20 Burst results for "Scott Siegel"

Biden's Climate Change Plans Could Face Serious Challenges In A Divided Congress

Environment: NPR

03:56 min | 2 months ago

Biden's Climate Change Plans Could Face Serious Challenges In A Divided Congress

"Climate change is one of the top four crises president elect biden. Says he'll tackle. I but his ambitious plans could meet serious challenges if he faces a divided. Congress make an rod is part of npr's climate team and joins us now. Hi nathan nary biden's climate plans. Were the most aggressive ever put forth by a major party candidate. How much do they depend on. Congressional support Quite a bit to accomplish everything that he's pledging to do. Because yeah i mean as you said. He set some very ambitious goals though we should say they are goals that targets. That are very much in line. With what the scientific community has been saying for years that we need to do which is cut greenhouse gas emissions fast to avoid worst case climate scenarios. And that's what biden's plan would do. He wants to cut all carbon emissions from the electric sector by two thousand thirty five. He wants to make america. Carbon neutral p- not adding any greenhouse gas emissions to the planet by twenty fifty. And to do that would require massive changes and not just our electrical sector but industry transportation massive investments in new technology. And obviously. that's a lot easier to do financially politically lawsuit wise. If it's done with congressional support with congressional support you said so what happens if democrats control the house and republicans control the senate as looks likely. How much of this can you still get done. That's a good question. I think there are you know. Obviously there are parts of the republican party current present included who do not see climate. Change is as much of an issue but that is not universally true and You know remember. There's also this big and growing movement of businesses utilities cities states that are taking their own aggressive actions to reduce emissions themselves. So i've heard some environmental groups and also some more conservative folks. In recent days you know suggest that biden reach out and try to engage. Republicans on this issue scott siegel for example as a partner at the lobbying in law firm bracewell which represents some fossil fuel companies and. He says there is an appetite on both sides for technological advancement so better batteries. Hydrogen fuel carbon storage and. He thinks that's an opportunity. A lot of where we've seen. Bipartisan legislation in congress has married and innovation agenda to expansion frankly of regulatory authority so there might be the makings of a deal there and i think that A biden administration be well placed to try and pull that deal off and by that means you know. Biden has a history of working across the aisle and being in congress so that should help. So what if mitch mcconnell says not going to happen. What could biden accomplish with executive actions. He can still do quite a bit you know. He could roll back rollbacks. At the trump administration undertook on you know everything from methane emissions to clean water rules. He could use existing laws like the clean air act to direct agencies to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. That's what the obama administration did before you know maybe one of the easiest goals that he set for himself to accomplish just to make the us a big part of the global conversation about climate. Change again He can do that by rejoining the paris climate agreement which he says he's going to do and just by being a part of international talks. What are you going to be looking for between now january twentieth when he's inaugurated know i think it's gonna be really telling to see who he nominates to some of these key agencies that deal with environment and climate issues. He's being urged by more progressive parts of his party to not give leadership roles to people who have ties to fossil fuel companies That is something that no modern administration has done before. It's something that biden has not committed to But if he does go route or he nominates folks were viewed as more progressive to lead the epa or interior department That could be a signal of how ambitious you might try to be on climate action you know but also if republicans maintain a senate majority and they fight those nominations to nail. That could be telling of how much resistance. He's going to run into on his broader climate agenda as well. That's npr's nathan. Thanks nate thank

Biden Nathan Nary Biden Congress Scott Siegel Trump Administration Bracewell Republican Party Obama Administration Senate Mitch Mcconnell America House Paris Interior Department EPA NPR Nathan Nate
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 3 months ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Jeff Brady Jeff Brady Npr Amy Myers Jaffe Natural Resources Defense Coun Nrdc Action Fund Jenny Marino Zimmer United States President Trump Scott Siegel Congress Steph Feldman Bracewell
"scott siegel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:07 min | 3 months ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on KCRW

"Steve Inskeep. I'm Noelle King and I'm Rachel Martin this year. Climate change is a top campaign issue, at least for Democrats. Yesterday, We looked at President Trump's record on the issue. Today, we'll explore Joe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan Rot and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys. Good morning. Hey, so let's just state the obvious here. Joe Biden and Donald Trump. Do not exactly agree on climate change. Absolutely. Yeah, I think that's a fair way to put it. President Trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally, he depicts regulations to address climate change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs. Joe Biden Call's climate change in existential threat to our health, our economy or national security, the whole thing. But he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity, you know when Donald Trump thinks about climate change. He thinks hoax. I think about, I think jobs Good pain unions object put Americans to work. Building a stronger more Climate, resilient nation. I mean, Nate, that sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen? Yes, And it is a lot hey, would invest money for one. You know, Climate change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic, But he's also says he'll do executive actions right out the gate. Hey, says he's going to reenter the Paris climate agreement and put us back in the global climate conversation. He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity, stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic, reducing emissions like methane from existing oil and gas. Tell me when you want to stop, but he's also putting money towards climate adaptation. It measures to make communities more resilient to sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires, You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months, and he's also promising massive investment in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the you know the job's part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more solar, more wind, high speed rail electric car chargers. All with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by 2035 making the country carbon neutral, so it's not contributing any more to climate change by 2050. And I mean, I know a lot of campaigns. I mean, the rhetoric is aspirational, right? But even so, I mean by 2050 shifting the entire U. S economy to be carbon neutral, just sounds like a massive undertaking. Is he really going to be able to accomplish that, Jeff? You know, most of the experts I've talked with think it is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says he would take right away some of them nature's mentioned it. Also, this planet requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now that's going to require a Democratic majority in the Senate, most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients, including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot of steak hair. He thinks Biden's climate plan is realistic, He says it includes both regulations and incentives for people in industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. And I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of sort of maturity. In approaching these issues. Siegel likes that It leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 goal. Some of those companies and utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. And that's an important point. You know, I talked to Carl Afresh who worked at the U. S Department of Energy under three administrations, including Trump's. She's now with Rocky Mountain Institute. You know, And I asked her if she thinks that this could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected, no, so to get where we need to go on climate in the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy, it takes action by the executive branch action by Congress. And action by state leaders, city leaders business leaders on the ground and, she says, you know, a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level, so a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear President Trump attacked Abi. Not a lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up, Jeff. Does Joe Biden want a ban Fracking? No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land. And when Trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land, But that's still a point of contention for for Biden, with many climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So what about the politics of climate change? You know, I mean, we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change? Because we know for Republicans. It's an incredibly divisive issue. Where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well. Polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country. And when you look at Republicans, climate change is actually a lot less divisive. The younger you get But in terms of Democrats, a recent poll by Pew found that more than two thirds of Joe Biden supporters say climate change is very important to them. So Biden's plan is not as ambitious as what some progressive Democrats want to see. It is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says, but it is more ambitious and what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So, for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component, which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution and climate change and have been for a long time..

Joe Biden President Trump president Jeff Brady executive Steve Inskeep United States Congress NPR Scott Siegel Trump Noelle King Rachel Martin Nathan Rot Arctic Paris Senate Rocky Mountain Institute
"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's 7 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. I'm Noelle King and I'm Rachel Martin this year. Climate change is a top campaign issue, at least for Democrats. Yesterday, We looked at President Trump's record on the issue. Today, we'll explore Joe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan rots and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys. Good morning. Hey, so let's just state the obvious here. Joe Biden and Donald Trump. Do not exactly agree on climate change. Absolutely. Yeah, I think that's a fair way to put it. President Trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally, he depicts regulations to address climate change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs. Joe Biden Call's climate change in existential threat to our health, our economy or national security, the whole thing. But he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity. You know, Donald Trump thinks about climate change. He thinks hoax I think about, I think jobs Good pain unions, ABS put Americans to work. Building a stronger more Climate, resilient nation. I mean, Nate, that sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen? Yes, And it is a lot hey, would invest money for one. You know, Climate change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic, But he's also says he'll do executive actions right out the gate. Hey, says he's going to reenter the Paris climate agreement and put us back in the global climate conversation. He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity, stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic, reducing emissions like methane from existing oil and gas. Tell me when you want to stop, but he's also putting money towards climate adaptation. Measures to make communities more resilient toe sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires, You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months, and he's also promising massive investment in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the No, the job's part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more soldier. More wind, high speed rail electric car chargers, all with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by 2035, making the country carbon neutral, so it's not contributing any more to climate change by 2050. And I mean, I know a lot of campaigns. I mean, the rhetoric is aspirational, right? But even so, I mean by 2050 shifting the entire U. S economy to be carbon neutral. Just sounds like a massive undertaking. Is he really going to be able to accomplish that, Jeff? You know, most of the experts I've talked with think it is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says he would take right away some of them nature's mentioned it. Also, this planet requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now that's going to require a Democratic majority in the Senate. Most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients, including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot of steak hair. He thinks Biden's climate plan is realistic, He says It includes both regulations and incentives for people in industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. And I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of sort of maturity. In approaching these issues Siegel likes that leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 goal. Some of those companies and utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. And that's an important point. You know, I talked to Carl Afresh who worked at the U. S Department of Energy under three administrations, including Trump's. She's now with Rocky Mountain Institute. When I asked her if she thinks that this could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected, no, so to get where we need to go on climate and the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy. It takes action by the executive branch action by Congress and action by state leaders. City leaders business leaders on the ground. And she says, you know, a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level. So a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear President Trump attacked Joe by non A lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up, Jeff Does Joe Biden want a ban Fracking? No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land. And when Trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy, producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land. But there's still a point of contention for Biden with many climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So what about the politics of climate change? You know, I mean, we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change? Because we know for Republicans. It's an incredibly divisive issue. Where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well. Polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country. And when you look at Republicans, climate change is actually a lot less divisive. The younger you get But in terms of Democrats, a recent poll by Pew found that more than two thirds of Joe Biden supporters say climate change is very important to them. So Biden's plan is not as ambitious as what some progressive Democrats want to see. It is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says, but it is more ambitious in what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So, for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component, which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution and climate change and have been for a long time..

Joe Biden President Trump president Jeff Brady executive NPR News Steve Inskeep United States NPR Congress Trump Noelle King Rachel Martin Nathan rots Senate Scott Siegel Arctic Paris
"scott siegel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:49 min | 3 months ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on KCRW

"His plan says he do that by investing and disadvantaged communities holding polluters accountable. I talked to Michelle Roberts with the Environmental Justice Health Alliance about this, and she has a long history with Biden because she's actually from Delaware, his home state. And she says Historically, Biden wasn't always Overly supportive when it came to dealing with polluters like DuPont over communities like hers. Hey, was a filibuster for the political economy that was running the great state of Delaware. Does that make sense? But Robert says she's met with Biden since and she thinks his views have evolved. She supports him, but it's going to be important, she says. If he's elected to hold him accountable for all the things that he's promising to do now. NPR's

Joe Biden President Trump president Jeff Brady executive NPR News Steve Inskeep United States NPR Congress Scott Siegel Trump Noelle King Rachel Martin Nathan Rot Arctic Paris Senate
"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:17 min | 3 months ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The time is 5 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. I'm Noelle King and I'm Rachel Martin this year. Climate change is a top campaign issue, at least for Democrats. Yesterday, We looked at President Trump's record on the issue. Today, we'll explore Joe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan Rot and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys. Good morning. Hey, so let's just state the obvious here. Joe Biden and Donald Trump. Do not exactly agree on climate change. Absolutely. Yeah, I think that's a fair way to put it. President Trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally, he depicts regulations to address climate change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs. Joe Biden Call's climate change in existential threat to our health, our economy or national security, the whole thing, but he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity, you know when Donald Trump thinks about climate change. He thinks hoax when I think about, I think jobs Good pain unions. ABS put Americans to work building a stronger more. Climate, Resilient nation. I mean, mate. That sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen? Yes, And it is a lot hey, would invest money for one. You know, Climate change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic, But he's also says he'll do executive actions right out the gate. Hey, says he's going to reenter the Paris climate agreement and put us back in the global climate conversation. He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity, stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic, reducing emissions like methane from existing oil and gas. Tell me when you want to stop, but he's also putting money towards climate adaptation. Measures to make communities more resilient to sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires, You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months, and he's also promising massive investment in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the you know the job's part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more solar, more wind, high speed rail electric car chargers. All with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by 2035 making the country carbon neutral, so it's not contributing any more to climate change by 2050. And I mean, I know a lot of campaigns. I mean, the rhetoric is aspirational, right? But even so, I mean by 2050 shifting the entire U. S economy to be carbon neutral, just sounds like a massive undertaking. Is he really going to be able to accomplish that, Jeff? You know, most of the experts I've talked with think it is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says he would take right away some of them nature's mentioned it. Also, this planet requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now that's going to require a Democratic majority in the Senate, most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients, including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot at stake. Care. He thinks Biden's climate plan is realistic, he says it includes both regulations and incentives for people in industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. And I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of sort of maturity. In approaching these issues. Siegel likes that It leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 goal. Some of those companies and utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. And that's an important point. You know, I talked to Carl Afresh who worked at the U. S Department of Energy under three administrations, including Trump's. She's now with Rocky Mountain Institute. When I asked her if she thinks that this could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected, no, so to get where we need to go on climate in the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy, it takes action by the executive branch action by Congress. And action by state leaders, city leaders business leaders on the ground and, she says, you know, a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level, so a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear President Trump attacked Abi. Not a lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up, Jeff. Does Joe Biden want a ban Fracking? No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land. And when Trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land. But there's still a point of contention for Biden with many climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So what about the politics of climate change? You know, I mean, we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change? Because we know for Republicans. It's an incredibly divisive issue. Where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well. Polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country. And when you look at Republicans, climate change is actually a lot less divisive. The younger you get But in terms of Democrats, a recent poll by Pew found that more than two thirds of Joe Biden supporters say climate change is very important to them. So Biden's plan is not as ambitious as what some progressive Democrats want to see. It is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says. But it is more ambitious and what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So, for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component, which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution of climate change and have been for a long time. His plan says he do that by investing and disadvantaged communities holding polluters accountable. I talked to Michelle Roberts with the Environmental Justice Health Alliance about this, and she has a long history with Biden because she's actually from Delaware, his home state. And, she says. Historically, Biden wasn't always overly supportive. When it came to dealing with polluters like DuPont over communities like hers. Hey was a filibuster for the political economy that was running the great state of Delaware. Does that make sense. But Robert says she's met with Biden sense and she thinks his views have evolved. She supports him, but it's going to be important, she says. If he's elected to hold him accountable for all the things that he's promising to do now, NPR's Nate rot and NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks. You both for your reporting. Thank you. Thank you. This is NPR news VD news with Raquel Maria Dylan in a minute after jail. McConnell with some traffic.

Joe Biden President Trump Jeff Brady president NPR NPR News executive Steve Inskeep Nathan Rot Congress United States Delaware Scott Siegel Noelle King Trump Rachel Martin Resilient nation Senate
Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue  At Least For Democrats

Environment: NPR

06:54 min | 3 months ago

Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue At Least For Democrats

"This year climate change is a top campaign issue at least for Democrats. Yesterday, we looked at president trump's record. On the issue today, we'll explore toe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal. Any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan rods and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys good morning. So. Let's just the obviously our Joe Biden and Donald Trump do not exactly agree on climate? Change. Absolutely yeah I think that's a fair way to put it. President trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally he depicts regulations to address climate. Change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs Joe Biden calls climate change existential threat to our health, our economy, our national security, the whole thing but he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity you know when? Donald. Trump thinks about climate change he thinks hoax. When I think about I think jobs. Good paying union opposite put. To work. Building a stronger more. Climate resilient nation I mean nate. That sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen. Yes, and it is a lot Hewitt invest money for one climate. Change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic. But he's also says he'll do executive actions right? Other Gate. He says he's GONNA re enter the Paris climate agreement and put the US back in the global climate conversation He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic. Methane from existing oil and gas tell me when you want me to stop. But he's also putting money towards climate adaptation measures to make communities more resilient to sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires. You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months and he's also promising massive investments in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the. Jobs part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more solar more wind high speed rail, electric car chargers all with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by twenty, thirty five and making the country carbon neutral. So it's contributing anymore to climate change by twenty fifty. And I mean I know a lot of campaigns I mean the rhetoric is aspirational, right but even so I mean by twenty fifty shifting the entire US economy to be carbon neutral to sounds like a massive undertaking is he going to be able to accomplish that Jeff? You know most of the experts I've talked with thinking is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says, he would take right away some of the nature mentioned. It also this plan requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now, that's going to require a democratic majority in the Senate most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot at stake care. He thinks guidance climate plan is realistic. He says, it includes both regulations and incentives for people. In Industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of maturity in approaching these issues. Siegel likes that it leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture, and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 call some of those companies in utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. Yeah, and that's an important point. I talked to Karl Frisch who worked at the US Department of Energy under three administrations including trump's she's now at the Rocky Mountain Institute you know and I asked her if she thinks it could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected. No. So to get where we need to go on climate in the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy, it takes action by the executive branch action by Congress. And action by state leaders, city leaders, business leaders on the ground, and she says, you know a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level. So a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear president trump attack Joe Biden on a lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up Jeff Does Joe Biden WanNa. Ban fracking. No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land and when trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land but that's still a point of contention for for Biden, with mini climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So. What about the politics of climate change you know I mean we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change because we know for Republicans it's an incredibly divisive issue where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well, polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country, and when you look at Republicans climate change is actually a lot less divisive you get. But in terms of Democrats a recent poll by Pew found that more than two-thirds of Joe Biden supporters sit climate change is very important to them. So Biden's. Plan is not as ambitious as what some Progressive Democrats want to see it is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says, but it is more ambitious than what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution climate change and have been for a long time. His plan says he'd do that by investing in disadvantaged communities pulling polluters accountable I talked to Michelle Roberts with the Environmental Justice Health Alliance about this, and she has a long history with Biden because she's actually from Delaware, his home state and she says historically. Always overly supportive when it came to dealing with polluters like dupont over communities like hers he was a Filibuster for the political economy that was running the great state of Delaware. Does that make sense BA- Roberts says she's met with Biden since and she thinks his views have a she supports him but it's going to be important. She says if he's elected to hold them accountable all the things that he's promising to do now. NPR's nate wrought and NPR's Jeff. Brady, thank you for your reporting. Thank you. Thank

Joe Biden Donald Trump Jeff Brady President Trump United States Executive NPR Congress Scott Siegel Michelle Roberts Us Department Of Energy Nate Dupont Delaware Senate Nathan Hewitt
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin students across the country are skipping school today to support efforts to combat climate change. It's being called a youth climate strike an extension of similar strikes around the world calling for more action to address global warming. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady in Denver twelve year old haven. Coleman says her environmental activism began with a campaign to help manatees. I ended up saving one manatee. His name is Jesus. He's adorable. But so I've always been passionate about fixing something when I see it's something's wrong on climate change. Coleman says she was inspired by Greta Thunberg in Sweden. She skipped school to protest outside parliament last summer. Coleman searched for other young activists interested in a similar school strike in the US and found her first colleague in Minnesota. I was like ok Tedi we estate lead over Instagram. And then she said, yeah. Sure. And I was like cool, and then we've became code. Victors the campaign has grown now. Climate strikes are scheduled in all but a few states today. Among organizers demands, they want congress to pass the green new deal, which would speed the country's transition to carbon-free energy and remake the economy to spread wealth more evenly. Coleman says the campaign received some help from adults but much of the preparation was done by young volunteers across the country over this more yellow this group met last weekend in Philadelphia row house paint a long cloth banner that reads, it's our future where they are built for the strikes. So making banners posters and signs. Sixteen year old Sabira MC mood leads a team of about twenty people organizing the Philadelphia youth climate strike, she has a personal motivation. Her family is from Bangladesh where flooding is a big problem. So the thing is that like sea levels are rising among issues one on the country is that climate change is really happening across the room. At the kitchen table. And yes, Sean is writing a letter to her congresswoman Shung is a sixteen year old sophomore at a high school in the suburbs and has worked on logistics for the strike. I had to go down into the city to file the permits and figure out all the sound technology. We need on figuring out how to get microphones and all the. And dealing with adults is a little scary. Some adults are critical of the youth climate strike both its goals and methods. I do not like the symbolism of sacrificing education to make political points. Scott Siegel is a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents energy companies. He welcomes these newcomers to the public policy arena, but just like some moderate Democrats says the green new deal is not realistic. And Siegel says energy companies are doing a lot already industry believed that policy to address global climate change is a twenty four hour a day three and sixty five days a year job that they're already engaged in their moving in that direction. But haven Coleman says they're not moving fast enough. She says striking school is extreme. And it's done with a goal in mind to get the attention because you're not really listening to us now. So this is the radical stuff that we need. Need to do to get your attention. And if the strike doesn't accomplish that Coleman says another is planned in may Jeff Brady NPR news, Philadelphia. Some voters Idaho say their voices are being silenced. That state is one of. But a dozen where lawmakers are trying to make it harder for citizens to put issues they care about on the ballot. Whether it be Medicaid expansion marijuana taxes. You name it Idaho. Lawmakers say they just need to rein in all the ballot initiatives, Boise. State public radio's James Dawson reports voters pass Medicaid expansion in Idaho last year by a whopping sixty one percent, I am an Idaho native third-generation. And I've always believed that if you don't like the way something is that you should do something about it. That's Carol ritual. She volunteered with thousands of others for reclaim Idaho. The group that put the Medicaid expansion initiative on the ballot. But now supporters of that push say, they're feeling a backlash from state Senator Scott grow..

Coleman Idaho Jeff Brady Shung Greta Thunberg Philadelphia David green NPR Rachel Martin Scott Siegel Philadelphia row house congress Boise Tedi Senator Scott Denver
"scott siegel" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Tonight Marian. Thank you. Thanks for calling New Jersey one zero one point five, you see you just gotta know who would have times a hostess Galina thing all dialed in managing my shock when I felt we have Cellino wicked this, you know. So looking at some of these God, let's see lane Staley Arthur killer Kane of the New York dolls totally stories. Go rule some of the the research. In addition to obviously what I said about Stevie nicks. I mean prince hit me definitely I mean, I think. Yeah. I just the again, the body of work and just the talent level is just off the charts with him. He was a lonely guy. Yeah. And and that's what I was. I was discussing it earlier in the newsroom with somebody. Just I feel like he was home host bored with it all at the end like he just kinda had his own little paradise in paisley park and just kinda had done. It. All I'd I'd silent. I don't know where his head was at the end. But was he working on new material? It seemed like he always was and I've read some I read so many stories right after he passed and he was just flying musicians and do a whole weekend. Jeff Lynne from Jeff Lynne as his whole house. He has his his whole is massive sales system. And he just walks around his house with Qatar and each room is Mike differently and he could play all day long. And that's what he does. In fact, there was a documentary. You gotta see the rocky memory on Jeff Lynne. Everybody's in the Beatles. Clapton's in it. I mean everybody's ever work with his ended the berries Dylan Gina he's enough jefflin's another one he gets lost in the shuffle. Sometimes I think, you know, the mainstream guys, but I mean again body he's not a tragic figure. No. But I'll save just body of work. I mean, he's just so amazing. Just the volume of stuff he's put out just so talented. He got imagine imagine getting the call from the Beatles. I'd like you to produce. Sure. Really, no problem. But the thing with prince is I think like you said he was just like he was above it all from that so much like he was above it, all I just came so natural. Did you see that clip of the Saturday Night Live cast party where all messing around and he just walks up? The the the George Harrison induction to the hall of fame where he just comes in while Mike, gently means, and I mean, just shreds it just throws gone. And then I post the one about the Super Bowl were the downpour just. Oh, yeah. Can you make it can you make it rain harder? I mean, they're all panicked. And he's just like just bats in it. I got a friend that I I work with Scott Siegel bomb used to be our promotions director YSP came from Minnesota. Okay. He he, you know, he hung out in the Minnesota clubs the way we hung out in the park clubs and all that. And just like, you know, every now, and then you may run into Bruce Springsteen down the shore somewhere plug it into a club. It was the same way with prince, and it would be the same thing. You know? Okay. He's here. Lock the doors and strap in you were in for one hell of a night and the other great thing with the Super Bowl was that the foo fighters had covered one of his songs, and he was kind of messing with them. And all of a sudden went into best of you playing a Super Bowl watched our into best of year. He just he he had that he was at that level. He could do whatever he wanted. You know who else is like Bono. Do you ever see bottle live stick around? We got something. We we got something else says there's.

Jeff Lynne Mike Beatles Stevie nicks New Jersey Staley Arthur New York Marian Galina paisley park Cellino Bruce Springsteen Clapton George Harrison Minnesota Qatar Dylan Gina Scott Siegel promotions director
"scott siegel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And for comparison, the deep tunnel holds five hundred and twenty one million at the end of August overflows from the storms were estimated at over two hundred ninety five million gallons, the family attorney for a team that was pulled over and detained in Wildwood tosa last weekend says the boy civil rights were violated. Joy Bertrand says her client has the right to be free from unreasonable stop and seizure. Police say it was a case of mistaken identity after a man stopped them and said to white ladies were being robbed by a black male in their car, the officer stopped the car in place. The teen in handcuffs ultimately letting him go after finding out. He was the grandson of the driver tows the police release. A statement saying the officer acted professionally during the entire interaction. A famous beetle is showing off his artsy side into whitefish bay gallery. I say Ringo Starr, and you most likely see details, but how about Ringo artwork on display right now at gallery five oh, five Scott Siegel bomb with the Ringo Starr, Artur unbelievable exhibit. This is only one of two galleries nationwide. That is hosting this show. And what you'll see show is has approximately forty pieces of artwork created by Ringo. Starr and signed by Ringo Starr display runs through Saturday. Melissa barklay WTMJ news and the fifth and final streetcar rolling into Milwaukee later today, it's traveling from its manufacturing plants in Pennsylvania closures are expected downtown when it arrives around ten AM at the streetcar facility on Saint Paul avenue. The hop is expected to launch sometime this fall..

Ringo Starr officer Wildwood tosa Joy Bertrand whitefish bay gallery Melissa barklay attorney Milwaukee Scott Siegel Pennsylvania Artur two hundred ninety five millio
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bureaucracy very difficult making customs procedures very difficult for us good more on the fallout from what is now officially afraid war coming up also what do oklahomans think about scott pruitt's resignation who had heads home after leaving the va but he may be welcome genesis senior state and this summer everyone is asking have you seen ninette we're asking to after news headlines live from npr news in washington i'm jack speer a new leader is taking over the environmental protection agency npr's rebecca hersher reports andrew wheeler has more washington experience than his old boss outgoing administrator scott pruitt had never worked in the federal government before he took over the agency his interim replacement couldn't be more different andrew wheeler has worked at the epa and for the senate committee that oversees the agency scott siegel is an environmental lawyer in washington dc who's known wheeler for many years and expects him to be an effective leader for the epa to be frank with you i don't think we'll see the kinds of personal issues that bedeviled the last administrator but environmental groups are concerned with wheeler's track record we alert has lobbied on behalf of major coal and mining companies and at his confirmation hearing he said he doesn't accept established climate science rebecca hersher npr news democrats say they are seeking a way to stall or durrell president donald trump's pick for the us supreme court which is expected to be announced next week though they'll also need to decide how to satisfy those seeking an all out fight while protecting those senators facing tight reelection races in deeply red states current strategy will apparently centered around for trying democrats as defenders of abortion rights and the two thousand ten health care law which republicans have been seeking to weaken millions of dollars are also focusing on a pair of pivotal republicans who've publicly stated they don't wanna see supreme court nominee committed to doing away with landmark ruling legalizing abortion a global chemical weapons watchdog group is out with a new report on an alleged chemical weapons attack in syria npr's ruth sherlock reports the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons now concludes chlorine was used in the attack but there was no evidence of a nerve agent on the seventh of april syrian activists posted videos from inside the besieged rebelheld suburb of dima sharing panicked men women and children's struggling for breath there were unconfirmed reports of dozens of people killed the state department said reports of the attack suggested a nerve agent was used in response to the damer attack the us struck syrian government targets it said were connected to the regime's chemical weapons program and its interim report on the attack however the w now says it's found no traces of a nerve agent it did though find evidence of chlorine gas a far less deadly chemical agent that has been weaponized frequently in the syrian civil war with sherlock npr news visions trade gap the difference between what you ask companies send abroad and foreign firms shipped us shores follow its lowest level in nineteen months in may commerce department says the may trade deficit dropped six point six percent to forty three point one billion that's lowest level since two thousand sixteen stocks gained ground today the dow is up ninety nine points to end the week at twenty four thousand four fifty six the s and p five hundred rose twenty three points the nasdaq was up one hundred one points this is npr you're listening to wnyc i'm jamie floyd former new york state senate leader dean scelo is testifying in his own defense on federal corruption charges skeleton his son were found guilty of bribery extortion and conspiracy back in two thousand fifteen convictions that were later overturned on appeal and in which the long island republican is being retried at federal court today newsday reporter james team madore says the former senate majority leader categorically denied that he used his political connections to seek work for his son adam door says the former politicians testimony was level and comb except as skill skelly described difficulties his son faced as a young man including learning disabilities and a drinking problem at several moments he did appear to be fighting back emotion when he was talking about his son's problems or issues or challenges is he called them scelo says testimony resumes monday the shooting of a police officer in bed stuy this morning was the first shooting of an officer this year w sees zoe was on the.

nineteen months six percent
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dot org from npr news this is all things considered i'm mary louise kelley and i melted chang the environmental protection agency gets a new leader next week andrew wheeler will take over as acting administrator of course this is because scott pruitt resigned yesterday amid many allegations of ethical violations we'll get a chance to chat about that in a moment but first let's take a look at wheeler as npr's rebecca hersher reports he brings far more experience to the job than his predecessor when andrew wheeler was fresh out of law school he got a job at the epa a special assistant in the agency's toxics office he helped write rules about how much information chemical companies disclose to the public and after a few years wheeler dead what many young environmental lawyer hoped to do he landed a job in congress working for the senate committee that oversees the why i've known andy longtime scott siegel is a partner at the law firm bracewell llp he is not an accidental administrator he is somebody who has been preparing for a position of responsibility like this really for all of his life he is a student of environmental policy over the years wheeler has helped draft regulations on tons of major environmental issues toxic waste air and water pollution climate change and in many cases he's worked to decrease the power of the federal government to regulate industry blocking or weakening rules about chemical factories refineries in manufacturers at his senate confirmation hearing senator ed markey of massachusetts asked wheeler what he thinks about climate science do you believe human activity is driving the temperature increases on the planet i believe that man has an impact on the climate but i must not completely understood is what the impact is the overwhelming scientific consensus is that human greenhouse gas emissions are driving global climate change wheelers position casting doubt on the science as he deregulates industry mirrors the broader position of the trump administration siegel thinks wheelers experience in washington sets him up better than his predecessor to advance the trump agenda to be frank with you i don't think we'll see the kinds of personal issues that bedeviled the last administrator he is a consensus builder even some democrats are cautiously hopeful the ranking democrat on the senate environment and public works committee tom carper told npr's morning edition it's possible wheeler will turn a page and surprise people in his running of the agency but environmental groups are sounding the alarm one of their main concerns after wheeler left the senate he lobbied for years for one of the largest coal companies in the country bob deans is a spokesperson for the natural resources defense council going from a train wreck to a house on fire doesn't give us comfort the fact is we have an andrew wheeler a former coal lobbyists spearheading the worst white house assault in history on our environment and public health wheeler is expected to stick with the epa agenda of rolling back multiple obama era climate and pollution rules but dean says some of those attempts have been held up in the courts because the epa hasn't backed up its new positions with sufficient science these safeguards were developed in most cases over years and with normal amount of input from the public from every stakeholder imaginable and if they're going to try to take down those safeguards the law requires that they demonstrate they have a better idea which is where andrew wheelers regulatory experience may come in handy if the epa is to succeed with its current agenda the devil will be in the policy details rebecca hersher npr news all right let's turn the conversation back now to scott pruitt and his relatively short but colorful federal career dominated by ethics scandals including his dc condo lease when you look at the facts of what i leased one i paid for it is absolutely one hundred percent ethical and it was signed off in his legal scott pruitt is doing a great job within the walls of the so you were not involved in that i was not involved in the approval the forty three thousand dollars in if i'd known about a congressman i would have refused it scott pruitt getting the last word there on the matter of the forty three thousand dollars secure phone booth installed in his office we also heard president trump they're defending pruitt which he did consistently up till yesterday here in the studio to talk about pruitt's resignation and other political news of the week we have got david brooks of the.

mary louise kelley npr forty three thousand dollars one hundred percent
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of ideas dot org from npr news this is all things considered i'm mary louise kelley and i melt chang the environmental protection agency gets a new leader next week andrew wheeler will take over as acting administrator of course this is because scott pruitt resigned yesterday amid many allegations of ethical violations we'll get a chance to chat about that in a moment but first let's take a look at wheeler as npr's rebecca hersher reports he brings far more experience to the job than his predecessor when the andrew wheeler was fresh out of law school he got a job at the epa special assistant in the agency's toxics office he helped write rules about how much information chemical companies disclose to the public and after a few years wheeler did what many young environmental lawyers hoped to do he landed a job in congress working for the senate committee that oversees the epa why i've known andy along time scott siegel is a partner at the law firm bracewell llp he is not an accidental administrator he is somebody who has been preparing for a position of responsibility like this really all of his life he is a student of environmental policy over the years wheeler has helped draft regulations on tons of major environmental issues toxic waste air and water pollution climate change and in many cases he's worked to decrease the power of the federal government to regulate industry blocking or weakening rules about chemical factories refineries and manufacturers at his senate confirmation hearing senator ed markey of massachusetts asked wheeler what he thinks about climate science do you believe human activity is driving the temperature increases on the planet i believe that man has an impact on the climate but i must not completely understood is what the impact is the overwhelming scientific consensus is that human greenhouse gas emissions are driving global climate change wheelers position casting doubt on the science as he deregulates industry mirrors the broader position of the trump administration seagull thanks wheelers experience in washington sets him up better than his predecessor to advance the trump agenda to be frank with you i don't think we'll see the kinds of personal issues that bedeviled the last administrator she is a consensus builder even some democrats are cautiously hopeful the ranking democrat on the senate environment and public works committee tom carper told npr's morning edition it's possible wheeler will turn a page and surprise people in his running of the agency but environmental groups are sounding the alarm one of their main concerns after wheeler left the senate he lobbied for years for one of the largest coal companies in the country bob deans is a spokesperson for the natural resources defense council going from a train wreck to a house on fire doesn't give us comfort the fact is we have an andrew wheeler a former coal lobbyists spearheading the worst white house assault in history on our environment and public health wheeler is expected to stick with the ep as agenda of rolling back multiple obama era climate and pollution rules but dean says some of those attempts have been held up in the courts because the epa hasn't backed up its new positions with sufficient science these safeguards were developed in most cases over years and with norma sort of input from the public from every stakeholder imaginable and if they're going to try to take down those safeguards the law requires that they demonstrate they have a better idea which is where andrew wheelers regulatory experience may come in handy if the epa is to succeed with its current agenda the devil will be in the policy details rebecca hersher npr news all right let's turn the conversation back now to scott pruitt and his relatively short but colorful federal career dominated by ethics scandals including his dc condos when you look at the facts of what i least one i paid for it is absolutely one hundred percent ethical and it was signed off in his legal scott pruitt is doing a great job within the walls of epa so you were not involved in that i was not involved in the approval the forty three thousand dollars and if i've known about it congressman i would have refused it scott pruitt getting the last word there on the matter of the forty three thousand dollars secure phone booth installed in his office we also heard president trump they're defending pruitt which he did consistently up till yesterday here in the studio to talk about pruitt's resignation and other political news of the week we have got david brooks of the.

mary louise kelley npr forty three thousand dollars one hundred percent
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Scott pruitt is still the head of the environmental protection agency that's notable because there have been eleven investigations into his ethics and public spending president trump though has stood behind pruett the president says the epa boss is doing a great job of getting rid of environmental regulations that he considers to be a burden but as npr's nathan rot reports how much pruitt has actually changed so far is an open question love them or hate them the narrative around scott pruitt is that he's highly effective conservatives and industry groups applaud him for overseeing the delay stoppage a review of roughly two dozen environmental regulations democrats and environmental organizations paint him as the most destructive epa administrator in the agency's history labeling in with trump esque nicknames like polluting pruitt in reality though i keep hearing how effective mr pruitt is and what you really getting our announcements about what he's going to do he's just pushing the star art button eric schafer is the head of the environmental integrity project an environmental nonprofit that is no fan of mr pruitt's but his point is one that you hear from many quarters that outside of delaying obama era policies on things like emission standards power plants or slowing their enforcement few of those policies have actually changed scott siegel a lobbyist who represents a range of energy company says that's partly due to the nature of the governmental beast under the best of circumstances major change in administration or in in the regulatory state takes time you have to propose what you want to change you have to take public comment and then address those comments then you have to provide documentation of all this because eventually almost always you go to court it is courts they're ultimately going to say whether these rules survive were don't tom lorenzen knows this better than most he spent a decade defending epa rules at the justice department and he says if an administrator wants to change existing environmental rules they have to explain clearly with evidence why the prior agency's decision was wrong and usually the rules that are rushed out are those that have the biggest troubles in the courts lisa heinzer link a professor at georgetown law school and a former officially dp under president obama says that could be an issue for the trump administration i think a lot of people have been struck by the thinness of.

Scott pruitt president npr administrator eric schafer scott siegel justice department professor georgetown law school obama pruett epa nathan rot tom lorenzen lisa heinzer
"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Narrative around scott pruitt is that he's highly effective conservatives and industry groups applaud him for overseeing the delay stoppage or review of roughly two dozen environmental regulations democrats and environmental organizations paint him as the most destructive epa administrator in the agency's history labeling in with trump esque nicknames like polluting pruitt in reality though i keep hearing how effective mr pruitt is and what you really getting our announcements about what he's going to do he's just pushing the star button eric schafer is the head of the environmental integrity project an environmental nonprofit that is no fan of mr pruitt's but his point is one that you hear from many quarters that outside of delaying obama era policies on things like emission standards power plants or slowing their enforcement few of those policies have actually changed scott siegel a lobbyist represents a range of energy company says that's partly due to the nature of the governmental beast under the best of circumstances major change in administration or in in the regulatory state takes time you have to propose what you want to change you have to take public comment and then address those comments then you have to provide documentation of all this because eventually almost always you go to court it is the courts they're going to say whether these rules survive don't tom lorenzen knows this better than most he spent a decade defending epa rules at the justice department and he says if an administrator wants to change existing environmental rules they have to explain clearly with evidence why the prior agency's decision was wrong and usually the rules that are rushed out are those that have the biggest troubles in the court lisa hines ruling a professor at georgetown law school and a former officially deepa under president obama says that could be an issue for the trump administration i think a lot of people have been struck by the thinness of the proposals coming out of the agency that would repeal the rules that are in place she points to pruitt's proposal to change fuel economy standards she calls it shoddy the document she says was thirty eight pages long the obama administration's justification for the standards was more than a thousand pages at least a couple of epa's actions have already been blocked by courts still some supporters approved say that he's learned from those earlier missteps and is now being more thorough ellen steam general counsel for the.

scott pruitt administrator eric schafer scott siegel justice department lisa hines professor georgetown law school president obama obama administration general counsel epa tom lorenzen
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Scott pruitt is still the head of the environmental protection agency that's notable because there have been eleven investigations into his ethics and public spending president trump though has stood behind pruett the president says the epa boss is doing a great job of getting rid of environmental regulations that he considers to be a burden but as npr's nathan rot reports how much pruitt has actually changed so far is an open question love him or hate him the narrative around scott pruitt is that he's highly effective conservatives and industry groups applaud him for overseeing the delay stoppage a review of roughly two dozen environmental regulations democrats and environmental organizations paint him as the most destructive epa administrator in the agency's history labeling him with trump esque nicknames like polluting pruitt in reality though i keep hearing how effective mr pruitt is and what you really getting our announcements about what he's going to do he's just pushing start button eric schafer is the head of the environmental integrity project and environmental nonprofit that is no fan of mr pruitt's but his point is one that you hear from many quarters that outside of delaying obama era policies on things like emission standards at power plants or slowing their enforcement few of those policies have actually changed scott siegel a lobbyist represents a range of energy company says that's partly due to the nature of the governmental beast under the best of circumstances major change in administration or in a in the regulatory state takes time you have to propose what you want to change you have to take public comment and then address those comments then you have to provide documentation of all this because eventually almost always you go to court it is the courts that are ultimately going to say whether these rules survivor don't tom lorenzen knows this better than most he spent a decade defending epa rules at the justice department and he says if an administer wants to change existing environmental rules they have to explain clearly with evidence why the prior agency's decision was wrong and usually the rules that are rushed out or those that have the biggest troubles in the courts lisa heinzer link a professor at georgetown law school and a former officially dpa under president obama says that could be an issue for the trump administration i think a lot of people have been struck by the thinness of.

Scott pruitt president npr administrator eric schafer scott siegel justice department professor georgetown law school obama pruett epa nathan rot tom lorenzen lisa heinzer
"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mrs malaga is that you along with other women were recognized as a group as time magazine's person of the year you know there were movie stars was a state senator a woman who picked strawberries there are many many other people and time said that you were the silence breakers and i wondered what it was like for you to be recognised in this way i mean it's really not bad it's not a matter of being in the magazine is summit it'll get him read songs in that we get policies that protects the war kissing hotel in full tell sound restaurants because course addict at the policy that gives his selfless right so no matter that complaint from guess is song with ju works against there were so is hard to make them a scene that you telling the truth that was one out malara she is a housekeeper who works at a hotel in southern california when i think so much respecting with us we really appreciate it thank you so much the trump administration repealed president obama's signature climate plan this fall the fossilfuel industry cheer that move it had spent years fighting limits on powerplant emissions now some fossil fuel companies these are worried because so far it's not clear exactly how or even weather the administration will replace the clean power plan and peres jeff brady reports the most vocal critics of the obama administration's clean power plan are in the coal industry chief among them bob murray head of coal company murray energy he testified at a public hearing in west virginia last month the clean power plan would devastate coalfired electricity generation in america as well a clearer stage coal industry coal companies are struggling mainly because of competition from cheaper natural gas but the clean power plan gets much of the blame even though it's never really been in effect because of court challenges critics argue the obama administration overstepped its authority under the clean air act when it crafted the plan while murray once the centerpiece of obama's environ at a legacy repealed outright others in the fossil fuel business find themselves lobbying for new regulations to replace it scott siegel directs the electric reliability coordinating council which represents utilities such as duke energy in southern company these businesses invest billions.

america coal company bob murray coal industry president trump scott siegel clean air act natural gas Mrs malaga electricity generation west virginia obama administration jeff brady obama california senator time magazine
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mrs malaga is that you along with other women were recognised as our group as time magazine's person of the year you know there were movie stars was a state senator a woman who pick strawberries there are many many other people and time said that you were the silence breakers and i wondered what it was like for you to be recognised in this way i mean it's really not bad it's not a matter of being undermined the theme is summit it'll get angry sauce in that we get policies that protects the war kissing hotels in full tell sound restaurants goals they got the policy that i guess it's all guus right so no matter that complaint from guess is sold with your works against there were so is hard to make them a scene that you telling the truth that was one out malara she is a housekeeper who works at a hotel in southern california when i think so much respecting with us we really appreciate it thank you so much the trump administration repealed president obama's signature climate plan this fall the fossil fuel industry cheer that move it had spent years fighting limits on powerplant emissions now some fossil fuel companies these are worried because so far it's not clear exactly how or even whether the administration will replace the clean power plan and peres jeff brady reports the most vocal critics of the obama administration's clean power plan are in the coal industry chief among them bob murray head of coal company murray energy he testified at a public hearing in west virginia last month the clean power plan would devastate coalfired electricity generation in a rare as well as zero united states cohen coal companies are struggling mainly because of competition from cheaper natural gas but the clean power plan gets much of the blame even though it's never really been in effect because of court challenges critics argue the obama administration overstepped its authority under the clean air act when it crafted the plan while murray once the centerpiece of obama's environment at a legacy repealed outright others in the fossil fuel business find themselves lobbying for new regulations to replace it scott siegel directs the electric reliability coordinating council which represents utilities such as duke energy in southern company these businesses invest billions.

electricity generation coal company bob murray coal industry president trump scott siegel clean air act natural gas Mrs malaga west virginia obama administration jeff brady obama california senator time magazine
"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Along with other women were recognized as a group as time magazine's person of the year they were movie stars was a state senator a woman who pick strawberries there are many many other people and time said that you were the silence breakers and i wondered what it was like for you to be recognised in this way i mean it's really not bad it's not a matter of being in the magazine is summit it'll get him wreaths loss in that we get policies that protects the war kissing hotels in hotel themed restaurants goals said they got the policy that dot com guests assault west right so no matter that complaint from the guess is sold with your works against there were so is hard to make then seen the you telling the truth there was one out miller she is a housekeeper who works at a hotel in southern california when i think so much respecting with us we really appreciate it thank you so much the trump administration repealed president obama's signature climate plan this fall the fossilfuel industry cheer that move it had spent years fighting limits on powerplant emissions now some fossil fuel companies these are worried because so far it's not clear exactly how or even weather the administration will replace the clean power plan and peres jeff brady reports the most vocal critics of the obama administration's clean power plan are in the coal industry chief among them bob murray head of coal company murray energy he testified at a public hearing in west virginia last month the clean power plan would devastate coalfired electricity generation in america as well as the united states history coal companies are struggling mainly because of competition from cheaper natural gas but the clean power plan gets much of the blame even though it's never really been in effect because of court challenges critics argue the obama administration overstepped its authority under the clean air act when it crafted the plan while murray once the centerpiece of obama's environ at a legacy repealed outright others in the fossil fuel business find themselves lobbying for new regulations to replace it scott siegel directs the electric reliability coordinating council which represents utilities such as duke energy in southern company these businesses invest billions.

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"scott siegel" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"scott siegel" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message comes from comcast proud partner of team usa and with nbc storytelling and expenese viewing experience comcast is proud to support team usa and bring the olympic winter games 2018 to every hometown in america the trump administration repealed president obama's signature climate plan this fall the fossilfuel industry cheered that move it had spent years fighting limits on powerplant emissions now some fossil fuel companies are worried because so far it's not clear exactly how or even weather the administration will replace the clean power plan and peres jeff brady reports the most vocal critics of the obama administration's clean power plan are in the coal industry chief among them bob murray head of coal company murray energy he testified at a public hearing in west virginia last month the clean power plan would devastate coalfired electricity generation in a rare as well as the united states cohen history coal companies are struggling mainly because of competition from cheaper natural gas but the clean power plan gets much of the blame even though it's never really been in effect because of court challenges critics argue the obama administration overstepped its authority under the clean air act when it crafted the plan while murray once the centerpiece of obama's environmental legacy repealed outright others in the fossilfuel business find themselves lobbying for new regulations to replace it scott siegel directs the electric reliability coordinating council which represents utilities such as duke energy in southern company these businesses invest billions of dollars in longterm projects and siegel says they want certainty about what the rules will be we won't always have the same administration in place and so too important to directionally have some indication of where the government would like to go it is also important to reduce the prospects of what i would call frivolous litigation siegel says if the government is somehow regulating power.

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