26 Burst results for "Scott Olsen"

"scott olsen" Discussed on Titus & Tate

Titus & Tate

05:00 min | 3 months ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Titus & Tate

"We have four awards left to give out tonight and this one might be. The most obvious slam dunk is what people are saying on the internet heading into duffy. Almost at the point where as we already explained. Josh passenger is not the good guy the year yeah and there was another nominee nominees coming into season one. Josh passenger bowed out of the race and there was one left. But we're going to go through their actually more nominees okay But i assume the academy was on the same campus us. But we'll see well we are now giving out good guy of the year and your nominees include. Jim christian boston college. Who is the odds on favourite the heavy favourite to win this a as we know coming into the season. He was a favourite to win. Good guy that your last year. Yes kept his job and is just a an all around. Good good person but breezy because he is such a good person the entire offseason where we're dealing with the pandemic and you're dealing with. What is basketball even gonna look like. You're happy to have guys like jim. Kirsten because again you want to be dealing with good guys yup but now that we're you know almost back to your regular scheduled programing good guys gotta go guys gotta go Speaking of guys ahead had that were shown the door archie miller also nominated who scott olsen and his in his press conference after he fired. Archie miller athletic director went out of his way to say how good of a guy archie. Miller is and this has nothing to do with if you are questioning archie miller's character if you think that's why fired this man be gone and you don't understand the character you know you don't get it and you simply do not get. That was not the issue. It was losing to purdue literally every time he played them and not making ncaa tournament and and just kind of like having every single player quit on him at the end of the year but he was a good person. And that's why nominated for good. Also ooh i like to state. I'm nervous roy. Williams has been nominated for good. I like it because he is a good guy. And that is one of those definitions. You know a look a class. Act as i said right here. I'm not the man for the job anymore. had to step aside because that is what You know the captain goes down with his ship. Roy williams is awful. Isn't even going down roy. Williams ship was going down exactly bosses. Don't you know he was. He was playing the violin himself in the corner. And everyone's like what's row he doing. We're we're eating eating caviar. Escargot over here. We're having a great time. We're drinking wine and roy. Where is it. His captain quarters all the doors and just turn on the bathtub. If it's over it's over. And the day i would always want to go down with a good guy then a bad guy and Roy williams i think that's very fair nominee because he also gave the scholarships so you know to keep a lot carolina yet donated about two million dollars so very good guy moves for roy williams Also nominated in the statement north carolina. Danny manning who was fired in april. Twenty twenty is eligible for this duffy cycle as reactor so Danny manning fired wake forest and Yeah he's nominee dump. We had on the show. We love coachman coming on the show but we also but we also got him the bump because then you got the espn job and it is true. There is doing great so now he's not allowed to come on our. He's gonna watch since they did. You just say you got coach. I'll come back on the on. The puck come back also nominated mark few. Ooh for getting. It says you're forgetting smoked by his good friend. Scotch ruin the game. I guess interesting. Also save for becoming the danny ainge of college basketball coaching. Because he's got punked by the michael jordan of scott drew. That's what it should all get it. Yeah yeah write that down a cab. I think so. I think that's what they were gonna imagine. Play and telling your secrets about what you're worried about your team scott drew's just like to eat like god fearing of a man to be used against you. Of course he taught us this. Of course he is thought it was just girls having girl talk. Yeah gavin praying. I guess what not for you know for you not today. That is good vibes of the suit. That's that's pretty. I don't know if we'll ever see coach win as many games murphy one and be nominated forget ear but it happened. He's easy answer before this year was i was gonna say sculptor they're not anymore And finally our last nominee is steve. Prohm iowa state who was shown. The door prome goes home from trauma. Put out a statement just thinking basically he thanked iowa state for firing his ass very good move staples guy. I am not the right man for the job. You see later savvy so those are the nominees. I think we know where this is going but the academy has surprised us before. Let's see if they surprise us again. Please duffy for good guy of the year decision.

roy williams Roy williams michael jordan scott olsen archie miller Archie miller Josh Williams april today steve jim roy Miller tonight one college Escargot season one four awards
Interview With Photographer, Ian Howorth

Photography Radio

05:45 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Photographer, Ian Howorth

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today. This is a treat. This is going to be so much fun. I am talking with. Ian howarth has been in the new york times. He's been in the guardian. He has spent everywhere. You can possibly imagine and in the second volume of frames magazine. He is one of the photographers. We have had the great joy to feature in the print publication. And an how you doing today. What's life like over in england. I'm very well. Thank you for having me. Yes things are very been very cold here but luckily we're having a bit of a bit of a spell of nicer weather so very grateful. Oh i'm looking forward to that where i live right now. It is minus twenty degrees fahrenheit. I don't know what that is in celsius but it's just a wee bit chilly over here so i'm looking forward to the warm up to in your work is very well known all around the world and certainly to the frames community and i want to jump right in with some notion of early days in and how you became who you are one of the things that you mentioned quite a lot. You were born to a british peruvian mother. You were born in peru and you've said that not being born and raised in central. London has really helped you understand the british sensibility or understand what it's like to be. There talked me about that a little bit. How does that change perspective. Get over into your work. Well i think. I think what really helped was the fact that you know being born and raised in peru and traveling every two years to the uk to visit my to my dad's family. It meant that from a very early age. I was able to kind of just really tell apart the difference in culture and how that translates to to what that meant visually you know but obviously there was. It was more involved than that it was officials. It was the smells being very different. I don't think well. At least back. Then i think in peru In the us. I don't think that smell of rolling tobacco and And bitter ale at with something. That was very common so for me these. These experiences kind of really really became almost cemented. My brain never really went away. So so i always have the every two years as i got older my brain develops they kind of took different meanings obviously lake so when i eventually move to england When i was sixteen. I'd already been coming here for a long time. So so these things were familiar to me but truth be told the alienness of them has never really gone away so whenever i smell that smell again so it's hard to explain it doesn't it doesn't make me feel like it's alien but it reminds me of the feeling that i had when it was once alien to me that makes sense so for me i think in in many ways having this view of of of the uk. That's been very much a part of me from a very young age but hasn't been innately a part of me like someone who was born here as maybe helped me look. Let's the country were live in in in a very different kind of way an office. Very visual person. You know maybe not. Everyone is visual. So i think the marriage between those two things is well. Maybe help me of look hits england in the way that i have. It's it's an interesting distinction. Photographers talk all the time about originality or freshness you know something that calls to their sensibility in thus you know. They point the camera that direction to think of it. As the alien to think of it as as the not common to me Aspect is a fascinating way to think about what we go out shooting for us. Say that you began your career making videos. Tell me about that. Yeah i studied filmmaking at university effectively. And it's something that i didn't pursue immediately after finishing my degree i actually got a pretty normal job. I did that for many years. And it's only when i was maybe twenty eight's that i started really exploring the the idea that i wanted to create something visual and that just manifested itself as making videos now. The time i was mountain biking law imagines thought well what better way to do. Something quickly on turnover. Quickly that making videos of yourself mountain biking so that number me became the process by which i created images at its at them and then deliver something and you know the more. You did it more than you knew how to shoot out of frame how to do this how to do that. And i think from that i think he just developed into a real thrill to to create to create visuals and he just happened to manifest itself as video so as things progressed. I did different things. And i was getting a bit older ourselves. Getting more confident with approaching people and doing things in a collaborative sense so so then kind of like you know Transition into making music videos and and my partner at the time she was a singer so it makes sense to film her. You know her kind of artistic exploits. So i would film her bands kind of rehearsing or whatever or will do a music video and then we up the budget each time new on unsown and so forth but i think what. I ended up discovering the more. I did it. And the more. I gots the more i got involved with with video and filmmaking whilst that the output was very low and also. I've found that much of the time the ideas that you had initially than get watered down the more you got into the project. So there'd be funny shoes that be scheduling issues so by the end of it. You'd have very much a fraction of what you had envisioned initially

Ian Howarth Peru Scott Olsen England The New York Times UK London United States
Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

Photography Radio

06:02 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today we are going old school and we are going deep into a really really wonderful type of photography. That's not practice very much anymore and really frankly when you see it. It's going to knock your socks off. We're talking with shane belkevich. Shane happens to live just a couple hours. West of me out here on the great plains of north america up north dakota chain that afternoon. How's everything out in the middle part of the state. good scott. thanks for having me on. We've got a little snow last night. Which was a very welcomed. Got a little snow over here. It's cold it's january is imagine about winner on the american that should be asked should be. You're absolutely right shane. You are just absolutely mesmerizing with the work. You're doing you do wet plate colin on photography. You do when one of the earliest styles of photography and admit you know. When i first heard about it i thought why in the world would anyone want to go through that amount of work for an image that i can do in my mirrorless. Dsl are very quickly. And then i realized how wrong. I was can't do that image and i certainly can't come up with a product that you've come up with so first question for people that that are familiar with the process. What is wet plate photography. What is the whole call it on process. Yeah so a wet plate clothing. Photography's invented by frederick scott archer in. He started working on about eighteen. Forty eight we believe in eighteen fifty one. He came out with a journal article in a scientific journal and presented it to the world. So what we're doing. I'm sure many of your listeners. Know about daguerreotype process which was invented by the declare. The frenchman About ten years. Before what plaguing frederick scott archer wanted to improve on that and This is what he came up with and the final product. And what your comment about why. You can't capture wet played in a modern a digital camera. Is that this is completely analog and the final images the images that i make. I an amber typist. That means i make my photographs on glass specifically for me black glass and these images are made out a pure silver on glass. And what's about silver silver does not degrade so these images that i have Have made over the last eight years of made a three eight hundred of them all by ten most most eight by ten black last amber types of they'll be here thousand years from now broken which which is not something you can save for princeton pigments in paintings and other things like that so the these are very archival images and i. it's just a very very romantic process. i was never photographer before. A two thousand twelve took my first exposure on october. Fourth never owned a camera. And i just find myself chasing this this historic process. It is really really interesting and we need to tell people that there is a movie out. There is called belkevich b. a. l. k. o. w. i t. s. c. h. on video. It's on amazon. Prime it is a documentary about you and your work and folks. You need to go there. You need to watch this film if you are in the any kind of photography. You need to do this but shane one of the things. That really intrigued me. Watching the film is that most of us that are in the photography files were making digital files. Or you know. We're coming up even if we're still dealing with old thirty five millimeter film or that kind of stuff Medium format film. You know we come up with a negative but then you know actual print is a temporary thing. You much more like a sculptor are making an object's this glass plate and it's not revisable you can't go back and tweak the highlights you can't go back and ask grain if you want. What is the appeal of making that object versus a kind of idea. We have to understand most web play. Cloudy and artists There was one here in bismarck. North dakota orlando scott gough. When he he was known for capturing the first ever photograph of sitting. Bull here bismarck. In the in this process that i practice and i i happen to capture ernie lapointe the great grandson. The city hundred thirty five years later in the same town in the same process but goth would have made a negative like you had said he would make a glass of so instead of putting his images onto black glass which you cannot contact with. He would have used clear glass. Clear glass as you insinuated. You can make multiple copies and you can enter. The final product in that scenario is a print. Because you want to be able to sell you know apprentice shayna print scott where wants to print you can make as many prints of these want is your business and it. Did you know good to have a one off plate because you and you know when you're talking about eighteen fifty one is no way of duplicate and they didn't have scanners and we couldn't do anything like that so you know. I think there's something very special about the the fact that these images are one offs and they can never be duplicated in they can never be replicated. When i make one of these images. I've for instance. I've dropped an image once and tried to go five minutes later. Ten minutes later tried to make this image with the same sitter the same camera. The same lenses saint chemistry. And i can never get back to that so if you look at this romantically. I'm not actually taking snapshots people actually making ten second movies. I'm still life movies. Because my exposures in my natural studio that i built here in bismarck. It's called nostalgic glassware plate studio the first one in in the country bill of the ground up and over a hundred years. I'm making ten second exposure. So there's heartbeats and there's blood flowing through the person there's a couple. Maybe a blinker to and what. I really love about this is. Maybe there's a thought so. I'm capturing thought on that piece of glass pure silver. That'll be here on.

Frederick Scott Archer Shane Belkevich Scott Olsen Shane North Dakota Colin North America Scott Gough Ernie Lapointe Scott Shayna Print Scott Bismarck Amazon Orlando
"scott olsen" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

05:17 min | 5 months ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine. My name is scott olsen. And today we're diving deep today. We're gonna get into not only magnificent photography and intriguing so may gang but into philosophy and spirituality. We're talking with. Sean tucker. Sean is well known throughout the world for his videos on youtube and elsewhere and his images frankly are breathtaking. so welcome. how are you doing today. I'm good thank you. Thanks for having me scope. It is my pleasure you know. I'm really looking forward today. Because so much of the work we do is well beyond the technical aspects of photography and so often we look out our window or door. We're going out to shoot and we think what in the world am i doing. What what is it that this work is really all about behind all the technical stuff. There is the core. There's the soul there's motivation. There's vision that there's all the things that make photography special and you have made a good bit of your career in especially with the films that you have on youtube talking. About the spiritual side of photography you quote may certain albert camus. Carl young a niacin and mark twain and a dozen other philosophers. And you say again you somewhere in your web presence you say. Photography is more than a technical exercise for me. it's also a spiritual practice. I couldn't agree more. And i'm looking forward to unpacking that a little bit with you but like so often you i. I wanna start at sort of the beginning. You say you mark the beginning of your career of when you were eight years old and you took a picture of a seagull. Tell me that story to tell me about the very beginning of your self understanding as the tougher it would probably i would say eight zero nine years old and at the time i think my dad left home about four years before that when i was about four and i think i was a pretty rootless shy retiring little boy and i suppose with my family was struggling to find my place within my family because my mom had remarried and his new man in my life i was hoping would be a father wasn't actually keen to sort of get the package deal of a a mamun two kids so he said it made it clear to us that he was going to be my sister's father when she came along but he wasn't actually are far the so we were kind of sort of on the side or felt very much on the side of things and were shipped off to boarding school fairly early. And i suppose whether diffa me was just made me constantly look for affirmation. Because i didn't feel at home in my own family was looking for people to tell me i was okay and i wasn't broken or i wasn't doing things wrong and we gone down to the seaside one day. It was just my mom and my little brother and myself and we'd be walking around. Oh my grandmother. We walking around the town and we got down to the harbour at some point. And there's a tradition in england. Where you where you have Hot chips wrapped in newspaper is the quick goto meal so we went to one of these chickpeas local gypsies and we picked up in a newspapers usually covered in salt and vinegar the seeps through the paper and we go sit by the harbour front worst the boats come in if you've been to the The kale and seagulls a particular menace. So eating your food. You really have to be careful. That one doesn't dive bomb. You nick meal out of hand so we we were sitting there eating watching an i. I'd recently been given a point. Shoot film camera with zip zip wind on back plastic little thing but i loved it because i think at the time as well. It gave me something to do creative distraction but it also. It's sort of made me look busy to the adult. So they wouldn't bother me as much. Because i was quite shy and retiring and so seagull landed perched on their on the railing in front of our bench. Kind of eyeing us up. Grandma little cameron. I stood up and stalked him. He let me get really close to him. I think because he was i think he thought i was bringing him chips but stalking place. Replace a mask really close to and snap a shot of him and when my mom had that film developed and we were sitting over the kitchen table probably in a week or two later. We've sort of leafing through the prince. She pointed that one out with the seagull. And she said that's a really good photograph and she said maybe you'll be a photographer one day and that for some reason at that point we had these little things people say is that they might have said in passing but the meant a great deal to us even though they were throwing for them. That little comment from my mom was like oxygen. It was like just all the affirmation i needed the world and i think somewhere that kind of love of photography attached itself to that feeling of being affirmed for doing a good thing and i mean it would be years before i became a professional photographer. I think it was. I got into professional photography in my mid twenties but it just sat in the back of my head a photographer one day and that's where it came back around. I think

Sean albert camus mark twain Sean tucker scott olsen youtube today Carl young frames magazine eight zero nine years old eight years old photography dozen mark
Sean Tucker Shares His  Thoughts ON Photography And Spirituality

Photography Radio

05:17 min | 5 months ago

Sean Tucker Shares His Thoughts ON Photography And Spirituality

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine. My name is scott olsen. And today we're diving deep today. We're gonna get into not only magnificent photography and intriguing so may gang but into philosophy and spirituality. We're talking with. Sean tucker. Sean is well known throughout the world for his videos on youtube and elsewhere and his images frankly are breathtaking. so welcome. how are you doing today. I'm good thank you. Thanks for having me scope. It is my pleasure you know. I'm really looking forward today. Because so much of the work we do is well beyond the technical aspects of photography and so often we look out our window or door. We're going out to shoot and we think what in the world am i doing. What what is it that this work is really all about behind all the technical stuff. There is the core. There's the soul there's motivation. There's vision that there's all the things that make photography special and you have made a good bit of your career in especially with the films that you have on youtube talking. About the spiritual side of photography you quote may certain albert camus. Carl young a niacin and mark twain and a dozen other philosophers. And you say again you somewhere in your web presence you say. Photography is more than a technical exercise for me. it's also a spiritual practice. I couldn't agree more. And i'm looking forward to unpacking that a little bit with you but like so often you i. I wanna start at sort of the beginning. You say you mark the beginning of your career of when you were eight years old and you took a picture of a seagull. Tell me that story to tell me about the very beginning of your self understanding as the tougher it would probably i would say eight zero nine years old and at the time i think my dad left home about four years before that when i was about four and i think i was a pretty rootless shy retiring little boy and i suppose with my family was struggling to find my place within my family because my mom had remarried and his new man in my life i was hoping would be a father wasn't actually keen to sort of get the package deal of a a mamun two kids so he said it made it clear to us that he was going to be my sister's father when she came along but he wasn't actually are far the so we were kind of sort of on the side or felt very much on the side of things and were shipped off to boarding school fairly early. And i suppose whether diffa me was just made me constantly look for affirmation. Because i didn't feel at home in my own family was looking for people to tell me i was okay and i wasn't broken or i wasn't doing things wrong and we gone down to the seaside one day. It was just my mom and my little brother and myself and we'd be walking around. Oh my grandmother. We walking around the town and we got down to the harbour at some point. And there's a tradition in england. Where you where you have Hot chips wrapped in newspaper is the quick goto meal so we went to one of these chickpeas local gypsies and we picked up in a newspapers usually covered in salt and vinegar the seeps through the paper and we go sit by the harbour front worst the boats come in if you've been to the The kale and seagulls a particular menace. So eating your food. You really have to be careful. That one doesn't dive bomb. You nick meal out of hand so we we were sitting there eating watching an i. I'd recently been given a point. Shoot film camera with zip zip wind on back plastic little thing but i loved it because i think at the time as well. It gave me something to do creative distraction but it also. It's sort of made me look busy to the adult. So they wouldn't bother me as much. Because i was quite shy and retiring and so seagull landed perched on their on the railing in front of our bench. Kind of eyeing us up. Grandma little cameron. I stood up and stalked him. He let me get really close to him. I think because he was i think he thought i was bringing him chips but stalking place. Replace a mask really close to and snap a shot of him and when my mom had that film developed and we were sitting over the kitchen table probably in a week or two later. We've sort of leafing through the prince. She pointed that one out with the seagull. And she said that's a really good photograph and she said maybe you'll be a photographer one day and that for some reason at that point we had these little things people say is that they might have said in passing but the meant a great deal to us even though they were throwing for them. That little comment from my mom was like oxygen. It was like just all the affirmation i needed the world and i think somewhere that kind of love of photography attached itself to that feeling of being affirmed for doing a good thing and i mean it would be years before i became a professional photographer. I think it was. I got into professional photography in my mid twenties but it just sat in the back of my head a photographer one day and that's where it came back around. I think

Sean Tucker Carl Young Scott Olsen Youtube Albert Camus Mark Twain Sean England Nick Cameron
"scott olsen" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

04:13 min | 5 months ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today i have an absolute thrill we are talking with doug hill. Doug is a corporate photographer. A fine art photographer. His work has been all over the place. It's in magazines books. Catalogues it's at the j. Paul getty museum the library of congress the museum of photographic arts in huntington library. You know of course for his work at frames a very active member of the community. Doug welcome how's everything out in los angeles today. Thank you very much scott. It's a pleasure to be here today. It's probably seventy five degrees and sunny but we're on stay at home orders though. I'm stuck in the office at the moment. Oh th that's a shame because seventy five degrees and sunny out in los angeles. That's a photographer's dream. That's what everybody hopes for. You could get that beautiful light out there does. There is so much that. I wanna talk to you about your photography there. There's so much about this. That i find really impressive and enlightening but i got to begin at the beginning i i really wanna know. How in the world did you get from being you know the seven year old with instamatic up to a world class corporate and fine art photographer. I got started. I got my first series camera niagara matt and the reason that i got it was that i was going out with someone who was very interested in pursuing an acting career. And the well. Here's a perfect opportunity. I'll have a model someone that i can work with them. And start to figure out how the camera work then actually worked out pretty well straight off the bat and i had access to actors and actresses drew agents and producers and folks like that so i began doing head shots and i did that for several years but after awhile i began to burn out on. I certainly loved working with people but there was something about the process of shooting. That was kind of growing stale. So i started looking around for other things that i could do with a camera. I had been interested as a kid in architecture. Thought i might even become an architect at one point except that there was way too much math involved and I i got a four by five. Large format camera and began shooting buildings that interested me but didn't know what to do next with it so i started calling all of the architectural photographers. The serious ones in the area Maybe a dozen people. It was before the the field had really burgeoned. I call them all Asking if they need assistance most of them alike. We said no including julius schulman said nad on the internet system Recommended a guy named leeland lee who had been his assistant for a number of years especially through the period when julius was at the height of his powers and he said you talked to leland and i have confidence that that that may work out. I called leyland. Leland was gracious enough to say sure. Come on by. I showed him some of my work. He said well. This isn't very good Which was but i thought. Okay i'll i'll plough on. But he said you know what. I can use an assistant and you're welcome to to start doing that. If it interests you so it did very much. And i learned an incredible amount from him working with him in the first year that i got to know him and i started to pick up clients and found that i really enjoyed the work. I enjoyed working at a much. Slower pace It was hard work physical work. There's a lot more lighting. The cameras were larger and heavier. It required an attention to detail that i discovered i. I really enjoyed so. I stuck with architecture photography for many years at the same time. It's doing some fine art. I had gone to ucla and studied there. And and also cal arts. So i i was sort of on these two tracks one being the commercial architectural work and the other being fine art.

los angeles Doug scott olsen doug hill scott scott olson congress first series today seventy five degrees frames magazine seven year old museum of photographic arts j. Paul getty museum frames printed photography huntington library
Interview With Douglas Hill

Photography Radio

04:13 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Douglas Hill

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today i have an absolute thrill we are talking with doug hill. Doug is a corporate photographer. A fine art photographer. His work has been all over the place. It's in magazines books. Catalogues it's at the j. Paul getty museum the library of congress the museum of photographic arts in huntington library. You know of course for his work at frames a very active member of the community. Doug welcome how's everything out in los angeles today. Thank you very much scott. It's a pleasure to be here today. It's probably seventy five degrees and sunny but we're on stay at home orders though. I'm stuck in the office at the moment. Oh th that's a shame because seventy five degrees and sunny out in los angeles. That's a photographer's dream. That's what everybody hopes for. You could get that beautiful light out there does. There is so much that. I wanna talk to you about your photography there. There's so much about this. That i find really impressive and enlightening but i got to begin at the beginning i i really wanna know. How in the world did you get from being you know the seven year old with instamatic up to a world class corporate and fine art photographer. I got started. I got my first series camera niagara matt and the reason that i got it was that i was going out with someone who was very interested in pursuing an acting career. And the well. Here's a perfect opportunity. I'll have a model someone that i can work with them. And start to figure out how the camera work then actually worked out pretty well straight off the bat and i had access to actors and actresses drew agents and producers and folks like that so i began doing head shots and i did that for several years but after awhile i began to burn out on. I certainly loved working with people but there was something about the process of shooting. That was kind of growing stale. So i started looking around for other things that i could do with a camera. I had been interested as a kid in architecture. Thought i might even become an architect at one point except that there was way too much math involved and I i got a four by five. Large format camera and began shooting buildings that interested me but didn't know what to do next with it so i started calling all of the architectural photographers. The serious ones in the area Maybe a dozen people. It was before the the field had really burgeoned. I call them all Asking if they need assistance most of them alike. We said no including julius schulman said nad on the internet system Recommended a guy named leeland lee who had been his assistant for a number of years especially through the period when julius was at the height of his powers and he said you talked to leland and i have confidence that that that may work out. I called leyland. Leland was gracious enough to say sure. Come on by. I showed him some of my work. He said well. This isn't very good Which was but i thought. Okay i'll i'll plough on. But he said you know what. I can use an assistant and you're welcome to to start doing that. If it interests you so it did very much. And i learned an incredible amount from him working with him in the first year that i got to know him and i started to pick up clients and found that i really enjoyed the work. I enjoyed working at a much. Slower pace It was hard work physical work. There's a lot more lighting. The cameras were larger and heavier. It required an attention to detail that i discovered i. I really enjoyed so. I stuck with architecture photography for many years at the same time. It's doing some fine art. I had gone to ucla and studied there. And and also cal arts. So i i was sort of on these two tracks one being the commercial architectural work and the other being fine art.

Doug Hill Paul Getty Museum Museum Of Photographic Arts Huntington Library Doug Niagara Matt Scott Olsen Los Angeles Library Of Congress Julius Schulman Leeland Lee Scott Leland Leyland Julius Ucla
interview With Thomas Bienert

Photography Radio

04:23 min | 6 months ago

interview With Thomas Bienert

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine. My name is scott olsen. And today i am thrilled. I am really excited to talk to thomas. Thomas has a long and distinguished career in photography is a very active member of the frames community. And i am looking forward to this conversation. Thomas good morning hi scott. I should tell everybody that as we're recording this i am sitting in the mid west of the united states and you are in germany. How is photography life and covid and life in germany these days. yes. I think like most of the countries. It's a much more difficult to work as much more difficult. Because you have to take care of yourself take care of the people you work with. So we're all happy when we're through with that. I think we are all looking forward. I think there's to be an explosion of taga fy once the vaccine comes out and we can start moving around again. I'm going to tell everybody something from your website here in describing who you are mean. I'm just gonna read what you wrote. Because i think this is wonderful. You say that you grew up between cow pastures and potato fields in the lower rhine. You studied visual communication and the cosmopolitan city of krefeld as a designer. When miami vice was still a television series showing your age there. Thomas you have sold herbal liquor. Lipsticks and bank loans as creative director in an advertising firm and you have painted drawn written composed made music filmed and photographed and photographed and photographed. You say that inbetween you've been happily married helped to children improve the world and always made art in your head. I think that is just fantastic. Thomas before we get into your work which for many reasons. I find personally compelling tell me how you got started. Tell me about you know being a five year old with your first camera or however this came into your life. My father worked as a painter so he painted houses not not an art painter but he wanted to be an artist but so he didn't make it so he was but he was always interested in photography and he had an old camera which had damaged light meter and he'd tried to tell me how to take pictures. And as i do not get it. How i don't know The aperture and the shutter speed and you have to look at how the sun is is bright. It's aperture number eight something. I learned it by this. Because it's all it was all analog and it was all with film there was no digital Help at this camera end was very funny to receive the first photographs. You open the box and you have nearly ninety percent of that was crap to large. I learned the hard way. I'm really happy now to to work with digital cameras really. Oh absolutely but what is it about photography. That was appealing to you. Way back then. When i was young i didn't know it was just just the fun about it. What i found out later. Is that as i worked for many many years in advertising and i have a great knowledge about making films and conception of making films and we're thinking about music and all this what you need to make good commercial but there's not one thing that can capture emotion in a part of a second that is photography no music if you take music if you reduce it to just a part of a second. It will not get any emotion. The same with with film photography can can do it. You take you slice the time into a part of a second and you see a picture ended it catches you and this is what i found so interesting to find the right moment to to to something. Visualize that is maybe sometimes not all the time but sometimes it's only there for the pot of of a second that's amazing it's like magic.

Thomas Krefeld Scott Olsen Germany Scott United States Miami
Interview With Ryan Herz

Photography Radio

05:27 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Ryan Herz

"Well did afternoon everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today i am talking to a member of the frames community ryan hers. Orion's work is all over our group. It is engaging it is provocative. It's the kind of work that you look at. And you're you're going to have a response to it. Personally i find it absolutely thrilling. An end fascinating ryan good afternoon. How're you doing pretty good. how are you. i'm doing great. You're out in santa monica california. Did tell me what you see out your window. What kind of day is it out there. It's pretty much seventy five degrees Another perfect Or another shitty day embarrass dice. All right well. I i envy you that here on the planes as it's gray and cold and snow ian winners coming in. You began your photography career when you were twelve years old and you came across an old range finder in a drawer. Tell me that story. Tell me how you got started in photography. Yeah i think actually it was more like it was about ten and i found an old contacts range finder in a drawer. Not being used. And i think it had been forgotten and somehow i latched onto it and i'm not quite sure how i learn to use it but i did and then a few years later there was a huge fire. One of those big california brushfires in my neighborhood. And i somehow got it together and took very poor pictures of the fire and the planes and i thought that was great in the photo bug was planted right then never left me. What what is it at age. Twelve or thirteen over that sent you out to photograph the fires versus. Just run away head you already been smitten a little bit by capturing images or what was the. What was the motivation there. I'm seventy three. That's a long time ago. There was always something about getting the images. I remembered i have one cute picture of me in my cub scout uniform with the context around my neck. My cub scout had turned backwards. So i don't know what pretended you were taking pictures. That bill was getting in the way where you go. that's right. we started the whole movement. There you go there you go. You also mentioned that. You took a two day seminar when you were in college with eugene smith that taught you as you claim the appreciation of the photo essay. Well okay i mean. Obviously we know what photographs are. What do you mean by the photo essay well especially with gene. Smith's work at life magazine. Was that former. You got to use eight or ten pictures. Basically to tell a story not a book nada along scale project but something you would go into for probably a few weeks and try and get eight or ten pictures. That convinced it all now. In his case obviously he was a master at it and obviously each composition was better than the last and medium and talking to him a little bit and observing him. Gave me a lot of input. Into what i want to do in the future and also what. The possible costs were because this is about nineteen seventy he had been fighting with various editors for basically his career and it was to the point then when he had recorded. I don't know how he'd recorded. But he ed recordings of his conversations with various editors and how they didn't understand what he was doing at the time and he actually broke into tears at one point in front of about thirty five forty people other points he was brilliant and other point see was certainly technically a master. So that was very insightful. I thought he was a rather troubled man at the time. And i had hopes for his future and lo and behold a year later he started minamata which obviously was a large-scale book project that was very very successful in lead to some of his best images. There's a good lesson. They're on both sides of success and working through the the struggle when people don't appreciate the kind of stuff that we're trying to get out there. I don't think that's unique to photography. I think musicians. I think writers. I think dancers all when they come up against a border are gonna meet resistance Border is is there because of some evolution of the form hasn't quite grown that direction. I bring that up. Because i am looking at your project called unseens which you subtitle street. Photography in the age of photoshop street photography is supposed to be the very real the documentary the untouched. And here you are really playing with that form so tell me about surrealism in street photography telling me about unseens. Where did it come from. What are you doing. Well in terms of surrealism. I've always considered myself and have a healthy dose of that. And i think a lot of the street photographers in france. Were surrealist their hearts. Certainly critize and man ray were surrealist and it was a thread that went through everything back then in paris at the time when everybody found the like and that was really the birth of the street. Photography movement my estimation anyway Unseens are a little different. They're not different than street photography in that they are not planned. They are not set up

Ryan Scott Olsen California Orion Santa Monica Eugene Smith Minamata Bill Smith France Paris
Interview With Sharon Williams

Photography Radio

04:36 min | 9 months ago

Interview With Sharon Williams

"Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the frames podcast. My name is Scott Olsen. And today I am Overjoyed to be talking with Sharon Williams Sharon is a member of the frames Community. She lives in one of God's gifts to photographers Ireland and his doing work that when it goes by on my screen is immediately arresting immediately compelling and someone that I've wanted to meet and talk to about her work for some time now Sharon, how are you today? I'm really good Scott. How are you? I am wonderful. I have to ask because I'm just completely jealous. How is Ireland? What does Ireland look like today? Well, Ireland Spain Four Seasons in one day. I suppose as it is most often. It's a very wet and windy but lots of sunshine in between. Oh man. I've Had The Good Fortune to be there a couple of times and every single bit of it from you know the song Inner City to the the countryside is from a photographer's point of view. I think really compelling you are doing work that is not like the work a lot of people on the commission are doing and work that when it goes by as I said really does cost me to stop and look and you're calling it fine art floral photography. That's not all you do. You do landscaping do portraits that this is all on your website for those of you that are that enjoy looking at websites during these conversations. Her website is s Williams images.com s w i l l i a m s i m a g e s. Tell me how you got started in photography. Did you remember your first camera? Do you remember when you first start thinking of yourself as a photographer? Yes. Well, that's not that long ago and my husband bought me a Camera DSLR nickel and for Christmas one year. It's probably dead. 2014 and and then a couple of months later. I'm thrilled cuz I had an idea that I would like to take photographs and a few months later wage. I work in the local hospice and we were looking at maybe doing a calendar for the first year as a fundraiser, cuz I had me brand new camera. I was nominated as a photographer. So there's no pressure. So it was the best thing ready cuz it really focused my attention on what I was doing and I said about we change the the Hospice and and dairy here boy hospice is set an amazing Grimes. We it's it's on the banks of the river Foyle and it has sneezing Gardens that I've been a script and maintained by volunteers over thirty years. And so that's where I immediately Drew my inspiration from the calendar and the calendar worked out really well. So I was inspired to sort of keep going. And did you have any training at all or was it just you know work yourself off of automatic as as gradually as you could chuck. Yeah. Well, my dad does spend to stay away from automatic and go straight into Nigel. So that's what I've always done. I never use automatic. In fact, if I do I get confused. I like the absolute control over what I'm doing but in the September of the following year, I did take a short course in the local College here and the city and Guilds of course and which really introduced me to page, you know, hire a camera works and and introduced me to a new community of people as well which and it was amazing. And then after that I took another course and it was at that point. I had started really experimenting with this and came across this sort of like pad photography, but I have to say I was always fairly experimental because off The rules were a bit too fast and maybe a bit too rigid for me. So I had always sort of my first delved into like an intentional camera moves. I see em work. Yep. And I love that. I just love the movement you could get from that. And from there. I started working in Photoshop bringing like the Box focused into the ICM work and blend on the two together so very abstract and but seemed to go down well with you know, some people that aren't really appreciated it so long I kept going.

Ireland Sharon Williams Sharon Scott Olsen River Foyle Spain Scott Williams Drew Nigel
Interview with Julie Grahame

Photography Radio

07:47 min | 10 months ago

Interview with Julie Grahame

"Well. Hello everyone, and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine. My name is Scott Olsen, and today I have the real real pleasure of talking with Julie Graham Julie is a photo consultants, a curator, a judge. She is one of the most involved people behind the scenes in photography today and in a real pleasure to get the insight that she has about what our world looks like. Truly Good Morning. How are you? Good Morning I'm fine. Thank you how you doing. I'm doing. Well, it's a pleasant day out here on the prairie. Nice and sunny kind of data just just makes you happy to be here. Tell me about being a photo curator because. So many of us who are not professional photographers not working for a magazine or doing weddings and stuff wind up with you know thousands and thousands of images that we know mean something and might be good as a collection that have no idea what to do with them. Tell me how your work involves making sense out of the huge mass of photographs that we all wind up with. Well the last thing you want to send a photo consultant or editors thousands of images so This is true. Certainly you're GONNA pay a lot more for the privilege. I'm honestly Scott it really the answer is it depends who are you? What are you have? What are your goals? Are they realistic? Where do you WanNa be when WHO's your audience? All of these things are the preamble to even beginning to work with somebody. I think there are two aspects of being a photography consultancy. You can either just hire me to edit your images. Say You WANNA make a book proposal or You want to redesign your website and you're not sure will albums you want to have on there there and how many images should be in there. You don't need to talk to me don't hire me for an entire hour. You can just tell me what you need in some the images and and get get a decent price according me, and then there's the other ocean, which is why you're more involved we together for an hour two hours or however many hours you need. An, rarely drove down into those things that I that I just mentioned what's realistic for you and how you're going to get there, and you know the web is affording US access to lots more eyeballs than ever. So choice be very realistic with my clients as to whether having a book is really a an optional goal for them or whether they should perhaps be publishing their work online and trying to drive a new audience to that. Instead those kinds of things it's kind of like being therapist. Tell me what kind of insight you generally bring to a client. Because if if I do say I wanted to redesign my website, you have good taste, but you also have a business. Of, what works tell me what a typical conversation might involve somebody call because they want a new website or they want to figure out what to do with their work? How does that conversation proceed? Well, I would normally have ten fifteen minute chat with them and again, just kind of understand if you want to redesigned website launching a new website, who's it for? How are they going to find? It so that that branches off into other questions you have a prison Sloan, instagram generate one is your projects. Are they need? Can you find target audience? So we would drill down you know what do you have someone may think they have four different kinds of portfolios and I might look one hundred images and think there's really just one serous here and then we would have to talk about. What else do they have often photographers not the best editors of their work. So would not case over like to see more than less what are they doing until now? which what of that's been working for them and what hasn't depending on what kind of photographer they? They might be a commercial photographer trying to look for an appetizing clients in which case I would want to know can you tell me which brands you love you would think you would like to shoot for and do you really have work that you could approach them with go to find out who the director was for the latest Nike Campaign. So help people kind of do research think more clearly, you can't just spreads your images out across everywhere will come. To it, but it published my own photography magazine on the weapon. The worst thing is if someone sends me, a project is clearly something I would never publish because of never published anything like it before and it clearly not my taste. So being discerning makes you look more professional. So having all those kinds of questions and oftentimes photographers not sure I've had people really resist me on these questions as well but I think it's super important. I don't think anyone can afford to say who my audience is yet if you're not really sure you really need to find. So, again, you're not gonna be sending someone thousands of images, but you're GonNa win be sharing enough so that I can really get a proper sense of you know maybe where I think you should be I might find images that you didn't think gray or thought went into a particular section on your website and I think differently and I would talk about who might be interested in those images. How can you describe them so that they might be found online, which is a huge issue with lots of photographers they don't do the most basic. Fundamentals premeditated the files and keywords their websites and missing opportunities to be found. So I'll be lucky if I can do all that internal fifteen minutes before higher. I try. It is it is amazing and it's not just for photographers, but it is amazing. How much insight? An extra set of eyes and especially as an exercise that has some experience can bring to understanding your own work. I. Do want to say to everyone listening you have a wonderful website. It's Julie Graham Dot COM J. U. L. E. G.. R. A. H. A. M. E. DOT COM, which goes over all sorts of stuff julie. Tell me how you got to be a photo consultant. How did you get from age twelve to now? Okay. Well, I was born in London England sometime last century and I left Scola sixteen and I actually went to train at Konica and I worked for a couple of years in a company bonus print doing one hour. See Forty one negative. Devon prints which at the time and the truly judging every single negative by making prints for a smooth and local community was on a local high street in London. which was fabulous had a great time and I learned a lot of this lay and then eighteen I went back to school and studied photography two years came out. The other end wasn't very good. Actually tool of photography and I was terrible at theory. I knew I didn't want to be a photographer. I wanted to be in photography industry. Somehow I'm back in nosed as well. Any good media student with day would be to get the Guardian newspaper on a Monday and Kim the back for the media jobs and I applied for a job managing a photo agency. I got rejected and then a couple of weeks later they email email Co.. Called me and asked me if I'd be interested in a filing position. So I went for an interview I got hired on the spot I hadn't really been to show what the job was. I spent my first few weeks cutting up to Nicole to transparency is mounting them in Kabul mounts rights in the name of it was a mutant mainly music photography, licensing agency. So we were essentially had hundreds of music photographers bringing in transparencies, and that prints we would make dukes Othello syndicating with around the world and everybody was selling tons of images everyday to magazines and newspapers but publishing it was very, very healthy business.

Consultant Julie Graham Julie Scott Olsen Frames Magazine United States Julie Graham Dot Instagram KIM Othello London England Sloan Nicole Director Konica Gray Kabul Devon R. A. H. A. M. Scola
"scott olsen" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Photography Radio

"If I'm someplace and I. Hear what I call the Zen. Bell then Beleza, thing makes a sound like this. It's really tiny. But sometimes, that tiny little notation is louder. Significantly. This forecast is brought to you by frames. Upcoming Printed Photography magazine here is your today's host. W Scott Olson with other fascinating conversation. Well hello, everyone, welcome to another podcast from Frames magazine, Mine Scott Olsen, and today I have the distinct and complete honor of talking with Joel Meyrowitz Joel is the definition of street photography, and has been for decades now is a work has appeared in the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Getty, the tape modern a, he's the author of more than twenty five books, and you cannot do street photography without knowing about Joel Meyrowitz his work has been a defining and transforming for quite a long time Joel good afternoon. How're you? Could. Ask to Scott I'm great. Thank you for that. Lovely intro. God have I been around that long. Well it may be I mean I I was teasing somebody other day. If they put street photography in the dictionary, your picture would be the one next to the definition. It's you have a new book out, and it is a wonderful book. It's called how I make photographs, and it's part of the masters of Photography series in before we get into the book itself, which is a fine book. A little bit about the masters photography series. What what is that? And what is this hope? Oh I tell you. It I I am so pleased to be a part of that group about four years ago. Chris Ryan. WHO's a photographer himself in? London came to me and said you know the time is right for an online photography class that the smartphone has bread. Over a billion people on the planet you know into wanting to be photographers and improving their game. He said and I think the time is right to do an online course. And this was right about the same time as masterclass came out in California. Of course they're. They're not only photography very in a writers and. Performers in script writers and things like that, so I'm Chris and I sat together for a while. And I liked how undersea was how familiar he was with photography itself, and how he wanted to be this generous offering to make this generous offering of of you know qualified photographers who can teach and so together. We worked up but it turned out to be thirty five lessons. And the course runs five and a half hours and the modules as we call them are anywhere from four minutes to ten or twelve minutes, and they take on in my case, street photography landscape, photography portrait photography shooting from a moving car interiors. I, in you name it anything that has a photographic question. Attached to it that has become of interest to me in the course of my life is something that I try to share. In, the in the most simple and direct way, no secrets held back. Just give it all away, and and it's a it's a very reasonable price I think it's about one hundred and sixty or seventy dollars for five and a half hours. And We! We've made a community now and there are a number of other photographers, Albert Watson and Steve McCurry. And David Yaro who is a remarkable. Animal and wildlife photographer. We just brought on a woman Tara for who works for National. Geo- so I think it's growing, and it's beginning to.

Joel Meyrowitz Joel Printed Photography magazine Chris Ryan Scott Olson Joel Meyrowitz Scott Olsen Whitney Museum of American Art Scott David Yaro Frames magazine Albert Watson Bell Geo Steve McCurry Beleza Tara London California
Beowulf Sheehan

Photography Radio

07:33 min | 1 year ago

Beowulf Sheehan

"Hello everyone and welcome to frames. My name is Scott Olsen and I am talking today with Beowulf Sheehan. Beowulf is one of the most sought after most successful and I believe most important portrait photographers in New York. These days he has worked in more than fifty countries lectured at New York University and Yale among other places and if you go to his website you will see portrait of people like Oprah Winfrey Twenty Morrison Patti Smith Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewart in Kellyn Paul Simon and dozens and dozens of others. It is a body of work of which I am personally Quite envious good morning. Bill could he's got great to hear Your Voice. I do have a quick thought for you. I've not traveled to fifty countries the photograph I photographed in better than ten by way of commissions however I have photographed people from at least fifty countries and hopefully been able to travel to their worlds in cultures through those experiences. Okay I saw that on your resume and I was impressed and I'm still impressed. So tell me how things are in New York this morning. New York is a beautiful place this morning. The air is cool and crisp outside. I did have a short walk this morning. I am very fortunate that out my window. I have a cemetery so I get to see less trees and I have a great deal of quiet. What sounds I hear. Every morning in this new time of ours is usually One of two things that I hear all either your birdsong or I will hear the sound of a passing ambulance and of course happy to hear the former not to hear the ladder. That is the time in which we live summer mornings in New York. City yes Tell me about portrait photography but let let let's begin where people how in the world could you get into photography? How did you get into the kind of portraiture that you do specifically I into photography being a shy boy and wanting to make friends and prior to the thought of making friends? I wanted to be reacquainted with my father. My parents divorced when I was in elementary school. My father was out in my life for a few years and when he came back the beginning of my high school years he had a Konica thirty five millimeter camera. A Long Lens to go with it and when I arrived at high school which was a high school outside of my neighborhood I went to magnet high school for foreign languages. I was busted very early in the morning to get there. I was in the ethic minority in head a world of new friends to make and when I got to school my classmates were speaking about two things with which I was unfamiliar of the Miami Dolphins. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale and girls and I knew very little about both but I had been working in the summers and not really spend that money on anything beyond books and comic book so I had enough money saved to become the youngest person in the history of the Miami Dolphins the buy season tickets to the Miami Dolphins. That's impressive I go So what I had done was than I began to use my father's camera and I would take a tripod that camera that long lens invite a new acquaintance from high school to eat game. And I believe my mother had driven been to us down To attend these games and no one ever stopped me. The guards were very kind. They recognize me after a few games. I always went through the same gate that sort of thing and was able to watch Dan Marino or the ball around and make pictures and then make Prince of those pictures and share them with classmates over time developing friendships and of course Getting to know my father again. That's a wonderful beginning there. Is I know an extraordinary event. Though in your early connection to reading and that's possible yes but but I'll let you lead that so when you're asking the extraordinary connection is well. Yeah you you are probably the only you are the only person I know who's ever been bitten by an alligator. Oh this is true this this. I don't know all the people in your life of course who you know but but I'm the only person I know who's been bitten by an alligator and that happened to me in the summer of nineteen seventy six in June of that year. I was of course on summer break from school quite small and my brother and I were playing in the backyard of the home of a friend of my mother in southwest Fort Lauderdale where there are canals and those canals in some cases feed than Their Way West to the Florida everglades and of course. That's where alligators hang out. And some of them sometimes get lost. My brother-in-law had been wrestling. This lady's backyard was time to come into the House for lunch. I had asked the Lady of the House. If we could use your host wash our feet persons they were full of dirt from the grass and the young lady had said no actually better just a spicer feed off the dock and then it'll be quicker and I went I. I remember sitting at the dock. Enjoying splash on my feet and looking at my brother and my brother's twenty months younger than me made his eyes get bigger and he looks down on my foot. I looked at my foot and I saw the alligator close. Its mouth around my right foot and I went to some degree of shock. The allegation let go. He caught the outside artery of my ankle and bloodshot out. Allah a bad money iphone sketch. And my my brother then began to grab my body to try to pull my body up and my mother and my mother's friend of course had come out of the house at this time and they were lifting me from the document onto the grass. The allegation had gone back under the dock. And I don't know how much more time passed or how much blood I lost but I then at some point found in the emergency room of a hospital where my brother was born. Only a few blocks away and doctors worked in saved my foot. Save my leg. There was concern for infection loss and I was very lucky to have for the balance of the summer. Have Gone to the hospital every day to get my foot. Epsom salts to save it and that meant of course not being able to play games at not being able to enjoy summer camp not being able to do sports do much of anything involved mobility and that deepened my reading and then with it of course my drawing and my reading and drawing through my childhood in and beyond began with comic books and then onto more challenging books More INTERESTING BOOKS. Maybe more interesting stuff. The right word say because books are wonderful. And they're very very interesting. Otherwise we wouldn't have these films adaptations of stories that now the masses is seen film but the the books of course comic books would come out once a month and it was great to go to seven eleven after school and pick up those books but I would devour them so quickly and then I really wasn't in the mood to wait another month for the next book to come out so I would just draw stories myself. The drawing worked its way over time of course into photography. But that's a longer compensation which I'm happy to have

New York Miami Dolphins Fort Lauderdale New York University Scott Olsen Magnet High School Beowulf Sheehan Oprah Winfrey Bill Dan Marino Wrestling Morrison Patti Smith Florida Everglades Yale Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewar Paul Simon Getting
"scott olsen" Discussed on Consumer Watchdog Podcast

Consumer Watchdog Podcast

14:53 min | 1 year ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Consumer Watchdog Podcast

"Thanks for joining us this week. On the rage for Justice Report I'm Jamie the court. This is consumer watchdog's podcast. I'm here with executive director of consumer watchdog Carmen Barbara. I'm the president of consumer watchdog Jamie Court and we did a big milestone Charleston. Didn't we carmen this week. What was that milestone the big milestone this week and happy Friday? Everyone is that the fairness for injured patients act our ballot measure to update. Update the nineteen seventy-five law that cap compensation for victims of medical negligence. Studies never once been changed in forty five years hit a huge signature gathering milestone allstone. We announced yesterday that we've collected over three hundred seven thousand signatures of the required six hundred twenty three thousand to make the ballot in November. Two Thousand Twenty so a huge victory signature gathering is going really well. It's really remarkable. We're getting We thought we'd get fifty thousand signatures a week because it's only been a month been five weeks lakes and We've we're getting sixty sixty five thousand signatures a week. We are the lowest paying petition on the street. Were paying for these signatures. That's what you have to do in this world but We are going to probably if there's key things keep going this. Well turn in a month before we actually have to. And it's it's I think it's a testament to the power of the issue issue. You know a month ago a little bit more than a month ago. We were at Frank Fat's restaurant in Sacramento. which is the location where there was a deal written on the back of a Napkin? That locked in this nineteen seventy five compensation cap. It was the last word on it for the next many decades and it was set by special interest groups that was set by the legislature in a backroom deal in nineteen seventy five and after the court declared the cap constitutional. They went to this restaurant. Frank Frank Fat's the trial lawyers insurance companies. The doctors lobby the medical malpractice insurance and there are also some tobacco companies there and they basically said we want peace. We don't want war. They cut a deal on the back of the NAPKIN. Nineteen eighty seven that locked in everything. That hasn't changed since only thing is the increase. Some attorneys Contingency fee rates. which you know? It's good because consumers can get attorneys but it's bad because they should have increased the cap cap set in nineteen seventy five at two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in. It would be worth seven one one point two million dollars today or the reverse. which is that two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in one thousand nine hundred? Seventy five dollars is only worth about fifty thousand dollars for families today so imagine minimum wage which was two dollars and ten cents an hour in one thousand nine hundred. Seventy five being your compensation today just doesn't cut it in it. Means families are locked out of the courtroom. And that's what we were talking about it frank fats to the need to finally update this outdated law. That closes the courtroom door for so many families choose deal literally written on the back of a Napkin has the Napkin from Nineteen eighty-seven hang on the wall of the restaurant. So he held are launched there for the signature gathering we brought patients who are the proponents of the initiative patients who've You know faced Either not be able to get an attorney. Because of the cap where they actually saw their Verdicts reduced what happens. Happens is a jury isn't told about the cap they will go in and award to seven million dollars for instance in the case of one of the proponents on was too blind brain damaged because he couldn't couldn't get a simple test when he had a major head injury facial- facial injury and it would have detected brain mass and the side of the trial. Got The simple tests in the emergency room in the age of HMO medicine in in Andy's he'd be fine today so the jury said seven million kids never gonNA see. He's got cerebral palsy. You'll never live alone. That's what is quality of life is worth. That's what his pain and suffering thing is worth. That is what his blindness is. Disability worth in the jury left the room. Guess what the judge had reduced the award and his his his father. Scott Olsen Stevenson's father other is on our board of consumer watchdog and Steven is His picture hangs on the wall. He is one of these in one of the sweetest families. Nicest families in the world for something like this happened to in a few years ago. This was twenty eight years old now. Even the mom died. Kathy died Then she was on board as well and Scott had to quit his job to take care of Stephen. She had already ready quit her job. So that's seven million to come in handy. And here's what Scott had to say at Frank Fats About the whole about.

Frank Frank Fat attorney Scott Olsen Stevenson Kathy Jamie Court Carmen Barbara Andy Frank Fats executive director Steven president Charleston Stephen Sacramento.
"scott olsen" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on KCRW

"You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. The floods that drenched, the midwest back in March have left a trail of silt and debris across corn and soybean fields that damage continues to affect not just farms, but the farm economy, Alison Mullen camp of member station, any t- in Lincoln Nebraska reports, Scott Olsen's three thousand acre family. Farm sits along, the banks of the Missouri river north of Omaha. Portion of the land sit just feet from the river record flooding, gouge tolls and Olson's land, and scattered debris across his fields fix that stuff takes a lot of money and a lot of time something nobody has time maybe not the money anymore. Wholesome is still deciding whether he'll try to plant the five hundred flooded acres, even as more flooding is predicted this summer. So do I fix it, and try to plant it not knowing whether I've got more water coming or not? 'cause if I get more water coming on their it'll end e everything. I did. Plus, why wipe out all the crop that I just put on their farmers who clear their fields, we'll have to re level the. Soil to restore drainage Kelly, Bronkhorst within bresca corn board, says silt, deposits aren't the only thing farmers have to remove all the way from tank sand stuff that floated downriver to livestock, to tree limbs and stuff like that. Course says all that will take time and lots of money, probably about four hundred and forty million dollars worth of crop damages. Because of as we look into twenty nineteen unplanted crops, late planning and stuff like that. That's going to happen this year. Those losses don't exist in a vacuum farms, depend on things like livestock, feed seeds, and pesticides with crop yields at risk, the suffering will spread far beyond the field. Mike Mackey runs to John Deere dealerships in eastern. Nebraska flooding has both helped and hurt his bottom line in part because of damage tractors. So there's been a little uptick in the service in part side of it. Another side of it is, there's a lot of laws revenue from our producers, so naturally, they're not thinking about new equipment purchases, if they're not going to get their ground planet, or if they lost grain bins full of grain. It's a hardship other businesses also initially benefited feed had to be replaced fences repaired that meant good foot traffic for farm supply stores, but business hasn't picked up for see dealer central valley, egg and Nick McCarthy says. Flooding is still affecting their profits. He says, flood damage to roads means delivery drivers, take much longer routes being able to up charge or, or recover any extra. Additional costs due to the flooding from additional miles is, is gonna come out of come out of CVA's bottomline, basically, on the other end of the supply chain. Grain handlers, who would usually ship it by barge or train. Can't do that because of flood damage. Mike Stine hook heads. The soy transportation coalition in Iowa and says that puts additional pressure on farmers trying to sell their commodities. So they discourage farmers from making these deliveries by lowering the price that they offer for Bush beans, quarter or other commodities back in Nebraska. Scott Olsen is dealing with the second big flood in the last ten years, it makes planning that much harder every place a turnaround. I've got to do something different. But I'm not giving up businesses across the sector. We'll be doing things a little differently this summer as the effects of flooding continue to ripple through farm country long after waters recede for NPR news. I'm Alison Mullen. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Three forty eight KCRW on the next morning edition with cherry Glazer tightest say they hope Christopher could fight one of the most alarming public health threats, the rise of dangerous, superbugs, and now dodgers are recruiting paralyzed veterans to viruses, that have been genetically modified with the technology. Hear more about that and other attempts to fight the rise of antibiotic resistant viruses, next time KCRW morning edition with cherry plays everyday until nine AM. Hey, you deserve some. Thanks. You.

Alison Mullen Scott Olsen NPR Nebraska Nick McCarthy KCRW Olson Missouri river Lincoln Nebraska Omaha Mike Mackey Bronkhorst Mike Stine John Deere cherry Glazer dodgers Iowa
"scott olsen" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"I think that that's a fair would say, and I'm and I'm close with them. And he by the way, one of my worst stories and baseball involves him one of the craziest stories of all time, which I'm happy to tell you, but I still speak to stand and text with them. And that's it tell us the Stanton's stand story is that he accused me of something pub in inside a clubhouse, and we had a fight. I've never been punched and I've got a mouth, and I've never been punched. And I thought that Stanton, and I we're going to actually have a physical altercation which would have been funny because he's three times my size. Well, what have been quick to it will it would've not only been it would have been very fast. Amy hitting the floor. You hitting your face with your own fist is how that wouldn't. It was brutal. He accused me of purposefully trying to put the entire team endanger by flying them on a plane that was not worthy of flight. Ever seen major league. They weren't planning was the was the plane that bad I said to him in a very loud voice in front of the rest of the team that I'm on that plane to and I value my life way, more than value yours. So the minute I stop fine on the plane who can start complaining right now. Shut up put your uniform on and try to win a damn game. Wait a second. David did did Sherman pay one point two billion dollars to be friends with Derek Jeter? Not just to be friends, but to have the ability to have it to get his cell number. I think that's what it was one to ten David Samson. Former Marlins team president with says spent the whole hour with us. What is your relationship now with Loria? You know, we don't talk all that much. He's you know, he used to be my stepfather, but he's not any longer only in that. He he's not married to my mother anymore. But we used we spoke every day for eighteen years multiple times a day. And obviously he's now moved on. And I've moved on. I just I sit home alone in a house all day doing nothing in my underwear. And he does you know, he buys Artan does stuff. So we talk so he buys her. That's what he's doing. Now. Where does he live is he para somewhere travels has got places in various places, he's got places that have places, and he's got people who have places and he's got one boy two billion dollars. What's the angriest? You saw Laurie over something Marlins related. Oh, God when I can tell you the year we won the World Series. When he demanded that we release Kevin Ohlson. He was so angry about Kevin Olson, then I remember thinking to myself who could be that angry about a guy who is so bad. Right. I mean, you should be angry about he was tasers in his front yard. No, not Scott Olsen. You're thinking. Scott Olsen talking. Isn't that a fine? Where's the sound effect for our? So that's it. It's just me saying too. That's even better production value. That's we don't even need a sound for that. It's. Evan Olson what was so angry about 'cause we had a pitch him. And he said he won't doesn't want team with Kevin Ohlson on it. Now is in two thousand three it was bad hit a twelve seven five yard in two thousand three and. Why were you pitching him because you were not available? You made that huge splash in the winter meetings. And I think a lot of the players sort of knew what they were getting into new that if things didn't go right immediately. They might be shipped off. But they were happy to get the contracts. But it seemed as Mark Burleigh was kind of upset at the deal. Was there anybody that ever got legitimately mad at you for trading them. Even though you gave them the contract that they should have known. What the deal was. Let's talk about Mark Burleigh because he's a guy who I was close to and I was very close to his wife, and and I was very honest with them. And I'm the one who called him to tell him. He was traded. And I told him that he was being traded to Toronto, which is the equivalent of baseball hell for tax reasons for passport reasons for just all sorts of now that Montreal doesn't exist because you ruined it..

Marlins Kevin Ohlson Stanton Scott Olsen David Samson baseball Kevin Olson Evan Olson Mark Burleigh Derek Jeter Loria Amy Artan Toronto president Laurie Montreal
"scott olsen" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:47 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Horizon dot global H O R, I Z E N dot global the story here from the free thought project about a basically a tell tale. Party a very large party going on outside of a presumed some sort of a football game it Penn State university. It's that time of year. Penn State parent in tailgater Scott Olsen said that early Saturday morning. A police officer asked the fraternity tailgating next to his group to move one space over now, it's not clear if Olson was the person who called the police in or what the reason was for the police initially asking for them to move a space over. Because later in the story Olson was one of the victims of this situation. In fact, Olsen said, quote, there was no fighting or big disruption. No, one was doing anything crazy or outlandish. We didn't have any issue with them talking about the tailgaters the ones that were supposedly rowdy. We didn't have any issue with them all day. He said he did report a scratch to his Mercedes Benz truck. Thanks to a flying tent and said a girl his tailgate was cut on the face from debris because again for those just tuning in the police bring in a helicopter after having failed to simply order the rowdy folks to leave the area. Believe is the state college police state college police, I think college psychologists a town in Pennsylvania. So I can't tell if this is like the university police or the town police haven't figured this may be Penn State police. Okay. But either way it's cops with the helicopter. Always with the toys. They went in. They sweep the crowd. They went in came in close came in low and loo stuff everywhere, including canopy, tents, the quote helicopter pilot used the out to disperse said the description of one of the videos, and then use the downdraft to get the point across blown canopies, etc. Unquote, the sheer lack of concern over what the potential damage could have been as outrageous people could have been verily injured by flying tents and debris or worse. If the pilot would have lost control over the students the results could have been catastrophic especially considering the concentration of people on the ground. It could've been pure carnage. And he was flipping about when I was watching this video is kind of frightening. Can you imagine if a helicopter sent debris that hit a horse, and it got spooked, and then started trampling the kids? This could have been a tragedy said Olsen again the man who observing all of this and there were head police horses there. It's not like just you know, that's what they brought in. I right. We're the horses. Quote, if that helicopter at any type of accident, you've had people shredded everywhere and cars on fire. It's so it's so fortunate that there wasn't a major tragedy yesterday unquote naturally and insanely enough to police are standing by their decision to endanger the lives of people. Disperse a few rowdy college kids because working for the government means you never have to say you're sorry on Monday. They were forced to respond to the myriad of inquiries. As to why they would do such a thing here is there statements, and there's another update to this story, by the way. But first their initial statement from the police, quote, we understand concerns have been raised regarding police activity during tailgate celebration. Surf's don't like the way you're being ruled in one lot in advance of the Penn State for so has to game on Saturday September twenty-ninth university police wishes to reassure fans that officers were responding to the circumstances on the ground which involved numerous law violations, including serious threats to officer safety. Nobody else was apparently in danger. It was the officers who were unsafe within a disorderly crowd. They say unruly individuals refused to disperse following. Verbal commands and at least one officer suffered injuries. Now, they don't really tell you why the officer suffered injuries for all. We know he got whipped in the face with one of these tents that the the helicopter ended up throwing up. It's rare to get an officer with an injury. So anything is fine. He goes on to say, it is rare to resort to these quote, I'm adding the quotes here expanded interventions, unquote. This is a this isn't a attack with a helicopter. It's an expanded intervention. However when all other warnings from the mounted just imagining like a, you know a door mounted fifty Cal with nothing, but rubber bullets. Branding down those just an intervention we had to intervene. They wouldn't listen to our mounted police unit. He goes on to say when all other warnings from the mounted police unit officers on the ground where ignored a Pennsylvania state police helicopter, so Pennsylvania state police. That's what it is. Then that makes more sense that Pennsylvania state police would have a helicopter, then state college, Pennsylvania or the Penn State college. You had better bet that they would love to have mounted gun kind of cannon on there that would rubber bullets if they had it. They sure waited used it Pennsylvania state police helicopter was deployed as another tool to compel the group to disperse and curb dangerous and unruly behaviour following the use of the helicopter, the dangerous behaviors dissipated. People are picking through the rubble. Trying to deal with their wounds all drunk God. What a scene so it doesn't end there as I clicked onto state college dot com, which is local I think newspaper in the area to see if there was an update on this case there is story from today after a low-flying state police helicopter, deployed for crowd dispersal caused disruption at tailgates outside beaver stadium, Saturday Penn State police and public safety is at least temporarily discontinuing use of helicopters for crowd announcements at football got grounded, pending a review. Yeah. So it's not a real stoppage. It's just a for show stoppage. Okay. We're serious. We're serious about this. We understand you guys are concerned we're going to stop using the helicopter until we review. And then when we review it all of this will will do whatever they have fire copters that have fire hoses on them. Don't give them any ideas. We got more coming up here. There's a little bit more about their review and what they're saying. There's another statement here from Penn State police the toll free number eight fifty five four fifty free. That's eight five five four five zero three seven three three. And it is a little confusing is the Pennsylvania state police, or is it the Penn State college police,.

Penn State university Penn State police Pennsylvania officer Penn State college Scott Olsen football Olson Benz beaver stadium fifty Cal
"scott olsen" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Flipping over tents. I mean, yeah, Mark I would recommend that during the break you go into the back room here where we have one of these ten by ten canopy tents. It's an easy up brand. Sure. Go ahead. Heft one of those things, man. Those are not light. Right. You get hit by this. You're hurting. This is like standing out in you know, they say in the like in Florida you're supposed to put a hurricane. You're supposed to Batten down your windows because like chairs and lawn chairs and stuff can get whipped around in these. This is exactly what we're talking about. I watched the video. So I just did a Google search for how much does a helicopter way. Well, ironically, the results that just came up was helicopter are forty four police helicopter horse powder. Horsepower derating to two hundred and forty five horsepower for takeoff in two hundred and four five horsepower, continuous maximum gross weight twenty five hundred pounds to get to keep that thing. So that's over over a Tanya proximate empty weight, including oil standard, avionics and standard police packets. So no equipment at all. In this thing. It would still be one thousand six hundred thirty eight pounds standard fuel one hundred twenty seven pounds of fuel. This is for that standard police helicopter. Now, you think about that? This means that the. The air force is got to be enough air to keep two thousand five hundred pounds a loft. Right. Well, that's just a lot but lifted upward relatively quick. Yeah. Yeah. So there is a little bit more here to the story from from the folks over at the free thought project, this is from state college dot coms report. Penn State Penn State, parent and tailgater Scott Olsen said that early Saturday morning police officer asked the fraternity tailgating next to his group to move one space over. One space after the fraternities members refuse to move the officer told Olsen and his group. The fraternity would be on watch for the day. We've been told the tailgate wasn't just one fraternity like Olsen described but a senior tailgate with members of the Greek community, and they're known to be rowdy Olsen said. Police didn't check in all day until sometime between three thirty and four when eight officers on horseback and fifteen to twenty other officers showed up to disperse the frats tailgate shortly thereafter, the helicopter flew in and made a sharp cut in Olson's, I'll picking up tents and other debris. So. Yeah. This appears to be now hot and. Yeah. Penn State parent. What's not clear here is that says you're a police officer asked the fraternity tailgating next to his group. I guess they're referring to Scott Olsen. So one parents didn't like this group.

Scott Olsen Penn State officer Google Mark I Batten Florida Olson one thousand six hundred thirt two thousand five hundred poun one hundred twenty seven pound forty five horsepower four five horsepower
"scott olsen" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

07:35 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Presume some sort of a football game it Penn State university. It's that time of year. Penn State parents and tailgater Scott Olsen said that early Saturday morning. A police officer asked the fraternity tailgating next to his group to move one space over now, it's not clear if Olson was the person who called the police in or what the reason was for the police initially asking for them to move a space over because later in the story Olson was one of the victims of this situation. In fact, Olsen said, quote, there was no fighting or big disruption. No, one was doing anything crazy or outlandish. We didn't have any issue with them talking about the tailgaters the ones that were supposedly rowdy. We didn't have any issue with them all day. He said he did report a scratch to his Mercedes Benz truck. Thanks to a flying tent and set a girl at his tailgate was cut on the face from debris because again for those just tuning in the police bring in. Helicopter after having failed to simply order, the rowdy folks to leave the area state college. Police say college police, so I think state college psychologists a town in Pennsylvania. So I can't tell if this is like the university police or the town police haven't figured this may be Penn State police. Okay. But either way it's cops with the helicopter. With their toys. They went in. They swooped the crowd. They went in came in close came in low and just blue stuff everywhere, including canopy tense. The quote helicopter pilot used the PA to order the crowd to disperse said the description of one of the videos, and then use the downdraft to get the point across blowing canopies, etc. Unquote, the sheer lack of concern of what the potential damage could have been as outrageous people could have been verily injured by flying tencent, debris or worse. If the pilot would have lost control over the students the results could have been catastrophic especially considering the concentration of people on the ground. It could've been pure carnage. And he was flipping about when I was watching this video is just kind of frightening. Can you imagine if a helicopter sent debris that hit a horse, and it got spooked, and then started trampling the kids? This could have been a tragedy said Olsen again the man who observing all of this and their head police horses there. It's not like just you know, that's what they brought in. I the horses. Quote, if that helicopter at any type of accident, you'd have had people shredded everywhere and cars on fire. So it's so fortunate that there wasn't a major tragedy yesterday unquote naturally and insanely enough. The police are standing by their decision to endanger the lives of high. Disperse a few rowdy college kids because working for the government means you never have to say you're sorry on Monday. They were forced to respond to the myriad of inquiries. As to why they would do such a thing here is there statements, and there's another update to this story, by the way. But first their initial statement from the police, quote, we understand concerns have been raised regarding police activity during tailgate celebration here that you surfs don't like the way you're being ruled in one lot in advance of the Penn State were so has to game on Saturday September twenty-ninth university police wishes to reassure fans that officers were responding to the circumstances on the ground which involve numerous law violations, including serious threats to. Officers safety. Nobody else was apparently in nature. It was the officers who were unsafe within a disorderly crowd. They say unruly individuals refused to disperse following. Verbal commands and at least one officer suffered injuries. Now, they don't really tell you why the officers suffered injuries for all. We know he got whipped in the face with one of these tents that the the helicopter ended up throwing up. It's rare. They've got an officer with an injury. So anything is fine. He goes on to say, it is rare to resort to these quote, I'm adding the quotes here expanded interventions, unquote. This is a this isn't a attack with a helicopter. Intervention. However when all other warnings from the mounted just imagining like a, you know a door mounted fifty Cal with nothing, but rubber bullets. Raynham down. And look those just an intervention we had to intervene. They wouldn't listen to our mounted police unit. He goes on to say when all other warnings from the mounted police unit and officers on the ground where ignored a Pennsylvania state police helicopter, so Pennsylvania state police. That's what it is. Then that makes more sense that Pennsylvania state police would have a helicopter, then state college, Pennsylvania or the Penn State college. You had better bet that they would love to have mounted gun kind of cannon on there that would shoot rubber bullets if they had it. They sure waited used it Pennsylvania state police helicopter was deployed as another tool to compel the group to disperse and curb dangerous and unruly behaviour following the use of the helicopter, the dangerous behaviors dissipated. People are picking through the rubble. Trying to deal with their wounds all drug God what a scene. So it doesn't end there as I clicked onto state college dot com, which is a local I think newspaper in the area to see if there was an update on this case there is story from today after low-flying state police helicopter, deployed for crowd dispersal caused disruption at tailgates outside of beaver stadium Saturday Penn State police and public safety is at least temporarily discontinuing use of helicopters for crowd announcements got grounded, pending a review. Yeah. So it's not a real stoppage. It's just a for show stoppage. Okay. We're serious serious about this. We understand you guys are concerned we're going to stop using the helicopter until we reviewed. And then when we review it, we're going. All of this will will do whatever they have fire captors that have fire hoses on them. I don't give them any ideas. We got more here. There's a little bit more about their review and what they're saying. There's another statement here from Penn State police the toll free number eight fifty five four fifty free. That's eight five five four five zero three seven three three, and it is a little confusing is that the Pennsylvania state police, or is it the Penn State college police that we still are. Fanatic dot com. In the community from all over the world. Arm-in-arm strangers. Edward press dot com. The original blue Republican movement in two thousand eleven and two thousand twelve comprised liberals and independence joined the Republican party specifically to support Ron Paul. And his message of civil liberties peace and the end of cronyism we're the biggest coalition in support of Dr polls presidential candidacy. We're now. A movement of non dogmatic liberty curious Americans driven by finding common ground across divisions because winning basic freedoms back is much more important than winning arguments. And if you like the sound of that join me in the original blue Republican on liberty, talk dot FM every Saturday and Sunday at two PM Pacific five PM eastern. Revolutionary talk for revolutionary times. Liberty talk dot FM. Expected poison attack guy..

Penn State university Pennsylvania Penn State police officer Penn State college Scott Olsen Olson Benz Republican party tencent football beaver stadium cronyism Ron Paul Edward Dr fifty Cal
"scott olsen" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Then Johnson there's something that happens toward the end of this video one of the pieces of debris, it makes its way up to the helicopter blades, and it's just sort of floating in the updraft. That's that's coming as the helicopters approaching this piece of debris, that's sort of just floating. It goes up into the blade and immediately straight down shoots down. Great, very high velocity. Now. I don't know what this thing was, you know, it's not clear, it might have been a big plastic bag for all we know. But either way if it was something else, and it's hard to say, this could have harmed somebody very significantly at the the rate at which this thing is just brought straight down by the full force of whatever the blast of. I don't know. I don't know what the hell you the helicopter Bashar is suspending the entire weight of the hurricane force winds or something, you know. I mean, I don't know how fast it goes compared to a hurricane. But I bet it's pretty darn close after ways, but it's got to be at least a half a ton. I mean, so they just did it Billy slips this debris right down onto the crowd flipping over tents. I mean, yeah, Mark I would recommend that during the break you go into the back room here where we have one of these ten by ten canopy tents. It's an easy up brand. Sure. Go ahead. Heft one of those things, man. Those are not light. Right. You get hit by this. You're hurting. This is like standing out in you know, they say the like in Florida you're supposed to put your hurricane. You're supposed to Batten down your windows because like chairs and lawn chairs and stuff can get whipped around in these. This is exactly what we're talking. I just watched the video. So I just did a Google search for how much does a helicopter way. Well, ironically, the result that just came up was helicopter are forty four police helicopter horse better horsepower de rated to two hundred and forty five horsepower for takeoff in two hundred and forty five horsepower, continuous maximum gross weight twenty five hundred pounds to get to keep that thing. That's over Brittania proximate empty weight, including oil standard avionics and standard police package. So no equipment at all. In this thing. It would still be one thousand six hundred thirty eight pounds standard fuel one hundred seven pounds of fuel. This is for that standard police helicopter. Now, you think about that? This means that the air force is got to be enough hair to keep two thousand five hundred pounds a loft. Right. Well, that's just loft but lifted upward relatively quick. Yes. Yeah. So there is a little bit more here to the story from from the folks over at the free thought project, this is from state college dot coms report. Penn State Penn State state, parent and tailgater Scott Olsen said early Saturday morning police officer asked the fraternity tailgating next to his group to move one space over. One space after the fraternities members refused to move the officer told Olsen and his group. The fraternity would be on watch for the day. We've been told the tailgate wasn't just one fraternity like Olsen described but a senior tailgate with members of the Greek community, and they're known to be rowdy Olsen said police didn't chicken all day until sometime between three thirty and four when eight officers on horseback and fifteen to twenty other officers showed up to disperse the frats tailgate shortly thereafter, the helicopter flew in and made a sharp cut in Olson's, I'll picking up tents and other debris. So. Yeah. This appears to be now. Hot dogging Penn State parent. What's not clear here is says here police officer asked the fraternity tailgating next to his group. I guess they're referring to Scott Olsen. So one parent. Didn't like this group that was rowdy and asked the police to ask them to move one space over. That's what all this was about. You want the rowdy group to move one space over from you and you bring the police in on horseback. And with a helicopter to you know, what what how how long is this distance of one space. What are we talking about here? This is free talk live. There's more you wanna share it? You can join us. Tired of missing trade sorry to missing out..

Scott Olsen officer Johnson Google Bashar Brittania Billy Florida Batten Mark I Olson forty five horsepower one thousand six hundred thirt two thousand five hundred poun one hundred seven pounds
"scott olsen" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Makes this story career now, and that's the end of it in your career with the Marlins. What is the top three that you would give us on? I'm looking at unprofessional three, three people, three names, three players that you say, men that person just didn't behave professionally. Like give unprofessional stories. My favorite one is AJ Burnett, got a neck tat to the day before he was due to start. And then during the study was complaining that that it hurt like it was interrupting pitching and I just didn't understand how pitcher who only goes once every five days. Why would you get attached to the day before you're pitching it made zero sense. The second thing that I thought was outrageous is during three Pudge Rodriguez left our team, and no one talks about this because we won the World Series and I remember this those Marlins club. The team turned on Pudge. They were so mad that he left the team in the middle of the season. He's left to go visit his own hitting coach because he couldn't get a hit. So we completely bailed just woke up one day and said, that's it. I leave now I what? What do you mean? What are you going? He said, well, I gotta meet with my hitting coach. Well, what we have any coaches here, however bad they may have been. We've got enough coaches, why can't you fly your guy in? But he disappeared. But of course getting to out hit and helping us win the World Series made up for that was a rough one. There is that. And what else give us a third unprofessional story. And by the way, true or false Pudge had a giant statue of himself on his lawn. It's a hundred percent never seen anything like that statue of him. In catchers in a catcher's deer in his lawn, when he hosted a party after the World Series, and we were all taking pictures with it because it was almost hard to imagine. It was like a row debt. It was done by by who knows who, and it was just him. It wasn't him with kids with his own kids. It was just him. It was totally insane, but it was fun to watch the last unprofessional thing. And again, a guy who's very professional who I love, but it's hurts me to this day was d- Gordon not coming clean about why how and why he got suspended and we had just swept the dodgers and a four-game series couple years ago. And then he was gone for eighty games and that was the end of our season. And I just I can't understand how he would have done that still claiming that he doesn't know how it happens though. I don't understand how he would not know how it happened given that there's only one way you can't test positive for that type of. Steroid, and I just found it to be disappointing ready, have the contract, and it was just upsetting. I love that. I just asked you for three most unprofessional moments and that Scott Olsen being tasers on his front. Lawn wasn't among the. By the way you could've ad for ten. I've got seventy w. i. stories that all would tie, you know, getting the phone calls in the middle of the night Scott and would never make my list for anything because he's just it's too hard to imagine the things he did. Seven more please. I'd like seven more scuttles stories. In fact, we got five minutes left in the segment. Just want to tell stories for five minutes. I'm happy to have him. I tell you Scotto and I think he's actually I'll give you one more before him. We had a great lefty pitcher back in the day name was Sean west and he had its ability..

Pudge Rodriguez Marlins Scott Olsen Gordon dodgers AJ Burnett Lawn Sean west Scotto tasers five minutes hundred percent five days seventy w one day
"scott olsen" Discussed on The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

07:14 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

"You buy policy that meets feathering guidelines. So it has all the important consumer protections and. Okay. And it has. At least some inflation protection. Okay. Then if the policy runs out of benefits, you can protect an amount of countable assets for Medicaid that normally would have to be spent down in order for Medicaid to pay for your care. So normally for single person, in most states, someone has to spend their their savings down to about three thousand dollars before Medicaid will start to pay for their long term care, but it's someone had limited partnership policy. And let's say that policy paid out two hundred fifty thousand dollars worth of benefits. Well, the net person could apply for Medicaid even if they had two hundred fifty, three thousand dollars worth of counterblasts 'cause they still keep their. The three thousand state normally allows them plus they can keep an amount equal to what the policy had paid him benefits. So it's a, it's a great way. So what's best about it is that someone who wants. Yeah, it's huge. And so somebody who wants to protect a lot of assets while there has a lot of assets. Well, they're gonna spend by Richard penalty and they're gonna have higher premium because they're buying a richer policy. Someone who's you know, I I had one gentleman who he he he he was actually sixty nine years old. Okay. And he wanted to protect the what hit saved for his wife. Okay. And and he wanted wanted to protect two hundred thousand dollars worth of us. It's okay. That's you know. That's a, that's that's a, it's a, it's enough it. He was a lot of money to him. Okay. Any wanted to protect it protective for her and we got a policy for about, you know, a policy that will do that for about one hundred eighty dollars a month. He was over these six nine and that to me is really affordable at sixty nine typically it's not. Yeah. Yeah. And his case he was he was able to this because he was married posse was super healthy. It was an incredible sixty nine year olds. He was thinking marriage. So he was he was, yeah, he was in perfect health, and so we got a huge prefer this too, so, but yeah. Any. So we have, we have about two or three minutes left in that two or three minutes. It's time for us to give away the secret. Now I know you're new book is available on Amazon, but how else can people give capi of this new book? Because there's just so much to this and I know they're gonna wanna read up and make make list and think about what they wanna do before the call when a best. And he look, I do need this plan and we need to get this figured out how did they get your. Well, they can get it on Amazon. They can either download it, you know, through kindle. Okay. Were they can get a paperback paper version, you know, Manton through Amazon prime, and so they can do that. But as a courtesy to on my clients, anyone who visits my site and requests to know wants to work with me and shopping the different policies. I provide a copy of the book for free to them just as a courtesy. So, but but the book was what's good about the book is that it focuses it. It gives you questions that you need to ask any agent. You're working. Okay. So no matter what agents you, you might be getting close from your financial advisor. That's been advisor, your auto insurance agents, whatever, whatever aging you're talking to it, the book says, asked these questions when comparing policies and, and that's the best way that that information and powers, you know the. People who read my book because they know exactly what questions are asked to nobody else was gonna tell them to ask those questions because those questions reveal the strengths and weaknesses in each of the different policies. And my philosophy is urine forms. You can make the right choice in, you know, I'm glad to help you make the right choice, but it's the end of the day. It's got if your goal and you sound like the same way, you know, let's help you make the right choice. If it's the right view, let's get it if it's not. I'm not gonna split any. Here's mince any words. I'm going to say, you know, it's not broken, let's fix it. Right, absolutely. And, and you know, one thing that we weren't able to talk about today was the the different types of policies hybrids versus traditional care insurance, and I do just that in the book. Okay. Also. Yeah. Also the book talks about the the new regulations that protect against rating. That's been a huge deal with long term care insurance, and the older policies have had a lot of rain increases. The newer policies won't have those same rating and I explain why the book, and that's a good thing. The really wanna look out with that. You really need to get this book or you really need to go to LT the shop. LT c. f. a. Opie dot com. And you can get more information on Scott's long-term care solutions. You can, you know, get a council tation with got one on one because when it comes to something as personalized as your long term care plant, you really need to do that in a more private setting than what we can provide right here on on the radio. So we went to him, bite you to do that to go to the LT's shop dot com, or you can always reach out to one of us. You can get a hold of Scott. Got what's your Email address form. It's just my name's Scott at LT, c. shop dot com. Great. And as always minus RC money, coats a g mail dot com. And if you've got a long term care question that I cannot answer, don't worry out our discount for you. We will be Happy Valley. We will get you the reidents or an of. We don't know it. We'll just one of us will go research. Look it up, but I'm going to defer to Scott on most of them. 'cause he's twenty three years of experience in long term care Scott. I wanna thank you so much for being a guest today. This topic, everyone an anticipation of Intel you. The funniest one was talking to a couple about long term care insurance. They were. They were pretty young. They weren't really in the market yet met the band looks up any looks at his wife, and he says, Honey up thence, but this would be a great Christmas present for your mom.

Medicaid Scott Amazon advisor Intel Richard kindle Manton Honey Happy Valley three thousand dollars three minutes two hundred fifty thousand dol two hundred thousand dollars one hundred eighty dollars twenty three years sixty nine years sixty nine year
"scott olsen" Discussed on The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

"Everybody. This is Rhonda Cobb, the money coach him, welcome to wear. So we are so pleased with today's show. It's definitely a topic that all of you need to hear about, learn about. There's still much misinformation people say this, that the other thing. So let's all get our little, you know, back straight and you can make your decisions accordingly. I'd like to welcome to our show Mr. Scott Olsen. He's a Seattle t. c. which means he's certified long term care insurance, and he's got twenty three years of experience in long term care insurance. Those got sought after expert. That's why he's on our show, and he's been quoted in these next great periodical names. You recognize the New York Times. The AARP mixing u. s. news and World Report is this week. Pipping analyst goes on over the years. That has helped thousands of consumers get long term care coverage. That was right for them. And Scott has a brand new book called simple long-term care solution, how to protect your life savings with a long-term care partnership program that's available on Amazon. You listen to the end of the show. You might find that a way to get it not on Amazon. That's a surprise. We don't own it. So Scott came to us from New Jersey attended rescuers university, and he began his insurance career in the mid nineteen eighties. So I'd like to welcome news. Got, and I am just so glad to hear to tell people all about long term care insurance. Thanks. You're under appreciate your. As you know. So many people think that they don't need long term care insurance. Oh, don't worry about it. I'm I'm gonna drop over. Oh, don't worry about it. We'll take care of me. Tell me some of the top reasons that that is just kind of that could thinking why prudent people really do need to insist her long term care insurance for their most. In finally intial to curiosity. That's a great question round up. You starting off with them. Long term care is it it? It's the consequences of having of needing care the consequences of of how it affects your family, your spouse Ramirez, and that's the main reason for something to consider aiming long term care insurance. Now on isn't right for everybody. Everybody doesn't need it and other should buy it. In fact about half the people who come to me, I tell them, you don't need long term care insurance. I don't buy it so so not everyone should should have long term care insurance, but everyone should have a long term care plan. What are you? Gonna do if you need care, what? What if your health deteriorates you have your health is compromised somehow where you need help with bathing addressing things like that, and your health gradually goes down and and you need. This assistance, what's your plan going to be? And everybody needs to work out a plan well in advance of meeting care. So that when it does happen, which is pretty likely, then you've got, you've got something in place. In I read a statistic somewhere with run. It is consigned it to accurate something like seventy percent of people over the age of sixty five or going to need some sort of assistance at some point. Yeah, you know, there's lots of statistics that are that are thrown around net particular statistics. Seventy percent is actually goes way back to a study that was done by Harvard Medical School, like twenty five thirty years ago. It was a really old studying and the industry has used the cystic over and over and over again. But that actually that study was just the likelihood of someone needing spending any time in the nursing home. Okay. And you know, just about everybody's going to spend some time in a nursing home, if we have, you know, major surgery if we have new replacement or a hip replacement, or you know something, we're going to need to spend some time a few days at least in nursing home, so so that that's the ticket can really be misleading. You know the bottom line is it's either you know everybody who's age sixty five right now they're either there's

Mr. Scott Olsen Amazon Rhonda Cobb New York Times AARP Harvard Medical School analyst New Jersey Ramirez twenty five thirty years twenty three years Seventy percent seventy percent
"scott olsen" Discussed on GSMC Baseball Podcast

GSMC Baseball Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on GSMC Baseball Podcast

"Four detroit race went three or five as well in this one yeah so interesting pitching blinds for this one he ne enter a game five runs over five innings he did settle down after that first thing but the bath really couldn't come through form as my trout did it continue his streak but he had only one hit in the game kinser went through three or four but that was about it as the angels bat cooled off in oakland the as be three injures eight as the rays tampa bay ab raise seven to three on this one so i think they raised it they do their little starter thing yeah they had had the reliever take the start pitch one and a third sittings in the yarborough came in i can and ryan yarbrough face the pitch the rest of the of the bulk of the game when five and two thirds innings a lot of three runs on five hits three walks nine strikeouts and this one give it a couple of home runs in this one as the olsen scott olsen in match adleman hit a home run of yarbrough and match also got a home run in this one in late in the game of of nuno as i was really the as the bulk of as often they're all those home runs olson's ninth chapman's night enjoys his seventh and it's when seeing scotty also added a coupla guys in this one too and then i was to back backup meghan who actually pitched pretty well ended up going eight innings.

kinser oakland yarborough scott olsen nuno chapman scotty meghan detroit ryan yarbrough olson
"scott olsen" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"Stick by cheats no michael holley greetings from cyber delic space this is lorenzo and i'm your host here in psychedelic salon to doubt oh and his good to get back with our podcast in a podcast salon to series but first of all i have to admit being seriously remiss in not bringing you up to speed on the adventures of lex pilger who brought us the first 35 salon to pipe gas although i've made brief mention of his current whereabouts i should have made a bigger deal about it however a well i felt that first of all the details of lexus life should be made here in a salon two podcast which hasn't happened for a couple of months and secondly it seemed to me that lex would be the best person to bring us up to date himself and i'm sure that he'll be doing that very soon but here are the headlines about lacks big news is that he is now the father of a baby girl next comes the news said lex has a regular job which shouldn't be a surprise considering the fact that he now has more people to take care of than just himself one other thing is that lexus doing a podcast for the cannibus company that he's working for and those and other stories i'm sure lex will be telling us himself in the weeks ahead when he returns to salon too with more podcast but today our host is alexa not to be confused with lax and should be joined by her sister cat in the weeks ahead are going to be hearing more podcasts at the lake he sisters are now developing and further first podcast which we are about to listen to they've included two topics first will hear them speaking with my old friend scott olsen on the final day of what was the largest exhibit of amazonian art yet to be held in the united states.

lorenzo lex pilger lex lexus united states michael holley alexa scott olsen
"scott olsen" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"scott olsen" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Were lucky she calls madison home helo heather elo always wonderful to have you in talk with you also on the studios aaron throw only parisi she's the executive director of the rape crisis centre which provides for survivors in the eyes of all forms of sexual violence knocked just rape are including sexual assault and sexual harassment hello erin i care cell banks for having me wonderful to have you on the phone we have a ocean ugh sorry added an s name i think there jeff scott olsen he's the nationally recognized civil rights attorney here in madison he's been named best civil rights lawyer in madison by madison magazine been a leader for more than thirty five years and litigating civil rights unease and a civil rights discrimination cases hello jeff oh great to have you on the phone things for joining us i i heard you at a busy morning of clients in your center thanks for that i appreciate it so let's start the conversation a little bit of soda how how do we explain what's happening in america today you know after the election there were concerns where i we were normalized naked we were even beyond normalizing we were almost leg over it of like yet this is what happens yet people the talk about sexually assaulting women can be president of the united states and even if accepting it in the best possible scenario for a moment of even if he has merits the qualify someone for the president of the united states therefore them were willing to look past serious allegations statements of such are aspen and then they're almost was this opposite backlash of over well meaning the media to movement of absolutely not this is every woman we all standing up it it truly feels like a backlash of drug back and forth and none and all of it making me feel dizzy thoughts on absolutely what the heck is happening i mean i think it's likely ripped off a banded you know we with trump wave were willing to turn our heads and be like oh yeah of.

executive director rape assault harassment attorney madison civil rights madison magazine america president united states parisi jeff scott olsen thirty five years