22 Burst results for "Scott Rudin"

"scott rudin" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:19 min | 9 months ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on TechStuff

"Terrorism which can break regional peace and caused the war end quote but this message says that the previous one on the fifth was written by someone else someone who is not affiliated with the group and the plot thickens in the meantime north korea media states that the north korean government played no part in the attack but does out the attack as a quote righteous deed in quote so in other words there statement is. Hey we didn't do it. But whoever did as aces in our book on december ninth the hackers dumped a huge. Number of amy pascal. Email correspondence online. This dump included some stuff that was particularly embarrassing for the studio. Such as an exchange between pascal and producer scott rudin who called angelina jolie quote a minimally talented spoiled brat end quote the following day more emails between pascal and rudin emerged showing the to joking about what president obama's favorite films might be and those were jokes that were at best racially insensitive which is a gentle lay of putting it. I have some other thoughts. But i'll i'll reserve them. I should add. That didn't earned a reputation as a real piece of work in fact just earlier this year. In twenty twenty one he was essentially forced to resign from broadway league. After numerous people were stepping forward to accuse him of engaging in abusive violent behavior. Hecht wall street journal said he would brag about burning through one hundred nineteen personal assistance in five years. Anyway this is the kind of juicy stuff that media companies go gaga for and clearly. I am no exception to that. By december twelfth people discovered that the hackers posted documents that included sony employee medical records. Some of the details include. Not just the sony employees but their families. The media for once did not go bonkers. Start publishing those documents. Which i guess is a a small favor right. On december fifteenth screenwriter and director. Aaron sorkin had an editorial piece published in the new york times calling out the media for playing a part in helping the hackers sorkin point..

north korean government amy pascal pascal scott rudin north korea rudin Hecht wall street journal angelina jolie president obama sony Aaron sorkin the new york times sorkin
"scott rudin" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"And with melissa melissa joan. Sooner she's brilliant she was one of the producers on jagged little pill as well but you have a heart but you also have your also have blinders on for what the show is but she really that she broke that mold. Because i always thought an rose kiowa roles corolla is one of the most amazing people on the planet broadway producer and she like human loves people talks to people gets people excited about the you know But there are some that are just bankers. And that's that's where you know unfortunately ragas expensive and it's expensive to do sets costumes and and it's expensive crew it's expensive to have ushers You know so. You can't eliminate those things because they are. What makes the magic happen. Yeah so but i was really. That was something that really moved me was when melissa called me and yeah she even called me when i was in the hospital with my hip replacement. Come around the corner. I can come visit anytime you know. And i was like i'd like to think in general i think we're becoming more conscious as business people and i think in in light of everything that happened with a pandemic and and You know the racial injustice in this country. I think inclusivity is in some ways. It is a buzz word. But i think there is a lot of The glass ceiling getting shattered with people that are producers that you would never have been in a conversation with rich white male producers anymore. I mean in television. It's always refreshing to me. When i see created by female name episode ridden by female. I see it. Tv all the time more than ever right now. And i can't imagine theatre isn't going to there might be a world where it's the artists that are the business people yeah. I do think that there is a shift happening. You know. the scott rudin is issues that came up recently. Yes yum you know and.

melissa melissa joan melissa scott rudin
"scott rudin" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on More Content Talk

"That allow you to create your podcast directly from your browser or phone anchor will distribute your podcast on spotify apple. Podcast and more you can make money on anchor with With no minimum listenership is everything. You need mega podcast in one place. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started today because anchor is awesome. Just like more content please. Yes.

"scott rudin" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"That's so shopping so get on patriots. You can see this picture my dad. My dad spent probably fifteen years managing shopping malls and we. When we moved to southern indiana. We built one called river falls and it had an amusement park on the inside. Had a like a ferris wheel merry go round and arcades and bumper cars and so when they built his train that went around the mini golf course. We got to be an all the pictures for the promos. That's so cool. Yeah very very kitschy. I met my mom's house. I'm all right let's do. Let's talk about something and then we'll do it just mere everyone boy. We're going to run out of time. Okay jenna your late to this. So the the past past past past get the hell out of here. That is scott rudin. Who is have you heard that name has pass outta here. Plays something or other. I don't know that's okay for me to say that right daniel. What did that. That scott rudin. Who it said. i've said it. Okay yeah so he is. There's like he's producer and their stories going around town about him right now that he's just like this horrid horrendous bully and it's supposed to be like the worst kept secret in hollywood or something because he puts the rude exactly so daniel told me that the way he knew about this is because he was dating a woman who worked for scarring the way i heard about it. Yes and i was like which is important because everybody who works in hollywood knows about scott rudin antics. This is it like a secret. Yeah and i was like daniel. I've been together for ten years. This is the first. I ever hearing this and no i'm not jealous. It truly and the more you try to say you're not jealous. The more you sound does. But i swear to god. I'm not jealous. I just have some questions. I just want to know a little more about who she is. But i can't ask them without him thinking and everyone thinking that i'm jealous but i really not eye doctor professor bitch but also like i mean. I know you're not jealous. Thank you but also like who cares if you are you. Are the one married to him. Yeah but nobody thank you. But also i just just wanna know what's her name what. She looked like she'd do what's her instagram handle. What is she up to now. What happened like how come it didn't go further. You know. oh you want. That's a deep dive. Didn't what's and by the way i never even got my answers questioned and other way the other way around. I never even asked them all i because daniels set her name and i was like oh i have literally never heard this name. What do you think we moved. Seems weird that you haven't mentioned her name before daniel. Maybe we should just throw back on him here and that he was like you know. Let's say her name was lucy. You know about lucy. Lucy's how i like. She's the one who dated sorry. You heard about lucy. She's the one who worked for scott rudin. I'm like now. We're just going in circle. I i sure didn't anyway daniel. I like keeping it a mystery from you like the fact driving you crazy but it's not the thing but but i al does that to me. He'll he just like wits hold just because he knows what bugs me..

daniel lucy ten years fifteen years scott rudin southern indiana Lucy daniels first instagram river falls hollywood one god
Scott Rudin Says He Will 'Step Back' From Film Projects

Colleen and Bradley

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Scott Rudin Says He Will 'Step Back' From Film Projects

"Upcoming projects after his former staffers accused him of abusive work. Police behavior routing first said over the weekend that he was stepping back from his Broadway endeavors. But today or yesterday. Added that he would also stop his work on other media as well. Ex employees first made their allegations against route into the Hollywood reporter earlier this month. I think this is probably a wise choice.

Hollywood
Scott Rudin to Step Back From Broadway Amid Bullying Reports

BBC World Service

00:59 min | 1 year ago

Scott Rudin to Step Back From Broadway Amid Bullying Reports

"Tony, An Oscar winning producer, Scott Rudin is reportedly taking a step back from his Broadway productions following a recent article in the Hollywood reporter outlining alleged abusive behavior in a toxic workplace environment. Jeff Lunden. Reports in an email routing, told The Washington Post that he would be stepping back from active involvement in his Broadway productions, effective immediately, saying he was quote taking steps that I should have taken years ago to address this behavior. Since the 19 nineties, Rudin has been one of the most active producers on Broadway and the article in the Hollywood reporter alleged incidents of violence towards his colleagues. Several unions released a statement last week on the need of a harassment free workplace in the arts without naming Ruden. When Broadway closed, Rudan had three shows running on Broadway. The Book of Mormon to Kill a Mockingbird and West Side Story for NPR News. I'm Jeff Lunden in New

Jeff Lunden Scott Rudin Hollywood Oscar Tony The Washington Post Rudin Ruden Rudan Npr News
Scott Rudin will 'step back' after allegations of bullying

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Scott Rudin will 'step back' after allegations of bullying

"I'm Julie Walker amid mounting anger over allegations of bullying Broadway and Hollywood producer Scott Rudin broke his silence Saturday saying he is profoundly sorry and will step back from his theater work the powerful producer behind book of Mormon to kill a mockingbird West Side Story said in a statement after a period of reflection I've made the decision to step back from active participation on our Broadway productions even active immediately the move comes more than a week after the Hollywood reporter story on Ruben contained accounts of him throwing glass bowls staples and baked potatoes at former employees in his statement he did not deny the allegations he said I am profoundly sorry for the pain my behavior because two individuals and he's taking steps to address it Julie Walker New York

Julie Walker Mockingbird West Side Story Scott Rudin Hollywood Ruben New York
"scott rudin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Book is Amazing. It turns out that you have lived as somewhat unusual life for a big time movie director. But usually we think of movie directors as being like Riel, Alfa people, They're powerful. They've got division. That's not you. I don't think you know, you know, As I mentioned eight years ago, I learned from my mother concept of strength to weakness that Theo the more sort of needy you seem to be of other people's help. They will come to the rescue, so I surround myself with really smart people. And really talented people. And then I like point and I'll stutter and then say what? You want me to talk faster. And I will yet be great. Thank you. Book tells more stories about your parents. Both your parents who were I believe the technical term is a piece of work. You know what's funny is neither of my Jewish parents. Yes, wanted me to go into the doctoring or loitering or finance businesses. My mother wanted me to be an artist and my father's that do whatever you want to do, and somehow you'll make a living doing that which is unusual considering He was bankrupt seven times in my life. Really? Yeah. He believed in doing what you like to do. He just didn't figure out a way to make money doing it right. Well, he, uh he also wasn't that good in telling you about the facts of life on my right. Well, here's the problems. Is that how he started his explanation of the facts of life? Here's the problem. The problem. The dad and I were going to go to a Yankee game and that was my hero, and I was about 13 or 14. And we were in a hurry. So I put on dad's jacket and found A bunch of condoms in there, which was surprising since I can't imagine my parents ever having sex. So anyway, Dad decided to take that moment where I discovered he was obviously having an affair. Teach me about the facts of life, and he got it totally wrong. The flames me, for instance, that the only time a woman can become pregnant is during their period. At least I realized why I was the only child. Yes, but I had to explain to my father that it's exactly The opposite. He said. Good to know I read you had no interest in directing. You agreed to direct the Adams family. What made you change your mind? You know, I really enjoyed being a camera, man. You know, I write about being a camera man on Penny Marshall's movie and then all these other movies and This producer Scott Rudin sent me the script for Adam's family. Then he said, You should become a director. And I said, Okay, I'll direct it away. I go through life. Okay? I looked for Penny Marshall. As it turns out, In fact, I shot big for Penny and After the first week. She came up to me the second Monday and said I tried to fire you, but they wouldn't let base And I said Who wouldn't let you fire me? Then you should have any cameraman you want, but now they wouldn't let me I called Danny. She was friends with Danny DeVito and I had shot so throw momma from the train, she said. I called Danny. He says you're good, but I don't think so. Well, Barry Sonnenfeld, It is always great to talk to you. We've invited you here to play a game. We're calling very sudden. Feld's call your father Joe. Okay. You wrote a book called Barry's on involved. Call your mother. We decided to ask you about calling your father that is confessing to a Catholic priest. Oh, boy, This is gonna be fun. You'd be good at this Answer two out of three questions correctly, You might win a prize for one of our listeners know you will win a prize. One of our listeners, any voice they might like on their answering machine bill. Who is Barry Sonnenfeld, playing for Barbara pressed it of Phoenix, Arizona. All right, ready to do this. Here's your first question. Confession can take forever. If you've got one priest in a long line of centers, so one priest in Indiana had an idea to speed up the process. What was it A a multiple choice form. So centers couldjust check off. Your specific sins and handed in Be a golf cart that allows the priest to bring the confessional to you or see mass confession with the priest. Names of sin and everybody who did. It just raises their hand. Well, it's either one or three. I'm going to go one. It was actually be the golf cart. Father, Patrick at ST Thomas, a quietness church in Indiana likes to cruise around Catholic college campuses in his golf cart and offer the sacrament to anyone who looks guilty. You two more chances, and I'm pretty sure you're gonna get this Sometimes a congregations. Sins are too serious for just a couple of Hail Marys to fix which explains why two priests in Russia did what once a started telling congregants to do one billion Hail Marys. Be required every congregant to perform an original song, describing their sin or sea went up in an airplane and dumped a bunch of holy water on their hometown. You know, I'm going to get this wrong too. Which makes the third one totally useless. But I'm going to go with three this time. You're right, Barry..

Barry Sonnenfeld Penny Marshall Danny DeVito Adams family director Indiana Adam Riel Theo golf Russia Scott Rudin ST Thomas Phoenix Feld Patrick Arizona Joe producer Barbara
"scott rudin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's what drill thing really was a real problem with it in the fifties, so they had to threaten people with public shaming. All right, last one If you get this one, right, you're I was about to say perfect pretty your case, I'll say more perfect. Oh, yogurt is an incredibly popular food as I'm sure you know, but not all yogurt based products succeed. Which of these failed to find a new audience. A clear ALS touch of yogurt shampoo. The MacDonalds fillet of yogurt sandwich or see Lee's yogurt lover jeans with the yogurt cup shaped pocket on each thigh. Be because that's like the Americans. I love you for choosing it, but that's not right. Thea, sir. Was Clara lt's touch of yogurt shampoo. Oh, because of the culture. Yeah, man, it's alright Fan. It's failed, Bill. How did Kurama Brown doing our quiz? Two out of three. That means you're a winner. Congratulations. Finally back in February, we invited back one of our favorite guests, the movie director Barry Sonnenfeld to tell us about his recently published memoir, Thie Book is Amazing. It turns out that you have lived a somewhat unusual life for a big time movie director. Usually we think of movie directors as being like real Alfa people. They're powerful. They've got division. That's not you. I don't think I know. You know, As I mentioned eight years ago, I learned from my mother concept of strength to weakness that Theo more sort of needy. You seem to be of other people's help. They will come to the rescue. So I surround myself with really smart people and really talented people. And then I like point and stutter. And then they'll say You want me to talk faster and I will yet be great. Thank you. Book tells more stories about your parents. Both your parents who were I believe the technical term is a piece of work. You know what's funny is neither of my Jewish parents. Yes, wanted me to go into the doctoring or loitering or finance businesses. My mother wanted me to be an artist and my father that do whatever you want to do, and somehow you'll make a living doing that which is unusual considering He was bankrupt seven times in my life. Really? Yeah. He believed in doing what you like to do. He just didn't figure out a way to make money doing it right. Well, he, uh he also wasn't that good and telling you about the facts of life on my right. Well, here's the problems. Is that how he started his explanation of the facts of life? Here's the problem. The problem. The dad and I were going to go to a Yankee game and that was my hero, and I was about 13 or 14. And we were in a hurry. So I put on dad's jacket and found A bunch of condoms in there, which was surprising since I can't imagine my parents ever having sex. So anyway, Dad decided to take that moment where I discovered he was obviously having an affair. Teach me about the facts of life, and he got it totally wrong. The flames me, for instance, that the only time a woman can't become pregnant is during their period. At least I realized why I was the only child. But I had to explain to my father that it's exactly The opposite, he said. Good to know I read you had no interest in directing. You agreed to direct the Adams family. What made you change your mind? You know, I really enjoyed being a camera, man. You know, I write about being a camera man on Penny Marshall's movie and then all these other movies and This producer Scott Rudin sent me the script for Adam's family. Then he said, You should become a director. And I said, Okay, I'll direct it away. I go through life. Okay? I looked for Penny Marshall. As it turns out, In fact, I shot big for Penny and After the first week. She came up to me the second Monday and said I tried to fire you, but they wouldn't let base And I said Who wouldn't let you fire me? Penny? You should have any camera man you want you have now they wouldn't let me I called Danny. She was friends with Danny DeVito and I had shot. So throw momma from the train, she said. I called Danny. He says you're good, but I don't think so. Well, Barry Sonnenfeld, it is always great to talk to you. We've invited you here to play a game. We're calling. Very sudden. Feld's call Your father, Joe. You wrote a book called Barry's On Infeld. Call Your Mother. We decided to ask you about calling your father that is confessing to a Catholic priest. Boy could be fun. You'd be good at this Answer. Two out of three questions correctly, You might win a prize. For one of our listeners know you will win a prize for one of our listeners, any voice they might like on their answering machine. Bill. Who is Barry Sonnenfeld? Playing for Barbara pressed it of Phoenix, Arizona. All right, ready to do this? Here's your first question. Confession, Khun take forever. If you've got one priest in a long line of centers, so one priest in Indiana had an idea to speed up the process. What was it A a multiple choice form. So centers couldjust check off. Their specific sins and handed in Be a golf cart that allows the priest to bring the confessional to you or see mass confession where the priest names a sin and everybody who did. It just raises their hand. Well, it's either one or three. I'm going to go one. It was actually be the golf cart. Father, Patrick at ST Thomas, a quietness church in Indiana likes to cruise around Catholic college campuses in his golf cart and offer the sacrament to anyone who looks guilty. Two more chances, and I'm pretty sure you're going to get this Sometimes a congregations. Sins are too serious for just a couple of Hail Marys to fix which explains why two priests in Russia did what once a started telling congregants to do one billion Hail Marys. Be required every congregant to perform an original song describing their sin. Morsi went up in an airplane and dumped a bunch of holy water on their hometown. You know, I'm going to get this wrong too. Which makes the third one totally useless. But I'm going to go with three this time. You're right, Barry. Upset with the level of quote, drunkenness.

Barry Sonnenfeld Penny Marshall director Danny DeVito Indiana Clara lt Thea golf Lee Russia Kurama Brown Bill ST Thomas Theo Adams family Morsi Scott Rudin Phoenix Khun
"scott rudin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"No! Ben spent the third trimester writing incessantly, barely stopping to sleep any but no matter how frantically he worked, the fetus kept gaining on him. In the 36th week of Suze Pregnancy. The New Yorker published an excerpt from the fetus his unfinished book. Ben couldn't bring himself to read the entire thing, but he forced himself to skim the 1st 3 columns. It was unbelievably intimidating. The fetus had boldly chosen to portray General Custer as gay. Not just a little gay, fully gay. He'd also included a black character and written his dialogue in dialect but somehow managed to pull the thing off tastefully. Then flip to the contributors notes and was horrified to see that unnamed fetus was listed as a staff writer. He cursed out loud and chuck the magazine into the garbage. As the weeks were on, Ben found himself, spending Mohr and more time in his office and less and less time with Sue. He's still massage your belly every evening, but he rushed through the ritual like a squeegee man at a red light. Calling it quits after a couple of perfunctory swipes. At night while she snorted in her snuggle, he pounded out page after page racing towards his novels, Dynamo He was nearing the final scene when he heard a soft knock on his door, sweetie. Susan, can you please come out of there? I'm busy, he said harshly. Can't wait. She let out a sharp intake of breath. No. Look who's decided to show up, Jones said. Glaring it Ben with undisguised contempt. Ben avoided eye contact and followed his wife into the delivery room. She was lying on a gurney surrounded by nurses, anesthesiologists and Scott Rudin, who was trying to option the fetus is booked for a film. Ben gave his wife's shoulder an obligatory squeeze your doing great. He said. Great job. Where have you been? She asked. Then forced a laugh, but he leaned down and smiled at her. What do you mean? She gripped his hand. Her eyes were soft and glossy from the drugs, and her forehead was beated with sweat. I've missed you, She said her voice breaking. Where did you go? Ben felt his throat go dry. He started to apologize, but before he could get out the words shoes body was wrecked by a violent contraction. He winced as his wife grunted through it, breathing bravely through the spasm of white hot pain. Here it comes, said Dr Kowalski. It's a big one. The nurses guided the manuscript out of Suze vagina, making sure the title page was facing up. The book was called last stand and somehow featured an advanced blurb from George Saunders. The baby himself popped out a second later, looking smart but understated in a slim tweed blazer in a pair of Warby Parker glasses. The doctor laid him on his mother's chest. He seemed calm it first. But within moments He began to scream. Sue, trying to calm the newborn with a kiss, but the infant kept howling. A whale that build steadily and pitch like a fast approaching siren. Is this normal? Been asked. What what? What's happening. I do not know, said Dr Kowalski. His face was pale and his eyes betrayed a small degree of fear. It is louder cry than normal. I'm not sure what it is. Then watched as the baby flail, desperately grasping at the air with his tiny, bluish fingers. It never seen anything look so helpless. In the infant turned toward him his eyes wide with fear. Then felt an odd sensation in his chest. In a flash. He knew just what to do. Then followed his son's gaze across the room to where the nurse had set aside the manuscript. Does anyone have a pen? He asked. Jones shook her fist it What do you need A pen for? Just give me a pen, he said firmly. Joan raised her eyebrows. Taken aback by Ben's confidence. She dug into her purse and handed him a purple big. He wants to make a revision, Ben explained to the hospital staff. That's why he's screaming so loud. He's wary. The manuscript will go out to critics before he's made the edit. He carefully placed the pen in his son's hand. A baby gestured frantically at his novel, tears streaming from his frightened eyes. I know, Ben said soothingly. I know it's hard. He carefully flipped through the pages, making sure the baby had a chance to scan each one. They were six chapters in when the baby started bawling. Is this? The page been asked gently. Is it something on this page? The baby sniffled. Okay, Ben said okay. He lowered his son to the manuscript and watched as the infant dragged his pan across the page, trimming the final sentence of a dense, descriptive passage. Good cut, Ben said, impressed Baby let out along contented sigh, then fell asleep in his father's arms. Then studied his son's tiny features his fuzzy, bulbous cheeks, his softly swelling chest. It was hard to believe this was something he'd helped create. He turned to his wife and noticed there were tears in her eyes. I love you, baby, she said. I love you, too, he said. Come on, Let's get this little guy into his nursery. Jason.

Ben Dr Kowalski Suze Pregnancy General Custer Jones Sue staff writer Scott Rudin George Saunders Susan Warby Parker Mohr Jason Joan
Remembering Harold Prince, Synonymous With Broadway

The Frame

04:18 min | 3 years ago

Remembering Harold Prince, Synonymous With Broadway

"Musical Michael guest all that coming up on the frame news comes today that Broadway director and producer Harold Prince is dead at the the age of ninety one according to a statement the musical theater giant died in Reykjavik Iceland after a short illness a prolific producer prince had his hands sculpting some the most endearing and enduring musical classics including West Side Story Sweeney Todd and fiddler on the roof. Jesse Green is the CO chief theater critic of the New York Times uh-huh any join me to talk about Herald prince in his career in musical theater. I started out by playing him a little bit of a tune. You might have heard before from west side story what Prince again as stage manager and producer not as part of the creative team of these shows. It's important to the rest of his career that he knew how to put shows on and not just how to artistically lead them and in west side story and some of the early shows we're seeing more of a matter of his taste which was different from the taste of a lot of the people working at the time then we are car sharing his artistic vision which came into play a little bit later the modern musical can be very political and have a strong point of view. I'm thinking of maybe Hamilton or we're going to be kind of a political and completely bland like Disney's beauty and the beast what was Herald Prince's bias but he was certainly interested in talking about the real world within the theater he was not only talking about it but bringing that to the forefront so a typical thing that how prints how prince show would do would be to invert the usual way you would get information in the great musicals of the Golden Age of Broadway you would typically get a story with characters that suggested a theme what Prince and his collaborators started to do in the seventies in particular is to flip that and begin with the theme and then fit the characters and plot around it so often you get these concepts musically that don't even have very much of a plot in and some people would say even characters but have these very powerful themes that people related to an example would be company where the team is marriage and you don't even really know exactly what's going on for most of the show. I'll play a clip from company. This is Elaine stritch singing. Here's to the ladies who lunch stay smart are again rushing to their classes in October. What was his reputation in terms of working with actors like Elaine Elaine stritch well. He was known as a pretty good disciplinarian. I'll say that much but you had to be if you were going to work with Elaine stritch and the kinds of people that he I chose to cast and that came from the fact that he had been producer and often was the producer of his own show so he had double quote with him whenever he went into that rehearsal room. I WANNA to play a clip from a New York Times interview with Prince that you have up on your site now. This is him talking about the aftermath of a nervous breakdown in its youth. I came to my my parents and said I think there's something really wrong. It's just a black cloud over everything and within a space space about three months it began to go away. The legacy of it was that I I came out of it. A different person extremely ambitious. I wanted what I wanted and I was Gonna get it. I can't help but think of another contemporary prey Broadway producers Scott Rudin right now who is equally driven. Was He really that driven was he. I guess somebody who would never take no for an answer. He certainly it was driven but he actually was terrifically enthusiastic and generally very positive. I actually was his apprentice at one point in the <hes> in the eighties and and I got to see him at work and I never saw him fall into those bunks that most artists do there was always more work to be done on the current in project but more than that he would have two three four five other projects in various states of readiness as you

Prince Elaine Elaine Stritch Producer Harold Prince Scott Rudin New York Times Herald Prince Jesse Green Broadway Reykjavik Sweeney Todd Iceland Director Michael Disney Hamilton Three Months
"scott rudin" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Play Hillary and Clinton. Ends its run early due to underwhelming ticket sales. The production of Hillary and Clinton. Was scheduled a close, July twenty first, but producer, Scott Rudin announced on Monday that its final performance will be Sunday, June twenty third, according to the Hollywood reporter, the play costs four point two million dollars to produce and only sold four point seven million at the box office. The show set in March of two thousand eight offers a fictional behind the scenes. Look at Hillary's, first presidential campaign as then Senator Barack Obama began gaining momentum, the place stars, Laurie Metcalf, and John Lithgow as former President, Bill Clinton. the play premiered on broadway in april of this year at the john golden theatre the early curtain call comes after hillary and bill's national tour their live tour also struggled to find an audience this year with some tickets for the thirteen city event selling at more than fifty percent off so for a lot less than that so for ten cents on the dollar on the show that i happen to know about that was according to the new york times so they made a broadway play about them that didn't sell well they went on tour themselves and nobody showed up she ran for president and she lost gosh it's it's almost as if the people are tired of the clintons a mansion that imagine that twenty seven years after he was elected we've finally said as a nation even their biggest fans have enough Please go away. Would you. You know, I'm bummed out. We're going to play them on ties that we created spent a lot of time on morning show today, talking about Donald Trump's reelection and I hit intended on the evening show today to get to more of your calls, and I've just run out of time and policies. I have a theory. Donald Trump has nothing but upside from two thousand sixteen and I say that because a lot of people didn't vote for Donald Trump. That now are going to, and I don't think that people who did vote for Donald Trump are going to leave him into the in twenty twenty I think we're going to be very surprised. I think twenty twenty is going to be for him. What nineteen Eighty-four was for Ronald Reagan? Ronald Reagan was an uncertain commodity in nineteen eighty. He was an actor. He was a guy that was considered out of touch. He was a guy considered maybe he just didn't have the chops to be president. That's what the media told us. And then he got elected. He did a great job in eighty four..

Donald Trump Ronald Reagan Hillary Clinton President clintons Senator Barack Obama Scott Rudin john golden theatre Bill Clinton. Laurie Metcalf John Lithgow new york times broadway producer reporter Hollywood twenty twenty two million dollars
"scott rudin" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on KPCC

"Frame I'm John horn. We'll pick up my conversation with screenwriter and playwright Aaron Sorkin about his stage version of tequila Mockingbird back in the spring of last year. Harper Lee's state headed by lawyer Tanya Carter sued the producer, Scott Rudin saying that Sorkin adaptation deviated too much from the novel. There were a couple of minor changes that the west wing creator agreed to but Sorkin wouldn't budge when it came to how he'd written novels to main black characters. Tom Brady Anderson falsely accused of raping a white woman and the finches housekeeper. Pernia sorkin. I talked about the concerns the estate had with his version of Atticus. Who initially swore drank whiskey and owned a gun in the book in the movie, Atticus, carved out of marble. He's the man with all the answers in the play. I wanted him to be wrestling with questions, and I wanted him to be more human and things like Atticus having sitting on the porch having a glass of whisky by himself after he's lost. The case seem very human to me the gun in the closet is the end of the first act when we all know the moment when he finds out that Tom Robinson has been moved to the local jail a night early. And that the clan the bad guys have been tipped off. So Advocacy's to go to jail and save Tom from being lynched. I had a moment where he grabs a shotgun from the closet. Hesitates looks at Purnea says you'd better take that with you at advocates puts it back and the note was Atticus would never have a gun in the house. Again, it first of all that note. I didn't understand because in the book and in the movie, he's dead. I shot shoots the rabid dog from two hundred yards. So it's not like Atticus gun objector. Notes like that. I reluctantly agreed to because I could live with them and the play wouldn't have happened unless I did I remember talking to you while you're working on the adaptation more than a year ago. And you're the midst of releasing the movie molly's game and the time that you were giving Tom Robinson Copernican more of a voice in the story, especially when it comes to the issue of racial injustice. I remember saying to you, what is the state of Harper Lee think about that? And you said they've been great to work with. We've got a pretty good deal and a couple of weeks later the. To play. So you're timing was a little bit. Your optimism was maybe a little bit falsely placed, but it does sound like you were able to resolve the dispute how would you characterize what the takeaway was for you as a playwright through that dispute ended it leave you with the play that you were a hundred percent happy with did you feel like you had to compromise in terms of what the estate wanted and what you wanted in the story. No the that lawsuit. Dad, no effect on the play. And neither I nor Scott, nor director share would have gone forward with the play. If now going back to the beginning, the novel has to only to a significant African American characters Tom Robinson, the defendant cow Purnea the mate. And this is a story about racial friction in the Jim crow south. Neither of the two African American characters really have much to say on the subject in the novels really most concerned with whether scout is going to wear address or overalls to school. Tom Robinson gets to plead for his life. And neither of them have agency. And the me that got scared by the lack of quality of my own. I draft one of the things I've Oude was I'm not going to pretend that I'm writing this nine hundred sixty and I'm not going to try to do a Harper Lee impersonation, neither of those two things will get very far. So I thought that in in nineteen sixty using African American characters only atmosphere is the kind of thing that would probably go largely unnoticed. But today, it's it's not only wrong, but it's a missed opportunity. You want to hear from those characters my favorite scene in the book, and my favorite scene in the movie. It's a lot of people's favorite scene in the book is the end of the trial Atticus. Packing up his briefcase. Everyone has left courtroom everyone except the people in what was called the colored section the balcony up where all the African American citizens of may come are standing.

Atticus Tom Robinson Pernia sorkin Harper Lee Tom Brady Anderson Scott Rudin Tom John horn Tanya Carter producer Purnea Jim crow director two hundred yards hundred percent
"scott rudin" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:35 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm John horn when Tony nominations are revealed next week to kill a Mockingbird will likely get a lot of attention almost certainly for Jeff Daniels who plays Atticus Finch, but the ATP tation by air. Sorkin was far from easy. Scott Rudin secured, the rights to the station and got Harper Lee's personal approval of Sorkin as the playwright. But then things started to go awry following Lee's death three years ago the estate eventually sued to stop the production. We'll get to the lawsuit in a bit. But when I spoke with Sorkin about to kill a Mockingbird. He first told me why his first draft didn't work. I simply tried to do no harm. I took the most essential scenes that you need to tell the story, and I stood them up. And dramatize them and the whole thing felt like a greatest hits album done by a tribute band. And I turned it in and Scott who usually at that point. Would meet with me for days, and I ended up with hundreds of notes to go back into the second draft with he met with me for less than thirty minutes and gave me two notes. And the second note was the one that changed everything what Scott said was that Atticus can't be accessed from the beginning of the play to the end of the play. He's got to change. That's what a protagonist does a protagonist has a flaw. Protagonist is put through something and changes as a result. And I thought well, of course, Scott's right? That has to be what happens in the play. I wonder how Harper Lee got away with an Abacus who is the same. At the beginning of the book is at the end of the book, how Horton Foote got away with an Akkas in the movie who's the same at the beginning of the movie is the is at the end of the movie. And that's when I realized that advocates isn't the protagonist in the novel or the movie scout is she's the one who changes her flaws that she's young and the changes that she loses some of her innocence. And while I wanted scout. And Jacksonville to remain protagonists in the play. I wanted advocates to be the central protagonist. I wanted him to be put through something. I wanted him to have a flaw. I wanted him to change as a result. And what happened in that moment was that? I simply stopped thinking about the word adaptation. That it no longer was my goal to gently swallow the novel in bubble wrap and transfer it to a Broadway stage that I was going to write a new play taking the circumstances that Harper Lee put on the table. And that's when things started to take off. So I'm gonna ask you this. Obviously, it's a period piece. But I want to talk about it's modern relevance of which there is a tremendous amount. What was happening in the world as you were adapting or reimagining, whatever we're going to do whatever verb. We're going to use to describe what you were doing with Harper Lee's novel to make it a point. Well, what was happening in the world was Trump was elected president Charlottesville was happening. Charlottesville became an important touchdown in this. And I'll tell you why advocates in the in the novel. This was in thinking about what flaw can Atticus half. Does he go from being a bad lawyer to a good lawyer a bad father to a loving father? A racist believing injustice in a quality. And obviously know all three what I realized was that Atticus already had a flaw. Harper Lee gave him one. It's just that. When we were learning the book, we were taught that it was a virtue Atticus says throughout the book that there's goodness in every. Learn a single six go get along better with all kinds of folks never really understand it until you consider things from his point of view. Climates out of his kidding. Woke rounding he excuses. Bob, Buell's racism by saying the man just losses. WPA job. You know excuses. Mrs Dubose is racism by she recently stopped taking her medicine or morphine. He excuses. The town's racism, this is the deep south things happen slower here. Give gift people time and was thinking about all that at the same time at Charlottesville happened in it started what Atticus was saying was starting to sound to me like there were five people on both sides. Right. And that's when the bells rang, and and I was really able to kind of go from a walk to a Gallup we're talking with earned Sorkin about his heart released novel to kill a Mockingbird. I want to play a scene between Atticus Finch and Tom Robinson who's been accused of raping a white woman in the story. Can't tell you how to plead, but I can't give you my best advice. You won't be my lawyer, Tom, very less thing. I won't be a lawyer right now negro man, what teenage girl wouldn't be going in with a win and hand. But I'm compelled to defend us an officer of the court, and in that capacity of taking us out to give him a best council, which is that you cannot and you must not lead guilty and go to jail for a crime. It did not could not commit. So how do you figure out a way to dramatize what Atticus is going through? And how he's changing the way that he sees excuses behavior through the play. What are the tricks? What are the things that you are able to do with the text and through new dialogue and putting dialogue into other characters mouths? They get you to that place where he can evolve for me, a big part of advocacy is journey in this play is going from someone who says, I know these people. These are our friends and neighbors. Sure, some of them may be stuck in the old ways. But there are none of them that are so far gone that they would send an obviously innocent man to the electric chair, and he discovers that he doesn't know his, friends and neighbors. That to me does a really good job of of reflecting. I think how a lot of us no matter where you are on the political or ideological spectrum the way, a lot of us have felt these last few years that we thought we knew our fellow Americans. But we didn't we were wrong about our friends and neighbors, and that's one of the reasons.

Atticus Finch Harper Lee Scott Rudin Sorkin Charlottesville Horton Foote Jeff Daniels John horn Tom Robinson Jacksonville Mrs Dubose Bob Tony Trump morphine Gallup officer president Buell
Inside Aaron Sorkin's 'Mockingbird' story

The Frame

07:22 min | 3 years ago

Inside Aaron Sorkin's 'Mockingbird' story

"Playwright and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin says he was eager to adapt. Harper Lee's to kill a Mockingbird for Broadway. But he still had some serious. Reservations about the job. I said yes, knowing really it was a suicide mission because people have a very special relationship to the novel. And it's a great book. What could I do but make it less than than what it was? And the acting future of Jesse smollet is still unknown. But his character on empire just made TV history all that up on the frame. Welcome to the frame. I'm John horn when Tony nominations are revealed next week to kill a Mockingbird will likely get a lot of attention almost certainly for Jeff Daniels who plays Atticus Finch, but the adaptation by earned Sorkin was far from easy. Scott Rudin secured, the rights to the patient and got Harper Lee's personal approval of Sorkin. It's the playwright. But then things started to go awry following Lee's death three years ago the estate eventually sued to stop the production. We'll get to the lawsuit in a bit. But when I spoke with Sorkin about to kill a Mockingbird. He I told me why his first draft didn't work. I simply try to do. No harm. I I took the most essential scenes that you need to tell the story, and I stood them up and dramatize them and the whole thing felt like a greatest hits album done by tribute band. And I turned it in and Scott who usually at that point. Would meet with me for days and ended up with hundreds of notes to go back and do the second draft with he met with me for less than thirty minutes and gave me two notes. And the second note was the one that changed everything. What Scott said was that Atticus can't be advocates from the beginning of the play to the end of the play. He's got a change. That's what protagonist does a protagonist has a flaw protagonist put through something and changes as a result. And I thought well, of course, Scott's right? That has to be what happens in a play. I wonder how Harper Lee got away with an Abacus who's the same. At the beginning of the book is at the end of the book, how Horton Foote got away with an Atticus in the movie who's the same at the beginning of the movie is the is at the end of the movie. And that's when I realized that advocates isn't the protagonist in the novel or the movie scout is she's the one who changes her flaws that she's young and the changes that she loses someone for innocence. And while I wanted scout. And dill to remain protagonists in the play. I wanted advocates to be the central protagonist. I wanted him to be put through something. I wanted him to have a flaw on. I wanted him to change is a result. And what happened in that moment was that? I simply stopped thinking about the word adaptation that it. No longer was my goal to gently swallow the novel in bubble wrap and transfer it to a Broadway stage that I was going to write a new play taking the circumstances that Harper Lee put on the table. And that's when things started to take off. So I'm gonna ask you this. Obviously, it's a period piece. But I'm gonna talk about it's modern relevance of which there is a tremendous amount. What was happening in the world as you were adapting or reimagining, but ever we're gonna do whatever verb are gonna use to describe what you were doing with harp. Elise novel to make it a play. Yeah. Well, what was happening in the world. Was Trump was elected president Charlottesville was happening. Charlottesville became an important touchdown in this. And I'll tell you why Atticus in the in the novel. This was in thinking about what flaw can Atticus half. Does he go from being a bad lawyer to a good lawyer, a bad father to a loving father a racist believing injustice in a quality, and obviously no on all three? What I realized was that Atticus already had a flaw. Harper Lee gave him one. It's just that. When we were learning the book, we were taught that it was a virtue advocates says throughout the book that there's goodness in every single chicks, go get along better with all kinds of folks never really understand it until you consider things from his point of view. Climates out of his skin woke rounding he excuses. Bob, Buell's racism by saying the man just losses WPA job. You know, it's he excuses. Mrs Dubose is racism by she recently stopped taking her medicine or morphine. He excuses. The town's racism. This is the deep south things happen slower here, you know, give gift people time and thinking about all that at the same time at Charlottesville happened in it started. What Atticus was saying was starting to sound to me like there were fine people on both sides. Right. And that's when the bells rang, and and I was really able to kind of go from a walk to a gallop. We're talking with earned Sorkin about his ad obtain of Harper Lee's novel to kill a Mockingbird. I wanna play a scene between Atticus Finch and Tom Robinson who's been accused of raping a white woman. And the story can't tell you how to plead, but I can't. And I must give you my best advice. You won't be my lawyer. Very less thing. I won't the world be your lawyer right now negro man, what teenage girl wouldn't be going in with a win hands. But I'm compelled to defend us an officer of the court, and in that capacity of taken Salamo to give him a best council, which is that you cannot and you must not lead guilty and go to jail for a crime that you did not could not commit. So how do you figure out a way to dramatize what Atticus is going through? And how he's changing the way that he sees an excuses behavior through the play. What tricks? What are the things that you are able to do with the text and through new dialogue and putting dialogue and other characters mouse, they get you to that place where he can evolve for me, a big part of Attica ses journey in this play is going from someone who says, I know these people these are our, friends and neighbors sure some of them may be stuck in the old ways. But there are none of them that are so far gone. They would send an obviously innocent man to the electric chair, and he discovers that he doesn't know his friends and neighbors that to me does a really good job of of reflecting. I think how a lot of us no matter where you are on the political or ideological spectrum the way, a lot of us have felt these last few years that we thought we knew our fellow Americans. But we didn't we were wrong about our friends and neighbors, and that's one of the reasons why this play based on a book that sixty years old that takes place ninety years ago feels so much like today.

Atticus Finch Harper Lee Aaron Sorkin Scott Rudin Charlottesville Jesse Smollet Horton Foote Dill Jeff Daniels Elise Officer Mrs Dubose Salamo John Horn Donald Trump Morphine President Trump BOB Tom Robinson Tony
"scott rudin" Discussed on Marty and McGee

Marty and McGee

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on Marty and McGee

"He was a great interview. It was like. We were inspired like it was like one of those where we had him all like it's going to be a joke, and he ended up like bringing everybody to tears like American dream made me feel super entrepreneurial for like a minute. And I love the end of those commercials where he's in the most beautiful tropical place driving a boat a boat that he solid it and half. Inflicts tape. All of this. And then right after we didn't show. This is not. I'm not saying this truth, wrapped we did the show we had one of these periods of Charlotte. We have now where it just rains for seven months, and I have but I had this one had a leak apparel. Where was now. And I'll still about sucker up flexibile deuce Affleck's type on there. And that's suck. It's been like a year. It's waterproof, man. It is airtight. So Phil if you're listening to this morning, we we appreciate all you do for America, sledge hammer. So I'm glad you might down here today, and I'm aided that boat to get down here today. Yeah. It's. So tell me I wasn't here and Rosza was week ago. But I haven't seen you. We were on the show together last Saturday. I was in Daytona. You're here. What was the Queen city like amid all of the all star festivities because almost south of here in the great state of Florida. It was awesome, man. It was awesome. So our town did a great job kudos, Charlotte. Great host for the NBA all star weekend. And man the stars were out, dude. And it was so cool. I went on Saturday to the three point contest at don't contest evening and interviewed so many interesting people, I mean to chains the rapper. Yeah. Quavo, the rapper Jamie Foxx, Jamie, FOX has won everything there is to win. Hold on a second. Only. Not only did. I interview Jamie Foxx. Jamie FOX is a fan. Is he a fan is he he's got you. The hail is that that's somebody who's wanted to place you go at Disney down that. Was there economic you? Go took took us up. E got someone who's won an EMMY a Grammy. He that's him Oskar and a Tony if you can win and he's wanted I think he might be on the list. I mean Lipman and the race issues an ego. What I cannot possibly read a Marino. I couldn't be more complimentary of how gracious he is how funny he is how kind he gave us basically he was like as much time as you need. No. He's not he is. He's not. No, he is. No, he's not. He's got. Oh, he's not an ego. Don't try to rebut. There's not an ego. This man's, but I'm not having the guts are Richard Rogers composer, Helen Hayes. Actress Rita Moreno who was on the electric company when I was a little boy. That's cool. Yeah. I guess I was a little boy to. Yeah. I don't know how to pronounce this other guy's name Audrey Hepburn Marvin hamlet Jonathan Tunick Mel Brooks. Oh, I'm a Mel Brooks two years ago. I didn't know you got Mike Nichols. The frames director Whoopi Goldberg is an ego. What Scott Rudin producer Robert Lopez? John legend. No, Kansas has an EMMY a Grammy and Oscar and a Tony Andrew Lloyd Webber that's phantom of the opera, and Tim rice who's composer?.

Jamie FOX Lipman Jamie Foxx Charlotte Marino EMMY Mel Brooks Tony Andrew Lloyd Webber Jonathan Tunick Mel Brooks deuce Affleck Mike Nichols Whoopi Goldberg NBA Scott Rudin Daytona Rita Moreno John legend Audrey Hepburn Marvin Disney
"scott rudin" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"I know what was eight twenty four and Scott Rudin knew kind of came on at the same point. I talked to eight twenty four early when they were just distributor, which of course, like your it was like my dream. Yeah. For this film. And they were like well distributed if you get money, and then I didn't get money for so long actually became a financing. In the meantime, is funny because Scott Rudin says like this was so not. Part of the argument or like soda part of why they came on board. But I tried to get a little make happy that previously just come out. And I it sold, you know, however, one hundred thousand tickets whatever the road that previous year, and I was able to go like, okay. If just these people buy the tickets, the movie, you'll get a little bit of your money back to like, I can already prove to you that at least some of this is recoup -able. But Scott says like now, he just read the script and this this. This seems good. And let's director is a different thing than loving the script. Yeah. Yeah. The truth. It was a risk, and I'm incredibly grateful, but the risk is a lot of people do not want to take that risk. Right. But then you get there. And obviously prove that you were able to do it. And I think something like the pool scene where you have everything from the music thumping when she sees the cuter kid to the tracking shots, all it's very cinematic -ly skilled for somebody who you didn't go to school. You didn't make other short films. No before. So like just literally how did you know, what to do when you had to direct relying on my collaborators for sure enjoy my DP, and my producer Chris store and a lot of people. But part was just like maybe just believing that I could do it was an apartment to intimidate. I did get the green light like eight months before we shot because we had to shoot in the summer because it was a kids movie the end it was going to double the budget during the school year. So I had eight months for read a book a week and three watch three movies day. So there was some stuff I need to. I there's a lot of stuff I still need to learn technically, I'm very behind technically. But I had confidence in my at least my ability to work with actors. I felt like. And coming from the world of theater, and and making the specials like I tried to make my specials like films, and I tried to introduce some film grammar into my intimate specials, and I do believe that like making stuff prepares you to make stuff, and I had made stuff before I had had visions at least of what thing would feel like and that I had made something and I realized okay, that's how you can make it appear like this. That's how you can. And I definitely a ton to learn about filmmaking. Like, I have a lifetime hopefully left to learn about film make last a couple of minutes here..

Scott Rudin Chris store director producer eight months
"scott rudin" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"The story of of advocates and the story of of tequila Mockingbird now. My question is how much because I know obviously, the the timing of this is is essential. You made a decision that, you know. This was the adaptation you were gonna make because it spoke to what we're going for. Yes. And what was that process that process was this first of all it? It's interesting talking to somebody who didn't walk into the theater with. Any preconception of nine what's going to happen? And asked me what you need. I'd love to. The process was this. The first thing I did was. My first draft wasn't good at all. Because all I did was really was take the book kind of take the best of the book the the all star Siemens. I'm damned them up. And and say it was a play. And it was a it was a greatest hits album done by a cover band. The really the best. You could say about it was that it was harmless. Which is I think the worst thing you can say about a point, right? And it was our producer Scott Rudin who gave me the following note. Atticus can't be advocates for the entire play. He has to become advocates. And I thought that's obvious. Of course. I I understand plays. The protagonist has to be put through something. He has to have a flaw. He has to be changed by the end of the play. How did Harper Lee get away with having Atticus be the same person for the entire book? How did Horton Foote who wrote the movie get away with having Gregory Peck me the entire person of the same person for the entire movie? And the answer was well advocates isn't the protagonist in the book. Or the movie scout is daughter is an advocate is a kind of father knows best God like figure in the book. And in the movie Atticus has the answers in the play that I wrote he struggles with the other questions. I wanted him to be the I wanted. Him to be the protagonist. So I need to get from a flaw. And what would that be? How do you take what the most iconic characters in literature who has no flaws and give them a flaw and expect to get out alive? Well, so I reread the book for the nineteenth time now and. And something really struck me. It advocates keep saying to his kids that there's goodness in everyone that really understands somebody. You gotta crawl around inside their skin for a while. He defends Bob you'll who's a member of the clan by saying you got to understand you just losses WPA job. He defends this woman. Mrs Henry Dubose who is just the most cruel kind of old lady racist. You got to understand. She's sick. She stopped taking her morphine recently. He even tries to defend the jurors who neighbors. Yeah, they're our friends and neighbors, we got understand. And this is the deep south. It's going to take time. Okay. It's just going to take time. And I thought. I'm not sure I buy that. And I hate to say it put it sounds an awful lot. Like that were fine people on both sides. Right. And they're that's what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna take this thing that when we were taught the book and seventh eighth or ninth grade that we were always taught was virtue, and I'm going to challenge those beliefs in the play and by the time Atticus guests at the end of the play. He is going to come to the point where. He realizes that. What he considers what what you and I might consider a kind of liberal high minded men that we're going to understand everyone. Is bullshit. And and there are some times times when you have to roll up your sleeves him fight. And it was just too serendipitous that we have this president. Right now, you work you start you start working on this before Trump. I started working on it before Trump. And when Trump was not before he started running before he was inaugurated. I, and, but it was definitely this new world that we're living in that fueled this play those classic piece of literature where there is no event that happens in the play that doesn't happen in the book. I haven't made up events we just look at it a different way..

Atticus Mrs Henry Dubose Trump Siemens Horton Foote Harper Lee Scott Rudin Gregory Peck morphine president producer Bob
"scott rudin" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"So what would you do differently about that show looking back? It's been twelve years twelve I would write it better. I I would just be, you know, the, they're here's the thing about television. That that is better. If you're writing a move your play if I'm writing a screenplay I and it's it's not going. Well, I've I've just run into a snowbank I can call the producer or the studio. Whoever is waiting for it and say, listen, I've run into some trouble. I know I said I was going to deliver in June. It'll probably be more like August that you'll get the first draft. In television. You've got hard deadlines arrogates, and you have to meet them. So you have to write even when you're not writing. Well. Yeah. Unless a tough pill to swallow, and then you have to point a camera at it. And then you have to broadcast it and with studio sixty and then later with the newsroom, I just always felt like had a pebble in my shoe. I couldn't get it quite right that I would write some good scenes, but I couldn't put together. A an an entire good episode. The way, you know. A basketball team will they can't put together for good, correct? You know, what goes back the thing where you really need a lot of things to go. Ray you need a lot of things to go. Right. But there was nothing wrong with studio sixty that could have been solved by better writing. Right. Social network really quick to go. I didn't realize you have to leave. No problems also network. I went to I had lunch with a studio head with. I don't know I'm bringing with Stacey Snider who right now is the head of the FOX. But at the time she was the head of universal. And she said. I just got this book pitch that you might be interested in because the Ben Mezrak book. Yes, he had written the book yet. But the publisher was setting the pitch for the book to Hollywood studios hoping to get the help and get it set up before the book was even written. And and such Stacey said there was a a a lawsuit. The there these other guys claiming that they were the ones who invented Facebook. And just from what she was describing to me. I I was in. I wanted to do this. And I think that you didn't know fincher is in fincher wasn't in yet on nobody was in yet. But me, I I was now in and in fact, I I wasn't going to wait until Ben had written the book I was going to start writing now. So Ben, and I were essentially writing at the same time. Then. And by the way, to didn't end up a universal ended up at Sony were any PASCAL at the time was the chairwoman and Amy and the producers Scott Rudin, and this would be the first of now many times that I've worked with Scott. They thought that I should direct movie, which I something I'd never done before never directed anything. And that scared the hell out of me. I and we said, you know, what before we pull the trigger on this? Let's just let's just let David fincher pass. Okay. Let's send it to David. He'll pass he passed on everything. And then I'll swallow Hardin and do this. So it was messengered over to David but two and a half hours later. I got an Email saying, Erin, it's David fincher. I'm going to direct the social network can I come over. And it was the beginning of one of the best creative relationships I've ever had and. He's a genius. Yes. He is. Hey, isn't regina's, but he's a genius. And he was he's a guy you would like very much. And if you can get him to do this podcast. Do you think he would do it? I do I know that he's a big fan of yours. Oh, wow. That'd be great. He he's he has a lot of questions about the game..

David fincher Stacey Snider Ben Mezrak Ray Scott Rudin producer Facebook FOX Hollywood publisher Hardin Sony Erin regina twelve years
"scott rudin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Everything entertainment. All right. We're going to be productive since its Tuesday were just talking about Carol Channing passed away of natural causes at the age of ninety seven people also know from TV television show she on game shows. Oh, yeah. I've got a secret. What's my line? Hollywood swears. She also guest starred as herself on magnum PI the nanny touched by an angel family guy. He also did a lot of variety TV variety shows in the sixties. Carol burnett. Dean. Martin. She won an EMMY for her Carol Channing and evening with Channing, and then unrolling and Martin's laugh in she was paired with the other Daffy blonde of that show. That's right. And yeah, that's kind of a cool and also. She just still can't get over the fact that she's six feet tall. She just looks little. Yeah. Also, Bette midler gave a response to people magazine they asked her about it. Because of course, she just played. Hello dolly. And she said when Scott Rudin invite me play Dolly in two thousand sixteen mmediately thought of Carol and went to visit her how could they not she played the part over seven thousand times around the world and only missed one performance food poisoning. How about that to the world show has Dolly was one of the great afternoons of my life. She was gracious and generous sharing with me, the legends the law and the mechanics of Dolly much of what has been lost in time. I'll be forever grateful to her for lighting. My waited one of the most magical experiences of my performing life. Oh, miss piggy tweeted, her some say diamonds, our girl's best friend. But those folks clearly never met Carol Channing legend star friend in one of a kind inspiration to assault kissy kissy. Yeah. I know I remember we had that bark who do you want to interview or something? It comes like quarterly who's available for radio interviews like two thousand six I think or nine when the book came out her beloved Harry was still alive. Yes. And we just like should we do it? I would just love him. Really? Like, let's go for it. I heard people approach something from the book it was. 'cause I go through that book everywhere. People were some quirky pizza's. Usually anyone who's giving interviews doesn't mean the morning. You're never available in our times. But Danny arranged that and it was so I just remember we giggled and laughed and she was absolutely delightful refreshing. Yeah, I think at one point she actually put the phone down walked away. She did she had to go get something like, okay. I mean, you never know when you're going to get to talk to a classic. That's true. All right. We'll speaking of classics Ellen Degeneres is has on her show today, Jane Fonda and lily Tomlin because Grayson Frankie's is coming back to streaming on Netflix. And I just will watch those two. I don't care. What counts are sitting on? I just think they are their chemistry together is magical. So we'll watch them on any couch, but we won't watch Frankie Gracie tweezers. It's just a matter of time. Okay. Have enough people may life or watching Greece, and Frankie my mom keeps me up to date. I feel like watch it, especially the sex toy episode, which I think is what we're going to hear. Let's face it. I cut last season. You you you had a product that you were we can't talk about on the show, but it's a very popular product. And you got some five greater you get you can save vibrate. I don't think we had for older women because you're not.

Carol Channing Carol burnett Dolly Carol Grayson Frankie Bette midler Martin Hollywood Frankie Gracie EMMY Scott Rudin Ellen Degeneres Dean Harry Greece assault Netflix Danny Jane Fonda lily Tomlin
"scott rudin" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Yeah, I guess motorized came them would be the first thing that did go that you were part of in the and movies that where it was beyond that early partisan extra in your dad's movie. But I want to ask you about rooting because he's probably the most influential person in film, TV and theatre who your average person at home has not heard of. And I wonder if you can explain from now having gotten to know where with him just can you pinpoint what makes him so special. Yeah. Well, I think the thing that's I honestly it's hard to even describe. But I think with respect to theater Scott sort of like a freelance artistic director in that. He has an idea he can get it done. He can he has all the resources. Nobody doubts him or screw. Nobody's gonna doubt doubt him has his track record. But I think he has just really great taste and a passion for his work that is simply unparalleled like everybody, I speak to work with him says that he watches interview with Chris rock that says Scott Rudin, he said Scott Rudin got meat to function at a rate that I've never I'd never thought was possible. Pushed me to a place that I didn't think was possible. And it's because he he really lives for what he does. And he surrounds himself by people who feel the same. And and when those people come together, it's really a crucible for I guess, really great art. I don't know. So when he was at that addition for SRI loud, you didn't get it. But did he make a point of saying to you, look, I really yeah. He's he then like hooked me up with a bunch of theater tickets, and sort of I really felt like he took me under his wing. In a way and was like whenever I came. In addition with him. He he was there and was so supportive and even one time he let me sit in on a like a business meeting of of his that he was in development for some project, and I got to sit in on just listen to them riff creatively. And I just felt like whenever he was working on something. And there was a part for me these very generous. And and was really like believed in now and to have his support at that age. I was like, I don't know. I I really felt like I was something. And so that age would have been let's let's do the math. You were born in which again ninety six ninety six and moon rise came out in two thousand twelve that we filmed that in two thousand and ten so you were fourteen I was yeah. And now for the first time having a semi substantial part in a movie like something to do as opposed to of small bit-part. What was that experience? Like because I think people sometimes forget that screen acting is such a different beast than theater acting. I think I don't know. Maybe you can maybe you don't feel that way. Yeah. I think what was tricky about the first few projects for me is I really got really scared on camera. And I started to feel like what's dangerous about fantasies is that when they don't go as I want them to go. They become kind of nightmares in a way. And I always felt like with film that I was so excited at these projects. And then that I would I was somehow disappointing the people was working with. And then it was like it was as if I'd been given access to like go do Hogwarts, but all the people that I dreamed of getting to spend my time.

Scott Rudin Chris rock director
"scott rudin" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"scott rudin" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"We'll just to give props the person who we have to think for for being here today. I guess who was this casting director and what happened. Yeah. That's Doug able well. Actually the first. Well, it wasn't Doug's of guy gave me my first job in Doug, Kass, Manchester too. But the first movie I ever for a movie called extremely loud and incredibly I came down between me and the boy who got and it was like a week long. Callback period. But that even it self came about because somebody came and saw so who was it was it was this girl named Romley in the great beneath me's mother who I think used to be a casting, and I think because Saint in the high school I went to like every celebrity in New York sends their they're so like if you go to a middle school play it's like Magill and hall, Jake Jilin Peter SARS guard. It's like, it's odd. It's like an event of some did you who was in your class? I Jennifer Connelly, Paul Bbatni. Well, but they're old. They're did they rare was there anybody. Well, you've been you're a little ahead of the curve you made it younger than most people. So there as any other. Yeah. From your year the girl in the grid beneath me my hawk. She's she's in stranger things and soon to be in a million thing. Yeah. This kid who's freshman when I was a senior really brilliant boy named Fred has Shingo. Okay. Who just got one of the leads in the new Joe Wright film lady in the window? Yeah. He plays opposite, Amy Adams. And I don't know. I think that might be it right now. I'm sure there will be more and more of it from my generation. I think that was sure. And so the mother of the girl a grade beneath the as one time casting director sees you and what nNcholas nickleby, Mike. Okay, this seventh grade. Yeah. Okay. And it was I remember this whole monologue about no one loved me. And I would just sit back trying to like think of sad things that would make me cry. And and for whatever reason I was like really good at at doing like, I could I was able to to make myself cry. And it was like nobody had seen a seventh grader do that. Like a play. So it was it was exciting people to be like, oh, there's a little boy, and he's crying, and he must be good. And I don't mean to say this to congratulate me because I think that like particular ability has gotten me into trouble as an as an actor moving forward. The idea that like oh cry you cry and that means good like, you're good. Right. When in reality. It's like I think it's very dangerous to rely on your emotions. I'm I feel like I'm talking very interesting. So from her seeing you got was in puppetry class, and I got a call from my mom or the perpetrator was like your mom's on the line. And I went outside and the phone was outside the door. And I my mom said I had an audition. And so I got really excited, and I went in and dishes for its casting director Malay Naegler. And I the next day heard back. I I went in read with Stephen Daldry director extremely loud acrylic. Yeah. Yeah. And then the day after that. And then I I was thrust into this week long audition. Call. Back. I didn't get the part was crushing. Did you think that was your one show? I remember being overcome with fear about it. And then being terrified that I would get it. And then when I didn't get it like going up to my bathroom and looking in the mirror and just crying. It's like you ever have. I don't know if you've ever get to personable sometimes in my darkest moments in my childhood, I would cry and look at myself in the near. But I met Scott Rudin who gave me this part in the waiver, the gal I did lady bird, and I was gonna say benefit charity. Yeah. And even the I did the corrections which was an HBO pilot that never got picked up of Noah Bassus. Yeah. But it began the longest most important professional relationship. I've had in my career and and Monroe he hooked up with them. We'll because..

director Mike Doug Kass Romley Scott Rudin Jennifer Connelly HBO Stephen Daldry Amy Adams Joe Wright Monroe Manchester Jake Jilin Peter SARS Fred Saint Noah Bassus Malay Naegler Magill New York