Office against our Movement building approach but as you said last year when we when our movement attempted to bring the what we call the Amazon tax which is a tax on the largest businesses in order to change what we have as a status school which is a tax haven in a city with the nation's most regressive tax system and the Seattle Times editorial boards built so much ink spreading lies as distortion and misinformation about that tax and then they carried that on this year and so you know while on the one hand all this corporate money into the four over four four million dollars in the corporate tax that were dumped by all these corporations by the billionaires while on the one hand completely backfired and he knew his show that voters are are rejecting this kind of attempted takeover but on the other hand it also bought them. Incredible numbers of attack mailers that were sent to people's those mailboxes endless attack ads on every type of social media and other media in of course the corporate media doing the bidding meeting of the billionaire. 'cause that was we were up against all of that and the that'd be a one despite that not only the progressive slate which is incredibly the important even in it was important that we built towards this progressive units. It's really important. Demonstration of how progressive movement's can have honest debates and discussions discussions amongst ourselves. But it's also important for us to take a principled unified stance against the billionaire class. which is exactly what we have been able to accomplish? And I'm really proud of rank and file Democrats and you know grassroots Democratic Party leaders and organizers taking a stand in solidarity with the Socialist Movement and working together and our movement wasn't just about making an abstract statement against corporations. This whole battle battle has unfolded from the wake of the fifteen dollar victory but as we went we we kept building our movement. We won landmark. Renter's right we want indigenous peoples both day and what we wanted most of all is the beginning of the empowerment emboldening of ordinary people working class people and the beginnings of a movement. I'm an incredible movement that started here including the leadership of my office for rent control without loopholes for green new deal for expanding publicly-owned on social about that program in part two of our discussion which we're going to post online at organ. Also ask you about the news. That Jeff bezos called Michael Michael Bloomberg one billionaire to another and asked him to jump into the presidential race. We'll ask you all about that. The man who took the Progressive Council members verse on richest man in the world ahead of Amazon poured one and a half million dollars into defeat. Your slate chaumont Savant Socialist City Council member in Seattle just reluctant for a third term. I'm Amy Goodman with one Gonzalez. Thanks so much for joining us.

Lula president Brazil San Francisco United States Amazon Seattle Police Officers Association Bolivia California murder Jason Bodine Union Rio de Janeiro Progressive City justice minister Joe Biden New York
Democracy Now! 2020-02-27 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

00:00 sec | 8 months ago

Democracy Now! 2020-02-27 Thursday

"From New York this is democracy now. I request alimentary middle and high schools and special needs schools to be temporarily closed from March second until spring vacation. Japan closes schools to contain the spread of the corona virus as the disease spreads to at least forty seven countries and every continent except and Arctic president. Trump downplays concerns because of all. We've done the risk to the American people remains very low greatest experts in the world. Really in the world right here. We're ready to adapt and we're ready to do whatever we have to. As the disease spreads if it spreads as trump spoke was reported person was diagnosed with the corona virus in California would not travel to any of the affected regions of the world nor had known contact with anyone. Who did it's called community spread we'll speak with Pulitzer Prize winning science writer. Laurie Garrett who says trump has sabotaged. America's Corona virus response will also talk to science investigative journalist. Sonia shop about the connection between Corona virus and climate change her book pandemic tracking contagion from cholera to Ebola and beyond then as trump leaves India the death toll from anti Muslim violence. In New Delhi has risen to at least thirty four twenty to twenty five people started beating me. The rest are standing by. If they were watching your show. There were thousands behind them. They kept hitting me. Nobody came forward to save me somehow. Some people came from the other side. I was like unconscious that didn't have much consciousness. My clothes drenched in blood. We'll go to New Delhi for the latest all that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot or the Warren Peace Report. I'm Amy Goodman. Us Health officials said Wednesday. They've identified the first case of Corona virus infection by person who had not traveled to any of the effect regions of the world nor have known contact with anyone else who did the case in northern California came as governments worldwide took increasingly severe measures to stop the transmission of the virus which causes respiratory trouble and is sometimes fatal. In Saudi Arabia officials have banned Muslim pilgrims from entering the country to visit the holy cities of Mecca and Medina in South Korea. The number of corona virus cases has passed seventeen hundred making it the largest outbreak outside of China the US and South Korea Wednesday called off joint military exercises indefinitely. Meanwhile Japan says the Twenty Twenty Summer Olympics are still scheduled to take place in the capital Tokyo in the US. President trump has sought repeatedly to dismiss the threat of the virus tweeting on Wednesday morning quote. Low ratings fake news. Ms DNC COMCAST AND CNN. Are doing everything possible to make. The Corona virus look as bad as possible including panicking markets. If possible likewise they're incompetent do nothing Democrat car. Ads Are all talk no action USA in great shape exclamation point. President Trump tweeted misspelling. The word Corona virus trump's comments prompted alarm among Congress members both Democrat and Republican this Democratic Congress member Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts Questioning Health and Human Services Secretary Alex as our on Wednesday secretary. I I don't want to panic over this either. The stock market's crashing. He's trying to stop stock market. He's not he's he's outright contradicting everything. That you all have just said outright contradiction. Eckes expressing confidence in with no medical basis for. That's what you've just explained to us on Sir there. He's expressing that there. He's expressing that the American people need to take a breath here that there's no change to anyone's daily life from this that the country has a plan. We have pandemic plans last late on Wednesday. President Trump held a news conference at the White House saying he's tapped Vice President. Mike Pence to coordinate federal response to the corona virus. Pence's not a public health expert and has governor of Indiana slashed public health spending and is widely blamed for an outbreak of HIV in his home state meanwhile the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta is warning the true number of US Corona virus cases might be higher than reported because test kits sent out nationwide earlier this month. Included a faulty component after headlines will spend the rest of the hour discussing the growing threat of the corona virus in Milwaukee. Wisconsin gunman opened fire inside a sprawling. Molson coors brewery Wednesday killing five people before taking his own life. The shooter was identified as a fifty one year. Old Man who worked at the factory complex police have not yet identified a motive in killing an immigration news. A new report by Physicians for Human Rights finds the trump administration separation of families at the US. Mexico border is tantamount to torture. The report studied seventeen adults and nine. Children separated for about two months. Under trump's so called zero tolerance policy finding people experience shocked terror and grief constituting cruel unusual and degrading treatment. The report warns of long lasting effects of family. Separations people put at higher risk of anxiety. Depression Psychosis and addiction along. With higher rates of chronic medical conditions like cardiovascular disease and premature death in Arizona Federal prosecutors Wednesday dropped a misdemeanor charge against humanitarian aid. Volunteers Scott Warren. One day before he was to be sentenced for driving on protected lands to drop water food and other aid to migrants crossing the Sonoran desert. The single misdemeanor count was the last Church faced by Scott Warren. Who at one point faced up to twenty years in Federal Prison for felony charges of harboring migrants after he provided food water and shelter to a pair of men who barely survived their journey into the US after first trial ended in a hung jury Scott? Warren was acquitted of felony charges in the second trial to see our full coverage of Warren case including our trip with him on a water. Drop in the Sonoran Desert. Last summer go to democracy now. Dot Org. The House of Representatives voted four hundred ten to four Thursday to make lynching a federal hate. Crime the Emmett till Anti Lynching Act was named for the fourteen year old African American boy. Who's killing sixty? Five years ago remains one of the most terrific examples of racial terror in the Jim Crow South if signed into law by President Trump. The bill will finally end what proponents say have been two hundred failed. Attempts to pass similar legislation this is California Democrat African American Congresswoman Karen Bass who co-sponsored the Anti Lynching. Bill One thousand nine hundred thirty editorial in Raleigh News and observer noted the elation of the audience witnessing a lynching as follows girls giggled as the flies fed on. The blood that dripped from the NEGROES. Knows lynchings were brutal violent and savage public spectacles as I said. They were advertised in newspapers and postcards. Were sold. Souvenirs were made from victims remains. Federal officials said Wednesday. They've arrested five members of a far-right white nationalist group who are conspiring to threaten and intimidate journalists and activists around the United States. Us prosecutors say members of the Neo Nazi group Autumn Waffen threatened black and Jewish journalists in Arizona and the Seattle area while others harassed and threatened unnamed reporter from PROPUBLICA. The reporter is likely journalists. Thompson who's written extensively about Autumn Watson and one of its leaders. John Cameron Denton. Who is among those arrested on? Wednesday in Media News. Abc has suspended veteran correspondent David Right. After far right activists published secretly recorded video in which right complains about President trump and corporate control of the mass media and the seven minute highly edited video posted online by the group. Project Veritas. Right is overheard calling himself a socialist favors national health insurance and stating there too many billionaires in too big a wealth gap right goes on to say the quote commercial imperative is incompatible with news and ABC's parent company Disney for cross promoting. It's entertainment brands and shows like good morning. America Project Veritas. A RIGHT WING GROUP. That often sets up sting operations targeting planned parenthood journalists and activists by recording covert videos and releasing deceptively edited footage. The group's founder. James O'Keefe was convicted on a misdemeanor charge after. He attempted to wiretap the phones of then. Us Senator Mary Landrieu in two thousand ten in response to its latest sting operation media critic. Dan Franken called Project Veritas loathsome but said in this case the group had done the. Us favor from can wrote quote. The group sneaky surveillance has uncovered someone speaking profound truths about how commercial pressures have skewed media. Corporate media's political news values not toward making things up but torch turning it all into shallow value neutral entertainment unquote in Saudi Arabia. Us Marines held joint military exercises Wednesday with their Saudi counterparts on that King Abdulaziz Naval Base. The war games along the Persian Gulf War widely seen as a warning to Iran. The joint exercises came as he rebels in northern. Yemen launched a new offensive following a recent increase. In the number of us-backed Saudi led coalition airstrikes in Yemen. More than one hundred thousand people have died far more have been displaced in. Saudi Arabia began. Its War on Yemen. In two thousand fifteen. The support of the Obama Administration at the time in Philadelphia. Seven Jewish activists were arrested. Tuesday outside Joe Biden's campaign headquarters calling on the presidential contender to skip the annual conference of APEC. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee members of the Progressive Jewish organization if not now are demanding biden reverse decades of support for occupation of the West Bank in Gaza. I is head of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and later as vice president. The protests came as the presidential campaigns of Amy Klobuchar and people to judge said they would not attend this year's APEC conference following similar moves by Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders in a statement if not now co founder Danny Muskovich wrote quote. Even moderates in the Democratic Party are now refusing to attend a conference by a right wing lobby that allies with bigots just to shield the Israeli government for many consequence for denying the Palestinian people freedom and dignity unquote billionaire former New York City mayor and Democratic presidential hopeful. Michael Bloomberg is scheduled to attend the APEC conference in March as a keynote speaker in Puerto Rico. Transgender activists was shot and killed early Monday morning just hours after someone called police to complain that she'd used a public restroom at a McDonald's disturbing video posted to social media appears to show the final moment of new Lisa Luciano reasons life as her attackers followed her in a car before opening. Fire with at least ten gunshots. Local police say they suspect four. Teenagers were involved in the murder. Reese was at least the second transgender non conforming person murdered in the US in twenty twenty and climate news. The trump administration's abruptly halted a project to protect the New York City region from flooding due to rising seas and extreme weather just weeks after president trump mocked plans to build a sea wall to protect the city as costly foolish and environmentally unfriendly. The move ends in nineteen million dollar project by the Army Corps of Engineers to research. What steps would protect residents of coastal New York New Jersey along with low lying areas of New York Harbor and on Capitol Hill near Congressman Alexandra? Cossio Cortez read the entirety of the green new deal into the congressional record Wednesday one year after she. I introduce the historic legislation. Realized that many of my colleagues have never even read the resolution that they're speaking on they haven't opened a single word of it and it's actually only about. I have it right in front of me. Just fourteen pages long so I have decided that since my colleagues some of my colleagues across the aisle could not for some reason read the resolution that perhaps this hour would be spent best reading it to them in new deal seeks to bring the US to net zero greenhouse gas emissions in ten years well investing in public transit and federal jobs fully transitioning the US electricity grid off fossil fuels and codifying indigenous peoples rights prior consent and approval for decisions that affect them and those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report. I mean me. Goodman the corona virus disease that was first diagnosed in China's who bay province has now spread to at least forty seven countries and every continent except Antarctica. The World Health Organization has declared the outbreak and international health emergency. Nearly three thousand people have died so far more than eighty one thousand have now been infected with the virus that causes the respiratory disease covert nineteen to contain the spread of the corona virus in Japan. Where the number of cases has reached two hundred today. The Prime Minister Shinzo obey called for schools to close so cool. I request all elementary middle and high schools and special needs schools to be temporarily closed from March second until spring vacation. Meanwhile Japan says the Twenty Twenty Summer Olympics are still scheduled to take place in the capital Tokyo and South Korea the number of corona virus cases past seventeen hundred making it the largest outbreak outside of China at least one. Us soldier stationed at a base in the area has tested positive for the virus and the US and South Korea have called off joint military exercises. This comes as the government of Iran says at least two hundred forty five people have been infected and twenty six died but experts say the toll is likely much higher. Meanwhile officials in Kuwait reported forty three new cases in Saudi Arabia's taken the unprecedented step of barring Muslim pilgrims from entering the country to visit the holy cities of Mecca Medina here in the United States. President trump downplayed the threat from corona virus and announced vice president. Mike Pence would be his point person to coordinate government efforts to prevent a widespread outbreak. Because of all we've done the risk to the American people remains very low. We have the greatest experts in the really in the world right here. We're ready to adapt and we're ready to do whatever we have to. As the disease spreads it spreads as trump spoke at his White House. News conference a new milestone in. The Corona virus outbreak was reported in a possible example of community spread. A person was with the virus in northern California would not travel to any of the affected regions of the world. Know or had known contact with anyone else who did officials say they don't know how the person was exposed begun tracing the person's contacts in order to determine how they got sick on Wednesday morning. Trump tweeted quote low ratings fake news. Ms DNC COMCAST AND CNN. Are doing everything possible to make. The Corona virus look as bad as possible including panicking markets. If possible likewise they're incompetent do nothing. Democrat comrades. Are All talk no action USA in great shape. President Trump tweeted misspelling. The Word Corona virus this Democratic Congress member Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts Questioning Health and Human Services. Secretary Alex as our Wednesday secretary. I I don't want to panic over this either. The stock market's crashing. He's trying to stop the stock market. He's not try. He's he's outright contradicting everything that. You all have just said outright contradiction. He's expressing confidence in with no medical basis for. That's what you've just explained to us. Come on Sir there. He's expressing that there. He's expressing that. The American people need to take a breath here that there's no change to anyone's daily life from this that the country has a plan. We had pandemic plans. Meanwhile the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta's warning the true number of US Corona virus cases might be higher than reported because test kits sent out nationwide early. This month couldn't included a faulty component to break down the news on the outbreak worldwide. And here in this country. We're joined here in New York by Laurie. Garrett former senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations Pulitzer Prize winning science writer author of several books including a Bola story of an outbreak. The coming plague newly emerging diseases in a world out of balance and betrayal of trust the collapse of global public health in recent piece for foreign policy. She wrote trump has sabotaged. America's Corona virus response and she has another piece how China's incompetence endangered the world. Laurie welcome back to democracy. Now it's great to have you with us So talk about the first news conference. President trump has held at the White House as he appointed. He wouldn't call him the czar but as he appointed vice president pence as the person the point person on dealing with the corona virus. Well pence needed some job besides space force so now he has something to do in the White House but all joking aside hence is not a medical expert and he certainly is not someone who's demonstrated particularly great amount of respect for science when he was governor of the State of Indiana The OPIOID crisis started in southern Indiana. And he suddenly. People were injecting opioids. He went to his God and came back and told the legislature that he did not believe that any human being should receive sterile syringes to assist them and being a drug addict His own legislature countered him veto countered vetoed meanwhile according to a study published by Yale University. At least two hundred and fifty people got infected with HIV as a result of this crazy policy and he also of course defunding planned parenthood leading the movement in Congress and they had the one HIV testing site in the area and it was the Indiana Model. That president trump cited in saying that he was qualified to lead this effort. Now let's talk about what's happening here while it is said that the. Us has far fewer cases of corona virus in anywhere else. In fact there is almost no testing. I can't say that we don't have a lot of cases at the last time I looked at the the count we had tested. Four hundred and fifty six people in the entire United States to put that in comparison in Seoul South Korea loan. They've tested thirty five thousand. Now you're not gonNA find cases if you're testing four hundred and fifty six people out of two hundred and sixty million. Americans. You're GONNA to miss quite a number what we should be doing right at this moment. The most urgent thing we should be doing is testing every single pneumonia patient. That is hospitalized. Because if there's likely to be a sneak through of this epidemic. It's going to come through as a pneumonia patient. It's going to be diagnosed as flu or some other cause And actually going to be this corona virus and Kovic nineteen will break out in the hospital ward because what we've seen all over the world so far is these outbreaks really explode when they hit one of two things a religious site where you have large concentrations of people coming in for a religious festival of some sort for a hospital and if the index of suspicion isn't very very high among the healthcare workers well cruise ship. That's a whole. That's just a petri dish. But if the rate is the healthcare workers aren't really on their toes. Really alert thinking what if and they don't have the right protective gear then as they examined that patient they become infected. And so this is. This is our problem right now now. This particular case in northern California is very worrying because the individual lived in a rural area was not a traveler. Didn't know any travelers was a local worker of some sort of detail. Sixty one year old male and was in various health facilities getting misdiagnosed and it was the health providers themselves who were saying to the public health of California. Which was intern saying a two CD IN ATLANTA? We want this person tested for the corona virus. We think that's what this is and the CDC said Nah doesn't look like it and didn't do a test on Capitol Hill lawmakers grilled senior administration officials over their response to the crisis. This is Louisiana Republican senator. John Kennedy who on Tuesday blasted the acting homeland secretary Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf for struggling to produce basic facts about the corona virus outbreak to keep aside budget supports the men and women land security. Yes Sir and you can't tell me what I would tell you. Is that the budget my budget. Our operations are focused. Not only in the men and women of D H S making sure. They're protected to do their jobs to screen individuals coming in we're working with. Hhs on in their budget. They answered to ensure that they have enough medical. Legally enough face masks we for the Department of Homeland Security that Askin for the Department of Homeland. Are you ask him for the for the for the entire American public? Yes no I would say probably not short. I don't have that number off hand senator. I will get that for you. Okay but but I WANNA be shot understand. Somebody yes sir is doing modeling. On how many cases were anticipated? He is not aware of that. You're asking me a number of medical questions mask. I could carry on Homeland Security. And you're supposed to keep a safe. Yes Sir and you need to know the answers to these questions and have far away away from getting a vaccine in several months. But that's not what we just heard. Testimony about okay. Who's on first here? So that was the Republican Louisiana senator. John Kennedy a questioning the head of Homeland Security Chad Wolf Laurie Garrett pretty abysmal situation where where we all right now is that everybody is recognizing oops it was a big mistake by the trump administration to obliterate the entire infrastructure pandemic response that the Obama Administration had created. Why did he do it? Well certainly wasn't about the money because it wasn't a heavily funded program it was certainly because it was. Obama's program explain you're talking about the unit within the Centers for Disease Control. No we're talking about something much faster than that. It was a special division inside the National Security Council a special division inside of the Department of Homeland Security. That Bozo was talking from and Collaborating centers in. Hey Chess headquarters in Washington the office of Global Health Affairs and the Commerce Department Treasury Department. But what what Obama understood dealing with Ebola in two thousand fourteen is that any American response had to be an all of government response that there were so many agencies overlapping and they all had a little piece of the puzzle in the case of a pandemic just mental exercise with me if we if we get to situation where we're anything like what's going on in China right now. Then our department of Commerce our department transportation and our department of USDA would have to collaborate to get food deliveries all over America. So that parts of America don't starve and you could see in China convoys hundreds of eighteen wheeler vehicles completely full of food coming into hun every single day. Do we have the capacity to coordinate? That what the Obama Administration realized with it. You can't corral multiple agencies and things from private sector as well as public sector to come to the aid of America unless you have some one person in charge who's really the manager of it all. And in his case it was Ron Clain who had worked under Vice President Biden and he was designated with an office inside the White House to give orders and coordinate all these various things. Well that was all eliminated. It's gone and now. They're hastily trying to recreate something. And last night. There were many names tossed around about who he was going to appoint as head of the response he had previously on the record. President trump saying I have great. Faith and secretary is our and my. Hhs Secretary will be in charge and we're told from multiple sources that right up until they got onstage for that press briefing as our thought he was in charge and then the president says an. Here's my good friend Mike Pence and he's taking charge well. There are reports. That trump was very angry that as our had even raised the concerns. He did publicly. Because trump was majorly concerned about the markets and that he had brought people in to the United States from the cruise ship they were Americans and they were as you were saying sitting in a petri dish that cruise ship of thousands hundreds of people got infected. Even when they were in lockdown which coaching thousand in many very well ended up at half of the crew passengers will be infected before that story finished his playing out. I want to turn to president trump and dressing reporters Wednesday night at the White House. Press briefing room. One of the reporters question trump on his comments about how former President Obama handled the Ebola outbreak in two thousand fourteen. I WanNa talk to you during the crisis. You said you wanted to fol travel ban. You said Mama was important for stubborn joke not for doing it. You said just stopped the flight studies you also said he was quote unquote total Joe To appoint someone to lead the fuller response with votes zero experience in the medical field. Now you listen to a lot of what I had this Sunday. Let's listen to a lot because it's a much different problem than e Bala Bala. You disintegrated especially at the beginning. They've made a lot of progress now but with a ball and we were talking about before you disintegrated. You gotTa Bala. That was it This one is different much different. This is a flu. This is like a flu and this is a much different situation than a ball but and we'll work it unabomber right now by the way we're working on. Certain areas of the Congo. The Congo has Ebola and caused largely by the fact that they have war and people can't get there. We can now treat Ebola in that at that time. It was infectious. And you couldn't treat it. Nobody knew anything about it. Nobody had ever heard of anything like this. So it's a much different situation. So that was president trump. Laurie Garrett you wrote a book about Ebola. You wrote Ebola the story of an outbreak but also now they're trying to take money from the Ebola budget dealing with the bowling not to mention slash the CDC's budget you. His latest budget. That went to Congress was cutting health services this country. Yeah well we've gotten used to trump being upheld contradictions and misstatements but in the case of epidemic is incredibly dangerous. I think part of what Donald Trump's been doing is even playing to rush limbaugh and the far right because they have started a narrative that says will they have to narratives one is There isn't any epidemic. This is all fake. News exaggerating everything to undermine. Trump's bid for reelection. There's a lot of that going on rush. Limbaugh is leading that charge another narrative out there coming from the right is this was all made in a laboratory in China and this is an evil bioterrorism. Something or other and our president has to show strength at this time both are lies and both people who play around a lot on social media regardless of their political stance are absorbing them because they don't understand where it's coming from. I wanted to go to a CNN. Reporter Marshall Cohen tweeting quote rush limbaugh and right wing fringe sites are attacking Dr Nancy a top. Cdc official handling the corona virus response. Because she is Rod Rosenstein sister. They're spreading the lie that she's part of the deep state and trying to tank the markets to weaken trump unquote. This is a clip of Dr Messenger discussing the Corona virus crisis some community level interventions. That may be most effective in reducing the spread of new virus like school. Closures are also the most likely to be associated with unwanted consequences and further disruptions secondary consequences of some of these measures might include missed work and loss of income. I understand this whole situation may seem overwhelming and that disruption to everyday life maybe severe but these are things that people need to start thinking about now. So That's Dr Nancy Messing you Laurie Garrett. Yeah well she's right and we all need to be getting ready. I mean we don't need to be distracted by this insane political situation. We need to be focused on what we're going to do when this virus sweeps across America and it's no longer a distant crazy idea of the kind of things. I received death threats every time. I'm on your show. Somebody calls and tries to kill me and every time I'm on your show. I get loonies telling me. They know of a secret cure. You know. It's the stuff you wrote off a tree or it's this thing you put under your pillow or whatever and if I don't show positive response and say Oh yeah I'm GonNa tell America to use that junk. You scraped off a tree. Then they threatened me and I you know it's there are people who want any epidemic situation to be something they can exploit for a set of principles they have ideas but this is not the moment for that. We have a very narrow window America to get our act together and get your act together. Means at an individual level at a community level at a business level at a school level. It even seems that president trump doesn't understand the deadly nature of this. He was being questioned by Sanjay. Gupta CNN at that news conference and he did not seem to understand that. The Corona Virus is. What twenty times more deadly than the flu? No more like two thousand times. I'm no way he. He completely got his numbers wrong. Although numbers probably are not his forte to begin with the he said we'll let's say a correctly rather than misinform. The Corona virus mortality rate is running somewhere between two to four percent. And depending where you look in which population groups here in the nineteen eighteen flu. Which was the most devastating influenza and the history of our species was less than two percent. So this is already more lethal than the pandemic of nineteen eighteen garden variety everyday flu. It's about zero point. One to zero point zero one percent fatal final comments as we look at what's happening in the world every continent but Antarctica. What does it mean to have a unified response? Well we won't have a unified response. We don't it's fragmented it's fragmented within countries and it's fragmented among countries already everybody sealing their borders. Everybody starts saying no. You can't fly here you can. Well we're going to see and what's unfolding now and the reason that the smart guys on the stock market are getting upset. Is that the whole globalization system the the chain of supply and shipping is fragmenting fragmenting amid fear and amid the false idea that in the age of air travel. You could somehow stop a virus but just saying no no no. You're not allowed to land at that airport. Well how did this fellow way up in northern California in a rural area get infected We've been screening at San Francisco Airport since day one of this mess so i. I think that the problem is we don't have a solidified response and what you're GonNa see already playing out. Is this nimby attitude. You know we already have states saying we're not going to allow you to put quarantine people in our state ship them to another state and Oh. My state has plenty of Mass on supply. We're not sharing with the Bozos next door. In every tabletop exercise I've ever been in for the last thirty years role playing. What would happen in an outbreak? The solidarity between the states of the United States completely breaks down states put borders. They won't let you come on a highway in the they blocked goods from leaving the state. No the That may be destined for Illinois. But WE IN INDIANA WANT THOSE SUPPLIES. You can't take them to Illinois. Well we're going to leave it there now but of course we'll continue to cover this laurie. Garrett the former senior fellow at for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations Pulitzer Prize winning science writer among her books bowl. A story of an outbreak. The coming plague newly-emerging diseases in a world out of balance betrayal of trust the collapse of global public health. When we come back. Is there a connection between the corona virus and climate change? Stay with US Allen Wars of faith bio machine. This is democracy now. I may you continue to look at the spread of the corona virus with cases now diagnosed in at least forty seven countries and on every continent save Antarctica. Nearly three thousand people have died so far. The World Health Organization declared the outbreak and international health. Emergency for more. We're joined from Cleveland Ohio. Sonia Shah Science Investigative Journalist and the author of pandemic tracking contagion from cholera twohey. Bola and beyond her new book is titled The Next Great Migration The beauty and terror of life on the move. Her latest article published in the nation. Think exotic animals are to blame for the corona virus? Think again explain Sonia shot and thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me So what what? I was trying to get in. That article was this fact. That over the past fifty years. We've had over three hundred new pathogens either newly emerge in that never been seen before or come into new places where they've never been before this novel viruses just one of a whole spate of other pathogens. We've seen Ebola in west Africa where it had never been seen before Zepa in the Americas where it had never been seen before new kinds of tick borne diseases new kinds of mosquito borne diseases new of highly drug resistant bacterial pathogens and we know that about sixty percent of these new pathogens originate in the bodies of animals about seventy percent of those are in wild animals. But it's not because wild animals are particularly infested. It's because of the way. Humans and wildlife are coming into novel intimate contact and that is because of human activities. So talk about this connection between climate crisis and the corona virus. We're not hearing very much about this. Well we know in a general sense that climate the climate crisis is resulting in tens of thousands of wild species moving into new places. It's scrambling migration patterns an so. That's going to contribute to this broader phenomenon of people and wildlife coming into new kinds of contact with for example deforestation. That when you cut down the trees where bats roost for example they don't just go away they come in roost in your back gardens and farms and your yards instead and that allows people in bats to come into contact in the microbes that live in their bodies which don't cause them any kind of disease can spill over into human bodies and that's how we turned animal microbes into these epidemic and pandemic causing pathogens. So how should this be dealt with? How should people understand? The Corona Virus Diseases always exists but how're epidemics and pandemics preventable infectious diseases? Always going to exist. We live on a microbial planet. So that's part of the human condition. We're not going to get rid of all of the microbes nor would we ever want to But pandemics are something that we can do a lot to prevent. There's a lot we can do to protect wildlife habitat for example so that the microbes in animal's body. Stay in their bodies and don't cross over into our bodies. We can do a lot to do active surveillance to actually look for microbes at might be turning into human pathogens and tried to contain them before they start to cause epidemics and that is scientific work that has been really successful the past ten years so if we have the political will to continue funding that kind of research. There's a lot we can do to reduce the risk of pandemics. This is Congress. Member Jan Schakowsky questioning health and Human Services Secretary. Alex as our Wednesday about whether the corona virus will be affordable to all. You're saying it will for sure be affordable for anyone who needs it. I'm saying we would. We would want to ensure that we work to make it affordable. We can't control that price because we need the private sector to invest the priority vaccines under control. Get us there. Schakowsky tweeted following the hearing. She gave as our three chances to assure us that. Any Corona virus vaccines are treatments developed with. Us taxpayer dollars. It'll be affordable accessible to everyone and he flat out refused to do so Sonia Shah. I mean it's just reprehensible I think there's a there's a well understood principle in the global health community that these are commodities that we need to make public. So you know this. This is like a real failure of leadership and it's it's actually it's a travesty. Finally what do you feel the corporate media? The mainstream media is missing here. That you feel is essential for people to understand. I think there's a sense. In which we kind of frame narrative around disease outbreaks something foreign like an encroachment from outside that invades us in posits us these passive victims but actually and I think that really obscures the larger story. Which is that. There's a lot of human agency involved in how we're turning microbes into pathogenic and pandemic causing pathogens. So I think we need to recast the whole way. We talk about. Disease is not a problem a foreign invasion. We talk a lot about Places when we talk about where diseases come from. We talk about the Wuhan flu or the Spanish Influenza even though that influenza did not originate span in Spain. So there's a sense in which we want to try to make. It seem like these foreign things that are coming to get us and encroach upon us and it's a habit of mine that we have around a lot of other subjects as well But I think that obscure is what our role is. And there's a lot we can do and that we are doing. We are turning a lot of these microbes into these pathogenic microbes. Instead and finally the trump administration gutting the very government programs. That were tasked to deal with something like this. The CDC cut eighty percent of its efforts to prevent global disease outbreaks because it was quote running out of money. The department went from working in forty nine countries to just ten with president trump and his isolationist tendencies. You know why give money to other countries explain why Sonia Shah well. I think the program that's been cut. That probably protected us from unknown pathogens. We don't know how how much we've been. Protected is the predict program which funded was through the USA and funded scientists to actually look for microbes and might be turning into pathogens and over ten years they found about nine hundred different microbes. That might be doing that. And we're able to contain them at their source so that's and that's the kind of program that the trump administration also cut and the. I think the reason they gave was that they were uncomfortable. Funding cutting edge. Science will soon shy. WanNa thank you for being with us. Science investigative journalist author of pandemic tracking contagion from cholera to Ebola and beyond this says Democracy Now Democracy Now dot Org Warren Peace Report. We will link to her piece in the Nation magazine that she just wrote called think exotic animals are to blame for the corona virus. Think again when we come back as trump leaves India the death toll from anti Muslim violence in New Delhi has risen to at least thirty four. We'll go to Delhi stay with us. Who says the man who stole your land because Suit says his whole children is moving. We remember Zulu Dependency Committee Birthright by Sarah. The core this is democracy. Now I mean he could mean as we go now to India where the death toll from anti Muslim violence in Delhi has risen to at least thirty four with police accused of standing by as Hindu. Nationalist MOBS assault Muslims. The violence began Sunday. When groups of Hindus attacked peaceful sit ins of Muslims protesting against Hindu nationalist Prime Minister Narendra Modi's new citizenship law which widely restricts Muslim immigration to India this is Mohammed Zubeir. Who said he was on his way home from local mosque and Northeast? New Delhi when he was attacked by a mob girl. Twenty to twenty five people started beating me. The rest were standing by as if they were watching a show. They were thousands behind them. The kept hitting me. Nobody came forward to save me different. Somehow some people came from the other side. I was like unconscious have much consciousness my clothes drenched in blood minister. Modi's said nothing is. The violence continued for days instead hosting President. Donald Trump on a two-day state visit in which trump he praised on the Indian prime minister. This is trump speaking about mody at a news conference in back in Washington Wednesday. He's a great gentleman a great leader. It's an incredible country We were treated very very well and we really enjoyed it. A lot of tremendous progress was made in terms of relationship. A relationship with India's extraordinary right now and we're going to be doing a lot of business with India they're sending billions and billions of dollars now to the United States on Sunday. Human rights lawyer. Arjun Sethi called. Modiin Trump. The worst kind of fascist. He tweeted both Modiin. Trump have criminalize minority communities championed fake news and persecuted descent promoted supremacist ideologies and played on the racism anxiety of dominant communities unquote. Mody BROKE HIS SILENCE. Wednesday calling for peace on twitter but many critics have noted. The Indian Prime Minister served as the Chief Minister of Gujarat. One of India's worst anti-muslim riots took place in two thousand and two that left at least a thousand people dead after the bloodshed the US State Department revoked. Modi's visa saying it could not grant visas to any foreign government official who was responsible for or directly carried out at any time particularly severe violations of Religious Freedom Unquote. Modena's never apologize for or explained his actions at the time. Well for more. We're joined by to guess from democracy now video stream in New Delhi. Nia addiction is with US independent journalist based there Her investigative reporting focuses on Politics Gender and social justice recipient of the two thousand Nineteen International. Press Freedom Award from the committee to Protect Journalists an ethic of New York speaking to us from Cornell University Prio Paul. Who's on the Faculty of English at the University of Cambridge? In Britain author of insurgent Empire Anti colonial resistance and British descent. We welcome you both to democracy. Now let's begin with and they had dixit in New Delhi. Tell us what has happened there in the wake of president trump's trip what took place in New Delhi Tonto. Ap The last days you've seen Astana violence in various parts of new a New Delhi especially in the northeastern district. As of now the death toll has gone up to thirty four. But the people are still in the process of of of finding dead bodies everywhere and Finding good easing count. What happened on Sunday? Was that a lot? Since December of two thousand nineteen seven people across the national capital have been protesting against the Citizenship Citizenship Amendment Act. That was passed a not obese. Protest Todd had been led by women and with the participation of various other communities against a law that is that exclude Muslims so on Sunday. Night a rule CA group Brawl Citizenship Arraignment Act Group which was led by a member of the body the body the BJP which is all these Balki they came there this Bjp member going couple shot. Who's onto a former employee of the member of Legislative Assembly? Danny he said he incited violence as evidence of that saying that the process should move and go back and destroy Sunday night yesterday evening. The violence continues on lots of school office packing guarded. Most of these working class Muslim areas of a large mall has been reported in various parts are stupid painting using tear-gas he using petrol bombs at all. This happened in the presence of police that have been several videos that show that the police is standing while this kind of violence as being met to dial out by the mob on on the people in these neighborhoods. The other thing also happened was that this is the first time yesterday. I seen amid seventy but who would enjoyed apart from petrol bombs and guns and dodges. A acid was used on several people which is why lots of people have lost. It is have typed damaged faces again Each time somebody tried to stop them from DAX. The police did not hit them instead. bystanders bystanders. Also the police also joined at several places. Hindus Rogan's Down so this has been a situation Has Been The situation the last three days. Thirty four people who've been killed the bodies are still at the hospitals post-mortems conducted but lack of government support Latte. Lack of administrative support has led to a norton though tiny treatments for the people who've been injured and this has been brewing for the last two and a half months since the government Boston. Citizenship Amendment Act because exclusively is MS main to keep out the Muslim community in in the country and while these protests were resorting to nonviolence and constitutionalism clearly. This Guy. Violence was used. I'm not just the Speeches have been used in the recent elections on so it has created in Moss Fiat by the silence of the Prime Minister under whose jurisdiction under the central government. And WHO's the police? The Delhi Police is under that anybody who raises a right-wing Hindu nationalist slogans Agenda forward on the road enjoy impunity and not encouraged by this kind of silence from Modiin the other ministers. And can you tell me? How is this in any way? Were what just happened in New Delhi? Is it related to president trump being there and then being in? Gujarat one hundred thousand people for this noma stay trump rally in answer to trump going to Houston Welcoming Modi at that. Howdy mody rally. I would definitely say that the guy of Islamaphobia that we have seen in the recent past in the last few years in India is also kind of engaged by best jump in the way they he has featured the minorities every is this kind of his level will be easy encouraged by this guy. Andrew Silence onto from visiting dump because he was asked a question during the press conference and he did not respond to it. So there is a clear connection on so the fact that these elements are emboldened by the visits of somebody like trump on recently onto had to narrow. President Bernard over Brazil who kind of share similar principles when it comes to wine auditees when it comes to climate when it comes to the honesty that leads to displacement and Wendy. There is no reaction from them intact. They're seen as endorsing president Prime Minister of India. There is a kind of encouragement for such things. He'll I would also like to see that. This is the first time not the first time but I would say the ignored in deducing boss man journalists in the last few days but actually attacked by mobs in the presence of Police. David asked for their religion so several known Hindu journalists championed and they were forced to delete their videos forced to delete photos. They were brutally attacked. Some of the Hindu John Lewis had to identify say Hindu prayers so that they are let off by the mall and this is unprecedented in this kind of situation. No even reporting what is happening with a certain community has become such a problem. The the other thing that happened was that lots of people who would enjoy an wooden small nursing homes needed Beta facilities needed to be transferred to a bigger hospitals. Ambulances would not allow the police to ANC does so which is why on a Tuesday midnight. Some of the members of the suicide. You tried to contact Heikal. The High Court at midnight buy bought some injured aid Austin or does seeing that ambulance should immediately allowed by the Delhi police including several other things also one of the judges who said that they should not become like a nineteen eighty-four situation in nineteen eighty-four several the daily witnessed genocide of the community. I'm today behavior that that judge has been transferred so I also want to point out that the institutions the police the judiciary and the other people in the administration who are supposed to protect the constitutional rights of people in India in a secular India are also under grieved under the political pressure. Right now I WANNA bring in pre ago Paul to this discussion. You're now in Ithaca at Cornell University Your twitter thread has been extremely significant in saying we have to reshape the framework that this is being seen around the world and the language. That's being. Please explain professor. Go Paul. Well I think that we have to drop the language of clashes and even riots and communal violence a lot of the language certainly in the British press and I think in the American press has been presenting this as a conflict between and opposite sides as a kind of religious fighter does not a religious fight. We are witnessing situation. Not Very deep structural violence. There is a a majoritarian supremacist party. In power in India and mobster directly incited by senior Indian. Politicians are roaming around in Muslim majority areas. Identifying Muslim shops businesses home setting them on fire identifying Muslims. Beating them up. There is some pushback. Certainly as as you might expect but this is not a situation of equality and I said that any press outfit which refers to this as clashes clashes between Hindus and Muslims or even as kind of riots is actually culpable off a dereliction of duty and certainly of critical analysis. This is not a situation where equal and opposite forces are in conflict. It's not even a civil war. What we have is a very dangerous supremacist ideology. That is now out on the streets and I'm afraid the parallels with one thousand nine hundred thirties. Germany are extremely clear. What is taking place in Delhi? In the last couple of days is comparable to the Rice Kristallnacht when Jewish businesses were attacked and set on fire? And I think that the world really needs to wake up to the gravity of the situation in India because we are in a situation not unlike what was happening in Germany in the nineteen thirties in. Its twenty first century variation. But I think that to just play this out of conflicts and clashes religious fights I think is is deeply responsible and president trump paying homage to Gandhi. And at the same time hailing his three billion dollar military helicopter deal with mody the significance of trump's relationship with mody. We just have thirty seconds while. I'm afraid that you know more has to be set. In the context of the global rise of nationalism. Trump is a kind of apprentice to mow the rather than the other way around trump. I think watches the situation in India and probably sees this as really a fantasy. Come true the using of Gandhi to sanitize out what is happening in India is now in all story and trump is simply picking up the narrative that has already been peddled by Indian state. But this is not Ghandi's India by a long shot. What we have here is violent supremacism out on the streets of India and if the world doesn't take notice then like the corona virus this is also going to spread and we will all pay the price pre apollo and thank you for being with US lecture at the University of Cambridge Energy and independent journalists based in New Delhi India. And well of course. We'll continue to follow this study tune in Tuesday night for Democracy Now. Super Tuesday live special broadcast with intercept starting at seven PM Eastern time until midnight right here at democracy now doug organ many stations around the country we have job openings at democracy now from producer producing fellow to communications director and more go to democracy now dot. Org Goodman thanks for joining us.

President Trump president United States California CDC Americas Ebola China Vice President New York Laurie Garrett New Delhi CNN Congress White House Influenza Mike Pence India Saudi Arabia Pulitzer Prize
Democracy Now! 2019-11-21 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-11-21 Thursday

"From New York. This is democracy now equipped problem and as I testified previously with regard to the requested White House call and the White House meeting. The answer is yes. We followed the the president's orders. Those are the words of US ambassador. Gordon sunland Wednesday as he told lawmakers he helped pressure the Ukrainian government to investigate trump's trump's political rival Joe Biden and his son hunter. We'll hear part of Sunland testimony and speak to Democratic presidential candidate who Leon Castro about impeachment men and last night's democratic debate in Atlanta the first Castro was excluded from the debate former vice president. Joe Biden repeatedly stumbled black mounts for me because they know me. They know who I am. Three former chairs the black caucus the only black African American woman has ever been elected to the United States Senate. A whole range of people now are the couplers. Senator Accountable Harris laughed after Biden. Apparently forgot got a US. Senator we'll hear excerpts from the debate and speak to a round table guests for shot Robinson of Color Change Ryan Grim of the intercept. Phyllis Bennis the Institute for Policy Studies and economist. Gabriel Duckman all that and more coming up welcome to democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Peace Report. I'm Amy Goodman. US ambassador. Gordon Sunland told the house impeachment inquiry Wednesday president trump directly directly pressured Ukrainian government to announce an investigation into his rival Joe Biden and son Hunter and that other senior administration officials were quote in the loop during during explosive testimony on the fifth day of public impeachment hearings. Ambassador Sunland said Vice President Mike Pence and secretary of state. Mike Pompeo were part of the effort to force Ukraine into helping trump's reelection bid sunlen testified the officials new president trump condition the release of nearly four hundred million dollars in US military military aid and the No vote office meeting with Ukrainian president. On a statement about the Biden's I know that members of this committee frequently frequently frame. These complicated issues in the form of a simple question was there a quid pro quo as I testified previously with regard to the requested White House call and the White House meeting. The answer is yes Wednesdays. Impeachment hearings overshadowed the latest debate by candidate the dates for the two thousand twenty Democratic presidential nomination Wednesday evening ten leading candidates squared off in Atlanta Georgia discussing race. Women's rights healthcare foreign policy and climate climate change after headlines speak with Democratic presidential candidate holy on Castro about the impeachment hearings and last night's debate. We're front runner. Joe Biden repeatedly stumbled and Leeann. Castro was excluded and southern Mexico. Police and National Guard troops freed sixty two migrants Wednesday who are struggling to breathe as they attempted to break out of a locked truck. Most of the migrants were from Guatemala. They were detained and taken to local immigration jail. Police arrested the truck driver and passenger in Tucson Arizona a federal jury found humanitarian activist. Scott Warren Not guilty Wednesday on two felony charges of harboring migrants after he provided food water and shelter to a pair of men who survived a perilous journey across the Sonoran Desert Warren who's a member of the Humanitarian Attorney Group. No more deaths face up to ten years in prison at his second trial after a first trial ended in a hung jury in June Warren which charged after he gave aid to twenty the three year. Old Christiane Peres Villanova and L. saw from El Salvador and twenty year old Psychedelia today of Honduras. Scott Warren spoke outside the federal courthouse moments after his acquittal into migrants. Like who saying Dion who are truly the wind at the center of this story who must make impossible possible decisions. Many of us cannot even imagine who bear the brunt of this suffering. Our hearts are with you as we stand here. Your People's Brothers Sisters Fathers Spouses and children are in the midst of the perilous desert crossing the need for humanitarian aid continues and unfortunately the damage to land in life and the mortar region not only continues but has been ramped up way up since my arrest us to see democracy now interview with Scott Warren during our trip to the scenario in desert this summer you can go to democracy now dot org. Meanwhile a federal judge in Tucson sentenced former Morona Border Patrol Agent Matthew Bowen Wednesday to three years of supervised release an eight thousand dollar fine for intentionally running over over a Guatemalan migrant with a pickup truck in two thousand seventeen then falsifying records about the assault. The man he struck Antolin Rolando Lopez Aggie Aggie Large Survived Court Filing Show Bowen had sent a slew of racist text messages on his phone referring to immigrants as mindless murdering savage's and beaner among other insults in Syria. At least twenty two civilians were killed Wednesday as government forces backed by Russia bombed and shelled parts of. Leave the last rebel control province in Syria. The aid group known as the white helmet set a missile loaded with clusterbombs struck camp for internally displaced people among those censured were medical workers maternity hospital meanwhile Israel launched fresh airstrikes overnight on the outskirts of serious capital. Damascus Syrian state media says two civilians were killed in the bombings which were aimed at Syrian military targets. As well as buildings used to house members of Iran's puts force the attacks have bolstered all stirred fears of sparking an all out conflict between Iran and Israel. Israel's former army chief Bennigan's said Wednesday. He's failed in his attempts to form a coalition and government setting up a likely third national election in less than a year. Now the prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu's Likud party in Kansas Blue and white party won enough votes in September to claim an outright majority after an election in April also yielded no clear winner at the United Nations. The United States alone Wednesday as fourteen eighteen other members of the Security Council rebuke the trump administration's announcement it no longer considers Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank illegal under International Channel Law. This is Karen Pierce United Kingdom's ambassador to the United Nations. I'm making this statement today. On behalf of Belgium France and Germany Poland and of course United Kingdom opposition on Israeli settlement policy in the occupied Palestinian coachee including including east Jerusalem is clear remains unchanged all settlement activity is illegal under international law and did she roads viability of the two state solution and the prospects for a lasting peace has reaffirmed by UN Security Council Resolution 2334. The United Nations is this warning global fossil fuel production on track to rapidly increase global temperatures spy more than two degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels leading the planet climate catastrophe Castrophe in a new report. The U N Environment Programme found nations are planning to burn fifty percent more coal oil and gas by twenty thirty than what would be needed to keep global global temperature rise below the two degree benchmark. It's more than double. The carbon budget needed to keep global temperature rise below one point five degrees Celsius in Sydney. The Australian health officials are warning young and elderly residents and people with respiratory illness to stay indoors and avoid exercise as a thick blanket of smoke from unprecedented wildfires. Settles over the city of five million people. The out of control. Fires have raged for weeks as much of the continent is baked by a searing heat. Wave with the city of Melbourne Wednesday matching a November temperature record highs in parts of New South Wales have topped one hundred ten degrees Fahrenheit this week. More fires are raging in Victoria and Queensland Means Lands States North Dakota's Department of Environmental Quality admitted Wednesday. The amount of land fouled by an oil spill from the keystone pipeline. Last last month is nearly ten times greater than initially reported the company operating keystone. TC Energy Corp formerly known as Transcanada says over three three hundred eighty thousand gallons of crude oil spilled in a rural wetland after the pipeline ruptured. October twenty ninth. TC Energy is seeking approval to restart the oil flow through the pipeline. As early as Sunday in Haiti hundreds of protesters took to the streets of port-au-prince Wednesday in the latest demonstration. To call for the ouster. The precedent Giovanelli. MOE's not people suffering longer. We live in a place where there are no roads no water no hospitals. There's nothing everything's. The thing is blocked in this country. Were saying this is possible. That's why we're in the street. We're going to stay in the streets every day. More than forty people have been killed. In two months of the anti-government protests in in Haiti in Britain Prince Andrew said Wednesday. He'll withdraw from public duties amidst mounting public anger over his longtime friendship with the deceased serial. Sexual Predator Senator Jeffrey Epstein in a BBC interview that aired Sunday Prince Andrew denied accusations by Virginia. Roberts Jufri who says she was sexually trafficked picked by Epstein and forced to have sex with prince when she was seventeen years old. A photo released by Chew Free Shows. Prince Andrew Standing beside her with this hand around her bare stomach with epsteins epsteins longtime confidant e slain maxwell and the background in Somalia Prominent Peace Activists Almaz. Elman was shot and killed old Wednesday as she wrote in car and heavily fortified area of the capital. Mogadishu elman was from a family Somali exiles to return to Somalia from Canada in two thousand ten she worked to promote women's rights children's rehabilitation and other social justice issues. She was the daughter of a prominent activists who was assassinated donated in Mogadishu in nineteen ninety six and in the Mediterranean island nation of Malta. Prominent Maltese businessman. Your Gun. Fenech was detained aboard his his yacht Wednesday while heading out to see an arrest linked to the car bomb assassination of the reporter. Daphne Caruana Glitzy two years ago. Glitzier was a well-known investigative journalists analysts. Who reported on corruption at the highest levels of the Maltese government including tax evasion nepotism and money laundering at the time of murder? Galizia was investigating Fenech businesses. Mrs Dealings on Wednesday. Hundreds of demonstrators gathered outside Parliament demanding the resignation of the prime minister over glitziest murder. They surrounded the car of Malta's Justice Minister Banging on the whole impressing photos of Daphne Glitzy against the windshield glitziest sister Mandy. Malia wasn't part of the protest login today where people have to do protests like these more often the corrupt must not stay where they are now they must stay in jail. I hope to have a normal country for my children and Justice for my sister and all her stories and those are some the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report. I mean Egerton and I mean shave. Welcome to our listeners and viewers around the country and around the world world. We followed the president's orders. Those were the words of US ambassador. Gordon sunland Wednesday as he told lawmakers that he helped pressure the Ukrainian government to investigate Joe Biden and his son Hunter Song Luynedyk Knowledge. There was a quid pro. Quo Tying US military aid to Ukraine with with Ukraine's announcement of a probe into the Biden's Sunland also said Secretary of state. Mike Pompeo and Vice President Mike Pence were aware of the campaign. Sauna testified the officials new president trump condition the release of nearly four hundred million dollars in US military aid and an Oval Office meeting with the Ukrainian Union president on a statement. About the Biden's this is part of ambassador. Son Lund's opening testimony Wednesday First Secretary Perry Ambassador Volker and I worked with Mr Rudy. Giuliani on Ukraine matters at the express direction of the president of the United States. We did not want to work with Mr Giuliani simply put. We were playing the hand we were dealt dealt. We all understood that if we refuse to work with Mr Giuliani we would lose a very important opportunity to cement relations between the United States and Ukraine. So we followed the president's orders second although we disagreed with the need to involve Mr Giuliani at the time we did not believe that his role was improper third. Let me say precisely because we did not think that we were engaging in improper behavior. We made every effort to ensure that the relevant decision makers at the National Security Council and the State Department knew new the important details of our efforts the suggestion that we were engaged in some irregular or rogue diplomacy. He is absolutely false. I have now identified certain State Department e mails and messages that provide contemporaneous rainiest support for my view. These emails show that the leadership of the State Department the National Security Council so and the White House were all informed about the Ukraine efforts for May twenty third two thousand nineteen until the security purity aid was released on September eleventh. Two Thousand Nineteen. I will quote from some of those messages with you shortly forth as I testified previously as I testified previously Mr Giuliani's these requests were a quid pro quo for arranging a White House visit for presidents. Alinsky Mr Giuliani demanded that Ukraine make a public statement announcing the investigations of the two thousand sixteen election. DNC Server and Maurice Smile. Mr Giuliani was expressing the desires of the president of the United States. And we knew these investigations were important to the president. Yeah that was. US Ambassador to the European Union. Gordon Sunland testifying before the House. Intelligence Committee on Wednesday former National Security Council official Fiona Hill an US diplomat. David Holmes will testify today beginning at nine. AM and democracy now. livestream that democracy now dot org but right now we turn to Democratic Eric Presidential candidate. Julio Castro who served US housing secretary under President Obama in a moment we're going to ask him about last night's presidential debate the first he he wasn't participating in but first we go to the impeachment inquiry which you've also been talking about and tweeting about Secretary Castro. Can you talk about the significance accounts of yesterday's testimony. What was considered to be the most important the front page headline of The New York Times across all five columns Alan's we followed the president's orders? It was blockbuster. Testimony was I believe a nail in the coffin of Donald Trump and the case that he tried to make. I mean how many times that we heard the president say over and over again that there was no quid pro quo and here. We have investor Sunland John Lund that everybody acknowledges had the most direct contact With the president knew what was going on was part of also email chains chains saying very specifically very directly that there was a quid pro quo and the president was holding up military aid until presents Alinsky of Ukraine would announce an investigation of SMA. So you know you really couldn't be more clear that the president has violated his oath of office. He's abused abused power. And you know this was just some of the testimony. There was plenty of other testimony to back that case up and of course Fiona Hill testified today so it's very damaging to the president and do you believe sexually Costra me now. Many people believe that of course trump was guilty of this. But do you think everyone is persuaded that this is an impeachable offense and that he is in any sense likely to be impeached. I believe so so I believe anybody. That's looking at this. You know in a in a neutral way that includes the majority of the American people that are number of polls polls have suggested that more than fifty percent of Americans believe that the president should be impeached and removed from office. Because of what he did. I have no doubt that he's get H- he has had his defense lawyers in the House of Representatives. He will certainly have Mitch. McConnell his defenders in the Senate on not my eve. I don't believe it Mitch. McConnell and his buddies are going to take an impeachment from the house if the president is impeached in the house and I believe will be. They're not gonNA take that and turn that into a removal all however the American people are paying attention and I believe if they don't remove him it's going to have dire consequences for them in November. Twenty twenty twenty while you're out on the campaign trail your brother. Your identical twin brother Joaquim. Castro is of course on the House Intelligence Committee that is questioning the candidates. I wanted to go to a lighter moment in the hearing. earings when Congressman Castro begins to question Lieutenant. Colonel Alexander van men. During Tuesday's impeachment hearings curl been thank. Thank you for your service. And it's great to talk to a fellow identical twin. I hope that your brother's nicer to you than mine is to me doesn't make you grow beer. uh-huh That's congressman Joaquin Castro Secretary Hulan Castro. Do Care to defend yourself. uh-huh why sit on twitter. That Ev- I if I'd known it was going to look at that on him. I wouldn't have suggested and I sent my brother taxed yesterday. I think before he asked his questions just tell him to make sure that he didn't look rumbled on TV that everybody is watching. But actually I'm very proud of Joaquin this fourth term representing the Twentieth Congressional District of Texas for those who have been watching the impeachment hearings. He's had excellent questions including in yesterday. I think he some of the footage of Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney talking basically admitting before Ambassador Sunland said it on the record admitting that there was a quid pro quo. So he's doing a great job and so we're all of the Democrats on that on that committee. I mean they're trying to get at the truth on like unfortunately what we see on the other side with people I representative Jordan and representative Nunez. Who living in another world so I wanted to turn now from the impeachment hearings to the debate? The Fifth Democratic Arctic presidential candidate debate that was held last night. It was the first one that you were not a part of Can you explain gene why you are not invited to be part of this ten. Well it's a lot of your viewers know. This is the first year that the Democratic National Committee she has imposed certain thresholds polling thresholds and fundraising thresholds in order for candidates to get on that debate stage and the thresholds for the November in December debates. Were that you had to get four. Polls at three percent either nationally or in one of the early states or to five percent polls nationally and we did not hit those thresholds. You know I understand. They're thinking in terms of bringing order to A race that has more Democrats running than ever before at the same time I think they're going to have to go back and reevaluate these thresholds. Because it's clear that people can buy their way onto that debate state. You can buy an increase in polling at those kinds of numbers polling pulling itself when you're dealing in those kinds of numbers is not that precise all of that two percents three percents. Four percent is within the margin of error and on top of that. Yeah I questioned whether when we get to November December. You're right near the Iowa caucus whether they should have kept increasing the threshold in the first place race. Well I wanted to ask you about this key. Issue of polling and also the first two primary end caucus states of being among the whitest states in the country and this is a question you've been asked before but during the first ever presidential forum on Environmental Justice earlier earlier this month in South Carolina. I had a chance to ask one of your political rivals about this Senator Elizabeth Warren about the order of the primaries. Mary's and caucuses weren't just thirty seconds. Left but speaking about racial injustice do you think the order of the primary state should change change. You Have Iowa and New Hampshire. Let me just before you finish. Are you actually going to ask me to sit here and criticize I. O N New Hampshire. No I'm asking about the order. That is what I house. They're two of the whitest states in the country and then we moved to South Carolina with the very significant population of people of color and it means the candidates spent so much of their time catering to for those first two states overall. Do you think that should change. I'm just a player in the game on this and I am delighted to be the and South Carolina. Thank you thank you. So that was Senator Elizabeth Warren comment and of course candidates. Do not want to disparage states or talk about changing order when this is the key states a number of candidates drop out after these first two primaries and caucuses and and in the lead up the longest lead up in history of presidential pre-primary season these candidates and I'm sure including when you Secretary Castro go endlessly to these two states going to so many different areas addressing their concerns. Can you talk talk about whether you see. This is a major problem. Yeah and you know. I've been there to New Hampshire and Iowa number of different times on many occasions now as you could imagine we're pretty deep into the the presidential primary. I mean primary campaign cycle and the people are wonderful. I've said I been pleased with the way that we've been received. Everybody has been very nice. But Amy you're correct in and the concerns that you raised in in you know that forum which which is that. These two states Iowa New Hampshire simply do not reflect the diversity of the Democratic Party or of the United States dates and Iowa has been the first to vote since nineteen seventy two and our country has changed a lot. Our Party has changed a lot. Since nineteen seventy into further. The Democratic Party justifiably has pressed the case against Republicans for trying to suppress the votes people of color in different ways whether voter ID or gerrymandering or throwing people off rolls or closing early voting polls on Sundays. When there's a greater proportion of African Americans they go to vote in souls to the polls drives across the country entry so we should do that but we can't just do that and then turn around and start? Our primary process are nominating process for president. Dead in two states. Hardly have any black people hardly have any people of color that does not reflect the values that we say we espouse and my point has been. I understand it tradition. But look it's a different day and age and we have the DNC change that the primary ordering process and give other states by an opportunity to go. I was actually 'cause I want to ask you about the discrepancy Z.. In funding between White and Other candidates who are running for for the nomination a nation earlier this month axios ran a piece titled The Racial Wealth Gap Among Twenty Twenty Democrats. It revealed quote the leading white candidates in the Democratic presidential. Primary combined. Have nearly four times as much cash on hand as all five non white candidates sexy Costra. Well I mean I think that's a function of the fact that right now. These candidates are the leading candidates eight and these two things go together. They're raising more money now because they're near the top of the polls there near the top of the polls holds because in part they've been able to raise more money. I think that one of the biggest challenges ages of twenty twenty cycle for some of us who are running is that right now for a decent percentage of the voters in certainly. There's a media mainstream three media narrative that's been created and this mainstream media narrative is that it's GonNa take a certain type of candidate that can appeal specifically to a white light midwestern voter. That's what's going to beat Donald Trump and because of that. I think that folks are gravitating towards certain types of candidates. My my point all along has been that. If we want to win this election we actually have to electrify that Obama coalition a diverse coalition end of people of different backgrounds working class people young and old from every part of the country. That's how we're going to win. Not We're not GonNa win if we believe that we only have two or we can just appeal to one certain type of voter in one part of the country if we do that. We're actually risking giving the election back to Donald Trump because if our candidate of our nominee can't appeal to the whole process of voters. Yeah you may increase your take your share of voters in one part of the country of one profile. But you're going to lose a lot of people in other places and you're GONNA lose the election as we wrap up faster. Do you think the primary order should change. Is there any reason that the should continuous it is. We interviewed the head of the Democratic Party in Texas. He'll Berto Hosa and he's that he can't get the candidates down for forums and Texas major state in the United States far larger than the first two primary states and of course a majority minority state. But they're too busy in Iowa New Hampshire. Oh Oh of course that order should change. I've made that point. Very clearly and bluntly and you know what I believe that there are a lot of people in Iowa and New Hampshire that appreciate a candidate telling the truth and I would say to them. Look I just told you the truth about what we need to do. And I was in Iowa when I did it. I'll tell you the truth now. And if I'm President I can tell you the truth when I'm president and we need to change the order of those states to reflect the diversity of our country and of the Democratic Party only on Castro. WanNa thank you for being with us. Democratic presidential candidates are Secretary of Housing and Urban Development from two thousand fourteen to two thousand seventeen. Are you staying in the race. I I am. I'm working and fighting through Iowa on all throughout this campaign we've been speaking up for the most marginalized people that are often forgotten the poor and I'm going to keep doing that. Thanks so much. When we come back we will be joined by a round table of people to talk about what was raised in wasn't raised in last night's fifth if Democratic presidential primary debate it was held in Atlanta Georgia? Stay with us. His pre took me in. Your friend says no traces that lurks within. Dan says he says with smiling faces some time by the undisputed truth. This is democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Peach report. I mean goodman within their means shake as we continue on the Fifth Presidential Primary Debate Democrat in Atlanta Georgia where now joined for a roundtable table on last night's debate in Washington. DC We have. Phyllis Bennis fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies and author of several books including understanding the Palestinian in is really conflict a primer in Berkeley California. Gabriel Duckman is with us. He's professor of economics at UC Berkeley and the CO author of the triumph Empha- injustice. How the rich dodge taxes and how to make them pay and in Atlanta Georgia? We're joined by Ryan Grim The Washington DC bureau chief for the intercept upped. who was at the debate last night and here in New York City Rashad Robinson is with US president of color of change his latest piece for the nation headlined? Forget about out plans which candidate can get things done. Let's begin with former vice president. Joe Biden speaking last night on the Obama Coalition. I come out of the black community in terms of my support if you notice. I have more people supporting me in the black community that announced for me because they know me they know who I cam three former chairs the black caucus the only black American woman that ever been elected to the United States Senate a whole range of people. Now my point in the Senator Kamla harasses putting your hands up. And she's the one who corrects and no you don't have the support. Sort of your rival right. Senator Harris What are you talking about Rashad Robinson. Can you explain what happened. I think it's always tricky. When White folks tried to out black black folks and I think Biden would do self favorite looking what Bill Clinton did back in? Oh seven and eight In South Carolina where he sort of talked about his history and support with the black community to undermine the insurgent candidacy of President Obama. I'm at the time and folks began to turn on him and began to push back on that. Hillary Clinton enjoyed a lot of support back then from a wide range of of black folks but what she enjoyed and what Biden enjoys is a lot of support from insiders from the establishment from folks that are looking at the calculation and think that this is the candidate that white people will accept in white people will vote for and as we get closer and closer to election. Day of Biden is not willing to to consolidate support when we were going to. We're going to see people moving away and we already see that in terms of young black folks in terms of the activist community and many others is that just simply. Don't think that Biden has the range and he hasn't been there he hasn't showed up. Biden is the only candidate that we have not been able to get a sit down on meeting with It's absolutely outrageous that we like have reached out multiple times and it's almost like a joke now with his folks where they say. Oh well maybe we'll sort lord of and I can't. I can't even think of any next generation black leader organization in the movement right now. That's had a sit down conversation with Joe Biden if he's if this is what he does when we're dating what's going to happen if we marry it. This is actually a really big problem. He's not willing to sit down and have have conversations to hear from us about our priorities. Then we've got a lot of concerns about what what the future looks like. Let's go to an exchange between Senator Harris Chris and South Bend Mayor Pizza Judge. This is co moderator. Kristen welker Senator Harris this week. You criticize mere people to Outreach to African American voters you said quote for the Democratic nominee has got to be someone who has the experience connecting with all of who we are as the diversity city of the American people and quote. What exactly prompted you to say that? Senator Harris that was asked a question that related to a stock photograph Oh to craft his campaign published. But listen I think it really speaks to a larger issue and and I'll speak to the larger issue I I believe that the mayor has made apologies for that. The larger issue is for too along. Candidates have taken for granted constituencies. That have been the backbone of the Democratic Party and have overlooked those and have you know they show up when it's close to election time shopping a black church and want to get the vote but just haven't been there before judgy response to that my responses I completely agree and I welcomed the challenge of connecting with black voters in America. Who Don't yet know me and before I share what's in my plans? Let me talk about what's in my heart and why this is so important Morton. As mayor of a city that is racially diverse and largely low income. For eight years I have lived and breathed the successes and struggles community where far too many people live with the consequences of racial inequity that has built up over centuries but then compounded by policies policies the decisions from within living memory. So that's South Bend May appear speaking last night at the debate Ryan Grim Of the intercept. You were there air. And you've written a lot about the mayor your response to what he said and his performance last night it was. It was interesting that Kamla Harris decided to kind of take a pass on coming directly at mayor. Buddha judge that exchange and nobody else it really came at him throughout the entire debate and he was prepared for an onslaught given that he there have been recent polls showing him up in New Hampshire and Iowa and normally the front runner runner gets GETS PILED ON. That may have been delayed until the next debate. What what she was referring to? The stock photo was related to a broader controversy over over the way that he presented. What's known as Douglas Plan for Black? America this is. This is the primary piece of outreach that he has to the black community and and when he rolled it out yes. It's kind of funny that he used a stock photo from Kenyan woman and her little brother to promote the project for Black Black America but you know more damaging to him and which Harris did not get into is that he listed four hundred supporters of of this plan. The top three of whom were leaders of the black community in South Carolina after they told the intercept Two two of them. Johnny Gordo. Who is the the the chairman of the South Carolina Black Caucus said I explicitly told them? I do not endorse this plan. And they used my name anyway. State representative ivory. thig pen said the same thing. He explicitly told them that he was not endorsing the Douglas Plant and they put his name on it. Anyway he in fact is a CO chair of the Bernie Sanders campaign in in South Carolina. the the the third endorser said. I told him that it was okay to use my name for the Douglas Plan. But I I said please don't make it look like I'm endorsing your candidacy. And she felt like they were intentionally vague and the way they rolled it out to make it look like they had done that and it's very difficult to imagine a politician doing that sort of thing to a white state. Senator in Iowa or New Hampshire for instance. It's really difficult. Imagine that happening to any community other than the black community. In American Politics Politics Harris pivoted to a conversation. About what your what is your authentic connection with the black community and booker also hit later on on on a related point. which is if you can't bring together? The Obama coalition and that was kind of a code for bringing together White Progressives. LGBT community and the black community together an immigrant community together into that coalition. That's able to get more than fifty percent of the vote if you can't make that entire coalition whole whole you're going to fall short but they didn't name him when they were making that argument now Rashad Robinson. I mean the significance of this because you have mayor P now polling number one and one of the states in the country Iowa number one and he jumped something like if you believe the polls roughly ten percent against our Warren Sanders and Biden. Which is why everyone was going after from last night yet pulling it almost zero within the black community? Yeah I mean I. I've had some time to talk with Mayor Pete and and really have pushed him. I don't even understand why he named his plan. The Douglas Plan. Can you explain this. Frederick Douglass someone that is really inspiring to you. Why what is your relationship with the community community? I think the problem. That Mayor Pete has is that He comes across as a very good student. Someone who is deeply studied and and and can understand issues but doesn't have context oftentimes or story to back it up and people realize that in recognize that he is a millennial it does not have right now. Black friends out there talking about them. And that's worrisome. Alex yes what happened in South Bend Indiana during his campaign the killing feeling of an African American early the killing the both both the police killing and the ongoing way that he's had problems with police community tension the the firing of the black police chief who was working to expose racism in the force. You know this is someone who's had deep challenges with racial justice in a relatively small city that most people probably can't point to the map on the map who now wants to be president of the United States. Racial Justice is not outta sight piece. It's not it's not charity while it is morale it is actually strategy. It's a strategy to actually win and it's a force multiplier for the type of change that we need on our side to get people mobilize out to the polls to expand the base if a candidate actually does not have the type of relationship we're here people feel like they're known like they're like they're going to actually beef engaged and they're gonNA be prioritized then they're they're not gonNA show up in big numbers and I think the challenge for Mayor Pete. Is that the Douglas Plan on paper. Seems like a lot. For Frederick Douglass. Seems like a lot of good information. I've read through it. I've talked to him about it but there is no story or contexts behind it. There's also not a history of him implementing and executing executing it and with all of these candidates I am not interested in folks are not as interested in the what but the how. What is your experience reince and your relationship to movements to actually getting this done? We have a history hundreds of years of stalled progress of inequality on race issues in in this country. And we need someone. That's actually has experienced the ability to mobilize people and ability to move people. We need to know that. It's a priority. Not something that you have to do to check off a box. He still has some work to do. In that regard. We're going to break and then come back to discuss this fifths. Democratic presidential debate that took place in Atlanta Georgia. Stay with us. Pour came at the May see so through though the okay gain gourmet ghetto in game at their own game. At the Richard Been taught he has seen Vida them Woah. Sola see many hours Uh Tennis in our democracy now studio her latest album. I`Ma Duda was just nominated for Twenty Twenty Grammy Award to see her full performance. It's an interview here at democracy now about the protest movement that took down. Puerto Rico's governor last summer visit democracy now dot org. I mean me good moves. Nermeen shake as we continue last night's debate and Atlanta Senators Elizabeth. Warren and Cory Booker clashed on. Warren's proposal to impose two percent annual tax and wealth about fifty million dollars allers sure so let me just tell you what we can do with it. Too sent wealth tax two cents on top one tenth of one percent of this country and we can and provide universal childcare for every baby in this country. Zero to five. This is transformative. We can provide universal pre-k for every three year old and four four year old in America. We can stop exploiting the women largely black and Brown women. Who Do this work and we can raise the wages of every child care worker in Preschool teacher in America? Okay we can put eight hundred billion new federal dollars into all of our public schools. We can make college tuition free for every kid. We can put fifty billion dollars to historically black colleges and universities and we can cancel student loan debt for ninety five percent of the folks who've got it to sow well texts and we can invest in an entire generation. Cheer Senator Booker Respond. Sure again I agree with the need to do all of those things. We're all united in wanting to see universal preschool and I'll fight for that we're all United Wind Fund Hughes. Wouldn't be here if it wasn't for two parents that went to HCC a US but the tax the way we're putting afford right now. The Wealth Tax. I'm sorry it's cumbersome as tribal nations is hard to evaluate we can get the same amount of Revenue Taxation Asian so that Senator Senator Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker at last night's debate I'd like to bring a Gabriel Zuckerman into the conversation professor professor of economics at Berkeley and Co author of the new book the triumph of injustice. How the rich dodge taxes and how to make them pay? So Gabriel your response to Elizabeth does with warrants tax plan and cory booker's criticism of it. Yeah well I I think it's fascinating to see the sheep conversation about taxis. Axes among among Democrats for very long time. They were reluctant most of them talk about more progressive taxation to talk about dexing billionaires in particular particular and now we have these proposals about Welbeck's Asian that endorsed by major candidates as an example Bernie Sanders so supportive wealth tax in both cases. These are very progressive taxes. Starting very high in the wealth distribution of fifty million dollars for Warren As high as six percent but when billion dollars as high as eight percent of of ten billion dollars in the in the center of plan so this is a dramatic departure and a major change that welcoming the in the conversation and of course there are some some pushback and we heard Senator Booker pushing back the idea of waft accession. My answer to that is studied European experience with wealth decoration. And it's true. He's been largely a failure but this is preventable reasons. I think the US a much stronger position to make a wealth tax wealth today for instance. If you owe reach French person you could avoid a wealth tax by moving to Belgium not moving too low tax country anywhere else else in Europe. If you're wealthy American you cannot avoid taxes by moving abroad because the Texas follow you. Taxation is based on citizenship. There's this problem of tax competition for instance the US does much to fight tax evasion and could do even more in the future than European countries have been. I'm doing. Many wealthy Europeans used to hide assets and still do in banks in Switzerland in Luxembourg in similar tax havens. The West is a bit more aggressive when it comes to trying to relate information from these tax havens and then when that's thing you know there is this notion that wealth taxes or cumbersome of very hard to implement because it's how to value assets but it's not quite true true because when you look at the wealth of these very wealthy individuals who would be affected by the wealth tax is about seventy seventy five percents of their wealth is invested in listed securities and Equities Bonds Mutual Fund shares that have well defined well measured market values. And so. He's actually pretty easy to these. Very wealthy Americans potentially quit progressively and Gabriel's wanted to ask you about that recent Guardian piece you wrote wrote make no mistake Medicare for all would cut taxes. For most Americans the way the corporate media and the moderators questioners in general through these debates. Ask about issues like Medicare for all is saying. Are you going to increase taxes. Explain what the cost would be and in fact how people would actually elite save money. Yes that's very important question and something that's not very well understood a hill hill among the public. So what's very important to understand. Is that the way that healthcare is funded today when it comes to employer provided a healthcare is already through what you could be private tax. which is that employers have to pay private insurance companies to Kovanda workers and that's mandatory essentially any Utah Cost? It's about thirteen thousand dollars per worker and the cost. This is the same no matter what the wage of the employee is. That is it's thirteen thousand dollars for a secret secretary and for an executive so if there was a transition to medicare for all. Here's what could happen. You could imagine that employers would be eh forced to convert the premiums that they currently pay to insurance companies into wages so for them it would make no difference for workers it would make a huge difference because they are wage would increase essentially by thirteen thousand dollars which would be the biggest pay raise in in a generation for the vast majority of Americans and then of course taxis would have to increase to pay for Medicare for all but we smart taxes based raised on income or wealth of our taxes on corporate profits is very easy to make sure that for most workers that the extra taxis would be much less than the gain in wage. These thirty thousand dollar waging craze so that the net stay home home pay the increase in take home pay would be again. The biggest increase in a generation for native percent of workers and of course it would increase access best to healthcare for everyone I turn to foreign policy right now. this is Senator Bernie Sanders speaking about the US relationship with Saudi. Saudi Arabia may have been the first person opium to make it clear that Saudi Arabia not only murdered the show. This is a brutal dictatorship. which still everything they can to quash democracy treats women as third class citizens? And when we rethink our American foreign policy but we've got to know is that Saudi Arabia is not a reliable ally we have got reading Iran and Saudi Arabia together in a room other American leadership and say we sick and tired of US spend huge amounts of money and human resources because because of your conflicts and by the way the same thing goes with Israel and the Palestinians. It's no good enough frost simply to be pro Israel. I am Pro Israel but we must treat the Palestinian people as well with respect and dignity that they deserve what is going on in Gaza. The right now with employment at seventy or eighty percent is unsustainable so we need to be rethinking who our allies are around the world work with the United Nations and not continue to support brutal dictatorships so that Senator Bernie Sanders. At last night's presidential primary debate Phyllis Bennis is with US fellow at the Institute for Policy. Studies has written a number of books including understanding the Palestinian Israeli conflict. Phyllis response to the foreign policy section of the debate. It wasn't isn't that long but it took a lot of issues and It looks like Bernie. Sanders dared to talk about Israel Palestine Bernie Sanders was indeed the only one who who talk directly about Israel Palestine. I think was interesting. There was some good news and bad news in the sense. If we look at the foreign policy debate over all the good news is that there's starting to be it's it's other than Bernie Sanders to some degree Elizabeth Warren. There's not a lot yet. But there's a growing recognition among the candidates that the base of the Democratic Party the discourse has changed dramatically across the board on the Middle East. So that questions of recognizing that Saudi Arabia is not our trusted ally against is terrorism or something but is a brutal dictatorship is now a widespread view even from the centrist Sector of the of the Democrat Democrat Party people like club. Char Biden both said that. What's missing and this is where we get into the problematic part? What's missing from this shift shift is that there's not a lot of discussion about what would that mean Bernie Sanders comments about Saudi Arabia and the need for diplomacy between bringing together as he put it. Saudi Arabia and Iran was the one very specific and very innovative notion of replacing war and threat of war with diplomacy slow missy. But there's not a lot of that kind of Discussion about how would this happen in the past Elizabeth. Warren has very importantly given a number on the question. Of How much money would you cut from the military budget. In her proposal around Medicare for all she proposed cutting eighty billion Leeann dollars from the military budget which is huge no other candidate and virtually no one else in Congress has given those kinds of specific numbers yet about what they would be willing to To cut to pay for big bold new proposals like the green new deal like Medicare for all in this debate when there was discussion about the green new deal discussion about healthcare. It didn't come up in connection that we didn't see that intersectional relationship between in one of the places we can get. Money is from the military budget. There was a very extensive discussion From Elizabeth Warren about the eight hundred billion dollars which is is a very important Figure that she has put forward on a number of occasions in terms of the wealth tax. And how that could be used for health care. The same thing is true across the board for other candidates on the question of cutting the military budget in fact in June when the poor people's campaign convened a candidates forum aurum. There were nine members of of the the pool of candidates who were there including all the major candidates and seven of the nine. We're asked would you cut the military terry budget. Every single one said yes. The other two were not. We're not asked just by chance. One of those two ironically was Bernie Sanders who has most perhaps most consistently assistant -ly talked about cutting the military budget. But the problem was the questions the questions from the The the journalists asking the questions didn't include. Clued you've all said you would cut the military budget now. The question has to be how much my colleagues at the national priorities project have put together the numbers where these these cuts can come from. We could cut sixty six billion dollars just by ending the Pentagon's war slush fund. We could one hundred twelve billion by cutting just seventy five percent percent of the eight hundred overseas military bases. So there's a way to do this. There's a way to do this and to make it real. And that's what we're not hearing from the candidates they're recognizing that the discourse is changing and they have to catch up but they haven't caught up sufficiently. They're not listening to the movements. They're not listening even to the polls in which people in the Democratic Party and more broadly are all calling the military person who wasn't standing on the stage in Atlanta last night but clearly they error every step of the way and that's Barack Obama former President WanNa talk about his comments last week at a fundraising event. He said quote even as we push the envelope and we're bold within our vision we also have to be rooted in reality. The average American doesn't think we have to completely tear down the system remake it. I don't think we should be deluded into thinking that the resistance to certain approaches to things this is simply because voters haven't heard a bold enough proposal and if they hear something as bold as possible then as immediately that's going to activate tatum Ryan grim the significance of he basically was saying that the party he was warning the party about going to left right and and because the Democratic Party and and and by that I also mean kind of the base of it the voters have refused to kind of reckon with the Obama Administration in an honest way he he he remains able to kind of dictate the direction of the conversation. Sation nobody on stage is is willing to come. After Obama specifically and it it not only allows Biden Leiden himself to his record but allows Obama to make these interventions. If you notice in the debate last night even Tulsi Gabbard who is more willing than probably anybody anybody on that stage to specifically come after the Democratic Party said that Harris Administration would just be an extension of a Bush Clinton trump foreign policy. She she she very specifically flinched at at putting Obama. Wanted WanNa give just ten seconds. Get along the Roman that happened. Most of the people in the room were donors. The Obama also said one other thing that I think all of us have to remember is that he wished he had put more money into state infrastructure. To actually get other people. Elected arrive was very good.

US president Char Biden Iowa Senator Senator Elizabeth Warr Senator Accountable Harris Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Democratic Party Atlanta New Hampshire US Ambassador Sunland congressman Joaquin Castro Sec black community Israel United States Senate Senator Phyllis Bennis Rashad Robinson
For Volunteer Humanitarians, Solidarity Is Not a Crime

Tiny Spark

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

For Volunteer Humanitarians, Solidarity Is Not a Crime

"And he welcomed a tiny spark podcast of a nonprofit quarterly we take a close look at philanthropy nonprofits and international aid i'm amy castello in the news italy passes a lot penalized any vote but it's rescuing refugees punishing with fines of up to fifty thousand euros in love it on the foreign minister leads the campaign saying it's time for syrians to go home and here in the usa immigration and customs seems enforcement gears up for the mass arrests of undocumented immigrants woman texas accounts of migrant children living in squalor that detention centers has sparked outrage in washington n beyond across across the world anti immigration sentiment is shaping policies enforcing migrants and refugees into increasingly unstable an unsafe conditions and yet stepping into the spring sometimes are ordinary citizens who feel compelled to act to provide a semblance of safety and sustenance the migrants and refugees specially when governments refused to do so in fact a few years ago volunteers many with no previous humanitarian experience experience at all traveled from around europe kelly france to assist some of the ten thousand migrants were living in an unregistered camp commonly known as the jungle these volunteers when professional in the humanitarian tarian field however a lot of them were highly professional social work his youth for kids joined the list billed as lawyers doctors anthropologist elyssa sundry was one of those volunteers fears and i asked her about the problem which we've covered extensively on this podcast about the risks that unskilled volunteers compose when they just show up in the midst of a crisis thinking they can help all these kids had professions and they had skills that they could using the camp and i find that this distinction between professionals and not professionals in this specific case of kylie wasn't necessarily relevant you have to imagine a place where there's no support whatsoever including from the french government itself which did not formally recognize the camping kalay that meant eight organizations could not operate there for the most part and as a result sundry says conditions in the camp are probably hard for many of us to even imagine if you have an image in your heads of a refugee camp on television don't think about that because the jungle was in anything like any other refugee camp it was an informal sat two minutes on now wastelands and people were sleeping ross there was no formal humanitarian aid that there was also a lot of food distribution there was a lack of safeguarding measures end so foundry says it was pretty much these volunteers assisting or no outside help at all she wrote a paper about the volunteers and kelly which was published in the journal of ethnic and migration studies it's called volunteer humanitarianism volunteers in humanitarian aid in the jungle refugee camp of kelly sundry says the volunteers were not your typical volunteer us these vote on his way traveling normally short distances and most of the volunteers way europeans and they were going to how they were going to work in a humanitarian emergency in the global north they when volunteers that suddenly book top in the global south to help international national development project so these are very specific traits of this case of a vote on humanitarianism right 'em you know the volunteers came from all over europe to provide assistance but the overwhelming majority of the volunteers were from great britain and you described the kinds of things these volunteers did such is cooking hot meals sorting and distributing donations building temporary shelters there's an toilets organizing recreational activities and just kind of contributing to the general upkeep of the camp but you say at the same time these volunteers were doing something quite different from official aid groups their work and they illegal camp with a form of civil disobedience volunteers were vocal in advocating furry form of french and uk policies toured asylum seekers i talked to me a little bit more about how the work of the volunteers went from kind of traditional forms of aid just helping out at the camp to a form of civil disobedience how did this happen okay so at the beginning these grassroots organizations of volunteers started wiz some kind of humanitarian ideals you know they want to help not political grounds these grassroots organizations when affiliated to political groups or to face based groups they were just groups of people who wanted to help by providing the very basic forms of eight what happened just after a few months everyone realized that the jungle was the director's pro dot of fairy player political decisions and therefore to ensure shaw that the jungle wouldn't be as neglected we needed to do some political activism to so what happened was that for the kids started to for example create petitions online or they started to talk to their local and peas and they really started to raise awareness across the uk and they became very outspoken about what was happening in the jungle and i really think that through the what of these for the kids it made the news you know i think if it hadn't been for older what that the volunteers were doing in kelly it probably would have gone unnoticed yeah i mean you talk about the fact that these volunteers kind of eventually started leading activists campaigns demanding change in asylum policies and more humane treatment meant of refugees and you juxtapose this kind of humanitarian activism you say it's stood in opposition to what we think of as the more traditional humanitarian machine is is this just say that you think that humanitarian aid is kind of inherently an historically apolitical like why does that matter to you that these volunteers became politically active the more time they spent this camp i think because maybe to austin we tend to see humanitarian what as something that is apolitical or that wants to show itself as apolitical but i think that a big pot of money tabby in what is inherently political and i think this case shows how it's okay to do the two and it's okay to do the two quite well do you think that more traditional forms of humanitarian aid should be more overtly political should be advocating in the way that these volunteers who worked at the camping calais did i mean do you see this it's kind of a role model for the way the age should be or do you see it as kind of an anomaly not necessarily want to be replicated i think it really depends on the situation then it really depends on the humanitarian crisis or you know it depends depends on the context but in this very specific context of northern france it was clear that war happened and the reasons why there was a humanitarian emergency was was because of political decisions and was because the french government clearly decided to neglects they issue of kelly and they sure of thousands of people arriving in france and wanting to either claim asylum or continuing their jenny's to the uk mhm you talk about on the british and french government's response to this humanitarian crisis and kalay you said that as a crisis was unfolding the british and french government's were pouring more money into a border control building new fences and deploying more border officers and as a results you write quote it became extremely dangerous to attempt the illegal crossing to the uk end you know we are having similar challenges here in u i s n i find it interesting that you note that as thee british and french government's kind of put more resources toward border control you noted it rise in violence against migrants and you described it this way you said violence tore camp residents increased mostly perpetrated by far right groups the police in the crs which is an acronym for the special a branch of the french national police usually in charge of riot control you say the ladder were actively hostile routinely attacking the camp with tear gas using physical violence detaining refugees with no charge taking them outside the camp to beat them and ignoring reports that a third of the refugee minors went missing in just one month i mean not 'em was very difficult to reid and i'm just wondering if you can talk to me about the tensions that you saw between in these volunteers who were working in what was essentially an illegal settlements and government that was overtly hostile to these migrants yes so a near when i was describing the camp i didn't talk about the violence of the police but this was something that was happening daily so refugees where where attacked by the police and we know about this because the grassroots organization that i was felons hearing for was mainly in charge of medical attention for the refugees and so we were receiving almost on a daily basis people who were beaten up and we're asking for help and when you die you know what happened they would tell you that the police beat them up and so of course these are very grave acusations but we are set and that this was happening and not only that but also their local residents of highway started to be violent against the refugees but also against the and t is once i was sleeping in the hall still in the town of kelly and we will cop to the sounds of asylum because one of the violence of the volunteers was just set on fire by some of the locals to protest about a presence that so they were incredibly high tensions and of course the tensions and so so where's the local governments and the volunteers because they were always trying to change policies about what you could do and what you could do in the camp at some point the police started to ask volunteers for their identification for the passport i think the situation and the tensions were so high at some point that it was very hard for volunteers to work there and to provide adequate support to the refugees mhm i mean you know even now i mean the the jungle was addicted in twenty sixteen and of course of course people still will kind of dismantled in two thousand six yes so you know whereas say four weeks notice half of the jungle was addicted in february twenty sixteen and they evicted three thousand people whereas a week's notice so you can emerge those people go they went to the north part of the jungle or they just bust in smaller count switch didn't have any support so people once again started to sleep ross with no tenants in forests trying to hide from the police trying to hide from the smugglers some of them were transferred to the sentence is in fronts but some of them were just left on their own and they just moved to paris and in fact paris now has a lot of people sleeping rough x dongo residents we are aware that a lot of mine is went missing during their vacations because no one was keeping an eye on them we are aware that police brutality wills heightened during their vacation they just destroyed or the shelters without giving people a chance to pick up the documents to pick up their belongings the level of violence perpetrated by the police was extremely high and frankly not justified and even now the situation is rarely rarely tenants so it's changed quite a law since twenty sixteen volunteers are much two more regulated they can only do food distribution or clouds distribution between certain times and if they do these distributions outside of this time stay run the risk could've been arrested and they have very much respected in what they can do their highly scrutinized some of them were arrested without any charge but apart from that the violence continues on the refugees as well so old the ten stat a dna test every morning they get confiscated by the police the police also used pepper spray on the refugees these belongings on sleeping bags so that basically these items are unusable so the situation continues even though the john goal is not there anymore there is still a lot of tension and there are still a lot of people living that is about two thousand people at the moment living in thailand and let's just take a short break to hear from one of our sponsors to help make tiny spark possible for not for profit organizations it's all about you're mission how do you structure investment strategy to get you there how do you balance risks and opportunities what's the best way to maximize returns at pavilion villian that mission let's work together to strengthen your conviction in your investment decisions and to achieve your long term investment goals with confidence pavilion mercer practice collaborating with healthcare institutions endowments foundations help drive better investment outcomes find out more at www dot and pavilions dash not for profit dot com you know unfortunately the scenes at you've just described will resonate here among american listeners for these documents at abuses of migrants and refugees who are attempting to enter the united states as we speak and more particularly the tensions between volunteers like the ones you've talked about in kalay volunteers here in the usa who are seeking to assist migrants on a humanitarian basis are also being arrested in and here many of us have been watching the case of a thirty six year old geography teacher named scott warren who is charged with three felonies for helping a pair of migrants from central america who had arrived in u s hungry dehydrated and with blistered feet warren's case just ended recently in a mistrial after jurors were unable to reach a verdict about the charges against him and i just wanna reach you some questions proposed an article in the new york times which sub this key to the case was mr warren's intent was he holy motivated by humanitarian purpose when he gave food water shelter unclean close to the two men from central america or was he illegally concealing the men when he allowed the three main at the volunteer groups camp this tension between volunteers who are trying to provide humanitarian assistance to people who are sometimes on the brink of death or who are certainly in need of basic goods just stay alive and to be healthy are consistently instantly at odds with us government policies that are seeking to crack down on these very migrants and decriminalized they're very presence in the countries where they arrive talk to me about you know how you see this playing out on a broader role when you step back back from the situation that you've described in such detail and kelly and you look at the globe what is this kind of growing tension between anti immigrant policies on the parts of governments and far right wing groups and the volunteers both the unofficial volunteers at you've described andy more official humanitarian landscape how do we see these tensions unfolding globally as we look ahead what concerns from where you sit now well i find the frightening really i find that more and more volunteers are being accused of a crime that is not a crime solidarity is not a crime people are trying to help other people all over the world you've just talked about this case but in europe we have many of the cases going on at the moment where a vote on kids or activists have been sentenced or have been taken to court i'm thinking about fama in south in france that helps refugees to cross the border in a car from italy to france i'm also thinking about a very important case here in the uk cold stansted fifteen distance at fifteen where a group of activists who stop a flight that had some passengers that were being deported and stay race going to jail for life this was a very big case here in the uk because it sparked a big debate about solidarity and about activism there's also another case in the mediterranean of a captain who has just been arrested and she's facing up to twenty years in prison because she was the captain of one of the ships that are conducting rescue missions in the mediterranean and there's so many more people that are facing imprisonment because they have tried to help it's really frightening and it's obviously to me seeing so many volunteers being accused of a crime that is not a crime is obviously a political mission to silence those voices that are against that restrict migration policies and unfortunately you know i think that there is at least in europe and i'm sure in the u s as well a big part of the population that is against all these policies however they're not really hud you know and i think this is a massive issue because the biggest voice is the voice of those people who are against migration we really to find a way to make her voice is had to show that there is another you wrote the reason the u s and i think this is why i decided to do this research and just briefly i wanna know that you you know you were indeed a volunteer at the beginning of this research projects you undertook and you have kind of acknowledged that you're scholarly work is based on the traditions of activists anthropology so in other words it seems he tried to remain they kind of scholarly distance from the subject you were working with an interviewing and observing but you do acknowledge that you kind of had a role in this personally and perhaps have a perspective on she says that right yes absolutely i mean you know my background is announced apology and i think well anthropology dies brilliant play is to situate your research into the reality of the world but also what it does very beautifully to reflect on your own position as a researcher you know being a volunteer really allowed me to see some of the things that i couldn't have seen if i was just a research and as a researcher i had the food trust over my fellow volunteers and that helped my research because they were open and they trusted me in doing a good job i wanna end by asking you about something else you've looked into which is see role that emotions play among the volunteers that she's researched it comes to mind for me because of this picture you just tainted of a government policies around the world butter increasingly hostile to migrants and refugees in this band of human beings who are trying to provide sustenance to people who desperately need it into her being at times arrested for that at other times harassed for that to me this gets that's at what you've identified as one of the main emotions that drives these volunteers which is empathy and i think many of us have noted in the last few years here in the usa and perhaps in other parts of the world what seems to be an alarming decline in empathy and i'm wondering if you could talk to me about what you have observed with respect to the role of empathy in the work of these volunteers well embassy played a very big role in this kind of what festival in my research it became apparent that the majority of volunteers started to to contact grassroots organizations offering to volunteers after the images of the syrian boy allen coordi wet broadcasted you probably remember he was that little boy who who drowned in greece trying to cross the sea with his family and i think after seeing those images which were really shocking a lot of people felt like they wanted to do something thing to make the situation better and in that case empathy was was a very big part of that feeling but also empathy sustained the work of the volunteers throughout the moms even it wasn't just on initial reaction empathy was rarely the foundation of this work that continue to be reinforced by the shocking scenes that were seeing in the camp and i think the holding onto that empathy and olding onto those feelings of solidarity and also of real bonds between people not just between volunteers but also with refugees some of the refugees became friends to the volunteers and i think that really helped sustaining they amount of distress that everyone was going through at the time because i think a lot of us were more observing from a further distance can feel overwhelmed by de enormity of various situations including refugee eugene migrant situations and just feel overwhelmed and i think it can try our embassy it can challenge the limits of are empathy and i think summer concerns at being overwhelmed by these images being so overwhelmed by the problems the scope of the problems adopts the problems can make us just wanna turn away and turn off because it's too hard to be empathetic i mean you know i understand i do understand how some of these issues might feel too big but i think that if we owe came to gets a you know you don't need to go to the jungle involuntary to do something you know i think that for example donating to charity that you like and you trust i think that's such a big action that you can do and i think the beauty you know i used to i volunteer kids in the jungle with the hummingbird project checked and the humming bed project is inspired by the tail of the humming but end the forest fire and there's a forest end is all gmo's and at some point a fire breaks sal an old johnny morris run away and look at the fire and there is this led to humming but that goes to pick up some water and sprays there on the fire and with the animals asked how many but what how you doing you know you're not going to make a difference but the hummingbird response i'm doing all i can and i think this was a very empowering story and we were very aware that we couldn't so tile the situation and but we were doing well we could and i think that's a very inspiring salt elyssa sundry researcher activist anthropologist an author of volunteer humanitarianism tarian ism which was published in the journal of ethnic and migration studies thank you so much for your scholarship a four year activism and first speaking with me today thank you amy it was great speaking to you own tiny spark and we'd love to invite you have you're say about this interview did you volunteer in the camp and kelly per do you have any other examples of volunteer humanitarianism they'd like to share with us well let us know please leave a comment on her website tiny spark dot org or you can email us at podcast at n p q mag dot org end subscribe to our podcast on just about any platform stitcher pocket casts apple podcast google podcast and if you like what you heard today it would be great if you could rate us some i tunes help more people find out about her work also like us on facebook and you can tweet me at tiny spark under scoreboard elyssa sundry was recorded at her home in brighton england by philip smith today's program was produced by friday boswell

amy castello italy usa thirty six year twenty years two minutes four weeks four year one month
Democracy Now! 2019-06-06 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-06-06 Thursday

"From New York. This is democracy now. We the people all the security forces accountable for the dispersal of the sit in the security forces have betrayed the Sudanese people. Get toll and sedan rises to more than one hundred following a deadly military, raid on a nonviolent sit in Khartoum Monday doctors with the ongoing anti-government uprising say at least forty bodies were dredged up from the Nile river. We'll get the latest. Then the Trump administration cracks down on US travel to Cuba, the new regulation, stop the people to people program and affects nearly eight hundred thousand bookings on cruise ships. Dahlie, Trump's policies wrong because it's just like what other United States presidents have done, and the reality is that it affects the Cuban population and not the government will then nearly one hundred animal rights activists are free today after being arrested for carrying out a rescue mission at a northern California duck farm. They say tortures animals. We'll speak with leading animal rights activists, Preah hunting, and Wayne shown he was just released from jail to make stop when you've gone to the government you've gone along. You've gone to the corporations and CEO's and called fish, sign and time again. The only way to make this act violence. Stop is people can take the wreck to this face years in jail, all that. And more coming up. Welcome. My personnel democracy now dot for the Warren peace report. I'm Amy Goodman. President Trump's brought the United States one step closer to a devastating trade war with Mexico saying talks with Mexican officials at the White House Wednesday ended without a deal Trump's threatened to impose five percent tariffs on all imports from Mexico beginning Monday, unless it agrees to crack down further on Central American migrants bound for the US. Trump's plans have drawn resistance even from within his own party. With Republican Senate leaders, including McConnell threatening congressional revolt. Democratic house speaker Nancy Pelosi fresh off in meeting with Mexico's foreign minister, denounced Trump's tariff plans. But I think that this is dangerous territory. This is not a way to treat a friend. It's not a way to deal with immigration. It's not a way to deal. Meet the humanitarian needs at the border. The Trump administration said Wednesday it will suspend legal aid programs recreational activities and English. Classes for all the company migrant children jailed in federally run immigration centers, the move drew condemnation from human rights groups, including Amnesty International USA, which wrote, quote, it's bad enough that the Trump administration's trying to normalize the warehousing of children. It's unconscionable that they would so blatantly, try to strip them of their rights locking children than denying them. Legal-aid education and even playtime is all part of this administration's cruel efforts to dehumanize people who've come to the US seeking safety. Amnesty said in Mexico police arrested two prominent immigration rights activists Wednesday, christova Sanchez was arrested by six plain clothes police officers outside his home in Mexico City and driven away in an unmarked car, and in the border town of sonatas Nahra police detained Eranio Mujica director of the organization, Poile blows seen Frontera or. People without borders. In a statement the group called both arrested legal and said the activists were targeted by the Mexican government for the humanitarian aid work with asylum, seekers will he has worked closely with Scott Warren, the humanitarian aid, volunteer with the group no more deaths in Tucson, Arizona who faces up to twenty years in prison for providing water clean clothes, and bids to asylum seekers in the Sonoran desert, on Wednesday, Scott Warren told a jury trial has actions were motivated by three intentions relief of suffering respect for human dignity, and the right to self-determination in France. President Emmanuel McCall welcome. President Donald Trump to Normandy today for the commemoration marking the seventy fifth anniversary of d day, the allied invasion of western Europe in nineteen forty four the invasion of major turning point in the US led campaign against Nazi Germany Trump's trip to France, followed his state visit to the United. Kingdom in a short visit to Ireland Wednesday where Trump met with the Irish prime minister during their brief encounter Trump said he believed Brexit would be a boon to the Irish Republican compared Ireland soft border with Northern Ireland to his plans to expand the wool between US and Mexico. Of. Public opposition runs deep against any new border controls in post Brexit Ireland is Trump arrived at our Lynch and an airport. Hundreds of protesters set a peace camp to call out Trump's policies on climate change, immigration and war. I'm here today, because Trump's misogyny, basically. Also, I he's a homophobic, racist and out Marissa cicis. And that's why I can't Sund. Minutes to the planet. Always climate change, which is rampant, and threatening the whole planet. And he's withdrawn from the Paris agreement Trump has again denied the existence of climate change. Telling a British television show that weather quote changes both ways Trump was speaking with a host of good morning Britain, Piers Morgan, a former contestant on Trump's NBC reality show, the apprentice. Supposedly believing climate change. I believe that there's a change in weather. And I think it changes both was during the thirty minute interview, Trump to -flective questions on gun control and defended his ban on transgender soldiers in the military, claiming it's too expensive to provide the medical care as if the United States who take military action against Iran, Trump replied, there's always a chance in southern Saudi Arabia. He rebels from Yemen say they've crossed into Saudi territory in a surprise offensive. That's left them in control of nearly two dozen positions. There was no comment from Saudi officials on the claim which represents an escalation of Yemen's more than three year. Olds of a war. The fighting's left at least seventy three hundred children killed or seriously injured, by US-backed Saudi coalition. Airstrikes pushed half of Yemen's twenty eight million people to the brink of starvation. CNN reports that Trump administration's learned that Saudi Arabia has significantly escalated its ballistic missile programme with the help of China threatening to spark a new arms. Race in the Middle East. Democratic lawmakers were reportedly furious at the White House failed to disclose news of the Saudi missile program saying the intelligence had been deliberately withheld during briefings where it should have been revealed to members of congress. This comes as a bipartisan group of senators said, Wednesday, the Lynch, reduce Bill, that would require the White House. Get congressional approval before approving eight billion dollars in weapons to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab. Emirates April President Trump vetoed a congressional War Powers resolution to end US support for the Saudi led war in Yemen in Sudan, the death tolls risen to at least one hundred following a deadly raid on a sit in, in Khartoum Monday morning. That's according to Dr Shuping, taking part in the ongoing anti-government uprising who say at least forty bodies were dredged up from the Nival river on Wednesday. The transitional military council said it had launched an investigation into the violence and offer to resume dialogue on a transition to democracy. Just today after scrapping all agreements with the opposition will have more on the crisis in Sudan. Dan after headlines in Australia press freedom groups are sounding the alarm over a pair of police rates on journalists on Wednesday Australian Federal Police swept into the headquarters, Austrailia Broadcasting Corporation in Sydney known as ABC reviewing thousands of documents for information about a two thousand seventeen report that found Australian special forces soldiers may have committed war crimes. Enough ghanistan ABC executive editor John Lyons spoke on his own network, just minutes after police served a warrant naming a news director and the two reporters who broke the story. Downloaded nine thousand two hundred and fourteen documents I counted them and they now going through them they've set up a huge screen and they going through Email by Email. It's quite extraordinary, and I feel as journalist, I feel it's a real violation because these are emails between this particular journalists. And he's boss hood, boss aids, draft scripts of stories. I've never seen an assault on the media as savages this one we're seeing today at the and the chilling message is not so much for the journalists. But it's also for the public Wednesday's raid on ABC came one day after police in Melbourne, Australia. Raided the home of Eneka Smet Hearst reporter with the herald, sun newspaper. Police served a warrant related to Smet Hirsch reporting on a secret effort by an Australian intelligence service to expand surveillance capabilities, including against Australian nationals Australia's acting federal. Police Commissioner Neel Gagan defended the raid saying journalists could face prison time for holding classified information. No sick of the community should be immune. All this talk of activity evidence collection. More broadly. This includes Lawrence fulsome itself. The media or indeed, even politicians in Denmark, social democrat may to friar is poised to become prime minister after party won the largest share votes in parliamentary elections, held Wednesday with more than a quarter of ballots cast firearms and has promised to defend Denmark, social welfare programs and it's made combat in climate change a priority. The far right anti immigrant Danish. People's Party saw its support plunge below nine percent in south East Asia health officials are warning, and outbreak of the highly contagious pig disease known as African swine fever is spreading, and on track to become what summit Diaz are calling the biggest animal disease, outbreak ever recorded in the world, swine fever. Which causes internal bleeding, and pigs and spreads rapidly. And dense factory farms has appeared in China Vietnam. Mongolia and Cambodia with reports of a new outbreak. In North Korea. Health officials estimate China may be gearing up to slaughter up to two hundred million pigs ahead of schedule in an effort to quarantine the outbreak. Youtube said Wednesday, it'll remove thousands of online channels promoting white supremacy hate speech, and extremism, YouTube says its new policy will remove videos alleging that group is superior in order to justify discrimination. Segregation or exclusion, unquote. The Trump administration Wednesday cancelled millions of dollars in federal research funds for California laboratory that uses fetal tissue for lifesaving medical research. The Washington Post reports the move was ordered directly by President Trump, it represents victory for anti choice groups and comes as a number of states have passed bans, most abortions in challenge to the Roe v. Wade supreme court. Ruling legalizing abortion nationwide. The laboratory at the university of California, San Francisco us this tissues, gathered from elective abortions to carry out research into treatments for cancer by 'rises like HIV and Zeka as well as treatments for neurological disorders like Parkinson's, Doug. Melton, Harvard professor, president of the international society for stem cell research said, quote with these new arbitrary restrictions on research the United States ceding its role as the global leader in the development of cellular therapies and regenerative medicine on quote in more news on reproductive rights. Former vice president, Joe Biden angered much of his own Democratic Party Wednesday. When his campaign manager said Biden, still supports the Hyde amendment. The decades old ban on federal funding for most abortions, which disproportionately impacts the poor people of color, Biden's, position, puts him at odds with the democratic national committee's two thousand sixteen platform, as well as all the with. Senators challenging him for the twenty twenty presidential nomination. Kirsten gillibrand come Harris. Amy klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren, all four co sponsors of legislation to overturn the Hyde amendment. Other twenty twenty presidential candidates also weighed in as well including Senator Bernie Sanders, who tweeted, there's no middle ground on women's rights. Abortion's constitutional right under my Medicare for all plan. We will repeal the Hyde amendment, sender said, Meanwhile, Senator Bernie Sanders, confronted executives at WalMart Wednesday, blasting starvation, wages, and extreme wealth. Inequality out the retail giant's annual shareholder meeting in Arkansas, speaking, a proxy for a WalMart employee who invited him to attend. Sanders. Introduced a resolution to raise wages into put hourly workers on WalMart's board of directors. Employer in America and his own boy will family, the wealthiest family in the United States or at the clocks, one hundred and seventy five billion dollars. And yet, despite being credible wealth of its own, WalMart pays many of its employees starvation wages, wages that are solo that many of these employees use of force to rely on government programs like food stamps, Medicaid, and public housing in order to survive. The resolution was quickly dismissed by Rachel brand. Walmart's executive vice president of global governance. And those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot or the Warren pace report, I mainly Goodman, and I'm not being Shane welcome to listen few around the country. The death toll in Sudan, has risen to more than one hundred following a deadly military raid on a nonviolent Sitton in cut through Monday morning, according to doctors who've been taking part in the ongoing anti-government uprising. At least forty bodies were dredged up from the Nile river in the aftermath of the carnage. Meanwhile, the state news agency SUNA reported Thursday that the death toll was no more than forty six on Wednesday, the transitional military council said it had launched an investigation into the violence and offer to resume dialogue on a transition to democracy. Just a day after scrapping all agreements with an opposition alliance. This is left Enin, general of the Fateh, boot, Han service. Squares and spaces have witnessed important events, sparing human, emotions and a lively social life, showing the true depth of Sudanese culture and Sudanese identity history will record this. We in the transitional military council, open, our hands to negotiation with no purpose, but the interest of the nation through which we can complete the establishment of legitimate authority that expresses the MVP of the Sudanese revolution in all its varieties. The opposition has rejected the military's calls to negotiate citing ongoing violence against civilians. This is a protester on the streets of doom Wednesday. What about our children? We started from one to change the regime, now, the regime is falling completely. So the military council either respond to our demands or leave demonstrators from a range of civil society groups are continuing to demand, a civilian transitional government following the overthrow of president laurel, but sheer, and April after a months-long popular uprising and the military subsequent government takeover. For more, we're joined here in New York City by marine O'neil, a Sudanese activists just back from Khartoum. She was at the sit in just days before it was raided, welcome back to democracy. Now, marine, can you talk about the numbers of people been killed? Why people are sitting in and who did the killing the numbers saying that it's more than one hundred is actually gross under a summation because still this is not a safe area. It is difficult to go and find the dead bodies of the protesters that may still be there. There are also new. Of people being still stuck in buildings within the area. They cannot leave because the streets are full of rapid support forces, this is the forces that have attacked the sits in an are still terrorising Khartoum, her to is for all intents and purposes, currently under military occupation, by the rapid support forces previously known as Jinja under him AT's leadership. And he is still calling for attacking people are barricading the streets are on him. He's saying that they will pay the price. Many believe that want him. It says paying the price he's only talking about killing, and there's a. Who he is? He is the leader of the rapid support for forces. He is currently the vice president off the military council, and he's the person who's leading all of the talks that are happening that have happened at this and are happening around. Well, can you explain also a marine, who what the transitional military council is that's taken power incident off to President Bush, she'd was ousted and what role they're playing now while the military council more accurately referred to as the military council. This lot of transitional government. They are only the Security Council that was supporting she'd that they have ousted vitiated, but they remain parts of the previous regime. They have been negotiating with the declaration of freedom and change forces. But it now seems that these negotiations have not been in good faith. They have never intended to give up power for. Billion government. I wanted to go to Hetty the military council general that who you've been talking about une Wednesday. He talked about the gang members, he's he claimed the protesters really gang members threatening and attacking people. Assure them throughout the past few days. We have had rising numbers of martyrs, the last of which were to yesterday, people going through the days, my brothers, the matter is no clear. They want rapid support forces troops to be killed. They call themselves protesters. Those are not protesters there gangs, which we have warned against early on the conspiring group will not get through to the Sudanese. No, we are warning from here, warning all the students people that they are false vehicles in neighborhoods yesterday in Besir, and Munsu. In disguise, as rapid secured forces threatening and attacking people. Harry council. Muhammad Hamdun Golo known as the so explain what they're saying about elections and what the civilian uprising is demanding right now. Well, they've said that they want to conduct actions with a nine months, and those nine months have started already from there, the out singles, but she'd so technically within seven months that would be twenty twenty that is going back to plan of holding elections at twenty twenty definitely the country is not ready for elections is not safe. The capital city is not safe. Little in the places that have been facing conflicts for years are not safe. It is, there's no freedom of expression. It is, there are no parties that are ready to, to offer the people programs that might be satisfying to the Sudanese people, the opposition s- calling for civil disobedience starting Sunday. There are signs of it already. However, because of e holidays, it is difficult to. Valuate the level of the civil disobedience, Sudanese professional association is an umbrella that holds union, such as doctors unions, lawyers unions, but we're also seeing people from outside the is professional association, who have said that they will join the civil disobedience. So, for example, there's a group called diplomats fourteen and they said they, they will also be part of the civil disobedience which means that even Florin embassies incident will not be functioning starting Sunday. Can you explain a marine for people who aren't clear what the relationship is between the Esa RSF and the military council? I mean who you were talking about earlier, many reports, suggest that he is? In fact, the most powerful person in Sudan, and the RSF has been accused of genocide in the Darfur war, the hours before it has become legitimized by the previous regieme by ommited machine was. Scold. Jinja. They are the same forces that have conducted, the genocide that Ford later on it became more powerful and numbers. And because of the legitimization by the government Vive of the now hold more weapons. They've had funding coming in funneled, through the government, but mainly from the EU to curb that the migration of immigrants because on a sort of a portal to North Africa. And from there, causing them into terrain into Europe, so they have been given that task of stopping the migrants at the borders. Sudan by any means and their main mean as killing these immigrants. And for people to understand what Sudan has been going through, and the corner, JR. That has been wreaked by Omara sheer explain where he is right now. The prison, he's in and what's happened in that person over the years. Well, according to the military council ommited as being held in Kobe present. It's an infamous prison that many political prisoners have been held in. However, there had been no confirmation of these reports there have we have not even seen images of since his ousting. We have not seen images of him being arrested when the ons thing occurred. So it's a very difficult to confirm his whereabouts. And before we conclude motoring, I wanted to ask you about all the different countries that are involved in the conflict in Sudan, Egypt Saudi Arabia, and the UAE have all been supporting the military in Sudan, helping to suppress the opposition, the protestors and just last month had met the met with Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman. So can you explain what interests do Egypt, the UAE an? Saudi Arabia have in supporting this military council. And what the protesters are saying about that for Egypt. It would be difficult if Sudan has peaceful transition to civilian government, that would be some somewhat of a trigger for, for the Egyptian people saying that, okay. This is possible, then maybe we can have different conclusion to our revolution. Instead of having a military government, which is what happened in Egypt for you e- and Saudi Arabia. They are interested in Sudan's unfortunate involvement in the war has been providing them with soldiers, many of whom child soldiers fighting on the ground actually a lot of Saudi, and dotty. People have said have raised their governments for using our people instead of theirs to fight on the ground so that they would save more of their people's lives. So if, if there's a transition to a civilian government this billion government, one of its first demand is to stop this outsourcing that, that is happening through Sudan of our people, especially the human rights violations of using child soldiers and to stop the conflicts within Sudan. And as we wrap up you've been back and forth to Sudan, you just came back. You were there just before they opened fire on the sittin. You were jailed in January, you were detained describe what it's like to be there and why you continue to go back and forth and hold out hope while in my most recent visit what I've seen was very different from from done. He and definitely from what is happening now. This was a place for people to get together. There was a place where a lot of the agregation UC around that make the socio economic the gender segregation that you see them. You did not see that at this young people can get together and speak about their hopes for the future of Sudan, people can organize unionized professionals can unionize and doing the days that I was there. There were a lot of eat preparations. It was a happy place where you have a lot of the homeless, children of Thome finding a family for themselves. People who are willing to get them new clothes for aid, and all of this has been and tragically by the raid, that has cost us many lives. And we don't even know the number of we want to thank you so much marine for being with us, marine on Neil Sudanese activists based in New York City when we come back, the Trump administration cracks down on US travel to Cuba. Stay with us. Think of the I keep inside. The ones who came. I think the people here on my journey. Help bring now. Yesterday by the Sudanese American musician sin Kane. This is democracy now. I mean me Goodman with Norman Shay we turn now to look at the Trump administration's crackdown on American travel to Cuba, off to the treasury department announced Tuesday that it's ending the people to people program, the most popular way from visit the country through organized group, trips in spite of the embargo private cruises to the island will also be banned on Wednesday, the cruise companies carnival corporation, Royal Caribbean. And Norwegian all announced they will no longer travel to Cuba. The new regulations affect nearly eight hundred thousand bookings in a statement Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin claimed the ban is in retaliation for Cuba, quote, providing a communist foothold in the region and propping up US adversaries and places like Venezuela, and Nicaragua, Cuba, supports the government of Venezuelan, President Nicolas Maduro, while the US has backed opposition leader. One boy, though, and Kohl's to overthrow the bundle government on Tuesday, national security adviser John Bolton tweeted, quote, the administration has advanced the president's Cuba policy by ending veiled tourism to Cuba. An imposing restrictions on vessels. Cuba has continued to prop up the illegitimate Madhu regime in Venezuela and will be held responsible for this ongoing manmade crisis. President Trump has made it clear that we stand with the Cuban and Venezuelan people as they fight for freedom. Bolton tweeted the move is just the latest attempt by the Trump administration to squeeze the Cuban economy in April, the administration moved to allow US nationals to sue any company that does business in Cuba using private property seized during the Cuban revolution. The president of Cuba Miguel Diaz. Canal responded to the news by saying, quote, Cuba, will not be frightened or distracted with new threats and restrictions work creativity. Efforts in resistance is our response. They haven't been able to suffocate us, they won't be able to stop us. He said many Cubans were also critical of the move. This is artisan on how Neo. Dahlie, Trump's policies wrong because it's just like, what are the United States presidents have done, and the reality is that it affects the Cuban population and not the government the Cuban people are affected by these arbitrary measures that not only affect us. But I imagine you're also here, Tate's Americans because it's limiting them from getting to know the culture in our country. For more on the impact of the Trump administration's policies we go to Charlottesville Virginia to speak with Cuban political science professor Arturo, Lopez Levy, he teaches at the office college in Minnesota. His cO, author of the book Raul Castro in the Cuban close up view of change. Welcome to democracy now. Professor, can you start off by talking about this latest crackdown on Cuba? What exactly it means for your country? These, these dome basically mean bombing Keisha on Terrell. Group three to kill that purpose. Is according to ministration to Stoep what they call bail today's. But in reality, what they are trying to is to stop. Contacts between the peoples of Cuba on the people of the United States impact, you think this will have a on people in Cuba. Not just the ban on travel, but the other policies put him traced by the Trump administration, including the sanctions, of course your I is a very negative impact all over the board. I will use the, the contacts in a moment when the countries are the critical juncture, the country's Gordon Lee is going through an important process of reform. Recently, the country, approve. Division of reform. There are better important issues such as transition to a mix economy with unimportant, a indirection between a state government property, the non-state sector that it's basically creating a new new country in the sense that a private people Kobe, these are having an impact in an economy that has been stalled because of the command structure, that used to have Sehgal, it's also a moment of great debate of ideas, because the Castro era is ending. Although the successor, the new generation in the house clean that it's basically about continuity together with these dignity. There is a lot of change in immortal evil way in a motel way the very. Issue is that Israeli using the in the hardcore is the, the other countries receiving, particularly these emerging private sector and an interview with NewsHour, April national security adviser, John Bolton was asked why he tweeted that the Monroe doctrine was quote alive, and well, this was his response, many US allies this region in this hemisphere. Those closest to us, welcome the US leadership here under President Trump to keep foreign powers from extending their influence, particularly in Venezuela, which is what I was referring to. When I said the Monroe doctrine is alive. And well, it's intended to throw a shield around the hemisphere, it's worked for a long time. And I think it's an important doctrine to keep in mind as we work for the objective that President Trump seeks here, which is the first completely free hemisphere in human history. We're not embarrassed by that. And in November. Vote and said Cuba was part of a troika of tyranny? Troika of tyranny in this hemisphere, Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua has finally met its match. This troika of tyranny, this triangle of terrorist stretching from Havana to Caracas, the Managua is the cause of immense human suffering, the impetus of enormous regional, instability, and the Genesis of sorted. Cradle of communism in the western hemisphere, national security advisor on Poulton are Turlough has Levy, if you can respond to what he has said as he talks about trying to stop communism having the first free hemisphere in the world. Can you respond to all of this and troika of tyranny that he is talking about putting together Cuba with Nicaragua and Venezuela? The these referees to Ramon, roll doctoring these reference to throw of tyranny, it's simply red meat to the crowd, that Woolsey Miami when he made those speeches. This is the use of American foreign policy for electoral purposes. Honda percent. Obviously they the moment doctoring Easter reference in history to a lot of buzz things that has been in the religion between the United States, and the hemisphere. And if these of history that doesn't exist anymore because the United States is not anymore. They only country or the country where we almost all rate of Latin American countries. Reentered China is the first three partner of Brazil of Peru or Chile. And in the case of Cuba, I think that there are sixty years, that has the most raided the in Q are taking in Havana note in Washington. Well earlier this year, the Wall Street Journal reported the US backed effort to oust Venezuelan, President Nicolas Maduro is just the first step in the Trump administration's plan to reshape Latin America with Cuba next on its radar. The report suggested the US would announce new measures against Cuba, including new sanctions, and would also restore Cuba's designation as a state sponsor of terrorism. According to the Wall Street Journal, the US then plans to target Nicaragua. In November, national security adviser John Bolton dubbed the three nations the troika of tyranny. In January, vice President Mike Pence said that President Trump is quote, not a fan of US interventions. Broad except for in this hemisphere. So Tudo could you respond to that? And what you see happening next. The reason to expect a reasonable behavior from the people that are running US policy towards loud, in America in these administration. This is an administration. That is guided by very particularly after the replacement of general McMaster by national security adviser, John Bolton. It is an administration. That is Betty guided by a very ideological view of the relationship with the real Joan ball is April the of Jesse Helms. He had been a those in that is fair to say that he has follow on the steps of his, mental a, he, he, he has a vision about left and right in that it's very, very much on the right, I would say to the right of Genghis Khan in the vision that he has about the political forces in Latin America. And obviously, they have tried to push Moshe suppose for a policies that are not clear to me that they are in line with in the natural law, or even with the purpose of the natural interest on the values of the United States. There is now these tape of Mr. Pompeo talking to so leaders of Jewish of any stations in which he in meet the those ideas about. Using the mobile social to put a the model out of the game were excessively of domestic. Our Torello has loving. We're on a thank you for being with us Cuban political science professor status. Adolf's college co author of the book Roel Castro in the new, Cuba, close up view of change. When we come back from break nearly one hundred animal rights activists are free today after being arrested for carrying out what they call a rescue mission at North Carolina duck farm. They say tortures animals will speak with leading animal rights activists press, Honey, and Wayne, Sean, he was just released from jail. They both faced years in prison for different actions. Stay with us. I think by Cuban these Celje crews and Johnny paycheck. Oh, this is democracy now. I mean, he Goodman with Nermin shake we end today's show in northern California where nearly one hundred animal rights activists are free today after being arrested for carrying out a rescue mission and protests at rice heart. Duck farm in Petaluma, which they accuse of animal, torture more than six hundred activists with direct action everywhere storm the slaughterhouse Monday, finding out in teams to chain themselves together at the entrance freeing dozens of ducks, and in some cases, locking themselves by the neck to the slaughter line. Several of the activists made it inside the slaughterhouse where they began trying to rescue dogs that were hanging upside down by their feet. Team. Baynes are pretty move out. Michael, stay in place to animal perceptible over to go. Splitting off right teams with me. More over. Inside the slaughterhouse, the activists began using you longs on their own necks locking themselves to the metal duck slaughtering production line. In shocking move an employee of the slaughterhouse then turned on the belt threatening the lives of the activists and nearly as fixating one man who was dragged by his neck and wedged against a metal pole, you can hear panicked. Organizers frantically working to unlock him in this next video a warning to our viewers this footage is disturbing. Your king? Member. The activists Thomas Chang was taken away by ambulance and treated for nerve damage, and severe pain. He since been released from the hospital. Police armed with riot gear arrested ninety eight activists who participated in the action despite numerous complaints thirties, have yet to investigate the Petaluma factory and slaughterhouse activists. However, have been repeatedly arrested with many face in multiple felony charges. And if convicted decades in prison Pulitzer prize winning journalist and co founder of the intercept Glenn Greenwald praise. Monday's action tweeting the real criminality is the stem, torture and slaughter of billions of animals in the coolest filthiest, most sadistic conditions. It breaks multiple laws, but the police protect the corporate criminals and instead arrests. Those saving lives screen tweeted well, for more, we're joined right now by two guests. Preah Sahana is one of the cofounders lead investigator of direct action everywhere known as DNC. She's speaking to us from Las Vegas, Wayne Shung is co founder and lead organizer for DNC. Former law professor, he was arrested during Monday's action was released late Wednesday. He's facing a total of seventeen felony charges jurisdictions around the country for his annual rescue actions. Pre also facing felony charges. We vote welcome you both to democracy now, Wayne and Preah. Thank you for joining us, Wayne, you just got out of jail. Can you explain exactly what this Petaluma farm, is what the Reicher duck farm, does why you went there. Why you targeted it and hope to accomplish. They rocker Doug farm is one of the largest factory farms in the state of California. They slaughter one million animals every year. And there have been repeated reports of animal cruelty from undercover whistle blowers, mourners, citizens, even from people walking down the street next to the farm because the smell emanating from this facility is so awful. But it's hard to breathe when you're standing outside, despite the fact that there have been so many complaints, including complaint supported by licensed Marion's, former prosecutor's criminal law. Professors indicating there's criminal violations happened at this farm, and other factory farms across the state of California. The government has failed to take any action at all. And what we've seen in the past years. Ordinary citizens have started taking action when the government has been asleep at the wheel lane pigeon explain, what are the criminal violations that are taking place. I mean what is legally? What is illegal that, these companies are doing is animal cruelty of this kind illegal. Give you a concrete example, one of the whistleblower accounts received showed a duck with a gaping hole in her side collapsed on the ground of the factor form, writhing in agony rolling back and forth. Unable to even stand this animal all likelihood starved to death over the course of weeks. And if you were I did this inter- on home if we had an individual puppy kitten, or doc, stabbed her in the side of her neck and left her to slowly bleed to death in her home for weeks. It would clearly be animal cruelty, there have been multiple whistleblower crowns accounts across the state showing systematic violence on a scale thousand or ten thousand times worse than what you're I might have done to individual duck that clearly would be a criminal violation. If your IDE in our own home, because he's powerful corporate interests that have deep ties the government donate millions of dollars the politicians across the nation, but especially in farm counties, there's no accountability or transparency whatsoever. Tell us the history of this right cart for. Facility and also what happened to Thomas Chang, what exactly one down in sa-duk facility. Rocard vicinity that was first investigative mercy for animals in twenty fourteen. There was an employee who was a whistle blower, and undercover investigator who found that babies were having their faces mutilated their birds who's next being ripped in, in broken kind of mercilessly and brutally and thrown in a garbage bin. Some of them probably still alive while they slowly rotted inside of a landfill or instead of a dumpster, and criminal cruelty investigation was demanded by activists. And at that point, the government did actually take some action. They brought some police officers out. They've been brought a veterinarian with them. But even the veterinarian herself who was on site. With police said the investigation they did was completely perfunctory. They didn't even actually walk into the barns. Didn't do a systematic investigation of the conditions inside the Barnes and cruelty charges broad back in twenty fourteen since that time, there have been multiple reports of additional cruelty happen at this facility, we've seen birds, collapse in the ground, we've seen birds with sickening diseases that if they were able to get out. And in fact, the human population on danger families in the area and families eat the meat from. The city. And yet, again, the government has not lead denied us an opportunity to investigate. Find out what's happening inside this farm. They've now come after the rights actors some exposing, but we seen is the response of the animal rights movement, is not to show away in dissipate, in the face of these charges, but more and more people are acting up and fighting back because we see this as a threat, not just the animals we love, but frankly, to our own communities, what are you all charged with almost one hundred? You're arrested. I mean, I'm still honestly shaken from the experience because we saw some of her friends nearly decapitated. We saw teenage girls, being assaulted by farmers, farmers threatening the lies of nonviolent activists. These are people are holding flowers in their hands grandmothers in some cases, small children, and yet, the police did not arrest or investigate anything those happening at the farm. Whether to the animals, or to the humans here were there to protest the facilities cruelty to animals, and one hundred active now face felony charges and could face years in prison for merely protesting and trying to do something to stop the system cruelty happening inside factory farms Chang. What exactly happened? Thomas was one of the activists who've decided to, to lock himself to the slaughterhouse line. Well, it might seem extreme act when you see just the systematic retaliate. When you see animals being ripped to pieces alive animals, languishing rotting on the grounds of factory farms, and slaughterhouses and you see the government doing nothing about it and corporations making millions off of this people are starting to use the tactics of their social movements. We've learned from Greenpeace from extinction rebellion the climate defense project, how we can use direct action to seize attention and make sure the government realizes. This is an issue. So Thomas did was he was one of a number of actors who actually locked his own body and neck to the slaughter to show solidarity with the animals, and frankly, the human beings that are being threatened by the industry. But the employees of the farm in response to this decided to turn on the suddenly want and nearly ripped his head off, when we reported this the authorities, they did nothing in response, and instead, charged and arrested one hundred activists well, anticipate an eighteen hundreds of people with the group direct action everywhere much to an industrial shed housing, chickens and peddle. California that's owned by sunrise farms, which supplies cage free eggs to Amazon and whole foods. What happened next unfolded on Facebook live narrated. I buy, you, Wayne Shung. This is an edited recap. Store your photo. What's happening inside. This farm are activists were in this as recently as a couple of days ago, and you see animals have huge source line. Hannibal's collapsed on the ground and feces rotting and this is standard practice and people don't realize is the farthest applies whole foods in Amazon Amazon is largest tone of the shipping in with two three hundred million households across the world. It is one click cruelty, and it's high for this one cruelty to stop and the only way to make it stop when you've gone to the government gonna lawn force, you've gone to the corporations and CEO's and called fish and time again. The only way to make this act. This violence stop is people take. Hey, in Julianne Perry, the north I'm here with direct action everywhere. We do. The country all we ever. Okay. This animal. Pants. Barnum doesn't he? Any person who impounds concentrating powder doing again? No disrespect to supply during such. Putting on biosecurity here activists behind them holding power. They're arguing but activists here today demanding to know what happened inside of warford warm. What happened? Chickens who are held in these new by grains organic. Of any, we do you want to be the stuff, you have a rut pictures. What? Activists say they removed thirty-seven chickens and took them to get veterinary care. Police arrested thirty nine people for trespassing. So Wayne, can you talk about what happened then in two thousand eighteen? Team there were two mass demonstrations outside of Boll tree facilities, including the largest organic suppliers of chickens and eggs to companies like Costco, whole foods and Amazon in these activists were working under legal authority called five ninety seventy. There's a good Samaritan statute in California that presto, reclaims been mostly plied, two dogs and cats gives you the right gender facility. We have evidence that animals are being denied food and water. Just give them some care in an activist set up a medical care tent. They had veterinarians inspect the footage. We had to show that the animals were in fact being denied access if water and attempted to give these animals aid peacefully, but in response, we had farmer workers in, in the thirties threatening to run us over of trucks. Hurling homophobic slurs at us. It got so bad than one case. A young woman was was was endangered and felt like her life was being threatened. We had multiple activists in fear of their lives at these demonstrations yet when the police were called the police instead arrested the. Activists instead of the folks were threatening to kill them. And this is coming from the discovery and the cases when these people when the farmers are talking the police. They're saying to the police directly, I'm going to kill these people yet instead of trying to do something about the violence against animals, and frankly, the violence against activists that's happening in these demonstrations, the police who receive in are working really in cahoots with the industry are doing nothing about that, instead, putting the activists in prison pre we are watching you at that action. You were also at the Monday that you weren't arrested. But you were there, confronting the thirties in two thousand eighteen as well. One of the co founders of direct action everywhere explain why these chickens mattered so much to you. You also then got arrested as that right? And face felony count years in prison. Yes, I'm facing facing up to a decade in prison and seven felony charges. I was one of the fifty eight activists who was arrested in September in the same county at the for documenting criminal animal cruelty at the largest organic, poultry producer in the nation and yet for for me and for so many Americans and, and frankly citizens of the world, people love animals, and we know this to be true because most people have dogs at home, and they'll do they'll they treat their dogs like children. And when we show people, what's happening to these chickens inside a farms to, to pig inside of farms, people are mortified. And the reason for this is because people don't want to see animals being hurt and growing up as a child in India saw a lot of stray dogs lot of stray animals, and I always knew that these animals are helpless, and we need to help them and do whatever we can't. So I've carried that into my work as. An investigator for DNC. Well pre can you explain? I mean you face felony charges. This might be surprising to some because it's not clear at all what loan they're saying that you've broken by participating in these protests. Yeah. And when I was arrested in September four for for being at this facility, I was actually just documenting what's happening. So I was behind the camera watch watching, and filming, my friends and just making sure that someone is present and, and showing the world, what's happening. So I was behind the camera. I don't know what I what I did wrong, and, you know, quite frankly, I don't know my friends had wrong because they were just helping animals and we were present with. Letter from legal professor, stating that we had the legal right to be there, because we know from whistle blower, footage that California law is being violated, and I know Wayne mentioned this, but despite a showing the officials and we showed show these letters to officials back in September. We also did the same on Monday were repeatedly refused any conversations about this. And, and what we see is that instead of helping activists and helping the animals. The police turn their backs on both the animals who need help both the activists who need help and continue to arrest people for documenting animal cruelty, and for helping animals in two thousand seventeen direct action everywhere went to Smithfield circle for farms, and Utah, one of the world's largest pig farms to expose conditions at the facility. Investigators report finding piglets feeding on their own mother's blood pregnant pigs held in station. Crates too small for them. To turn around and, and sick and feverish piglets left to die of starvation or be trampled. This is Wayne Cheung. It Smithfield circa forms. That was like one third of the piglets. That she's gonna faces covered but we gotta take drums. New. Fficials filed felony burglary and writing charges against Wayne showing and for other members of DC direct action everywhere accusing them of removing a pair of piglets named Lucy and Ethel the activists could face sixty years in prison. You go to jail. You go to trial for this in November, Wayne, we just have a minute to go. But if you can talk about the significance of Smithfield, who its own by and what you did with these piglets and why they mattered so much to you. Foods is the largest pork production company in the world and the single largest acquisition of US company in Chinese history. The Chinese government finds a deal to buy out the company and this is a company that is systematically abuse the rights of workers, they have caused environmental devastation communities of color in North Carolina, and Utah. They've been caught up in human trafficking scandals and Utah. And obviously, they're engaged in brutal abuse of millions of animals every year and what has happened over the past ten years as more and more exposure has occurred of the industry. More and more citizens and consumers are upset and furious about the violence against animals and human beings are singing factory farms corporations are being forced to change, but too often, what happens instead of real change. Is they put up the appearance of change. So if you'll change it's mono to good food, responsibly raised, they claim they stop using station, crates, and twenty seventeen. We went into their single largest facility circle for farms in Utah, and found the there were continuing to use station. Crates spite the fact that they'd told the pop they'd stopped using that. But instead of trying to dress corporate fraud the system out of cruelty at the farm, the Utah government about prosecutions against six actives including retired woman named Diane Gandhi Sorby, who was no criminal record spends, most of life. And most of her time taking care of. Nj animal sanctuaries and shelters. And we're seeing this happening across the country right now, we're going to do part two of this discussion to find out more about these actions with Wayne Shung and Preah. Honey? Cofounders of direct action everywhere. Go to democracy now dot or for details. Democracy now produced by my birthday and it goes. Livy rainy, Carla wills with Nermin say.

President Donald Trump United States government Cuba Trump administration president California Sudan Wayne professor Amy Goodman Trump military council transitional military council Khartoum vice president Thomas Chang Saudi Arabia John Bolton