20 Episode results for "Scott Horsley"

U.S. Unemployment Is At A 50-Year Low. But Not Everybody's A Winner

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:11 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Unemployment Is At A 50-Year Low. But Not Everybody's A Winner

"This message comes from on points sponsor indeed. If you're hiring with indeed, you can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions, then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast. From NPR WB. You are Boston, I'm magnetized party, and this is on point unemployment is near a fifty year low and we're at what economists call full employment. Meaning everyone who wants a job can have one and the jobless rate is also at historic lows for both Hispanics and African Americans something President Donald Trump touted again on his biggest stage of the year. The two thousand nineteen state of the union back in February African American Hispanic American and Asian American unemployment have all reached their lowest levels ever recorded. But not everyone's a winner in this economy and not everyone's celebrating. There are faultlines here cracks and fissures things like slow wage growth or unequal, wages in equal jobs, Courtney herring worked at the colour distribution center in eastern, Wisconsin for years before learning. Many of her colleagues doing exactly the same work made twice as much as she did it really did open. My eyes to see what was really happening. And how much of an opportunity is actually missing compared to what I thought I was getting it made me realize, oh man. This is a huge gap will all this week. NPR has a special series of reports, taking an in-depth look at what full employment means in the lives of real people in this hour on point who wins and who loses in a strong labor market, and you can join us what does the job market look like for you where you are. Are you finding the work you want or are the wages, not keeping up with what you need? Join us anytime at one point radio dot org, or on Twitter and Facebook at on point radio. We'll join yesterday from Washington is Scott Horsley NPR's chief economics, correspondent, he's one of the lead reporters on this new series from NPR about full employment and you can find a link to his piece, headlined America is in full employment. So why aren't we celebrating that link is at on point radio dot org? Scott, welcome to on point and a great grid booth. You is really great to have you. So first of all, set the stage here for us a little bit. I mean when we say, full employment, what are we talking about? Exactly, how good is the job market right now. The job market, if you look at the country, as a whole is, is very good as you as you mentioned, the unemployment rate, the macro unemployment rates near fifty year low the lowest it's been in generations. There are obviously regional variations. There are educational variations not everybody's sharing in that, but we wanted to kind of look behind those numbers and say, what does it mean when we have a job market that the that's that strong? What does it mean for employers who are struggling to find good workers? What does it mean for workers who may be found some? Restoration of the bargaining power that they lost over the years. An ability to command, higher wages or, or better, working conditions, and so my colleagues on the business Eskenazi sort of fanned out around the country to, to try to tell some of those stories all this week, and they're absolutely fascinating and we're going to focus in this hour on sort of two aspects of this reporting that the union colleagues have done. We'll talk about two tier Wade systems and the employment situation for Hispanics and African Americans. But, but Scott, I just wanted to get a little more sense from you about a third part here. Just because I can't because it's so fascinating about how the unemployment rate is so low in certain places that employers simply cannot find the workers they need. I mean you, you into Ames Iowa where we're employers are just hungering for for folks to fill job. What's going on in Ames? Well, actually, it was my colleague, Jim zarroli, who, who went, okay? I spent a good deal of time there, myself, though, so I can certainly attest to the, to the strong job market throughout Iowa, even with some of the troubles that they've been having in their agricultural sector with low crop prices. And of course, this spring with some real severe flooding as well. But in general, the Iowa economy is, is very strong and the job market is very strong in places like aims, which is a very nice college town about an hour north of or maybe less than an hour north of the capital. The moines. One one thing that is happening is folks are just not moving tile in large numbers. In fact, the state population has has really been kind of stagnant. And even though there's this very strong job, magnet people around the country are not saying, hey, let's pick up and move to Ames Iowa. And so the sort of market forces that you would expect to level out those variations in in unemployment. Rates aren't necessarily coming to work. The same thing is true in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, where I went and talked with according to herring at the at the colour factory there. The unemployment rate in Sheboygan is around two and a half percent higher. The names, but still well below the national average and yet folks are not just itching to move to, to the, the edge of the Great Lakes there in Wisconsin. I don't know why it's a very nice place to live. Maybe it's the cold winters. They've tried to market. The city is, you know. Malibu of the midwest, but even though it's gotten positive rankings as a great place for millennials to come and set up set up a home and start a family. They're not necessarily attracting population. And so when they do have a successful company successful business, they struggle to find workers. So first of all, let me apologize to our colleague, gyms zero. For for asking you about one of his stories. There's sorry about that. Jim, my deep apologies, but Scott tell us more about instable you, what's, what specifically is going on there. That's that's created such a great job market, and we'll talk about why people aren't moving there in a in a second. But why is economy so healthy there in terms of Wisconsin, as a whole has, has long been a pretty manufacturing intensive state, they've had more manufacturing than than many states around the country? And the Kohler company is an example of that. This is a company that's been in business for almost a century and a half there along the Cheboygan river, it started as a iron, foundry making farm equipment, and then morphed into bathtubs and kitchen fixtures. The kind of thing that the colour names, probably best known for today, but they also make other products, they make engines for lawn mowers and snowblowers, and that sort of thing, so they have a pretty big industrial base. There's. Out of other industry in the area. There's Johnson Ville sausage companies in Cheboygan sergeant. Oh cheese has a factory there. So Koehler was competing for factory labor with a number of other companies in the area. And if, if you go back to the recession back in two thousand ten colour had adopted this two tier wage structure, which was not uncommon at the time when, when the economy was in freefall where they were saying, well, we're gonna keep paying our existing workers. What they're being what they've been making what they're accustomed to making. But for anybody we hire on, now they're going to come in at a much lower wage lower benefits, all kinds of challenges. And you know, even though it was a unionized workforce. The, the economy at that time in two thousand ten was was so weak. The unions would of had to grudgingly, swallow this and now they've been trying for nearly a decade to kind of whittle away at that. It. And they finally succeeded in late twenty eighteen at getting a new contract that does effectively does away with that two tiered wage scale the same thing happened with the big three automakers. They had agreed to a two-tiered wage scale back in the recession they've been chipping away at it as the economy has improved, and they're coming into new negotiations. This fall, the big three automakers with the UAW and the UAW hopes to accelerate the the phase out. Well, that's why that's exactly why I think this NPR series is so important, right? Because when we broadly talk about, you know, low unemployment numbers, were speaking about average is right in the average is always, conceal what you're talking about the these strong regional variations and the stories within the stories of, of those numbers in, in the case of these two ways not only regional variations, but, you know, on the same factory floor people doing the same job and younger workers, typically younger workers newer, workers, making making considerably less than their more senior colleagues and. And, you know, unionized labor is a is a shrinking set of the overall workforce. But this is just kind of indicative of worker bargaining power in general. And when you know, when unemployment is at ten percent, workers don't have a lot of bargaining power. You would think with unemployment at three point six percent. Nationally two point five percent in Cheboygan one and a half percent. Aims workers would have the power to say if you want me to do this job, I'm going to have to pay me a little bit more. And, and to some extent. We're seeing that, well, actually just want to listen to a clip here of tape. This is George Cooper, who drives a truck for colour and he got his job. There are a couple of years ago after the great recession had more or less faded, not faded away. But at least faded from its peak any found that the two tiered contract locked in lower wages as you were saying Scott compared to other drivers doing the same work, and Courtney herring, who we mentioned before, who works in the distribution center, and has been at Kohler for seven years, also saw that friction as well as. We're being asked to do the same level of work for less. So we'll hear both of them in this clip didn't matter. How long I was there? I was never going reached that same peak plateau that they did. And you end up having your clicks because all their tier a and we're here be, and we shouldn't do the same type of work day would just tell you flat out. Well, why should I do the same amount orcas that teary to spend their twenty years? Well, so Scott Horsely stand by here for just a second because I want to turn now to Alexia cool wick. She's joining us from Madison, Wisconsin. She's a professor in the school for workers at the university of Wisconsin. Former lead attorney for the service employees, international union local one in Chicago, Alexa, cool, whick, will welcome to you. Hi there. Thanks so much for having me. Great to have you. So first of all, you mean you heard Scott Horsely there and his reporting talking about how yes we have this very like rock bottom unemployment level right now unemployment rate. But even with on the same factory floor, for example, because of these two tiered. Leads systems in some places. We're seeing a big disparity in wages. I mean how long has that been going on? Well, we've seen two tier wage systems in place. Really as we've seen union power decline. So he I saw big wave of two-tiered wage systems come into place in the nineteen eighties. And I think that Scott's reference to the recession two thousand eight two thousand ten we started seeing even more of these two two tier wage systems. So what we've seen is even if when we're down at low employment that doesn't necessarily mean that wages of kept up or that health benefits and pension benefits have kept up to benefit the workers, and Scott was saying, though, as we have, you know, this very hot labour-market does that translate into potential potentially more power for four labor for union if their workers are in such high demand. I think it certainly has potential for unions, and their workers to obtain better. Benefits in this time of lower unemployment, colder, was a really great example. I think that though you can't change things overnight. So we we're back in better. Konomi today. In Scott said these wages have been put into place in a collective bargaining agreement so by contract. Now they're already settled and once you've given something away at the bargaining table in collective bargaining. It's very, very difficult to get that back. And so having given it up in the recession workers are trying to improve things, but it's very difficult. Well, we are talking about what this in full employment economy, actually looks like in the lives of real people. NPR's running a special series about all of this week, Scott Horsely NPR's chief economics, correspondent is with us and a Alexia cool whick professor in the school for workers at the university of Wisconsin. Also with us as well. We'll be right back. This is on point. This message comes from on points sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring, you don't have time to waste you need. Help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions, then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs, new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast. Terms, conditions, and quality standards apply. This is on point. I Meghna Choco bardy, we're talking this hour about what a full employment economy, looks like in the lives of real people. And when we talk about the historic low unemployment rate, what sort of variations in regional differences are being masked by that one, low average number NPR's running a special series about full employment all this week, and Scott Horsely joins us, he's NPR's chief economics correspondent. Alexia Kulik is also with us. She's a professor in the school for workers at the university of Wisconsin. And we want to hear from you. What is the employment situation looking like where you live? Are you an employer who's having trouble finding workers? Or are you someone who has exited the job market and is now trying to get back in? But the wages are too low to meet your needs Scott Horsely limitation back to you here for a second, and just as you tell us more about what the situation in Cheboygan, what eliminates for us in terms of how we better understand this, this full employment economy will again. It's, it's kind of a microcosm of the, the improved bargaining power. And in this case collective bargaining power that that workers have as a result of the strong, job market and low unemployment, but it's not, you know, consistent picture across the country, even in this environment. We've we saw for example, UPS just adopt a contract with the Teamsters that actually puts an anew two-tiered wage scale we saw the. The there was a General Electric locomotive factory in Erie, Pennsylvania that GE sold and the new owners, they're tried to impose a two tier wage scale just in this dispatched winter that prompted one of the first big industrial strikes of the, of the Trump era. And right now, that's kind of in limbo, the, the two sides are in mediated talk. So we'll see if the company's successful there in imposing two-tiered Wade scale, or if the union is successful in holding the line and saying, no. In this climate, we we're not gonna we're not going to go that route interesting Alexia Kulik, which to respond to that. Yeah. I think while we see increased bargaining power. I also think that kind of like I said before the break, it doesn't necessarily turn quickly. And so while I think that the example in Cheboygan was fantastic. I also think it was a little bit of a special case in that we are seeing a lot of workers around the country, not being able to influence and use that power to increase their wages. Benefits again, and that's true throughout Wisconsin, as well, as I think, other parts of the country and part of that has to do with the decrease in union density, and the loss of bargaining power that we've seen what I will say about the examples that were given the Teamster two-tiered wages that have just been put into place that has been very controversial, and it will be interesting to see how things go going forward because I think a lot of those members realized that we are in a better position in that shouldn't have been agreed to, oh, his Teamsters membership actually voted against it. But because of some wrinkles in the, the way the votes are tallied. And they needed to they needed a supermajority reject the contract. And so they it, it has gone into force Alexia when you say union density though, specific what do you mean by that? Yeah. I mean so in Wisconsin, the private sector density, is down to about six point seven percent throughout the state throughout the country. Of course we're below ten percent. Probably about seven something in terms of how. How many people are within the workplace are members of a union, and therefore able to engage in collective bargaining over the terms and conditions of their employment? I see well, actually just want to hear a little bit more from Courtney haring, Scott, you talked to her, she worked, and the colour distribution center for the past seven years. We heard her a little earlier in the show about the, the difficulties around that two tiered wage system, but she says the mood has improved on the factory floor since new contract with sign and now she can envision being at Kohler for the long run, you could tell there was a lot of happy, people, a lot of them production went up. People are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth their time now. I was still don't go in factory. Don't go in a factory. You're not going to have a life there. If feels like I do. And I'm getting somewhere. So I could see myself being here for my career my family's been in it for at least forty plus years. So I like to kind of continue that tradition. That's courtney. Haring who's worked in the colour distribution center for the past seven years. Alexia cool. We ask you about once again, there's this. There's a big difference between what the numbers extensively save versus what people are experiencing in, in their real lives, and in Courtney there. We heard a sense of, of relief and security that she hadn't felt before this new contract was signed. But, you know, given what you would you had been talking about regarding union unions. Overall reduction in power and influence over the past forty years. I mean, what's it gonna take to get that same sense of, of security for other workers? Yeah, that's a great question. And I think, again, the colour strike and Cheboygan is a great example of what it takes what it takes is more engagement from more workers to participate in acting collectively to try to improve those wages and benefits and what we saw in Sheboygan. We haven't touched on is that the workers went on. Strike to chip away at that two tier wage system and they head community behind them. So, you know, people in the community were supportive of the worker's plight. And the workers were very strong in going on strike, and exerting power to, to be able to influence the collective bargaining agreement, and that in turn had an influence in what colour agreed to, and I think because of the overall loss of union density. And I'll just say here in Wisconsin. We've seen a legislative attack on workers with in the public sector in two thousand eleven and right to work in two thousand fifteen workers are pretty demoralized and it's, it's difficult to exert that collective power that they really do have when they come together like the workers at Kohler did Scott just dumping here because I'm wondering if you heard that from workers in your reporting. And I imagine that eve even as good as the job market is now are people still wondering what's going to happen when the next downturn comes because that's. An inevitability eventually. Well, absolutely. And I mean, we're, we're almost ten years into this economic expansion now but if you ask most Americans, do you feel like you've been gaining ground for ten years. They'll say no, they might feel like they've been gaining ground may be the last year, maybe the last couple of years, or maybe they don't even feel like they're, they're gaining ground yet. The scars of the great recession are deep and long lasting. You know, when, when colour initially imposed a two-tier weight scale back in two thousand ten there was a strike vote, and the, the workers at that time were not willing to take take the gamble of going on strike. They did strike in two thousand fifteen narrow narrow the gap between the two tiers and then they got the the, the new contract just late last year. And, you know, that's, that's the collective bargaining picture. But you can it's kind of a little bit indicative of what happens on an individual level, when you when you had individual workers who weren't necessarily represented by union debating, do I settle for. Whatever the company is offering do. I maybe accept a pay cut during tough times. Or do I say, look, I'm going to demand a pay raise and go elsewhere? You're finally starting to see more quits. That's something, the government tracks. How many people are quitting their job? Meaning they feel confident enough to go out and either find another job or because they already have another job. The quit rate has gone up, and that's a signal that more people are feeling the freedom to, to go out there and try the waters a little bit. But that's that was a long time in coming after they're very, very painful recession. Well, let's take a quick, call his go to Pam who's calling from Williamsburg, Virginia. Pam you're on the air. I worked for the airline had a two year, wait system. They are line never recovered from that employees, three unionized groups pilots flight, attendants mechanics, they are still suffering onto the recession and trying to get back those benefits and pay it'll never happen. I'm now with the school system. I'm astonished at how pay is particularly in southern region. City Newport News Hampton. The pay alone the cost of living has gone up there is no way to make a living wage, and it seems to me that a culture of poverty is being created. I see it in the school system. And I don't know if anything's ever going to be done to which reps bat. Right. We'll pam. Thank you so much for your call. Alexia kulik. Did you? Respond to her share. I mean, I, I absolutely agree. I think the way she laid out that dilemma was very articulate and the thing that I also wanna point out as even was we see so wages have been stagnant across the board. Right. If we if we look at two thousand seventeen dollars wages for manufacturing in Wisconsin have gone up about one dollar since nineteen eighty but what's also happened in that time period, is workers are paying more for their health insurance. They don't have the defined benefit pension plans that they used to. And so we're so far behind that trying to make those in inroads, and making those improvements is extraordinarily difficult. And, and so I agree. I think, you know, coming together and acting collectively poses one potential, although I think the caller is absolutely right. That once once you've given something up in that collective bargaining process. It's extremely extremely difficult to regain that in to recapture the, the benefits that we used to have so in term. Of the culture or the creating an atmosphere of poverty. We've certainly have much more inequality in this country than we used to. And it's something that I think both individuals and policymakers needed to pay attention to well, Alexia, cool whick professor in the school for workers at the university of Wisconsin. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me. We'll Scott we were talking about a two tiered wage structures in a lot of workplaces but another major part of NPR's special series about a full employment economy has to do with the differences in jobless rates that we're seeing amongst Hispanics and African Americans versus white Americans here, and we should say, though, that African American unemployment is also at historic low right now even though it's still significantly much higher than for white workers. However, doing speech in hack berry Louisiana just last week, promoting energy infrastructure and economic growth. The president again, talked about record low. Employment numbers, and he says it's going to be a campaign signature forum in twenty twenty. So let's say I'm on the debate stage. We start talking, and I say, well, you know, we have the lowest rate ever. For African American Asian Hispanic all I have to say that woke off the stage. I guess you win the debate who's going to beat your that in the history of our country. The best unemployment rates. That's the president in Louisiana last week. Scott, just briefly. How different is the unemployment rate for Hispanic and African Americans versus white Americans, will they've all been coming down, but the African American unemployment rate is six point seven percent. That is still more than twice the rate for white Americans. And so it's you know it's a glass, half full or half empty. It's, it's certainly a smaller gap than we've seen in the past, but it's, it's still a pretty high unemployment rate for African Americans, and they're certainly regional and educational variations that, that make that rate a lot higher in different different areas. I don't think the president is probably going to win a whole lot more support from African Americans in his reelection bid and twenty two. Then he did in two thousand sixteen at argument is probably a more at suburban whites to sort of convince them that some of his policies are, are you neutral towards African Americans or or whatnot, but he, he has certainly bragged, a lot about of falling unemployment rates among both African Americans and Latinos, regardless of what his policies may be. And, and I'm sure I'm sure continue to do. So right through twenty twenty. Well, Scott, hang on here for a second, because Andre Perry joins us. Now, also from Washington. He's a fellow at the metropolitan pulsa program at the Brookings Institution, his research, focuses on race and structural, inequality, education and economic inclusion, and he's author of the forthcoming book. No, your price valuing, black lives and property in America's black cities. That'll come out in January Andre Perry. Welcome to you. Thanks for having me, it's great to have you. So, you know, this hour we're trying to vault off of NPR's series here. To take us behind this number of historically, low black unemployment. What do you see in that in that six point seven percent that scarves, told him? I'll tell you what if you're black, and in your in your in Baltimore or in Chicago, you don't see full employment you see a recession historically. The black unemployment rate is has always been about twice that of the white rate. And so the, the, the rhetoric around full employment really math. What's going on at the city level, we, we have a inordinate amount of data that show, particularly when you're looking at employers, and their call backs for for employees. They do not call back black. Am potential workers at the same rate at White's? We've known that there's employment discrimination discrimination at all levels those who, who are. Highly educated those who are in need of, of an education. So the, the, the idea of full employment has never am Inc. Black work rates in a way that would address the structural reasons why they're not absorbed in, in, in the economy. It's tell us more about e you started talking about some of those structural reasons. But, but tell us more is it? I don't want to say is it a simple because nothing is simple. But you're talking about callback rates is it about who are the employers as well? Absolutely. I mean, that, you know, at a very basic level the unemployment rates reflect who's being hired. So you can't ignore that, but you also cannot ignore a bias criminal Justice system that really throttled black men and black women's ability to get the skills to, to get into Connie. And you also can't discount. The, the wealth gap know that how we how we build businesses or create businesses largely come from our ability to leverage, the equity on our homes and blacks have been denied. That two blacks, also have not had the ability to create the, the jobs themselves in the manner, that white people I'm having in the past, so but at its core bull. Blacks are not hired at the same rates and they are hired to essentially service white growth. And that's where the this, the rhetoric of full employment re really hides that win whites or are getting jobs in managerial positions, getting benefit blacks are working, but they're the Uber and lift drivers. They're working in the convenience stores. They're not getting the kind of benefits that will that, that they can use to build. Wealth and longevity with their families. And so it's long as we keep saying that we're in a state of full employment without recognizing the wage differences, the benefit differences, who's who's really benefiting from this economy. We're all we're going to just reinforce structural inequality in this country. We've got about thirty seconds before just take a quick break here. But there you said a lot, and I want to dig into a bunch of it. But let me just ask you though, even given all you said. I mean as Scott was saying earlier the rate at which the, the unemployment rate is falling falling for African Americans is, is, is pretty significant. That's gotta be some good news. Well there with the other there, another time we were at full employment. Blacks were and wasn't a good thing. So we got to look at the full picture, and I'm referencing slavery, obviously. But we gotta look at the full picture. All right. Well, we'll take a bigger look at that full picture when we come back. So Andre Perry, and Scott Horsely stand by here for just a second. We're talking about. NPR series all this week about what a full employment economy, really looks like in the lives of real people. And we want to hear from you. We'll be right back. This is on point. Nineteen sixty five a darkened street corner in Selma Alabama and a murder. A new podcast exposes the lies that kept this murder from being solved and explores memory myth and accountability for a crime at the heart the civil rights movement from NPR white lies. Listen and subscribe, now, this is on point, a mega Chakrabarti. We're talking this hour about what a full employment economy, looks like in the lives of real people. NPR's running a special series all this week about exactly this. And Scott Horsely is with us this hour. He's NPR's chief economics. Correspondent Andrea Perry is also with us as well as a fellow at the metropolitan policy program at the Brookings Institution and Scott before the break, you're hearing Andre talk about how the, the benefits of full employment economy. He says haven't at all yet reached the African American community. What did you find in your reporting? Well, that's consistent with something Mark morale of the urban league told me years ago, which was he said black America's like the caboose. On a train, and when the train speeds up the caboose speeds up, but it's still the caboose and that's what we've seen. Yes. The unemployment rate among African Americans has has come down from where it was during the, the recession just as it has for other groups, but it is still considerably elevated, relative to the national average. And you know, when, when hundred Perry talks about the wealth, gap and not being able to leverage the equity in your home. I mean, the recession was disastrous. The subprime mortgage crisis was disastrous for the whole country, but especially for African American home ownership. And so that's that's a that's a big scar. That is very difficult to recover from my colleague NPR, Danielle Czeslaw did a story for our series where she visited Charlotte, North Carolina, which is one of the sort of southern success story cities, that have been attracting, newcomers and among African Americans, there's been sort of a reversal of the twentieth, century, great migration from south north, now, you're seeing african-amer. Moving from north to south oftentimes for blower. Home prices, lower cost of living overall, and in some cases job opportunities as well. And so you her story focused on, on the picture in Charlotte, North Carolina, where there has been an influx of sort of middle class African Americans who are finding job opportunities in Charlotte, but that's not necessarily helping the native African American population. So there's still a core within the city that has very elevated unemployment. Well, we had a little bit of tape here from exactly the story. This is thirty two year old Brittany Smith. He's African American group. In Detroit, six years ago really struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare in Detroit, and her then boyfriend and now husband worked at a college campus that was closing. So they moved to Charlotte here. I am a transplant that come has come down here enough taken advantage of all these opportunities. Now, some of it may be due to. I have, you know, an education and same from a husband, but also. So it made me actually my husband and I to look at ways we can help, you know bridge, the gap. That's Brittany Smith, who moved to, to Charlotte. Andre perry. Is there a reverse great micro migration going on? Oh, absolutely, particularly among a millennial who are black blacks are moving to the south, they're going to Charlotte. They're going to Atlanta, they're going to places where they have a cultural link to. So it's not just about jobs, which, which it is a major driver. It is also about going home, finding a sense of security, cultural security, and that might seem ironic that some because a lot of people feel that the, the south is racists. And, and in many instances, it is. But there are community communities in the south that blacks have found ways to empower themselves politically economically and so, yeah, I see it every day. And but it's. Also is bared out in the numbers. Well, you know, we have a lot of callers who want to have their say. So let me welcome them in here. Let's go to George who's calling from Richmond Virginia Georgia on the air. All right. Thank you so much. So I just wanna give kinda my perspective kind of boots on the ground. I'm an entrepreneur, I have technology business very busy. I have friends in multiple verticals across the city automobile repair shops. Breeze restaurants and, and they're all very busy to again. The one thing that we noticed is. Yes, barging in his there, but only if it's the right person with the right skills that really has a vision for the company and how to help move the company forward. So I would say that, that the struggle is, as somebody that hires is finding the right people, but there's definitely people out there. It's just always wanted to get the right people because we don't want to go through the turnover. Alternatively segue off the last comment. Richmond is, is a southern city. It's had some issues with race well-known throughout the civil war. But we too are seeing a. Movement of African Americans from up north, and from the west to Richmond, as well as we're seeing African Americans who come here to go to college not leaving once they graduate and actually participating in, in trying to reroute themselves in, in a place in which their history was routed. So I think I think there's a lot from any perspective. One thing I would like to say is while it's amazing that, that colour and Wisconsin has such great manufacturing. My family is from south West Virginia martinsville and we have a twenty percent plus unemployment rate. So while it's great incidents and emergencies. And, and in places that have plan themselves strategically to grow. Well, there's still places that are very, very hurt by trade agreements that happened twenty years ago even before the recession, and how do we get the skills, and how do we get the motivation back into those people. So that people in the rural areas rule manufacturing, how do we how do we get them back into the game? Also. Well, George, thank you so much fear. Call Scott Horsley meet just turn back to you on that, because this is absolutely a, a major underlying issue here when you were talking about variations before sure Andrea sherr. He's been talking about, for example, in some urban areas. There are pockets where there might be a very high unemployment rate there, certainly rural communities, where that's also the case one of the highest unemployment rates in the country is the imperial valley in California, rural agricultural area. Likewise, Yuma, Arizona has a very high unemployment rate. So there is absolutely variation that, that three point six aggregate number for the country masks, a whole lot of area in both positively, as in places like Ames and in places says Ville, and I and I have to mention that the last caller mentioned about finding the right people. Yeah, no in particularly with the. Tech industry that typically translate into white men, there is this, a proliferation of the bro culture? You hear about a lot, but we need to work on that because if we're ever going to solve this problem of having these economic disparities that are consistent over time we have to have employers, trust people who don't look like them and and get past this notion of finding the right person because that is just fraught with this too much air. Well, the one thing that we are looking at, in our in our series is how the, the generally low unemployment rate across the country has created opportunities for people who might have been marginalized in the past employers, in some cases, have grown more creative and are more willing to look pass things that would have been disqualifying in the past, for example, people with a disability might have a better chance of finding. A work now and an employer who will make some accommodations in order to to employ them, and we have a story in our series about a former prisoners, who are who are finding job opportunities that may or may not be the disqualifier that it once was. But of course, the flip side is some employers may say it's too hard to find people. I'm going to invest in technology. I'm going to automate this job that I used to have somebody doing. And, and we see that as well in places where unemployment's very low. Well, Andrea Perry, eliminate let me turn back to you on something because given what, what we just discussed and earlier, we're talking about how African Americans Hispanic people of color gen- genuinely in your words, you were saying that when the economy expands, they're doing work for white managers. But I wonder I mean aren't the very same things that are driving major changes in our economy, the continuing flat lining of union membership shift towards gig work in a lot of sectors. These are these are things that are affecting. Everyone and then you can the argument disproportionately affecting people of color. But, but given if, if that's the case if every if almost all workers are more vulnerable now than they ever have been for. How do we how do we close? The gaps that already exist one, if we're going to have have to accept this inequality across race and region because you're absolutely right. Poor white folks in rural communities are struggling then we're really going to have to talk about the social safety net that really impacts people in urban and rural areas. I'm talking about work guarantee. I'm talking about health care higher. Ed, there's going to have to be an expansion of the social safety net. If if low or high unemployment numbers are a given for particular races, and particu. Regions. Well, let's get more callers in here. Let's go to JoAnne calling from tamarac, Florida. John, you're on the air. Hi. I just wanted to say that I make a decent living. However, I still find it difficult to keep up with the rising cost of living. I mean, along with the increased healthcare costs homeowners insurance taxes. It's one thing to be employed. I think it's a whole different thing to get a good living wage, and I feel that corporations these days, they're making billions and it's just not don't prophets of just not being passed down to the average working individual. We measure our growth by our savings. And the average person we just can't seem to put the threat together to be able to, you know, live comfortably and say, forget, putting your kids through college. So what is the solution? And what are the corporations doing? To pass down those profits to the average work of because I say you're implied, but your paycheck, is small right doing thank you so much for your call. I mean, Scott. This seems to be right at the heart of the headline of your of your first story here is America's in full full employment. So why aren't we celebrating JoAnne? I think echoes the feelings of a lot of Americans why why they're not celebrating. Right. And, you know, when we talk about inflation that sort of measures the, the rise in the price of consistent basket of goods over time. But one of the things your your guest Alexi was talking about was the say the shifting of some costs from an employer onto workers. Whether it's you know, they're having a shoulder, a higher share of their healthcare cost. Or maybe they're, they're the employers old contribution, their retirement has gone away or it's shifted from defined benefit to define contribution plan. Or, or maybe there's no retirement plan at all, Tim Taylor. Who's the the head? Of the union local in Cheboygan represented. Kohler workers who managed to chip away at the, the two tiered wage scale successfully last year. He says, you know this is about bargaining for it. Nobody gives it to you. The, the owners of corporations are not inclined to share anything with the work any, a penny more with the workforce, and they need to, to keep the workforce there. And so it's it is very much about how the economic pie is, is divvied up. And for much of this recovery a lot of the pie was going to the owners of the companies and, and now we are starting to see workers grabbing a little bit more. But it's it's, it's a it's you gotta grab. You know, and that's and that's about power. I mean that's about. That's a and whether that's you know, a a, a low unemployment rate is one way to boost workers. Bargaining power collective bargaining can be another the a lot of policy. Choices can can shape that as well. I'm going to make a plane here that workers are going to have to take back some of that wealth your you will see a rise in labor movements across the country. The, the, the strikes, the teacher strikes, in recent years, within the last year in red states. Tell a an interesting tale of what's going to happen, if those benefits of a strong, a quote unquote, strong economy aren't passed down to everyday workers, because, yes, we're talking about racial differences, and regional differences. But everyone is feeling the pinch of this Konami. That is not. Distributing resources equitably. Well, I mean to me, it just makes me think. Again, as we you know, we talk about this daily in the news are we doing a disservice by constantly, not talking about Scott's an NPR series because they're going in indepth here, but on a daily basis in the news, just throw out him unemployment numbers. And like we're not what good is understanding that number for not also understanding, the fundamental insecurities people feel even in this full employment market. And there's a reason why we bring on a communist and an and people who are in the ivory tower to talk about this stuff. Because in, in a small way, they're protecting that establishment of distributing information. Yes, we need to talk about wages, much more. We need to talk about regional differences. We need to talk about racial differences. We just can't throw out this blunt object of unemployment rate. It really doesn't make much sense when you're going to the ground and so I I'm. All four making sure that we project other points of the, the, the story because if we don't we're really doing the public disturbance NPR series, will you hear voices like Charlotte resident Nicole muse? Dennis, she's a single mom raising two daughters on a teacher salary. Sometimes, she works, sixty five hours a week, having taken a second job as a bar manager at night when I call over implied, I have two jobs, and I'm still just trying to make it in meet the needs at half for myself and my family. Let's Charlotte resident Nicole muse. Dennis Scott Horsely got about a minute left here to go just want to give you a shot at telling us a little bit more about what NPR series has in store for us. Well as you've ended up we are trying to go a little bit behind the, the headline numbers here, and look at a little bit more of the what that means in people's actual lives. What it means for their lifestyles, what the gains the very real gains for a lot of folks have been, but also some of the persistent fishers that have that have that were still wrestling with. Well, I'm really glad that the series is, is happening NPR because again, I do feel strongly that we report average numbers a lot. But there are extreme variances and a lot of real lives that are behind all those average numbers. So Scott Horsely NPR's chief economics correspondent, thank you so much for joining us. And thank you for the series as well. Scott, great to be with you and Andre Perry fellow at the metropolitan policy program at the Brookings Institution and author of the forthcoming book, no, your price valuing, black lives and property. In America's black cities. Andre perry. Thank you for being with us as well. Yep. Thank you. And listeners you can subscribe, by the way to the on point newsletter. Right. Our homepage good point radio dot org to subscribes. You'll get weekly messages from me, and my colleague, David Folkenflik are reading lists surveys and. A lot more. So check it out. It's our newsletter. And it's an on point radio dot org. I make the Tucker body. This is on point.

Dennis Scott Horsely NPR Wisconsin America Andre Perry Cheboygan Scott Horsley NPR NPR NPR Charlotte Alexia Kulik Kohler Scott Horsely president Brookings Institution NPR university of Wisconsin
NPR News: 02-28-2020 7AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 9 months ago

NPR News: 02-28-2020 7AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. Futures markets are pointing to another down day on Wall Street. Npr's Scott Horsley reports all of the major stock indexes have fallen into correction territory on fears of the corona virus. The Dow Jones Industrial Average has now fallen nearly thirteen percent from its peak earlier this month the broader S&P five hundred index and the Nasdaq both lost more than twelve percent selling accelerated at the end of the day on Thursday and overnight markets in Europe and Asia. Were down as well. Investors have been alarmed by the growing number of corona virus cases outside of China and the prospect that the economic damage from the epidemic could be bigger and more long lasting than had been anticipated. This week saw the first cases reported in Africa and South America as well as the first case in the US where the source of the virus was not easily traced Scott horsely NPR news Washington. Health officials say that I use case of the corona virus with an unknown origin was identified in California this week all other. Us cases have been associated in some way with travel abroad. California Governor Gavin NEWSOM is calling for greater testing capacity for cove in nineteen the disease associated with the virus from capital public radio in Sacramento Sammy. Kayla reports newsome says testing is key to tapping down community spread of cove nineteen. But there's a supply problem. He says there are only two hundred testing kit statewide that simply inadequate to do justice to the kind of testing that is required to address this issue. Head on more kits would allow health workers to test more people including patients with certain respiratory symptoms regardless travel. History test results could also come back faster if state or county. Labs process their own samples instead of sending them to the CDC for NPR news. I'm Sammy Kayla. In Sacramento. Turkey says Syria will pay a heavy price for an attack that killed thirty three Turkish soldiers in northwestern Syria. Npr's Peter Kenyon. Reports on Gra is promising to target all known regime targets in response. Turkey's Defence Minister tells state media that Syria's main ally. Russia knew exactly where Turkish troops were located. When the russian-backed Syrian military launched the attack. Moscow denies that it was the worst single day loss of life for the Turkish military. Since it got involved in the conflict. For years ago Turkey called on NATO to get involved in NATO's North Atlantic Council convened a meeting to discuss the situation in Syria. Turkey's for a no fly zone has gained some supporters including us. Senator Lindsey Graham but there has been little sign that either NATO Europe or the. Us is willing to undertake such an effort. Peter Kenyon NPR news. Istanbul South Carolina's primary elections tomorrow. President trump will hold a rally tonight in North Charleston. Next week IT Super Tuesday. Fourteen states in one. Us territory hold presidential contests this is NPR blizzard conditions persist in parts of upstate. New York the National Weather Service Warns Up to two more feet of snow may fall. Meanwhile in the central and western US today temperatures will warm up considerably Opera Star Placido. Domingo is walking back. He's apology to twenty one. Women who accuse him of sexual assault. Npr's honest dossier CEO because has more from New York earlier this week. Un-american union representing opera performers said it had substantiated. What it called Placido Domingo's quote inappropriate activity. But after he said that he accepted full responsibility for his actions Domingo's started losing plan performances in his native Spain including one sponsored by the government on Thursday. The opera singer issued a statement saying that his earlier podgy created what he called a false impression. He insisted quote. I have never behaved aggressively toward anyone and I have never done anything to obstruct or hurt anyone's career in any way domingo's has stepped away from several Spanish performances and others have been canceled on associates. Lucas NPR News New York. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department says officials have recovered hers stolen yesterday with a casket and body inside officers arrested a suspect after a police chase the vehicle crashed officials. Say the body inside was not disturbed on Thursday. The agency's schooled in the suspect on twitter saying of all the bad decisions you've made make one good one and bring back the deceased person. Korva Coleman. Npr News in Washington.

Npr Placido Domingo NPR US Syria Turkey Washington New York Npr Korva Coleman Sammy Kayla Peter Kenyon NPR Scott Horsley Sacramento California Europe NATO Senator Lindsey Graham
NPR News: 03-27-2020 10AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 8 months ago

NPR News: 03-27-2020 10AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. The stock market opened lower this morning after three days of gains. Npr's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell more than eight hundred points in the first few minutes of training. Both the Dow and the S&P five hundred index dropped about three percent at the opening bell giving up around half their gains from the previous day. Markets have been volatile in recent weeks as investors struggle with the economic fallout from the corona virus. The pandemics price tag is beginning to show up in official government. Numbers including Thursday's jobless claims more than three and a quarter million Americans applied for unemployment. Last week nearly five times the previous record. Congress is responding with a massive two trillion dollar rescue bill. That's expected to pass the house later today. Scott horsely. Npr News Washington. The House is now debating the mammoth corona virus relief package. The measure passed the Senate on Wednesday with every senator present voting for it House leaders. Hope TO GET IT TO PRESIDENT TRUMP. Later today the. Us now has more confirmed cases of the corona virus than any other country. Johns Hopkins University reports. There are more than eighty-five thousand. Us cases slightly more than in China. Health officials say the number of cases in the US has been rising rapidly as more testing is completed. Meanwhile NPR's Windsor Johnston reports president trump is preparing to release an updated set of guidelines on social distancing trump says the government will use data from accelerated testing to categorize areas as high medium or low risk for the virus in a letter to governor on. Thursday. The president said the new guidelines will help individuals states make decisions in the coming weeks about maintaining increasing or relaxing social distancing efforts this week trump abruptly declared he wants to reopen the economy by Easter despite continued warnings from public health officials. Npr's Windsor Johnston reporting British Prime Minister. Boris Johnson has tested positive for the corona virus as NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London. More than five hundred. Seventy Britons have died of Cova nineteen in a video message. Johnson said he has mild symptoms a temperature and a cough. The prime minister said he would continue to lead the effort against the corona virus directing his ministers from self-isolation in his residence number ten Downing Street. Thank you to everybody. Who's doing what I'm doing working from home to stop the spread of the virus from household to hustle. That's the way we're going to win. We're going to beat it. We're going to beat it together. The British government has ordered. Most businesses closed to slow the spread amid concerns. Health Services could be overwhelmed. Officials are converting a London Convention Center into a four thousand bed field hospital Frank Langfitt. Npr News London on Wall Street. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is down nine hundred twenty four points or more than four percent. The Nasdaq is down. Two hundred fifty three points or more than three percent. You're listening to. Npr this week. President trump announced a delay in the deadline for Americans to get new real. Id's in order to get on planes or enter a federal building down the Department of Homeland Security says that delay will be for a year the new deadline to get real. Id's will be locked Tober. I twenty twenty one. The Democratic presidential primary is technically still two candidate race but his NPR's amy held reports. The Corona virus pandemic is changing the Calculus for that contest in an interview with. Npr's morning edition Senator Bernie. Sanders addressed his position in the race. A are assessing the situation where ended changing every day because elections are being delayed. We've hold rallies. Obviously we don't do door to door campaigning. Instead it's virtual campaigning. With former Vice President Joe Biden leading by more than three hundred delegates sanders concedes. He has a steep path to the nomination. But he says he's taking pride. In keeping his ideas at the forefront whatever happens sanders has his work cut out for him as a senator working in the pandemic that they'll be another stimulus package within the next month for his part. Biden says he's done with debates and wants to quote get on with this. Amy held NPR news. The National Weather Service is warning that critical fire weather conditions persist over the high plains. Temperatures will be very warm today through the southern and central high plains combined with gusty winds and low humidity conditions are ripe for wildfires to ignite in the central United States. I'm Korva Coleman. Npr news from Washington.

Npr Npr NPR President trump president Washington Korva Coleman Boris Johnson Joe Biden United States senator Prime Minister Sanders Windsor Johnston Frank Langfitt Scott Horsley Johns Hopkins University
NPR News: 08-24-2020 10AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 3 months ago

NPR News: 08-24-2020 10AM ET

"Live from NPR news I'm Korva Coleman stocks opened higher this morning building on a rally that pushed the S. and P. Five hundred index into record territory last week. NPR Scott Horsley reports the Dow Jones industrials jumped more than one hundred fifty points in early trading. Stock Traders welcome news that the food and Drug Administration has granted emergency authorization to treat more covid nineteen patients with plasma from people who've recovered from the disease president trump touted the FDA's move on the eve of the Republican. National Convention tens of thousands of people have already been treated with convalescent plasma the world, health. Organization. Says, results so far have been inconclusive. The rate of new corona virus infections in the US has fallen by about a third in the last three weeks. Oil and gas platforms in the Gulf of Mexico are being evacuated as a hurricane and tropical storm make their way towards the Louisiana stocks in Europe and Asia were also up overnight Scott horsely NPR news Washington Tropical Storm Marco is expected to make landfall later today in Louisiana followed by tropical storm lure, which may become a hurricane before it makes landfall close. To the same place in about forty eight hours, some government buildings are closed today in Kenosha Wisconsin. After a night of unrest demonstrators filled the streets of the city south of Milwaukee after a police officer shot a black man in the back the incident was videoed reporter Kim. Shine of CBS affiliate W. DJ says Wisconsin Governor. Tony. Identified the man as Jacob. Blake. The video you you pretty much see the man identified as Jacob walking away from officers and then one eventually as Jacob is trying to get into his suv one of the officers seems to be pulling on his shirt and then you hear seven gunshots and and why that actually happened we still don't know police haven't said Blake is hospitalized in Milwaukee in serious condition postmaster general. Louis to joy will testify today before the House Oversight Committee the joys under scrutiny for recent changes to postal operations that have raised concerns about mail in voting in November NPR Susan Davis has more Democrats called for joy to appear to explain the decision making behind the removal of certain sorting machines and mailboxes. As, well, as changes to overtime pay for carriers that coincided with reports of male delays, Democrats alleged that the trump administration is meddling with postal operations citing the president's repeated attacks on mail voting, which he believes will hurt his reelection chances despite no evidence of that to joy already testified under oath before the Senate last week that he has never spoken to the president about postal operations he also testified that the postal service is capable of handling mail in ballots this November, but advise people vote early to ensure they are delivered on time Susan, Davis NPR news Washington on Wall Street. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up one hundred, sixty, two points. The Nasdaq is up nearly sixty nine points. You're listening to NPR news. Two of the largest wildfires in recorded California history are burning out of control in that state started last week, and each has burned about five hundred, forty square miles the L. and U. Lightning complex is burden north of the San. Francisco Bay area the S. C., you lightning complex fire using central California west of Sacramento hundreds of thousands of people remain under evacuation orders in California due to the wildfires. NPR's Lawrence summer reports because of the pandemic many evacuees are being sent to hotels. Instead of shelters evacuation centers can be crowded places during natural disasters but concerns about the corona virus are changing that the Red Cross says it's spreading out cots and tables and requiring that masks be worn by everyone. To, maintain that distancing almost half of the evacuees who contacted the Red Cross are being sent to hotels in northern. California. Those most vulnerable to the corona virus are being prioritized. Local officials want to make sure that the pandemic doesn't stop anyone from evacuating who should be lauren summer NPR news. The Republican National Convention has gaveled into session this morning in Charlotte North Carolina, a few hundred delegates are meeting to conduct party business but the big event of the day will happen when the state delegates place President Trump's name in nomination. Again, as the party's presidential candidate president trump is scheduled to be in North Carolina today but it is unclear if he will be present during the roll call of states. Again Wall. Street the Dow is now up one, hundred, seventy, six points. I'm KORVA COLEMAN NPR news.

NPR president NPR California Scott Horsley Trump Jacob Red Cross Milwaukee food and Drug Administration Washington Louis Susan Davis Louisiana US Korva Coleman Blake Kenosha Wisconsin
NPR News: 04-22-2020 10AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-22-2020 10AM ET

"Live from NPR news. I'm Korva Coleman. President trump is tweeting that he'll sign an executive order today cutting off most immigration into the United States the suspension last for sixty days. Npr's Asia Roscoe reports trump is claiming. It will help American workers who are dealing with the pandemic president. Trump is arguing that this two month pause will help protect American workers. But it's not really clear. How much of an impact? This will have temporary. Workers will still be allowed in under this order in. There will be other exceptions. Trump says he will evaluate the economic conditions after sixty days and decide whether to extend it immigration advocates say. The president is looking for a scapegoat. The trump administration has already closed. Us borders shoot non essential. Travel stocks opened higher this morning after two consecutive down days. Npr's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrials jumped more than four hundred points. In the first few minutes of trading investors are showing renewed interest in stocks as some states began the tentative process of relaxing stay at home order imposed in response to the corona virus other parts of the country are taking more cautious approach with few people driving or flying. Oil prices remained extremely low. The futures contract for May delivery expire Tuesday after briefly dipping into negative territory. The contract for June delivery is trading at just over thirteen dollars a barrel. The drop in demand for oil highlights the nation's economic slowdown but some companies are benefiting from the millions of people stuck at Home Netflix nearly sixteen million new customers worldwide during the first three months of the year. Scott horsely. Npr News Washington. Milwaukee officials have identified seven people who appear to have contracted the corona virus after voting in Wisconsin's primary on April seventh. One person is a poll worker from member station. W. W. M. by an silver reports more than eighteen thousand people cast ballots at five consolidated voting centers in Milwaukee coming into contact with hundreds of poll workers. The city's Health Commissioner Janette Kwalik says there's evidence that gathering resulted in some spread of the corona virus. We've identified seven individuals that contracted appears Kobe. Nineteen through election related activities state. Health officials have been monitoring suspected cases since the election asking people if they voted in person or worked at a polling place and if so where it generally takes two weeks for symptoms to appear. And that's now exactly how long it's been since the Wisconsin primary for NPR News Mayan Silver in Milwaukee. The Food and Drug Administration has approved an at home swab test kid for the corona virus. The Kit is from lab core would allow patients to swab their own noses and send the swabs in for testing on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrials are up. Four hundred seven points or nearly two percent. The Nasdaq is up. One hundred sixty seven points this is. Npr President trump is tweeting that he has ordered the US Navy to fire on any Iranian gunboats if they harass U S ships at sea about a week ago some Iranian gunships sell dangerously close to US naval ships in the Persian Gulf. Also today Iran announced his launched a military satellite into space the US opposes these launches saying Iran is violating United Nations resolutions. Today's The fiftieth anniversary of the first Earth Day created in nineteen seventy climate change activists were planning big protests today but NPR's Jeff Brady reports with the pandemic. The campaign will now happen online. For five decades activists have used Earth Day to call for more environmental protections this year climate activists had hoped to make this Earth Day a turning point to encourage more action in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and transitioning to cleaner forms of energy. Seventeen year old high school. Junior Nayna Agra while hardened says climate strikes around the world were planned. Now that's happening online. Well I think that it's inevitable that the movements not gonna get the same attention this Earth Day as we would have if we had been able to mobilize in person instead. There will be three days of online activism ending with a focus on encouraging young people to vote in November Jeffrey. Npr News new research suggests it will take a long time for the air travel industry to recover from the pandemic. The International Air Transport Association says forty percent of air travelers. Say they'll wait six months after restrictions are lifted before they'll fly this is NPR news.

trump Npr NPR United States Npr president Milwaukee Wisconsin Korva Coleman Food and Drug Administration Kobe Asia Roscoe Scott horsely Iran International Air Transport As US Navy Scott Horsley
NPR News: 02-25-2020 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 9 months ago

NPR News: 02-25-2020 1AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. The White House is asking Congress to approve two and a half billion dollars in emergency funding to accelerate development of vaccines treatment and protective gear. To deal with the deadly corona virus outbreak. Nearly thirty countries have reported cases of the disease nearly seventy eight thousands of those cases and almost twenty seven hundred deaths have been confirmed in China mostly in New Bay province where the outbreak began. South Korea has the most virus cases in Asia outside of China it reported sixteen New Cases. Tuesday increasing the total number of infected patients in that country to eight hundred ninety. Three governments around the globe are imposing new restrictions on public gatherings and venues to contain corona virus theories of a pandemic caused a ripple effect on world markets and PR Scott Horsley reports. That Wall Street stocks fell over three percent Monday. It's were session in over two years for weeks now the. Us stock market had seemed largely immune to corona virus shocks but not anymore grow in clusters of infections outside China in South Korea. Italy and Iran have markets worried. The outbreak won't be contained and the economic damage will be worse than had been expected. South Korea is a major export to the. Us supply not only finished goods but also components used by manufacturers of electronics computers and cars a growing number of cases in Italy also raises fears. The virus could spread throughout. Europe with continents open borders investors now see it increasingly likely that the Federal Reserve may be forced to cut interest rates in response to the widening outbreak? Scott horsely NPR news Washington on Asian stock market shares are mostly lower down over three percent in Tokyo. Harvey Weinstein is in custody. After being convicted of to sex crimes charges a jury in New York quitted the former movie mogul on three more serious counts. Kpcc's caroline champion has reaction from Weinstein's accusers. A group of women who have accused Weinstein of abuse joined a phone call this morning sharing thoughts on the verdict actress. Zoe Brock called in from New Zealand. She expected Weinstein to go free and was dreading would make a comeback but not going to happen because now Harvey Weinstein is a convicted rapist. And Right now. He's sitting in jail and so happy about it actress. Mira Sorvino says she wants to see justice for more abuse survivors. Any survivor out there. Who is scared and hopeless adjusted what to do know that we are here for you one. Survivor called the decision. The first guilty verdict of the METOO ERA. Sorvino says it's just the beginning for NPR news. I'm Carolyn Champion spokesman for Weinstein says he was taken to Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan which has a unit that provided medical care for jail inmates. No reason was given for the diversion. You're listening to NPR. News police in Ontario begun clearing rail blockades that crippled freight and passenger train service and most of eastern Canada. At least ten protesters were arrested. Monday during clashes with police. Another group abandoned a blockade in Quebec demonstrators. Set the blockades week ago weeks ago to protest pipeline project that would encroach upon indigenous territory. The crisis has prompted temporary layoffs at two rail companies and disrupted the transport of an estimated three hundred forty million dollars worth of goods mathematician Katherine Johnson. Who help prepare America's first astronauts into space and onto? The Moon has not of natural causes in Virginia. He was one hundred and one years. Old Johnson solved equations by hand for NASA during the agency's early years. Vpn's whole Spencer reports that her pioneering work was featured in the two thousand sixteen. Hollywood movie. Margo Lee chatterly. Wrote the book hidden figures that revealed how an African American woman working in the segregated south performed Nasr's crucial Calculations Katherine? Johnson was amazing person. Also a superhero. But a real person shed early says Americans can learn. From Johnson's life contributions come from all around us and they come. Every single day may think that's really the lesson of Katherine Johnson in Two Thousand Fifteen the year before the film was released. President Barack Obama presented Johnson with the medal of freedom. Nasa dedicated a new research building in her name in two thousand seventeen for NPR news. I'm Hawes Spencer in Charlottesville and I'm Shay Stevens. Npr News in Washington.

Harvey Weinstein NPR Katherine Johnson South Korea Washington China Shay Stevens Mira Sorvino NPR Scott Horsley NASA Npr Hawes Spencer Asia New Bay White House Us Congress
NPR News: 11-24-2020 2PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 3 d ago

NPR News: 11-24-2020 2PM ET

"Live from npr news in washington. I'm windsor johnston. President elect joe. Biden is formally introducing his foreign policy and national security team today. Speaking in wilmington delaware biden said the people he's chosen have unmatched experience and accomplishments that will usher in a new era of thinking for example. We're going to have the first woman lead. The intelligence community the first latino immigrant to lead the department of homeland security and a groundbreaking diplomat at the united nations. We're going to have a principal on the national security council's fulltime job is to fight. Climate change for the first time ever that will occur at the white house. President trump made a brief appearance to tout the recent advancements in corona virus vaccines and today's new record on wall street or the stock market. Just broken thirty thousand. Never been broken that number. That's a secret number thirty thousand. Nobody thought that ever see it. The president has yet to concede the election but has cleared the way for the biden transition team to move forward with the process. The new york state sheriff's association is refusing to enforce governor. Andrew cuomo has guidelines for private indoor gatherings ahead of the thanksgiving holiday. Npr sally reports. The governor has limited get togethers to no more than ten people. Say you're the sheriff. It's thanksgiving if eleven people one more than is allowed are around a table. Who should you arrest. Just the eleventh person or everyone. They're fifty eight sheriffs in new york state and the association that represents them and their officers says practical problems like this one make enforcing governor cuomo's cap impossible and the association notes. There are bigger problems without violating our constitutional right to privacy. How do officers know how many guests are gathered in a private cuomo says law enforcement officers do not have the right to pick the laws they enforce in called officers who do so dictators sally herships. Npr news consumer confidence is down this month amid a spike in the number of new coronavirus infections. Npr's scott horsley. Reports consumers are nervous about the months ahead. The survey by the conference board finds consumer's feeling less confident than at any time since late summer attitudes about the current situation show little change from the previous month but consumers expectations for the future soured. Fewer people are anticipating a rapid improvement in business conditions or the labor market. More than half those surveyed. Think to holding pattern for the next six months overall. Consumer confidence is higher than it was. In april and may at the beginning of the pandemic there is considerable regional variation with people in the middle of the country expressing the highest offense while residents of new england. Show the lowest scott horsely. Npr news washington. You're listening to npr news. France's post to start easing coronavirus restrictions. A series of measures were implemented last month to help curb the rate of new infections. President emmanuel macron is expected to announce a phased approach to begin lifting restrictions in the coming weeks. They've been in place since october. Thirtieth russia's says one of its navy ships threatened to ram an american guided missile destroyer that russia claims was violating its territorial waters in the pacific ocean. Npr's laura kim reports the us navy says the destroyer was challenging. What it calls. Russia's excessive maritime claims the defense ministry in moscow says the us john mccain violated russian territorial waters by more than a mile and did not turn around until was challenged by a russian destroyer the us navy disputes mccain ever entered russian waters and says it does not recognize russia's claim to obey in the sea of japan. The navy says the destroyer was conducting an operation to assert navigational freedom in the area. Russian ships and planes regularly challenge you us naval vessels with close encounters and flyovers in two thousand seventeen the mccain was involved in a collision with a tanker that killed ten sailors lucian kim. Npr news moscow stocks. Continue to trade higher at this hour on wall street after setting an all time record today. The dow for the first time ever surpass the thirty thousand mark right now. What's up four hundred forty six points at thirty thousand thirty seven. The s p five hundred fifty seven. This is n. p.

Npr windsor johnston biden new york state sheriff's assoc cuomo npr sally herships scott horsley national security council Biden department of homeland securit wilmington Andrew cuomo washington delaware scott horsely united nations white house us navy joe
NPR News: 03-13-2020 10AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 9 months ago

NPR News: 03-13-2020 10AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. Stocks opened higher this morning as investors look to Washington for some relief in the face of growing corona virus. Npr's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped more than a thousand points at the opening bell. Major market indexes rebounded sharply in the first few minutes of trading stocks regained. Some of the ground. They lost on Thursday in the biggest one day route. Since nineteen eighty seven investors are hoping that Congress and the White House can agree on a package to help prop up the economy. Even as workers and consumers try to adjust growing restrictions put in place to control the corona virus pandemic lawmakers have been working on a plan that would include more food stamps unemployment insurance free testing for the virus and help for states facing higher healthcare costs. The House is expected to vote on the measure as early as today. Scott horsely. Npr News Washington House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi is negotiating with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin over that legislative package. Democrats unveiled a bill late last night. But some Republicans and members of the trump administration have expressed concerns with key parts of the package. The Food and Drug Administration says it's ramping up the ability for private labs to start testing for the corona virus. The expanded testing will start first in New York state. Dr Anthony Vouching Director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases says the private sector will help boost the number of test kits available in the. Us I must say that anyone and everyone I'm saying it's going to be markedly improved in. What has changed is that there's been a major involvement of the private sector the companies that generally do these kinds of tests for living now going to be major major league involved in getting this available to the public he spoke to MSNBC Iraq has condemned U s airstrikes militia backed by Iran the overnight strikes were in retaliation for the deaths of US and British personnel. This week in a rocket attack near Baghdad. Npr's Jane Arraf Report on the strengths and Iraq. The US says it hit weapons depots used by one of the major Iran linked groups tab Hezbollah which it accuses of attacks on US forces. The Iraqi government though says the air strikes also hit a civilian airport under construction in Karbala and an Iraqi army unit racks military condemned the attack saying violated agreements with the US and coalition partners. It said the casualties included Iraqi army commandos KHATTAB HEZBOLLAH AND OTHER RONNBACK groups in Iraq have threatened revenge on US forces over the drone killing and Baghdad of a senior Iraqi security official Jane Arraf NPR news on Wall Street. The Dow was up six hundred seventy eight points or more than three percent. The Nasdaq is up. Two hundred fifty four points or three and a half percent this is NPR commercial satellite. Imagery shows what appear to be mass graves being dug in Iran. Npr's Jeff Brumfield reports. They are near the epicenter of the corona virus outbreak in that country. The images were taken on March first by the company Max are and showed trenches dug in cemetery on the outskirts of the holy city of Qom. The Washington Post which broke the story also published social media posts in which a large number of bodies appear to be taken to the site. Comb is at the center of the outbreak in Iran which is one of the largest in the world. The country has reported over ten thousand cases and more than four hundred deaths so far but some feared the count may be even Higher Jeff Brumfield. Npr News Washington. California's governor has issued a sweeping executive order that would allow state officials to take over properties to deal with the Corona Virus Governor Gavin. Newsom order would allow the state to commandeer hotels and medical facilities to help care for people in California with the illness. The order also bans. Large gatherings of two hundred fifty people were more states are taking fresh steps to prevent the spread of the corona virus. They're closing all public schools. School closures had been limited to areas where clusters of the virus had turned up such as in Seattle now all public. Schools are closed in Maryland Michigan New Mexico Ohio and Oregon this morning Washington. Dc announce it. Starting Monday students would not report to school for the rest of this month again on Wall Street. The Dow's up seven hundred twenty four points. I'm KORVA COLEMAN NPR news.

Npr NPR US Iran Npr Washington Jeff Brumfield Iraq Baghdad Jane Arraf Iraqi army Korva Coleman Steven Mnuchin Food and Drug Administration White House Scott Horsley Washington Post Iraqi government Nancy Pelosi
The White House Is Out With Its Annual Economic Report

NPR's Business Story of the Day

08:25 min | 1 year ago

The White House Is Out With Its Annual Economic Report

"Support for NPR and the following message. Come from gusto providing payroll benefits and HR services for small businesses. Gusto serves more than sixty thousand businesses nationwide with full service payroll HR, tools and health insurance at gusto dot com slash NPR. We're going to take the risk now of reporting on the future. You have to do that with care. You never get any first-hand information from there, but economists do make forecasts to which businesses respond. So it's important and the White House is doing its annual economic report which includes an optimistic forecast for economic growth more optimistic than some other forecasts Kevin Hassett is chairman of the president's council economic advisers and his on the phone. Good morning, sir. Good morning at great to be back when you forecast growth of something better than three percent annually instead of maybe to what are you seeing that other economists do not the same thing we saw last year. Steve I mean, so about this time last year, we put out an economic. That had a forecast we'd actually finalized in November before the tax cuts passed, and we model the number of policies that the President Trump President Trump team was going to Bush and found that the baseline growth forecast was about to to which we agreed with the Obama administration on. But that if all of the policies were pursued last year that we could get growth up to three point one and growth last year with three point one. It was a pretty good hit. And so actually that means that for the first two years of the Trump administration. Our forecast has been either exactly at or below the economic growth experienced in the year, which is the first time that's ever happened. So you're calling me rosy forecast. Gop just saying Rosie I called you optimistic. I have to say I congratulations on getting that number, right? But of course, as things like the Trump administration's tax cut extended gets more and more unpredictable overtime. The Trump administration for example forecast. The tax cut would pay for itself, which seemed false at the time and turned out to be to to be false should people. Take your economic estimate here as realistic and make plans based on it. Yeah. For sure in and again think about it that over the last two years things have come in pretty close to what we said. And I think that you were sort of jumping the gun a little bit to say that these tax cuts and really the whole plan because there's more than just taxes affecting growth lift revenues overtime, usually the models that give you long long run feedback. You know, take five ten years for the growth GDP to rise to the level where the revenues are back where they started. We're we're trillion dollar deficits. Are we going? We're going to get. Yeah. So so so think about it this way the that the current CBO forecast over the next ten years is the GDP is going to be about seven trillion dollars higher cumulatively, I think in part because of all the policy changes. And so the deficit is a trillion dollars higher. But I'm asking is that a trade that you would take so suppose the that you're a pessimist about the deficit, should you trade trillion dollar deficit for seven trillion dollars more in GDP? Would you trade it for having five million people get lifted off of food stamps for wage growth in the bottom Dessel north of six percent? And I think that the policies are really working to improve Americans live right to focus on the deficit of the log read. But I think that the policies we pursued our sound ones and the results are in the data. This is an interesting point of view. You will find Democrats who take this point of view, you will sometimes find Republicans who take this point of view. I think you're telling me not that the deficit is meaningless. But don't worry about it. It doesn't matter as much as some other things. No, I think he should have really worry about it. But I think that you know, again, when President Trump was elected, we were the highest corporate tax place on her. Earth. You know, when was the last time you saw new factory being built manufacturing jobs declined about two hundred thousand under President Obama and President Trump has come in. And then we've lifted manufacturing jobs are ready by about five hundred thousand in the fact factories are coming back and they're coming back. You know because of simple economics went oh one. Yeah, we're at attractive place to be again because the tax rates are back sort of in the middle of the pack for the world. Let's acknowledge the manufacturing growth under President Trump when you said manufacturing jobs went down under President Obama. What you mean is went down a lot at the beginning in the great recession, and then went back up again strongly in the last years of Obama's time. Isn't that? I'm not sure, but you're correct that if we exclude the great recession, then there was a uptrend for President Obama in the last four years that accelerated dramatically starting in two thousand seventeen I wanna ask you about some tragic news that has struck your profession in the last day. We've learned that. Alan Krueger who advised President Obama has died in the other party. But someone you knew. Do of course. And I've known her new Allen since graduate school. You know, my heart goes out to his family. It's just a tremendous loss for the profession. He was such a great guy, a brilliant economist model for all of us when I was chosen to be the C H air for President Trump. He gave me a call and had all sorts of really useful tips, and and stayed in touch after I got here. You know, he's the kind of person that didn't seek the limelight. But the limelight sought him because of his inmates down on a professional level. Did you agree with more than you disagreed about about how to do economics how to do forecasting? I think that and neither Eleanor I or professional forecasters, we work in different areas in the field or or he worked, but I find the looking back that the times when we disagreed tended to be because I was incorrect, and he was correct. He was just one of the greatest living economists. And and you know, I mean, it was really at times humbling to be in a room with him because he just had a way to see through the difficult issues that very few people have. Any did it with such Congeniality? You know, he would sort of say well, Kevin. Did you think about it this way? And of course, that meant that had gotten it really terribly wrong. And I just we're all going to miss them terribly. Well, Mr. has it thanks for taking the time and taking our questions. I really appreciate it. Yeah. Thanks for having. He is chairman of the White House council of economic advisers and the White House is putting out its economic forecast. NPR's Scott Horsely has been listening in with us NPR's chief economics correspondent, Scott. Good morning. Good morning. Steve. You also knew Krueger in dealt with him. Yes. He he had the job in Obama's administration that Kevin Hassett has now. And actually there was a poignant moment yesterday as Mr. Hassett was briefing a bunch of reporters about their forecast, we were sitting in the conference room with the council of economic advisers, and there's photos of all the past chairman hanging on the wall now and Kruger's along with all of his predecessors. And it was it was a poignant moment. Let's talk about the rest of what we heard from from from. Kevin Hassett there when you listen to that forecast of of a little better than three percent growth. What stands out to you one thing to keep in mind is that the the administration forecast is Suming some positive things, for example, that it infrastructure Bill gets passed that the president's individual tax cuts are made permanent all that sort of baked into their forecast on the positive side. They are also assuming that more people come off the sidelines and enter the workforce that businesses invest more in capital goods and that productivity they are certainly more optimistic than most independent. Forecasters are right now and even with those relatively rosy expectations. They are projecting trillion dollar deficits in each of the next four years. But as Mr. acid says they have nailed their forecast for the first two years the Trump administration. We'll see where they go from here is the concern that economists have not that we're heading directly for. Session, but the growth may be slowing down. That's right. And we've seen that deceleration already from sort of peak last spring it's slowed with each quarter right now we're at a round two percent or maybe even less than one percent in the current quarter. So what we're seeing is that deceleration when we last heard from Scott Horsely, he was NPR's White House. Correspondent now chief economics correspondent, Scott. Thanks so much enjoying the newbie. Thanks support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

president President Obama President Trump Trump administration Kevin Hassett NPR White House chairman Scott Horsely Obama administration Gusto Alan Krueger Steve Comcast Mr. acid gusto dot Bush Gop
U.S. Farmers Have Multiple Concerns When It Comes To Trade Talks

NPR's Business Story of the Day

07:38 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Farmers Have Multiple Concerns When It Comes To Trade Talks

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from US's online MBA ranked number one by poets in Kwan's NPR listeners reap the benefits of a prestigious USC NBA. Find out if your if it more at USC online, MBA dot org tomorrow US and Chinese negotiators will meet in Washington for talks about the trade war. Now, the stakes are high for everyone. But especially for farmers government data shows that income levels for farmers. Have recently been dropping Republican Senator Chuck Grassley represents Iowa that's a state. That's deeply dependent on agriculture. Grassley himself is from a farming family that grows sway beans and corn. I asked him if his constituents are worried, and he said, the farmers that he's talking to are worried about things beyond just their bottom lines. You don't want to think of farmers only thinking about their own products being sold to China. Farmers know that China's stealing our intellectual property. Our trade says grits, if you want to do business in China, you gotta do it the way they want you to do it. And that's give them or your technology. The farmers know that they're manipulating their currency. As Senator we've spoken to many farmers on morning edition who have told us that their bottom line is being hit hard by the trade war that they are losing tens of thousands hundreds of thousands of dollars. Their concern isn't intellectual property at this point their concern. He's making a living. What do you say to them? Their concern is intellectual property because there's an awful lot of intellectual property goes into the creation of the surplus that we do the government, though has acknowledged that this trade war is hurting farmers. In fact, last year, the government offered farmers bailout money to the tune of twelve billion dollars you as you said you'd apply for it. Did you end up applying? Yeah, I got it on a thirty acres. Soybeans. But I don't know how much money I got. But you're entitled to know if you wanna find out that means that you are far must have been at risk. You must have felt that you were losing money because of the trade war, otherwise you wouldn't have applied for federal bailout money, no participate in every government program. That's available because it's been considered in my generation. Remember, I'm eighty five years old that farmers stick together and participating in the farm program is one way of showing your in the same boat as everybody else's. We talked to a soybean farmer in Ohio, Chris Gibbs about the bailout program. He took the money as well. Here's what he had to say about it twelve billion dollars pumped in agriculture. That's great. But that's only a one time fix early tax payers not going to continue to do that. Why would they for a policy? That's inflicted pain. Byron government onto agriculture NASA. Tariffs he is not that impressed by. This bailout. What do you say to a guy like Chris cubes are Warren impressed by it? And I sat in meetings with ten or twelve other senators a couple of times over the course of the last eighteen months, and we told the president. We don't want aid. We want markets, and we want trade not aid and so- farmers feel the same way that person from Ohio fields. But on the other hand, I can tell you a lot of farmers that said to me, it's hurting us temporarily, but the president's doing the right thing because you lay can't let the Chinese screw us on international trade where we have six hundred billion dollar deficit. It seemed as if the United States and China were really making progress on these trade talks, and then President Trump tweeted this weekend that he plans to impose new high tariffs on Chinese goods. He is affected. -ly upping the ante right now ahead of trade talks that a y. Is move a based upon what I have found out from the executive branch of government from two different sources when our team went to China, we could go they got over there, and they found out that the Chinese had negotiated to a certain level. They got the tex- for that negotiation. And it went way back from where they thought we had brought them to the we can't make the same mistake with China. This time that we made in twenty eleven when we thought we had an agreement with Chinese and they didn't carry it out. So it's time I think to strike a very strong enforceable deal. So that farmers even non-farmers can get the certainty that they need. What is your message for each side here? And what do you think is it stake? If these talks break down what I would say is everybody benefits from. Freer trade. I'd say to China you joined the WTO, and you're in your into an organization that has to live by the rules of trade. Yarn living by him by not enforcing. Let's say intellectual property. I'd say to the United States we ought to be set in the pattern for the rest of the world on trade because that's what we have done since World War Two and Senator to the farmer who says, look, I don't care about intellectual property. I've got a small farm relatively small farm. I just need to make a living. I need to eat. I need to not lose money. Would you tell them? Hold on very definitely if this is all successful. And I know today that's a big if but if this is all successful, not only is that farmer going to be better off. But the entire world is going to be better off because free trade has proven itself with the reduction of. Global poverty with the enhancement of the middle class worldwide. And if this is not successful, if it's not successful will continue to go on and try to accomplish what we can in ways other than China. Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you, very much goodbye. All right NPR's chief economics. Correspondent Scott Horsely? Was listening into the senators interview, Scott what stood out to you there? Noel, I was just in Senator Grassi's home state of Iowa over the weekend and farmers. There have really suffered a series of gut punches not only low crop prices, and then the trade war. But now they're dealing with historic flooding. Farmers are resilient and like a lot of Americans. They do want to see changes in China's behavior, but they are carrying a heavy load in this trade fight. Chris Gibbs who spoke with earlier this week talked about soybean prices dropping by three dollars a bushel that twelve billion dollar government aid package pays at most a dollar sixty five. A bushel. And that's for farmers who qualify a lot of crops get less than that and Noel, it's not just China in this trade war Trump's withdrawal. From a big Asia. Pacific trade deal is hurting beef farmers who are trying to do business in Japan, dairy, farmers in Wisconsin. And elsewhere in the midwest are hurting because Mexico is not buying as much of our cheese anymore. Senator Grassley himself has complained about the president's tariffs on steel and aluminum America has the world's most productive agriculture. But the president's trade policies have given farmers a tough row to hoe. NPR's chief economics correspondent, Scott Horsely. Thanks got. You're welcome.

China Senator Chuck Grassley NPR United States Iowa president Senator President Trump Chris Gibbs Scott Horsely Ohio Noel Washington USC USC NBA Asia Senator Grassi Kwan Japan
Midterm Update: Trump Pivots To Immigration; Where The Parties Put Their Money

NPR Politics Podcast

23:23 min | 2 years ago

Midterm Update: Trump Pivots To Immigration; Where The Parties Put Their Money

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything. This is also Louis. Thank Laura Tara, highly met has him. Diane Nagin eighty ninety on from the Rosenfeld rare books room of the library of congress where we're meeting after a year of research in libraries and archives in Mexico, Indonesia, Mongolia, China vice that the US Japan Britain, Cambodia, Nigeria Italy, Taiwan through Tamala, same Macedonia. You're listening to the NPR politics podcast, which was recorded at two fifty six PM on Tuesday Tober, thirtieth Kimmy mind at things may have changed by the time. You hear it? That was I think the most earnest times STAN we've ever had. I love it snarky mood that time stamp was good. We said I loved it. Hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast. President Trump wants to eliminate birthright citizenship, it was always told to me that you needed a constitutional amendment. You don't do that. Well, maybe you do and we'll get to that in a minute. But one thing the president actually did do with send troops to the border. In response to a migrate caravan and must McCullough political reporter. I'm Scott Tetreault cover congress. I'm Kelsey Snell. I also cover congress, and I'm Scott Horsely cover the White House. All right. So we are exactly one week away from election day, and this is an election that Donald Trump has really wanted to make about immigration. I would argue for months at this point, Scott Horsely. Why don't you start? We knew that there are over five thousand troops that are being deployed to the US Mexico border in response to the come. Caravan? What exactly can these troops? Do the troops are gonna be playing a support role. They're not going to be a arresting would be border crossers. But they will be supporting the border patrol agents who do that work, basically just beefing up the border patrol can already do in. This is not the only time we've heard about immigration this week from the president. He brought up immigration again in an interview with axios re said that he wants to end birthright citizenship, you can definitely do it with an act of congress. But now they're saying I can do it just with an executive order. Now. How ridiculous were the only country in the world where a person comes in has a baby and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States for eighty five years with all of those benefits. It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous. And it has to end it's got Horsely. What is birthright citizenship? Will it's the notion that anyone who is born in the United States automatically becomes a citizen of the United States. The president is wrong when he says, we're the. Only country that observes birthright citizenship, actually, Canada, Mexico about thirty other countries, most of the western hemisphere practice this it's enshrined in the fourteenth amendment to the constitution. And I'm not sure who the they is telling the president he can change this by executive order, but it is very much. Jonathan swan suggestion that interview clip in dispute, so I mean can can a president really take it away. Then if something is enshrined in the constitution, as you mentioned, Scott, it's part of the fourteenth amendment is an amendment that was passed after the civil war. What are these reconstruction act amendments? It's something that we have had for at this point more than a century and a half. Can you just take it away through an executive order? Well, I think it's important here note that the house speaker Paul Ryan was out in Kentucky today campaigning. And he didn't interview today in Kentucky. And he says, I'm a believer in following the plain text of the constitution. And I think in this case the fourteenth amendment is pretty clear and that involve a very very lengthy. Institutional process. And what he presumably means there is that. Yes. Congress could take action or you would have to get the state to defy to ratify a change of the constitution, which is an extremely high bar, the plain text of the constitution is all of the fourteenth amendment is all persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof our citizens now if there's any dispute at all it's about that little phrase and subject to the jurisdiction thereof the supreme court weighed in on this more than a century ago and said, no it covers everybody except the kids of diplomats and the kids of foreign invaders, but the president's on pretty thin ice here. We should maybe interject a little surgeon general warning, it's very possible. This purported executive order is never going to materialize. This may very well be the kind of vaporware that we've heard from the president on other subjects it's very much designed to gin up enthusiasm among the GOP base. One of the things that we were talking about all last week. When the news was dominated by by. Attempted bombings. And then that terrible shooting in Pittsburgh, where President Trump is right now as we tape this is that President Trump was pretty clearly frustrated that those bombings were dominating the news. He put out that tweet where he put bombs in quotes saying that he was upset that this was this was the conversation, President Trump as you mentioned Osma wanted to talk about immigration over and over and over again, he kept returning to it in recent weeks on the campaign trail, this is a card that he can play to to shift attention for a moment at least back to his hardline immigration message, which he thinks will work well in exciting Republican voters, and we should point out that I mean, the reason he thinks it will work. Well, is that it did work well for him in two thousand sixteen if you look at the exit polls amongst voters who actually thought that immigration was an important issue. They tended to trend way more Republican and democratic and you know, look birthright citizenship is actually something that came up. I remember during the Republican primary in two thousand sixteen Donald Trump talked about it. I. Then we shortly thereafter, Bobby Jindal. I think was rand Paul came up in the role talking about it. And then was never heard of again for almost two years until here we are a week out from the mid term elections and suddenly it surfaces again, probably be oh back under a rock until the president again needs to gin up enthusiasm. It's a double edged sword though, we have a Republican congressman from the suburbs of Philadelphia Ryan Castilla. He's retiring this year, but he's calling this political malpractice on the part of the president because in the most competitive house races where tend to be a lot of immigrants. This could really backfire on the GOP and the president's party, even as it works to to his benefit in some of those more rural red states where the Senate contest is being fought out. That's a really really good point. Because I think this issue really does divide the Republican party and a pretty serious way. And if you're the president thinking about trying to turn out Republican base voters, and if you're thinking that the base is going. To carry an election that is far more likely to happen at a statewide level. So like in a Senate race, but when it comes to congressional races races. These are much more narrow groups of people and for the most part the battleground as we've talked about all million times in this podcast. The battleground for the house is happening in the suburbs and just outside of the suburbs. And those are places where you have much more moderate Republican voters, and your Trump style based just isn't as dominant throw the throw the immigrants out is not the message that's going to get you college educated suburban women voters, but it speaks to maybe the fact that Donald Trump for a long time has just focus on the Senate as his priority to some degree. Because this isn't the first time we're hearing him speak in sort of strong passionate terms around immigration. Right. If you like this is just the latest duration of him trying to see which cultural message might stick. I mean, he was he's been warning us about a caravan that is coming from Central America to the US Mexico border. He's announce that there. Will be five thousand troops sent to the border. I mean, it sort of the list goes on and on. He's warned us about many other potential things that he he sort of saying to his base could happen in the realm of immigration. Well, if you think about his focus on the Senate, it makes a lot of sense, right? He has been told throughout the almost two years of his presidency that the thing that is standing in the way of him getting everything that he wants is a sixty vote threshold in the Senate, and he sees the Senate as a place that approves the personnel that he wants that gets supreme court justices through so his focus on the Senate is is fairly logical. When you're thinking about what the president's goals are. Maybe he's putting his eggs in the Senate basket and more or less surrendering the GOP majority in the house, or maybe that's just the only mode. He has. So I wanna ask you Kelsey you as well, Scott detro- because both of you have been out recently to states where immigration is really important to parts of the electorate and Kelsey. You were just in Florida, and Scott, I know you have been in Nevada. So talk to me a little bit about. What what you've heard in terms of actually how some of this rhetoric say from the president is actually affecting voters at this point. I think Florida might be a little bit of an anomaly in this situation where you the area that I was in was just south of Miami. And it's represented by a Republican Carlos Curbello, and you have a lot of Republicans there. But a lot of them are Republicans who are also immigrants or Republicans who are farmers who rely on immigrant labor, and these are some groups of people that release split with the president on this. And they're concerned more about passing laws that fix the immigration system. And when they say fixed, they mean allow more immigrants in particularly skilled workers. But when I was up in New Jersey, I heard so much about the caravan and people worried about the caravan Republican voters who are really focused that seems to have gotten through the noise and given the New Jersey is quite far from the US Mexico border. Yeah. It was I was surprised at how many people really did bring that up. I, you know. It's one of the things we're stuck in Washington. We get a sense of how much something is breaking through. But it's not till you get out there and talk to people, and when it came up and person after person after person, it, it seems to really be sticking when I was in Nevada us, you saw the flip side of this where we're Democrats view this as a base issue, a big chunk of Latino voters in in Nevada and Democrats need them to show up and vote. So you saw candidates like Jackie Rosen for Senate, but cows candidates as well gubernatorial candidates, talking a lot about this reminding voters about Trump's decision to try and cancel the deferred action for childhood arrivals program to to rollback protected status for people in countries that has been on the books for a long time several their anti immigrant policies that Trump White House has pushed saying you need to vote. And there's an interesting broader argument that I've heard in places like Nevada, but also places like Georgia where I was this past weekend. Where Democrats have taken a step back and are trying to frame this election as a referendum. On American values saying to voters, what do you want this country to be about what kind of country? Do you think this is what kind of country? Do you want to show up and support and and making it a broad referendum on all these divisive things that President Trump has done in his two years in office to some degree what you're describing Allegri? I've heard that. I heard it down from Democrats in Florida is well, but but it reminds me of the closing argument that Hillary Clinton made in two thousand sixteen which you could argue just did not actually turn out to be very successful for Democrats should not have about this time fair point. He's not. And I think when you talk about President Trump is replaying his 2016 tactics. You have to think about the fact that Hillary Clinton is not on the ballot. And you have a lot of fresher candidates. A lot of first time candidates who voters might be a lot more inclined to support or cross an I'll for than they would somebody who'd been on their TV screens for thirty years. Also, you have President Trump with a record now before he was a person who had a lot of promises, and we heard from voters all the time. Time. Right. That were saying that well, we take him seriously. But not literally or we think of we don't know how he's going to have to give him a chance. Well, they'd given him a chance. And now this is an opportunity for voters to, you know, express whether or not they're happy with what he did. All right. Well, I am sure that immigration is not entirely going to disappear between now and election day. So we'll probably have more to talk about this. But Scott Horsely we're going to let you go for now. I know you've gotta jet. But thank you very much. Great video by other Scott, and Kelsey and Scott Detroit stick around because we're gonna take a quick break. And when we get back, we're going to look at where Democrats and Republicans are focusing their money and their efforts in the final days before the election. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from grow with Google digital skills are becoming more and more important in today's economy. That's why grow with Google is providing free online training and tools to help Americans. Learn the skills they need to succeed. Learn more about grow with Google and get started by visiting Google dot com slash grow more than twenty years. That's how long Olympic gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar abused. The girls and women who came to see him for treatment believed a new podcast from Michigan radio and NPR digs into how he got away with it for so long. And we're back and we've got Dominica Montinaro here with us. Hey, Dominica hither Osma. All right. So let us start this conversation. Just talking about money because money is always important, and it certainly very important when it comes to elections how the political parties are spending all of this cash that they have in the final days of the election. So Dominica, let's just start with a quick recap of who has spent the most money. Well, first of all start with sort of overall. How much money is expected to be sputtering. This election is a huge huge number. There's more than five billion dollars expected to be spent the center I bounce of politics has forecast, and that is an unprecedented number for a mid-term election. It's a whopping some like, it's huge. And a lot of that money is going to democratic candidates, frankly, there's so much energy on the democratic side with small donors that you're seeing candidates raise unbelievable amounts of money. For example, more than sixty democratic house candidates raised a million dollars or more in just the third quarter, which is unprecedented. The thing that got the most attention was the democrat running for for Senate, Texas beta Aurora raising something like thirty million dollars thirty eight million dollars. That's running for president money, not running for Senate money, and a lot of these house candidates have been raising the type of money, you see for us is absolutely your team that all over the place, in fact, and this using just suggested sort of enthusiasm, particularly the democratic side at this point. Well, you know, it's one measure of enthusiasm certainly that if you're willing to open up your wallets and give to a candidate. Then that's a big deal. Now one advantage that Republicans have is they are winning on outside spending, those super PACS and outside groups are giving Republicans in advantage and really giving them a lot of air cover whether it be in these house districts or in Senate districts because another factor wanna let you know about in the Senate races. Democrats are outspending Republicans and have out. Raised Republicans in ten of the twelve most competitive races, so far and the only to our Florida and New Jersey, and what are those races have in common? Very wealthy. Republican carries candidate who have poured tons of their own money into the race. Even even candidates who are trailing like Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota. She is at this point probably viewed as the democratic incumbent most endanger of losing her seat. She raised. I'm forgetting the exact number. But it was definitely tens of millions of dollars in the days after she announced that she was not going to vote for Brett cavenaugh just a flood of money coming in to help her campaign, even as she faces. Very uphill fight at this. She's raised three times as much money as her Republican opponent congressman Kevin Kramer at the same time. It's also North Dakota. There's only so much money. You can spend on the air in North Dakota. You talk to me about Republican candidates a little bit right because we have talked. I think so far more about the democratic candidates. I'm curious can you quantify for me? How much we're talking about? When it comes to Republican. Gates, because you said a lot of the money's coming from outside groups. Well, Democrats have out raised Republicans four hundred ninety million to three hundred fifty three million through three quarters. So still a lot of money going to Republicans, but not as much as Democrats, obviously, we should keep in mind that twenty sixteen was the first cycle where there was a serious conversation about is this the death of the TV ad in political campaigns famously Donald Trump waited until incredibly late in the general election to even begin airing TV ads, this has been happening more and more for several cycles. But twenty sixteen was the first time that we saw a social media advertising digital advertising being just as important to so many campaigns as television advertising, and especially if you're in a house race, you can you can get up a more quickly. You can target it to specific voters. You can be more nimble with it. And if you have a ton of money coming in at the end, you can use it for Facebook and Twitter and everything else advertising in a way that sometimes it's harder to to book that TV time Dominica, I want you to give us a. Picture at this point because we are one week away from the election on where we are seeing. Let's start with the Republicans. I where we are seeing them spend their money at this point in have we noticed any shifts in where that money is being spent. Well, you gotta look at the house because the house is really where this races is being won or lost. As far as Democrats thinking, they can take back at least one chamber right because the Senate looks more like it's trending Republican likely to stay that way because of the landscape that favors them. But when I talked to campaign officials today, they acknowledged that some of these resources are having to be diverted from a lot of these top tier races. In those suburban high educated, wealthier suburbs examples like which types oh places outside of Washington DC like the tenth congressional district for Barbara Comstock or outside the Denver suburbs. Where Mike Kaufman. The Republican is running in the sixth congressional district like outside of Kansas City for. Sample Kansas City, Kansas where you have Kevin Yoder, a Republican who seems to be down a lot within the internal polling that a lot of the campaign committees have seen and they need to at this point figure out where they're going to most sort of move their resources, and what one person told me was that the firewall has shifted it shifted from there to other districts that are little further out that you wouldn't have expected to see Republicans having to spend money in places like South Carolina's first congressional district, for example, not the kind of place usually a pretty pro Republican place not that that means the democrat is likely to win there. But that Republicans are having to spend money there to save some of these folks. So why are they moving the money away from some of these places because when you get towards the end of a campaign, you just have to decide where you have your best your best opportunities. And I talked to a lot of Democrats and Republicans who said we talked already about these outside groups and how much they're spending. There's. Hope particularly among Republicans as they move out of districts that these outside groups who have lots of money will move in. But the ads that they move in have largely as we've talked about before been more about Nancy Pelosi, and they've been more about some really divisive. It is really rough ads that are actually turning off a lot of voters that I've talked to and they actually pay more for ads campaigns get a discount and can actually buy more for their money. You know, and if people follow real estate, and you're looking for houses, you know, you understand suburbs? Verse excerpts know, the suburbs or right outside the city and the excerpts are just outside the suburbs. And there's listen. Are away. Supercomputers these are supercomputers, right? These people who decided, you know, maybe don't make as much money, but I really want a big house still, and they've sort of have some expansion into areas that might have previously been rural. And now we're being developed. That's where a lot of the races. Now, are that Republicans are trying to firm up those districts? That's interesting. And so presumably the demographics of the people living in those districts are also different in your sound sounds like you're saying they'll they're more favorable to the Republican party. These are districts that presumably Republicans ought to win. Yes. Generally, these are district's that Republicans do win. And that's that's what's been surprising for a lot of people. So Scott, I'm curious, you know, when you look at Democrats, do you have a sense of where they're really focusing their money at this point with just a week left before election day, everywhere everywhere there. Yes. And I think there's this weird tension going on because at one hand the polls remain incredibly close in a lot of these races. Even these races that Republicans pulled. Back on as Dominica was just saying on the other hand Democrats, see the trends moving in the direction, they feel like the independent voters are breaking for them. They seeing some evidence that their base is energized and showing up to vote, and they feel like an especially given all the money that they have they're able to start spending money in more Republican friendly friendly district's if anything to put the Republicans on defense in focus and force them to to spend the money on their turf. So it's really aggressive movement from Democrats at this point to try and expand the map and Dominica as we've been talking about. It's it's hard to it's hard to rationalize or it's hard to square that with the incredibly tight polls that we're seeing in all these raises. But that's what Democrats have been seeing all along Nancy Pelosi is favourite phrases all year is that if a wave comes it'll be tiny droplets of rain that put democrat over the top and each of these districts, and that's for a lot of factors among them. The fact that Republicans and a lot of key states were the ones who drew the district lines in twenty eleven and twenty twelve that that. Set up these Republican-leaning districts for districting is a huge key point here because Democrats are playing mostly on all of these places for the most part on Republicans Republican leaning areas, and because of that it's insulated some of these candidates to a significant degree, and it's one of the caveats at Democrats talk about they said looking past wave years, those those places that are most likely to flip suddenly you start to see an opening up of a much wider margin than what you're seeing right now in the polls. Now, you're you're saying are still really tight you're still very tight even at the places that are most likely to flip you have a very wide field right now. But it might be a little bit of an inch deep kind of thing mile wide inch deep or some of these races. We'll all right. That is a wrap for today. We'll be back as soon as there is more political news that you need to know about. And don't forget you can subscribe to our weekly newsletter. It breaks down all of the big themes of the week, and you can find our best digital stories on their subscribe to the NPR politics newsletter at N P. Dot org slash politics newsletter. I must Macao's political reporter, I'm Scott that try cover congress. I'm Kelsey Snell. I also cover congress, and I'm Dominican months in our political editor and thank you for listening to NPR politics podcast.

President Trump president Senate United States congress Kelsey Snell Scott Mexico Republican party Scott Horsely NPR Florida Google Dominica executive Nancy Pelosi Comcast New Jersey
Trump Defends Use Of Tear Gas At The Border; Mississippi Senate Heads To A Runoff

NPR Politics Podcast

17:05 min | 2 years ago

Trump Defends Use Of Tear Gas At The Border; Mississippi Senate Heads To A Runoff

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from IBM, who was helping create p Tech's schools, a new education model that prepare students for twenty first century careers. Let's put smart so work. Find out how it IBM dot com slash p tag get I- NBA crew. It's clayton. He from Melbourne Australia. I've just voted in my likely state election where it's compulsory voting. I get a fine. If I don't show up preferential voting I have to number every books and Iran, really just kids if they get a sausage at the select the front this podcast was recorded at three twenty four PM on Monday, November twenty six things have changed by the time. You hear this? Hey, can I have mine with onions on with the show? I wanted to know where the sausage is free. Yes. You get them. If you vote I won't have sticker you have to. But the point is they give you a free a free sites. That's just awesome. This is your word that is one of the main reason torii voted, hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast over the weekend. US border agents fired tear gas into Mexico as migrants tried to cross into the United States. And the election is still not yet over tomorrow in Mississippi. There is a runoff in the race for Senate. I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. I also cover the White House, and I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent, so let's start with what happened over the weekend along the border. Well, what happened this weekend was really this sort of the coma nation of something that's been building for a long time. There's been a large number of. Of Central American asylum seekers making their way to the United States. The Trump administration has deliberately trying to funnel all of those migrants to official ports of entry. That's the official doorways in the border between the US and Mexico. The biggest doorway is the Santa sedro port of entry. But between San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico, I used to live there. It's I've spent a lot of hours waiting in that border line. It's a very busy port of entry. It's very busy port of entry at the best of times, and it's more complicated now because you have several thousand additional Central American migrants who've been waiting to go through there and apply for asylum and the under the Trump administration they've only been leading fewer than a hundred through per day. I want to try to understand this. There were people who had already gathered trying to cross into the United States to seek asylum. Then caravan people have shown up making the crowd of folks in Tijuana. China larger do you have a combustible situation. You have folks who've been waiting weeks and now looking at the prospect of waiting months to have their asylum claims heard there was a protest, they got impatient. Some of the protesters also rushed to the border in a ill conceived attempt to think maybe they could climb over the fence or sneak under the fence or somehow get across the border, and that's when the border patrol responded with tear gas. It was a windy day. Some of the people who were affected by the tear gas were the folks who are not rushing the border. We're just having their protests. But it turned what was already a difficult situation into a really chaotic scene. And then the authorities along the border took the additional step of actually closing the door altogether, including to the ordinary commuters and tourists in the tens of thousands of people who pass back and forth between San Diego and Tijuana every day for hours on the Sunday after thanksgiving. So the tear gas being lobbed into Mexico game. Gives us this. What has become already an indelible image of this mom, wearing a frozen t shirt with their two kids frozen. As in the Disney show is in the Disney movie running away from smoke and our reporters on the ground have said that it was it's been windy that that air was moving around that that the tear-gas went beyond maybe the people that were trying to charge the border, right? So this is a picture of the mom and her kids with somebody trying to get away from teargas one thing, that's got you. And I know because we have lived in California and have crossed that border crossing. This is a pretty heavily fortified part of the US border. Like, if you're talking about build a wall, there's something that looks a lot like a wall there. Absolutely. And and even more so in recent weeks because the the thorns have been fortifying it with additional concertina wire they've closed off some of the what are usually traffic lanes. So it's even more fortified than usual right now. And today. Out on the south lawn of the White House. President Trump was asked about this. And he defended the action that the border patrol took. They had to use because they were being rushed by some very tough people, and they used tear gas and is the bottom line. Nobody's coming into our country unless they come in legally. No, we should say under both American law and international law. If you reach the US border you are allowed to petition for asylum. So that would count as coming in legally, the president has been resisting this and what he'd like to set up his some sort of system where asylum-seekers stay in Mexico while their asylum claims are being heard. Yeah. And you know, the interesting thing about the politics of this issue is that generally when the issue is border security, the president and the Republicans win when the issue is maltreatment of women and children the Democrats win. So you had this picture of the mom and her kids running on the border to get away from tear gas. Now is that a reduction of family separation which was the one moment in this entire debate. Where the Democrats were on the offensive not the defensive or can Donald Trump continue to say that pictures like this of women and children are somehow an imminent national security threat to the United States. Well, and if that was the only picture that would be one thing, but there were also images and moving images of these people trying to jump the fence or climb the fence. So that that certainly plays into the hands of the president and other immigration hardliners who want to say, look, this is a threat. This is a large number of people trying to come into the country against the will of the United States. And just to reiterate one reason it's a large number of people in one spot is because the Trump administration is deliberately said if you want to apply for asylum. You've got to go to a port of entry. And the other reason is because they have slowed down to such a great extent the asylum process that is. Just more people are massing on the border because so few of them can be processed per day. So this morning with all of this on cable news on a loop, especially Fox News. I was in the office of an ally of President Trump's today as on the television set in his office. There were there were moving pictures of of of this protest and what happened yesterday, and he pointed up there and said this is going to help the president in his effort to get funding for the wall. And that is going to be a very big matter very soon because there is a government funding deadline of December seventh where wall funding is going to be a big part of that discussion the this ally. The president says you look at that image of people trying to get into the United States. This large group of people trying to get into the United States that makes people want to have a wall. It makes Democrats want to give him funding for the wall. He didn't think that but he said it would make moderate. Republicans and independence more interested in a wall than maybe they would have been a week as they cast their vote before they are no longer members of congress because there's a lame duck. Yeah. And lame duck politics are very interesting. And and we don't know exactly which way this is going to go don't forget, the Democrats have now won thirty eight they might get up to forty more seats. So that me and the house in the house. So there are a lot of lame duck Republicans who are going to be asked to vote on this budget, including funding for the wall. Who know that this is the last vote they're going to cast. They're not going to be coming back in January some of them feel they lost their seats because of Donald Trump and because of his obsession about the border there from moderate suburban districts. They're not, you know, from the places where the wall is the most popular so we don't know exactly how that's going to play out. And when we talk about the budget. We're talking about the budget for the part of homeland security of the government has already been funded for the new year, but the homeland security department and a number of other branches of government have not yet been funded. So one of the things this lame duck. Congress has to do. Is pass a funding Bill for those remaining departments. And the it's I December seventh and it's an opportunity for the president to to push for a wall. But there's certainly no guarantee even if his ally thinks it's this kerfuffle in Tijuana helps him there's certainly no guarantee. I don't think there's a tremendous appetite in congress to spend anything like the multiple billions of dollars at the president wants on on a border wall. And don't forget that the president has said several times that he would be willing to shut down the government. If he didn't get full funding for the wall. Now, he said he didn't want to do it before the election. He understood the politics of shutting down the government. But he has suggested that he might be willing to revisit that. So just as a reminder what happened is in September. There was a government funding deadline and congress funded something like eighty percent of the government for the next year. And then about twenty percent of the government. That includes the department of homeland security was funded temporarily through December. So now Semper seventh through December seventh. It's the next front. It's the next fight. It is and once again, it's about immigration and don't forget in the past. The president has been close at several times to making a deal with Democrats where he would get the wall funding, but in exchange he'd have to either do something about DACA. The you know, the kids who were given temporary relief from deportation or something else. Those deals always fell apart at the last minute. And it's hard for me to imagine with the Democrats knowing that they're going to be in control in just another short month and a half after that that he can get a deal like that again. Now, we should say whatever happens in this budget fight in which the wall may be one of the big bones of contention as with previous government shutdowns or partial government shutdown. It's important to remember that essential government personnel are going to stay on the job so border patrol officers. TSA agents the quote, unquote, essential members that federal government will stay on the job. Even if their departments are not funded, but this. Is still an opportunity when lawmakers have some leverage the need to pass a spending Bill does force lawmakers, and the and the White House to wrestle with some of these issues that maybe they've been putting off for some time. Okay. We're going to take a quick break. And when we come back Mississippi and the Senate race there. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from grow with Google digital skills are becoming more and more important in today's economy. That's why grow with Google is providing free online training and tools to help Americans. Learn the skills they need to succeed. Learn more about grow with Google and get started by visiting Google dot com slash grow support for this podcast. And the following message come from southern visa institute of art offering educational programs, including fully accredited, master's, degrees, online, courses and summer courses for adults and teenagers. Learn about the business side of art art history. How galleries and auction houses work and how to begin your career in the art world in New York, London and Los Angeles. Learn more at Sotheby's institute dot com this week on asking other we have comedian Michelle wolf, and she shares her opinion about the White House's recent decision to not have a comedian at this year's correspondents dinner. They wanna make a. A case for the first amendment which first of all if you have to make a case for the first amendment. You're losing. Yeah. It's not happening. And you know, that won't be all on MPR's. Our puzzles where games and trivia, and we're back and President Trump right now is on Air Force One headed to Mississippi tonight to hold to rallies. And why is he holding rallies? The dude. Game. Really after thanksgiving. Here's a runoff election. Because neither there were three candidates running to Republicans and a democrat. Nobody got over fifty percent rules in Mississippi say he got to go to a runoff. So now, we've got Cindy Hyde Smith who was appointed to the position Republican running against Mike Espy democrat. He is an African American candidate. If he won he'd be the first African American Senator from Mississippi since reconstruction. That's why there's an election on Tuesday. Okay. That's why there's an election. But that's not why the president is going there. The fact that the president the Republican president is having to hold not one, but two campaign rallies for a Republican Senator in the ruby red state of Mississippi. That's the story Senator Cindy Hyde. Smith is facing a surprisingly stiff challenge from Mike Espy in this runoff, mainly because of her own missteps, although she's made several racially insensitive remarks. That's one of the reasons the race has tightened. She is doesn't have the kind of baggage that ROY Moore did in Alabama and SP. Let's just explain who he is. He's the former agriculture secretary in the Clinton administration. He comes from a very prominent African American family in Mississippi and former congresswoman congressman also what he's trying to do is run the Doug Jones playbook in Mississippi. Doug Jones was the democrat who against all odds won a Senate seat in Alabama. But the interesting thing is the same democratic strategist is running Espy's race as ran Doug Jones race. So he's trying to use the same playbook, which is get a certain amount of the white vote. Twenty five to thirty percent perhaps and then boost African American turnout to historic levels and most people I talked to on both Republicans and Democrats say that Espy's job is not impossible. But it's extremely difficult. But again, the fact that President Trump is taking a Monday afternoon in jetting down there to do to rally suggests that Republicans at least are hearing footsteps maybe their footsteps in the in the in the way back. But they are hearing. There's no doubt about that. But Donald Trump loves to campaign. He loves to hold these rallies. He wants to be able to say that he he'd her over the finish line. He wants to be there to take credit. He might have done this, even if she was maybe he would have only held one rally, but I think he would've gone down. Anyway, this is a state where Donald Trump can make a difference. This is the kind of very red state very pro-trump state where he can boost Republican turnout and as Mara says for President Trump to hold a campaign rally is not really a sacrifice. You don't you don't need to be. He doesn't make a big excuse. No. I mean, he had his groove heading into the mid terms because he was doing all these rallies in early between Labor Day and election in mostly red states where he won and where he was very popular. And then the midterms happened a lot of Republicans lost. He lost the house the president kind of lost his groove. He's going to get his groove back. But the other thing to remember Mississippi. This does not affect the balance of power in the Senate. Republicans are going to have either fifty two or fifty three votes. There it affects it's not we're not at the tipping point. It doesn't affect the majority. But fifty three is better than the balance of power. It's going to be a Republican majority. No matter what the other thing, we should mention just so people don't forget about it is the following Tuesday. We're going to have another runoff in Georgia for the secretary of state. There's Democrat John barrow he's in a runoff with Republican brand referenced burger Donald Trump has already been tweeting about this race. And the reason this race is so significant is that this whoever wins would replace Brian Kemp who's the governor of elect he was the secretary of state before? And don't forget that Georgia politics has been consumed with this debate about voter suppression voter fraud already in this runoff election for secretary of state whose job it is to oversee elections and ballot security etcetera. The Republican is already accusing the democrat saying if he wins his policies would lead to. More illegal voting than ever. We are going to keep an eye on all those results, and we will be back in your feeds on Wednesday with the news along with the latest in the democratic leadership fight election. Whatever you wanna call it in the house. I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Scott Horsely. I also come the White House. I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent and thank you for listening to the PR politics podcast. This message comes from NPR sponsor Capital One offering a variety of credit card options with features for range of customers from foodies to travelers Capital One what's in your wallet credit approval required capital. One Bank USA in a.

President Trump president Democrats White House US Mississippi Mexico Senate Tijuana Mara Liasson Mike Espy NPR congress tamra Keith California San Diego Trump IBM
Trump And Kim's Second Nuclear Summit Ends With No Deal

NPR Politics Podcast

17:48 min | 1 year ago

Trump And Kim's Second Nuclear Summit Ends With No Deal

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple, easy, and awesome. Hey there we've got some big news. The NPR politics team is going to be hitting the road. We will be in Atlanta, Georgia on March eighth making a podcast live onstage, and we'd love to see there. So had to NPR presents dot org to grab a ticket and see you soon. Hi, this is Christina in Hanoi. Vietnam where I'm stuck in traffic trying to get to work. My normal fourteen minute drive is now in minute forty eight as we ramp up to the summit between Kim Jong UN and my own dear president, and I have another two kilometers left to go. You're listening to the NPR politics podcasts, which is accorded at three fifteen AM on. What is it Thursday? The. The twenty eighth of February keep in mind things may have changed by the time. You hear it? All right. Here's a show. Hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast, President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Hoon left their summit in Hanoi with no agreement on denuclearization. We had some options at this time. We decided not to do any of the options. And we'll see where that goes. But it was it was a very interesting two days. And I think actually it was a very productive today's. But sometimes you have to walk as a wise man once said, you gotta no one to hold them know into fold them know win to walk away. I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Scott Horsely. I also cover the White House. And I also cover the white now. It is a full White House team here. But I assure you are on the other side of the world with President Trump in Vietnam. Currently in a motorcade is that right yet on our way to the airport about to get on Air Force One and hit out. But I had to talk to you guys. I absolutely. So thank you for making this happen. The last few hours have been quite a whirlwind. There had been a signing ceremony on the president's schedule. That didn't happen. There was a press conference. It got moved up. Tell us about what it's been like for the last few hours. Yeah. I mean, the summit started, and it seemed to be going along as normal. And then Trump was saying that he wasn't in a Russian. He'd said something like, you know, I can't speak today. But I think we'll have something long time. So he did things kind of signaling that he's in expect something today. But I think we thought that there would some types of agreements we were waiting for a war. And lunch and waiting for a very long time. And then we're told that there had been a change of plans, and it became clear that you were leaving without any anything in writing or any type of commitment or read that from either side, you know, heading into this there. There had been a lot of questions like will the president just make a deal to make a deal, and you know, a lot of foreign policy heads had been had been sorta worried about that. And now there is no deal. Know, it seems like maybe the political outcome in the foreign policy outcome or sort of are sort of different. It does seem like there's a difference in in. What President Trump was saying was you have to know when to walk away. You can't basically just go along with a bad deal. Now, what I will say is we are over here, Vietnam. This was not quick trip. Even though it wasn't like the first summit where it was historic where trumping Kim never met before a big deal. And so I don't know that the only options were a dealer Nobile typically what you would do before he came all the way across the world is you would have something worked out, and you would know that you walking away with something. And if you put in reach the deal, you kind of figure that out before you got here, and there was a White House team in Hanoi of glass weaker. So that had been trying to sort of nail down the points. And oftentimes you use the summit as kind of a forcing mechanism to to. To really get her when it sharpen their pencil, and and put their best offers on the table in this case, they obviously couldn't come to terms. So we're we're sort of in a holding pattern. The president did say before traveling to Vietnam that he was not in a hurry so long as there was no renewed missile testing, no renewed nuclear testing, and he did say he got assurances from Kim Jong own that he did not plan to restart missile tests or nuclear test at the same time as the New York Times, David Sanger pointed out during the news conference. The the North Koreans are using this time to continue to expand their nuclear stockpile. So in in some ways the clock is ticking. Even though the president says, he's not feeling any real pressure. Can we dig in on sort of what Kim Jong Hoon came into that room wanting and and what President Trump wanted and why they couldn't connect president. Trump says North Korea was basically demanding a complete lifting of the. International economic sanctions that have been putting pressure on Pyongyang. And in return, Kim Jong UN was only willing to guarantee limited curbs on North Korea's outlawed nuclear program that wasn't good enough. And that's why President Trump's has. He ended these talks without an agreement. The president did end up having a press conference that lasted almost an hour. Isha you got called on by the president. I did I was in a red shirt. So I think he couldn't miss me. And I was at the second row. So I did get called on it. And basically asked you know, once the President Bill going to wire completely relation. Thank you, Mr President June. I just wanted to clarify when you talk about what you would be willing to give up all of the sanctions for are. You still thinking that you want North Korea to give up everything to do complete verifiable. Don't want to say. I don't want to say that you live auctions. Yeah. It's a good question. I don't want to say that to you. Because I don't want to put myself in that position from the standpoint of negotiation. But you know, we want a lot to be given up and we're giving up, and we'll have to we'll be helping them along economically us, and other many other countries are going to be helping they're going to be in there. They're prepared to help sit that is kind of stunning that. I mean, I think he went into this the whole thing with Kim Jong UN as the US policy being complete denuclearisation complete verifiable denuclearization. And now he's saying he doesn't want to be putting a box while. Yeah, he seems to be kind of opening the door. They're saying, well, maybe they don't have to give up everything before we eat the thanking and Scott you were in Singapore. Does that sound different to you? Yes. And the position at the outset of before the Singapore summit was. North Korea must completely do nuclearise before the US is willing to lift sanctions. And in the run up to this summit. There were some hints from the Trump team that while the core sanctions would remain in place until there was complete verifiable. Irreversible denuclearization, there might be some wiggle room to take some goodwill building measures before you saw that. And that seems to be at the president's talking about there. Although as you could hear his answer to Asia, he he's just reluctant to be pinned down. I think there was there was some concern among even hardliners in his own administration that maybe the president would cut a deal at this summit that would lift some sanctions and not get much return. Obviously, we didn't see that. But he does seem to be leaving that door open. He did say that even though he's walking away. This was not a storming out. This wasn't a walkaway like you get up and walk out. Now, this is very. Hundley. We shook hands we. You know, there's a there's a warmth that we have. Now hope that stays I think it will he and cameras still on good terms and leaving the door open to further further talks. And I think that's an important point. Yeah. And but we haven't heard from him. So I guess the question that I have is Kim still the same way. And the prisoner also suggested that he's not planning to for example, resume the joint military exercises with the South Korean. So it's kind of a holding pattern from the North Korean side as well. And he said, he's not planning necessarily to have a third son. It anytime soon. I mean, you know, coming into this there there were people that were worried he would just make a deal. So is this. Ultimately, a good news story that the president didn't make a bad deal. I think that they're experts were concerned that he was gonna kinda give away the store in return for nothing or in return, not very much. We'll be remedied that that didn't happen. But there is a quest Matthau of where do you go from here? And he has this kind of big summit happen. You have another one. So now, okay, we're in this holding pattern. How do you get out of it? Trump has talked you know, from his from his art of the deal book about just what he said today that you have to be willing to walk away. And so in some ways he has he has demonstrated. He does have that willingness important because we're anticipating another major summit as early as next month possibly at mar-a-lago with Chinese press. President Xi Jinping. And there've been some of the same concerns there will Trump cut a trade deal that maybe is not adequate just for the sake of making a deal in a way. Maybe this kind of is a signal to president. She I'm not gonna do that. If you wanna make a deal, you better be prepared to bring something to table. Okay. So where does this all go from here? That's a good question. I kind of asked the president at up because you know, until there's a deal we looked real we'll continue developing its weapons program. And basically, what President Trump said is that they know more testing are you concerned if you're not able to reach an agreement that the testing will start again or that in that while all of this time said the testing continuing to develop their programs showed the testing will not start. He said that he's not going to do testing of rockets or missiles or anything having to do with nuclear and all I can tell you is. That's what he said. And we'll see this is. There hasn't been any nuclear or missile tests by the North Korean since twenty seventeen now. So that that is what something the Trump administration? Sees is a major accomplishment. Aisha a word is you are basically at the airport. So we're going to have to let you go yet. I will top team guys later. Thanks so much talking me. I gotta get on this twenty hour flight. All right. We'll see you on the other side. Okay. There are a couple of other things that came up at this press conference that we want to get into one is what President Trump said to Kim Jong own about auto warmbier the young American who had been held there for a long time and ended up being released in dying almost immediately. And also what President Trump said about yesterday's Michael Cohen hearing all of that after a quick break support for this podcast and the following message. Come from blue, FOX entertainment, presenting the new film, Saint Judy the inspiring and powerful true story of immigration attorney Jew. Would who led a landmark battle to establish legal rights for women seeking asylum? The Hollywood reporter says this in engaging and moving film features an exceptional cast whose work deserves to be seen starring Michelle Monaghan common. Alfred Woodard, Peter Krause, Leanne Liu Bonnie and Alfred Molina directed by Sean Hanish opens nationwide on March first human behaviour doesn't always make a ton of sense at least on the surface. I said what do mind if I give the dogs a little piece of cracker with some hot sauce on and without and see what they choose hidden brain, a spicy podcast about science psychology. And why people do what they do. And we're back, and Scott Horsely is just you and me here. The traffic is starting to clear in Hanoi and Aisha's owner winging away home. Yes. And one thing that came up was auto warm beer that the young American who was impr-. Isn't in North Korea and irreparably harmed during that time, and he was asked by a Washington Post reporter, David nakimora, whether that came up in in conversations with Kim Jong UN speak to him he felt very badly. But he knew the case very well. But he knew it later, and you know, you got a lot of people big country a lot of people and in those prisons in those camps. You have a lot of people and some really bad things happen to auto. So really, really bad thing. Why are you on? He tells me he tells me that he didn't know about it. And I will take him at his word that has sort of a familiar ring to it doesn't it? It does President Trump is has used similar terminology. When when talking about his conversations with the crown prince in Saudi Arabia regarding the killing of the journalist Jamal kashogi and also in in how he talked about. Out. What led Amir Putin told him about Russian election interference? It is interesting though, because the president has talked about auto warm beer, he he highlighted the warm beer family in his state of the union speech last year. Now, the White House prefers to talk about Americans who have been released safely from North Korea as a sign of sort of improving relations between Washington going on. Now, the thing that we were all waiting for leading up to this press conference was what will President Trump say about the day long hearing with Michael Cohen in the house oversight committee, and he was only asked one question about it. What's your response to Michael Cohen? Well, it's incorrect and reporter was Jonathan Karl from ABC news. He lied a lot. But it was very interesting because he didn't lie about one thing. He said no collusion with the Russian hoax. And I said, I wonder why. He didn't just lie about that too. Like he did about everything else. I mean, he lied about so many different things. And I was actually impressed that he didn't say, well, I think there was collusion for this reason or that he didn't say that he said, no collusion. He definitely found the parts that he wanted to hear in Cohen's testimony. And and there were parts of Cohen's testimony that we're beneficial to him the president actually exaggerated a little bit the extent to which Cohen spoke about collusion. Michael Cohen said he wasn't aware of any collusion in the he had no direct evidence that the Trump campaign had colluded with Russia, but he also suggested he had his suspicions. There were other parts of Coen's testimony that were favorable to the president. But in general, Trump tried to put the most favorable spin on what his former lawyer had said, while also attacking Cohen's credibility that was also the tact that most of the Republicans on the house oversight committee took yesterday. And just I don't know that this is media observation or whatever, but the president called on a lot of foreign. Reporters in this press conference who asked policy questions about China, North Korea, and Japan, and and all of these other issues, I mean, he was at a summit in Hanoi regarding North Korean nuclear matters. So maybe it makes sense that that there wasn't a ton of questions about home. But it was sort of a surprise the president did over call on a lot of American reporters. And with the exception of giancarl, they mostly stayed focused on the talks in Hanoi. As opposed to what was going on back here in Washington. I almost wonder if the fact that the president walked away from the table here was more surprising and therefore more of a subject for questions than. Sort of a partial nuclear deal might have been had there been a more of a DO perhaps we would have heard more questions about Michael Cohen. There is another podcast in your feed from not that many hours ago. All about the Cohen hearing, we really don't know how that is going to play out. What impact it's going to have the president hasn't even tweeted about it yet? He is on a plane now flying back and tomorrow, we are going to record our regular weekly roundup a day late. So keep your eyes on this podcast feed. I'm for Keith. I covered the White House. I'm Scott Horsely. I also cover the White House, and I share Rosco also covers the White House. And it was with us earlier. And thank you for listening to the NPR politics podcast. This message comes from NPR sponsor Capital One offering a variety of credit card options with features for a range of customers from foodies to travelers Capital One what's in your wallet credit approval required capital. One Bank USA a.

president President Trump Kim Jong UN White House Hanoi North Korea Michael Cohen Vietnam Scott Horsely Kim Jong Hoon President Xi Jinping NPR Kim Jong reporter Kim Trump Comcast tamra Keith
President Trump Delivers State Of The Union Address

NPR Politics Podcast

27:32 min | 1 year ago

President Trump Delivers State Of The Union Address

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple, easy, and awesome. This is Robert. It is eleven beautiful degrees in Wisconsin. And we are celebrating the end of the polar vortex by camping this podcast was recorded at twelve. Oh, two AM on Wednesday. The sixth of February things may have changed by the time. You hear it? All right. Here's the show. Wow. I think after Patrick bedtime, folks. Hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast. President Trump delivered his second state of the union address. The state of our union is strong will break down the speech and discuss the democratic response, which was delivered by Stacey Abrams. I'm tamer Keith. I cover the White House. I also covered the White House. I'm Susan Davis. I cover congress. I'm Ron Elving correspondent, so President Trump's state of the union address. It was his second though, his third address to a joint session of congress. It came between one government shutdown, and what could be the next government shutdown or an government emergency. Exactly. And it is also the first speech that the president gave in divided government where Democrats control the house of representatives. Sue, you were there in the chamber. What stood out to you from the speech? I think the. Image of the state of the union will linger in that. There was a call among health democratic women led by Lois Frankel, who's a democrat from Florida, although she did put out the call to the entire house not just to women encouraging them to wear suffragette white to the state of the union. It was meant in part to send a message to the president and the image of the chamber. You know, it's already kind of striking because on the one, and you have the Republican party, which is predominantly white men and on the democratic side, you had this c- of white women standing up and a much more diverse crowd. And I think that visual representation was not just about historic levels of women that helped Democrats win the majority of this year. But also, the kind of candidates that will help them win the majority, and I'd say a very muscular Democratic Party coming into power saying you now have a check on your power, and we plan to use it and also pretty good sign of democratic unity. They they can follow marching orders. Wardrobe orders, I should note that men in in the room also were wearing white ribbons as. As a sign of solidarity. There was at least one man in a white suit run. What to you was the take home from this address like all state of the union addresses by all presidents. This one was devoted to having it both ways it wanted to reach out to people who are not supporters of the president, but might become so persuadable as the campaign consultant, sometimes call them, but hold close those people who are the president's actual supporters and make sure that those people do not wander off or find themselves disappointed by the speech. And in this particular case, there was a virtual catalog of things that were clearly outrage issues talking about defeating HIV within ten years having paid family and medical leave. That is a proposal the president is made before, but he brought it up again infrastructure, drug prices, kids cancer, something everybody, obviously could really get behind addressing as an issue and veterans and the first step act, which is a criminal Justice reform. All these things were outreach. These recuperation issues between the parties in the last congress or prospectively in the next congress that to me there is one clip of tape that sums up this thing that you're talking about. And I wanna play this moment where President Trump is seemingly making a pitch for unity. We must choose between greatness or gridlock results or resistance vision or vengeance. Incredible progress or pointless destruction. Tonight. I ask you to choose greatness. So it's not a coincidence that he uses the word resistance, which is a word that has characterized the people who oppose him. And it's not a coincidence that he also chose the word greatness or you might as well put on the red hat that says MAGA on it make America. Great again greatness as word great as a word are associated with Donald Trump's campaign on the surface. The message is let's all work together. Let's not have gridlock. Let's have greatness. But on the other. I if you if you sort of dig into the language, it's a it's a little bit of a dog whistle of let's do it. My way there is a significant reason to be skeptical that Donald Trump is the right messenger for a message of political unity in the country. And I think Democrats going into the speech, we're trying to lower the expectation that they think that this is going to be some great new breakthrough in bipartisanship. Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer. Spoke to that on the Senate floor leading into the speech tonight, perhaps even more empty than his policy promises are president's Trump's calls for unity cheer. It seems every year the president wakes up and discovers the desire for unity on the morning of the state of the union, then the president spends the other three hundred sixty four days of the year dividing us, and so I- sailing state of this union, also important to note that you know, outside of what the president said tonight in his state of the union address leading into the speech. He also attacked the speaker of the house on Sunday and called her someone who was bad for the country today on Twitter. He attacked Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer and response to that Senate speech. So again, nice words, the tone of Washington did not change tonight because of that speech, and it wasn't all bipartisan, happy talk or even subtle shots at Democrats. There were some very explicit criticisms of the president's opposition. He talked about abortion too. Defend the dignity of every person. I am asking congress to pass legislation to prohibit the late term abortion of children. He referenced socialism tonight, we renew our resolve that America will never be a socialist country TV keto as of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Cossio Cortes. And there was also just some traditional red meat to the party kind of rhetoric. And I thought this was one of the lines of the night that got the biggest rousing applause from Republicans in the house. We are born free, and we will stay in holler in up and out of their seats for that one and USA, and he also talked about the investigations that congressional Democrats will be launching this very week an economic miracle is taking place in the United States. And the only thing that could stop it are foolish wars politics or ridiculous partisan investigations. If there is going to be peace and legislation there cannot be war and investigation. It just doesn't work that way. Those sort of interesting tack for the president to basically say we've got this terrific Konami. We're going great guns. We're adding three hundred thousand jobs month, but if congress pursues its constitutional oversight responsibilities that could all come crashing down. It's also he has a line in there. They says it just doesn't work that way that you can't do legislation and investigation, and I'm like, that's exactly how it works. It's not that is the exact function of congress is to do to legislate in conduct oversight simultaneously. They are not trying to do something new in different here. They're trying to do exactly what they're supposed to be doing some people might remember Richard Nixon at the beginning of nineteen seventy four saying one year of Watergate is enough. Let's have done. With this and not go any further that of course, it's not how nineteen seventy-four turned out. But he too thought it was time to stop with the investigations and focus on legislation which had gone forward. Pretty well. Even while the Watergate investigations were underway. Well, and I think what the president is trying to say here is he's not going to be in any mood to make deals with people and work on stuff and compromise. If he feels like he's being attacked. Well, I don't think he is very much about compromise. And that's what he's saying. I think I think he's saying you're gonna you're going take the economy if you come after me and speaking of being in the mood to make deals one of the main policy points in the president's speech was immigration and the border wall. And now, of course, remember this is coming off of thirty five days of government shutdown over border security, and right now there is a conference committee tried to reach some sort of compromise. Let's hear a bit of what President Trump had to say about the wall in the past. Most of the people in this room voted for a wall, but the proper wall never got built. I will get it built. And you put all this worth. But what we are still stuck with is the president's insistence that he win this one and the refusal of congressional leaders to let him win this one, and it really was not much different than what the president said in his Oval Office speech in the midst of the government shutdown. I he he didn't persuade any Democrats to to switch sides. Then I don't know that he said anything tonight, it's going to persuade anybody. And this argument that people on the other side have voted for fencing and barriers in the past. As if they if you voted for a fence in one section of the border, you automatically should vote for a fence in some other section the border. It doesn't really hold water. What the Democrats would say is we built the fences where we thought fences ought to go and we didn't build them anywhere else. And and we're not gonna build them anywhere else. I don't think in terms of his requests that anything was new said tonight. But I did think his tone was really notable in the speech when talking about immigration, and it was much more a throwback to Donald Trump on the campaign trail the presidential candidate who. Used really sharp stark language when talking about the immigrant community and inside the room that was one of those moments where it was really interesting to watch Democrats, many of which are Spanich many, which come from immigrant communities many of which are now second-generation Americans and hell hostile. They view that language, and knowing how the people you have to cut the deal with our absorbing those words, I think that it speaks to the intent of the president that he's not really looking to cut a deal on this. He's looking to stand his ground. And I think as we approached this February fifteenth deadline, this speech to me further raise the question and fueled the argument that the White House really is positioning to moving the president to declaring a national emergency. If congress doesn't give him what he wants to try and build the wall on his own. The president was in a way saying it is Americans versus immigrants that was really the framing that he presented. That's not the framing that the people who. In theory. He would have to make a deal with would use. He also frames this debate and cast this immigrant community, largely as criminals and his dangerous people. And I think that that is where his opponents in this debate think that he really does the debate a disservice in casting, this image of this millions and millions of people in this country are criminals there killers, the rapist there gang members, and that is not an accurate reflection of who they are. And when you only choose to highlight those stories it is not a message of how do we solve this problem? It's a message of I want to keep engaging in this fight. And again, this goes to what I think a lot of Republicans on the hill. Believe I'm thinking goes to what this White House believes that this is a bedrock issue for the president. And if he is going to compromise with Democrats in the next two years immigration should not be the issue that he chooses to compromise on. It has been a consistent message for this president. And it's one that he thinks helped catapult him into the White House. It is certainly. Not helping them cut a deal on a border wall. One of the lines tonight that got a lot of attention. And I thought it was an interesting line in which he talked about immigration. No issue better illustrates, the divide between America's working class and America's political less than illegal immigration. I think he's right there. I mean, I do think he does speak to something that it is an issue that has galvanized a lot of America in a way that Washington leaders don't connect with and Trump really did connect with that sentiment. And he's captured that sentiment of a lot of the country. It's accurate that in that. He is fighting for the viewpoint of a lot of Americans. It's just not the viewpoint that's necessarily going to get a Bill to his desk at the end of the day. And was interesting too. Is the geography of that is it it tends to be strongest in the areas they have the fewest immigrants. I mean, if you look at the border communities, that's not where the hue and cry for the wall is it's from overwhelmingly white parts of the country that are, you know, hundreds of miles from the border. That's where this message really resonates and the more immigrants live in a congressional dissed. The less support for awhile. You'll fund I will just say to that note. We'll heard is the Republican from Texas. He represents one of the largest stretches of the border. I had my eyes on him. When the president was making his immigration remarks. He did not stand up and clap when the president made his comments about immigrants. He sat there arms. Folded looking very uncomfortable as he sort of rail against immigrant communities and elites President Trump also talked about foreign policy he announced another summit with Kim Jong UN it'll be at the end of this month in Vietnam. He also talked about his decision to pull troops out of Syria and claimed again that ISIS is nearly defeated in in Syria that the caliphate is essentially gone, interestingly that was another moment. Unlike the one we just talked about a moment ago where not all the Republicans leap to their feet and cheered. In fact, the most obvious applause line when he was talking about Syria, did not even get any applause, and he had to move on. So there is not universal support for that particular. Position with his party. It is a popular position on the last among the kinds of people within his party who are Trump voters and his most devoted crossover people who are not necessarily Republicans also generally tend to favor his more isolationist views towards some of these foreign policy commitments. There are two more moments that I wanna get to. I I think that these are the things that people might remember from this speech. There was this moment where all of the democratic women who are wearing their white suits had already stood up. And we're clapping joyously at a reference the president had made about more women being in the workforce than ever before. Don't sit yet like this. At exactly one century after congress passed the constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. We also have more women serving in congress than at any time before and love this moment for a lot of reasons. But one of it is that in the tone of the president. It's a little self congratulatory. Like now, we have the most women ever also. Well, and they could say thank you very much President Trump because he is probably the reason they want he was sort of the galvanizing issue that prompted a lot of women to run for congress in the two thousand eighteen midterms almost all of the women that were elected in the two thousand eighteen midterms were strong opponents of the president's agenda, and now they're sitting in congress, and he's like congratulating them. But it was it was sort of this moment of comic irony where it was like, are you thanking them are you what are you doing here? We should also say that he did not make any. Effort to address speaker Nancy Pelosi of the one of the most prominent women the sitting over his shoulder in that audience is he never in his speech as past presidents have done is congratulate the speaker on their victory the majority or reference are in any direct way. Oh, in fact, he did not even allow her to introduce him, which is a traditional role for the speaker. The speaker is responsible for inviting the president to come to the chamber, and then the speaker has the traditional role and even a little traditional introductory speech. That is given to introduce the president has though anyone you know, was uncertain as to who he was and he did not pause to let her do that. He just sallied forth to the microphone, and it's not clear whether that was on purpose or if he was just like excited to start talking or what he just started talking before any introduction. But certainly a lot of people were watching to see how is the president going to acknowledge the reality that now the house speaker standing over his shoulder during the speech is someone from the other party and those of us who are old enough to remember when? George W Bush turn to Nancy Pelosi and commented on what a historic moment. It was to have the first female speaker. And as the father of two women, he was pleased by that Donald Trump is also the father to him. And there was none of that. At the top of the speech. I think maybe he was just sort of saving it. He knew there was this moment. But it took a long time to get to it. We were what forty five minutes into the speech when that salute to the new women in congress came up as forty five minutes in also known as halfway. For those of you who did not watch it. Okay. So this other moment, President Trump was addressing a holocaust survivor who was also a member at the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh where that terrible anti-semitic attack took place in a terrible shooting last year. And it turns out that it was Judah Samit. That's the guy his eighty first birthday. So members of congress starts singing happy birthday. They wouldn't do that for me Judah. He's probably right. They probably wouldn't do that for him. All right. We are going to take a quick break. And when we come back, the democratic response, and where all of this leaves us support for this NPR podcast comes from press reader, the all you can read newspaper and magazine app with a single flat rate subscription press reader gives you unlimited access to full issues of thousands of premium titles from around the world, you can read the Washington Post. Newsweek, the LA times the guardian Bloomberg BusinessWeek variety, vogue, Forbes and more. Download and keep as many issues as you'd like heads oppress reader dot com slash NPR to get seven days of press reader free. When you sign up, how do we perceive our experience as humans who are we today? And who could we be tomorrow, I'm guy Roz on the radio? Our we go on a journey through the big ideas. That animate our world each week. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR, and we're back, and it is customary after the state of the union address for the other party to deliver a response this year there were two responses one in English one in Spanish, let's start in English with Stacey Abrams. She lost the Georgia governor's race last fall. But narrowly lost it sou-. What is the significance of her being chosen for this? The thing about picking Abrams is that it's kind of a weird pick. If you think about it that she just lost her election. And as of right now, she has no real clear role inside the Democratic Party. She has suggested she wants to run for office again. But it's not clear what she wants that office to be. I can tell you that Chuck Schumer very much would like her to run for the Senate in twenty twenty against David Purdue who's the incumbent Georgia Senator it's unclear if she's going to do that yet. I think asking her to give the response. Was in part part of that courting effort to get her to consider running for congress. And I think choosing her speaks to a demographic reality of the Democratic Party right now, the really mindful of minority voters, and specifically black female voters who have been some of the most loyal voters for the Democratic Party and voters that show up and vote, and there has been a conversation inside the Democratic Party that if you wanna win in twenty twenty one of the groups of people that need to feel heard are black women. And so I think Stacey Abrams makes a lot of sense in those regards. Let's go to what she said probably the toughest line in in. This speech was about the shutdown. The shutdown was a stunt engineered by the president of the United States one that defied every Tenet of fairness and abandoned not just our people, but our values. She also talked about something that is an issue. It's been very important to her for a very long time, and which was a defining part of her campaign for governor. And that is voting rights. The foundation of our moral leadership around the globe is free and fair elections where voters pick their leader's not where politicians pick their voters. Of course. Stacey Abrams lost in the governor's race in Georgia to Brian camp who had been the secretary of state and she accused him of taking steps to discourage the African American turn out to discourage turn out in parts of the state where she was going to do. Well. And this is part of a theme that, you know, Democrats say the more people vote the better, we do and that Republicans go deliberately suppressed the vote in order to hold onto power the approach that Stacey Abrams took to immigration in the democratic response was quite different from the approach that President Trump took in his address this administration chooses to cage. Children and tear families apart compassionate treatment at the border is not the same as open borders. She's obviously talking there about the ill-fated family separation policy that the Trump administration adopted in for a period of months in two thousand eighteen policy which they have since ended. But she she really does try to push home. The point we as Democrats do that their opposition to the president's proposed border wall. Does not mean they are for open borders or against border security, writ large, can we very quickly. Because state of the union responses have a history of going poorly that was the stagecraft on this one middling strange. There was a group of women primarily I couldn't see any men visibly. They were not in close focus. They were in somewhat fuzzy focus. It was not entirely clear. They could hear her. I thought times that the some of them might be nodding, but they could have been nodding without it being able to here. So it was not the worst. We've. Seen much worse. Terminus upstaging of some of these things people not looking at the camera and so forth. But in this case, Stacey Abrams was fine and straight ahead to the camera, but the people behind who were slightly distracting because you really didn't know if they knew what was going on. It's such a trap this speech. 'cause the thing that you want to do the most is basically be forgettable ranked because the things that make people memorable or the disasters. It's the weird stagecraft at your shiny lips. It's your drinks of water. And so in some regard, I think she did a good job because I cannot I don't think when I wake up tomorrow, I'm going to be able to tell you three interesting things about Stacey Abrams speech. But I think in some ways that's a really good thing. Because if she was what we were talking about tonight. It would probably be because she screwed something up. I think it might also be the first time that people the next day you're talking about the Spanish response not because it was in Spanish that's been going on for several years. Now, both parties have been doing it in both languages, but because of some of the things that havi are becera the attorney general of California said about what they plan to do. If there is a national emergency to build. The wall face Sarah is also a former member of congress now innate as you said an G and also one of the that's looking to be the resistance to Donald Trump that if there are legal challenges that the states are going to bring against this administration. Specifically, if he does indeed decide to declare a national emergency and go around congress to build the wall becera said in his speech tonight that he will be one of the the challenges that measure in the courts, and is very enthusiastically looking to that role. And I think it's really interesting, the Spanish, language speeches. You've said that they've been doing but in the context of this immigration debate. I think the audience tonight to use a tougher message. There was really notable. Yeah. And it really was a tougher message. I'm just gonna because it's in Spanish, I'm going to read it in English here. And here he says and the idea of declaring a nonexistent state of emergency on the border in order to justify robbing funds that belong to the victims of fires floods hurricanes and droughts to pay for the wall is not only immoral. It is a legal. We are ready to reject this fool. Foolish proposal in court. The moment it touches the ground. It looked Sarah has a track record. He he has sued the president already over things like the president's plan to end the DACA program, and he's done so successfully, so this is a legitimate legal threat. So let's end this podcast looking forward, which it and kind of looking back did anything happen in any of these addresses that changes the calculation that moves the needle on the impending government shutdown if they can't come up with a deal on border security. It depends on what direction you wanted the needle to move. I think the Neil did move tonight in that. I think the Democrats that he has to cut a deal with walked down to the room more inclined to think this is the president. We can't cut a deal with and to that. I might take away from the speech was it was one that did move closer to that confrontation over a national emergency. Although also that confrontation with the national emergency would allow them to fund the government and move. On because the president could just say I'm doing it my way, and then we don't have a shutdown fight. We could have a big bipartisan deal next week that has nothing to do with speech to. I mean that congress could could work its will. And and cut an agreement. I don't not sure this speech would be what broke the logjam. Okay. That is a wrap for now. No doubt. We will be back in your feet soon. In the meantime, you can keep up with our coverage at NPR dot org on the NPR one app and on your local public radio station. Also, I really encourage you to check out our fact checks of both the president's address and the democratic response. Scott Horsely did a lot of stuff in there. So check it out. I'm Tam Keith. I covered the White House Horsely back over the White House to I'm Susan Davis. I cover congress, and I'm Ron Elving editor correspondent and thanks for listening to the NPR politics podcast.

President Trump president congress NPR Stacey Abrams White House America Democratic Party Chuck Schumer Tam Keith Senate Comcast Washington United States Wisconsin Susan Davis Ron Elving
Weekly Roundup: Thursday, April 4

NPR Politics Podcast

31:22 min | 1 year ago

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, April 4

"It guess what? What's got big news doing another live podcast on the road? We're going to be in Philadelphia. In fact, we are going to be there on April twenty-sixth to record a live podcast onstage all about the twenty twenty election. We just did this at Atlanta. It was great. But here's the catch. We need your help to make sure it's the best podcast possible. And the way to do that is to head over to NPR presents dot org and grab a ticket to be in the audience. That's Friday, April twenty six in Philadelphia. We'll see you there. Hi. This is the and I'm from Columbia, Missouri. I got my citizenship last year in November. And today, I'm going to cost my vote for the first time in the US for the local mayor and school board elections, which I'm very excited about this podcast was recorded at twelve twelve pm on Thursday, April fourth things may have changed by the time. You hear this? And I would have voted for the first time in the US. Okay. Here's the show. Congratulations. That is awesome and more awesome. That you are voting in local elections, which matter more to our personal lives than a lot of other elections. That was a great time stamp. Hey there, it's the NPR politics podcast. I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent, and I'm too MAC local reporter, and we are welcoming back a familiar voice, Scott Horsely. Hey sky, the great to be back. I mean, most people didn't know that you left. But last time you were on the pod we referred you as White House correspondent. And now you are. I am NPR's economics reporter now you're economics. Correspondent he's staying humble, right? Is always to humble, my real title is chief economics correspondent, which is a little more grandiose than it. Sounds because I'm the only economic force. Chief with with no followers. Well, it is good to have you back in your here. Because we need your help today in this pod. We are gonna talk about a bunch of things we're gonna talk about President Trump's threats to close the border Democrats stepping up their investigations into the president and a potential security breach. The president's mar-a-lago resort and we are going to start with the border. President Trump has been threatening all week to close the border with the US and Mexico. They don't stop with closing the border. They'll close it will keep with close for a long time. I'm not playing games. This got what is happening at the border. That makes the president that he needs to close it. Of course, we should also say that he has threatened this several times before this, right? And he this is his response to a wave of migrants. M- many of them children and families coming from Central America and seeking asylum when they reached the United States and just last month. We saw I think the highest number of border apprehensions in in a decade about one hundred thousand. So now this is a time of year when border crossings do typically peak because it's kind of nice nice time to be traveling. It's not too cold. It's not too hot. But we are certainly on pace to see a relatively large number of crossers for recent history. Although we're still well below the totals that we were seeing say around the year two thousand when when illegal immigration was at its height. So does this require immediate action as dramatic as what the president is suggesting can you give us a little bit more context on what the numbers are. And whether we're actually seeing crisis. The overall numbers are still well below what we were seeing a generation ago, but this is a qualitatively different flow of migrants because we are talking in many cases about children and families and in many cases coming from Central America. Whereas around two thousand it was mostly single men coming from Mexico. And the law requires the government to deal differently with young people who crossed the border and to deal differently with people who come from Central America than people who come from from Mexico. It's much easier to deport a single man from Mexico than it is to deport a twelve year old who comes up from water Mahler Honduras. So the the president has insisted that he doesn't want to simply release these migrants into the US interior to wait out there. They're the process while their asylum claims are being heard, and so in many cases, they are being detained in facilities. And with these numbers, those facilities have gotten very crowded, and it's taken a lot of people and materiel to handle that another big difference is some of these people are asylum-seekers, which means they are entering into a legal process as opposed to somebody sneaking across the border who can be deported immediately. That's rack, that's these are people who have some kind of legal Protech. Action by international law. They get a hearing US law and international law. And now now the Trump administration argues that in many cases, these migrants are gaming the system or exploiting that system that the reason they're coming as families for examples because they know that the law requires the US to treat families differently than with treat single single men. They know the the right words to say to pass the first asylum screening process, and then be admitted to the US the in some cases that may be true that that there is some gaming of the system or taking advantage of the way the laws are written one of the things the administration wants is for congress to go in and rewrite those laws, so they could deport people more quickly. It seems very unlikely that congress is going to be in position to make those changes Mara. Can we talk politics for a second here? Why would the president be talking about shutting the border down the border and immigration was the president's most important issue in two thousand sixteen his critics? Say that he's inciting racial panic that he wants his base to be afraid of what he's called an invasion of immigrants, and he thinks that's one of the most motivating issues for his base this week. I had a chance to ask Larry Kudlow, who's the president's topic Nommik adviser about this as you know, his economic advisors are very worried about the economic impact some of them have called it catastrophic. This is Republicans in the White House and on Capitol Hill, if he does close the border down and the way he explained it was he said, it's an exclamation point. It shows his seriousness. This is such an important issue. There's a principle here. In other words, just he made the analogy to the government shutdown something that Larry cudlow didn't like, but this is the way the president shows what he cares about most. And what he thinks his base cares about most. And the president does have a history of making very loaded threats oftentimes not following. Through on them. But following through just often enough that no one can really be sure he won't go through it. And the government shutdowns a good example, he could threaten to shut down the government. Nobody thought that was a good idea it proved not to be a good idea. But in the end, he actually did it nobody thinks shutting down the US border with Mexico is a good idea. But nobody can rule out the possibility that Trump may just decide to go through with this. And interestingly enough, the Mexican government Lopez over door has said he doesn't believe that Donald Trump will actually do this. Well, and it's not clear that Donald Trump even believes that Donald Trump will do this as the week went on the president has gotten a little bit squishy about whether he would actually follow through. I'm ready to close it. If I have to close it Mexico, as you know, as of yesterday is been starting to apprehend a lot of people at their southern border. Now that sounds like the president's starting to sorta declare victory I've achieved for an exit ramp achieve what I wanted through my threat. And in fact, there's no evidence that Mex. Co has done anything differently than what they've been doing all along our own John been on the border reporting. There's no there's no change in Mexico's behavior with the president by saying that Mexico's done what I wanted. It seems to be looking for a way he can declare victory and not have to close the border, right? And unlike the government shutdown which did have a small economic impact shutting down the border, according to the president's own advisers would have a big economic impact guy, you have been doing some reporting on that in your new role as chief economics correspondent for NPR. It would be a bombshell on the US economy. And and in particular certain industries of the automotive industry is is one that is very highly integrated. As one analyst told me, it's not just that we trade cars and parts back and forth across the border. They are literally assembling cars in Mexico, the US and Canada, and it needs they need all three of those countries. Participating just to complete a Finnish automobile about more than a third of all the parts that we import automobiles in this country. Come from Mexico. So I've been told that if you literally did close the border with Mexico. You would have some auto plants shutting down within hours, and you would have really the whole North American industry grind to a halt within a week, but more importantly avocados avocados would also take a hit, but not just Africa. I mean, tomatoes eggplants, I think that it doesn't really hit home. When you talk about parts to automobiles. But if you take away people's Advocaat does that's really where Americans are going to feel the pain. Right. I disagree only affects people in blue states who like avocado little you don't have to use Konno's on toes salads. I'm struggling to find a third thing. But there there were reports this week that that high poverty sized, hey, we closed down the border. We're going to run out of our Advocaat of supply in a matter of months is that right weeks weeks weeks weeks, and you know, what regardless of what actually happens whether the border is shutdown or not in one way, Trump has one and that is. Is that he has made this what people are talking about. And one of Trump's metrics for success is to dominate the media narrative to keep people focused on the border, whether or not he shuts it that's not the definition of success. Now, sometimes dominating the media narrative is not the same as winning the argument. But at least he's got this issue front and center as if it is the most important problem facing the country. All right. We are going to leave that conversation here for now. Scott, we have to say goodbye to you again. I'll be back. Yes. You'll be back. All right. We are going to take a quick break in when we come back security concerns at the president's mar-a-lago resort. And a slew of new news related to house investigations into the president support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from better help better help offers licensed professional counselors, who specialize in issues such as depression stress, anxiety and more connect with your professional counselor in a safe and private online environments. At your convenience get help at your own time and your own pace schedule secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. Visit better help dot com slash politics. To learn more and get ten percent off your first month HALE fear, Eisenberg here from NPR's asked me another need a break from the new cycle will then head over to ask me another this month. We've got puzzles games trivia and more women in comedy. Joining us is read from NBC's parks and recreation grittily, endlessly Hedlund from the Netflix series, Russian doll and many more. Listen this Friday, and we're back, and we are joined now by none other than Ryan. Lucas NPR Justice. Correspondent hey Ryan are there. So there have been a lot of developments this week, so many it's hard to keep track of them all related to House Democratic investigations of the president and his administration. There've been a bunch of subpoenas authorized and also this yesterday, the House Ways and means committee sent. A request to the IRS for six years of President Trump's tax returns. And this is a big deal because unlike all the other modern American presidents, President Trump has not shared his tax returns as he was running for president or even as president Tim what's up with this will, you know, this is a big thing because the president has run on being such a successful business person. It's been the backbone of his campaign the backbone of his qualifications to be president. And a lot of Democrats have long suspected, maybe he's not as successful as he has portrayed himself to be in the answer for a lot of Democrats to that question would be in his tax returns. So the House Ways and means committee through an obscure part of the law can request certain tax returns for individuals. And they're doing it in this case, let's any individual, isn't it? I believe you can you can use this for any individual. It's been sparsely used because usually congress is not interested in. Delving into the personal tax returns of a single American citizen. And what's interesting about this is that this is a multi pronged approach from house. Democrats not only is the House Ways and means committee interested in this. The house oversight committee has said that they've been talking to an accounting firm with access to some Trump's tax returns. And that they are considering issuing subpoenas for ten years of Trump's tax records. And I believe that the committee has said that the company is willing to to do. So so long as they've been subpoenaed the kind of want subpoena coverage in order to provide these they're willing to provide these documents, but they want legal cover in the form of a subpoena. Did they were forced to do? So okay. I got a question our guys just because they're curious and they want to see if the president's is rich as he says, he is theirs. God they have to have a better reason for that. There have been a lot of suggestions in the press through investigative reporting about whether the Trump organization broke any laws when it comes to taxes or insurance claims or loans. And what is what is Trump's response to the spend so far he's still? So, you know, he's always said, oh, I can't release my returns because they're under audit. And yesterday, he said, I'm always under audit. I think that the House Ways and means committee could easily figure out whether he's under auditor, not by asking the IRS. And then the president would have to decide if he wants to make a legal fight about this. He could order the IRS not to turn them over. And then it goes to court and on the on the question of audits. I think that Michael Cohen was actually asked about that during his testimony on the hill. And he said that he was never given any indication from the president himself that that he wasn't eat under audit. It was basically stone. Wellstone stumble. The question for me is is this even an answer which prevents him from providing those tax returns being under audit mean you can't provide tax. No, there's no bar against that. As a matter of fact, every United States president has his tax return audited. Like once your president. It's an automatic. That's correct. So I. I have a thirty thousand foot question for you guys. I was gone two weeks. I was on vacation. Congratulations little a little couple of things happened while I was gone. But the question I have about the tax returns. And this kind of continued democratic press in the house. There has been a lot of pushback from the White House about how this is essentially Democrats going after president whom they hate this is driven by hatred and not actual investigative needs. How is this push for tax returns going to play politically? And does this help or hinder the president? I think that the it's incumbent on the house of representatives to say why they want them, you know, how it fits into an investigation about the president. They have to explain that. Otherwise, the president can say you're just on a fishing expedition, but opposition Congress's investigate presidents of the opposite party. That's what happens and for the the Democrats. They always going to have this challenge of balancing pushing. Legislation even if it can't get passed by the Senator signed by the president pushing legislation that helps them lay down a marker for twenty twenty. You know, explains their message what they wanna do and investigation. So they've got legislating and investigating and they have to make sure that they do both incorrect measure, otherwise the public could conclude that all they're doing is going after Trump. Okay. Let's turn to mar-a-lago. This is the president's resort in Florida. He likes to call it. The winter White House, though, it's becoming quite clear that the security procedures there aren't anything like they are at the real White House. And Ryan this week. We learned that a Chinese national was arrested there. That's right. This is a very curious incident. There are a lot of kind of holes and information at this point in time. But what we do know is from what was filed in a in a criminal complaint. The woman's name is Eugene Jiang. She's in her early thirties. What she managed to do was illegally get onto the grounds of the club. She at the first checkpoint told the secret service that she wanted to go use the pool she was allowed in. She had a different story when she was inside. She said that she was there to attend a United Nations Chinese American friendship association event, she was detained questioned by the secret service in the course of all of this. It turns out that she was carrying four cell phones, a laptop computer and external. Drive a thumb drive that contained malware as well as to Chinese passports. I bring all that stuff. When I go to the pool. She didn't have a swimsuit contraction. Why would you need to passports to go to the pool or even to go to more Longo or even go tomorrow? Log out there are a lot of questions that come out of this. It's not entirely clear who this woman is what this is all about whether this is something sinister. Whether it's something silly does raise concerns about possible, espionage. However, obviously, China is a major espionage concern for the United States. They are very aggressive in going after US government secrets US trade secrets in mar-a-lago is this is a rich target. This is not like Camp, David. This is not a hermetically sealed US government facility. This is a private club. And so for the secret service to try to protect this in seal this off in keep the president physically safe is not impossible. It's not all that hard to do. I was told by a former secret service agent. What's very difficult in a place like like mar-a-lago is keeping it clean from a counter intelligence. And this is this goes into all the questions that have been raised about Donald Trump's security procedures or lack of them talks on a cell phone that some people have said is unsecure likes to mingle with the public at mar a Lago. So a lot of questions about how safe and private his conversations really are to people like the Chinese who want to hear what he's saying. And remember, this is not the first time that there has been an incident that raises security concerns at mar a Lago. There was the incident back in two thousand seventeen when he was having dinner on the terrace at the club with the Japanese Prime minister, Shinzo Ave. And there was a North Korean missile launch in suddenly they turned their dinner table on on the terrace into like an open situation room, and they're talking about how to respond guests. We're taking pictures of them and twit end posting them on Instagram that incident as well. As the incident that happened over the weekend with his Chinese woman points to counterintelligence. Concerns for people in the secret service people in the intelligence community. This is not an ideal environment in which to have to to try to protect government secrets. All right changing gears in an earlier podcast this week. We talked about a former Nevada assemblywoman Lucy Flora's who said that former vice president Joe Biden had acted inappropriately at a campaign event in twenty fourteen kissed her on the back of the head Biden gave a statement after that first allegation since then a few other women have come forward to say that Biden made them feel uncomfortable at times as well. And then Biden responded by putting out a video. And the bone is protected personal space have been reset. And I get I get I hear what they're saying. I understand it. And I'll be once more mindful. That's my responsibility Meyer responsible, and I'll meet him Mara. Does this actually change anything for him? Vice president Biden was aware. And so were his advisors that this stuff would come out. It's all on tape. He's done it in public. He's very tactile politician the women who have complained about this say it made them feel uncomfortable. But that none of them said it was sexual in nature, and the interesting thing about this whole episode is that it went on and on and on without hearing from the former vice president until that video his staff put out statements. But this is the first time we've heard him talk about it. I think it's the he had got some positive reviews. People said good that statement is the way to talk about it. He talked about his own response. Ability for respecting people's space. And the big question is how much do Democrats care about this? And I think it depends on which democrat you ask when you talk about Democrats as the zero tolerance party for me to incidents. What do they have zero tolerance for a kiss on the head? It's easy to say you have zero tolerance for sexual harassment or or sexual assault. But all of the other things you might want to call them microaggressions Democrats have to figure this out. And that's what's going to be really interesting when and if Joe Biden gets in whether this is a big deal or not well, and he's definitely acting like somebody who's going to get in. Yes. Of course, everybody thinks he will. But until he does we get to say when and if all right, we're going to take a quick break in when we come back. Can't let it go support for NPR in the following message. Come from the American beverage association, America's beverage companies are working together to support families as they reduced the sugar in their diets coke Dr Pepper, and Pepsi are providing more great tasting options with less sugar or no sugar at all. Smaller portion sizes clear calorie labels, and reminders to think. Balance more choices smaller portions less sugar. Learn more about how they're working together at balance US dot org. Now that Macy's has lost all its territory what happens to the people left behind. She chose Tyco. So fat that she issues finding Syria enroll and what about their children? How it ends a new series on in bed, and we're back, and we're going to end the show like we do every week with can't let it go. Where we all talk about one thing. We just can't stop thinking about politics or otherwise. And I am going to go first. So President Trump is expected to name Herman Cain to the Federal Reserve Herman Cain does that name. Ring a bell for anybody. Sure. Fathers pizzas and dude nine nine nine. So he was a presidential candidate in two thousand twelve I was assigned to cover his nine nine nine tax plan, which he explains this way. Throwing out the current tax code because it is a mess and then passing legislation with the nine percent business flat tax a nine percent, personal income flat tax any nine percent sales tax. So that is the nine nine nine tax plan. So I was already to dig in on the nine nine nine tax plan win all of a sudden all of these allegations of sexual harassment came out against him. And so instead, I ended up chasing him around the capital trying to ask him about sexual harassment. So shortly thereafter, he went from front runner in the Republican field to pulling out of the race. No longer running for president. And he ended his campaign with this. When I believe these words came from the Pokemon movie. The media pointed that out. I'm not sure who the original author is. So don't go ride an article about the point. But it says a lot. About where I am. Well, I am with my wife and my family and where we are as a nation. Life can be a challenge. Life can seem impossible. Is never easy. When there's so much on the line. So, you know, I think that this could be adjusted to be a poem about the fed funds rate. The big question for me is whether we're going to be aiming for nine percent inflation, right? I have a question about the poem itself. It actually is from Pokemon. So my understanding is that there is a Donna summer song that was on the Pokemon movie soundtrack. And that is where it came from. But Herman Cain kept saying a wise man once said or a famous poet once wrote, and it turns on the famous poet was the Pokemon movie and Donna summer. It's not like they couldn't have Google that and figure that out back twelve but. It was a long time ago as many moons ago, it was many moons ago. But I believe we did indeed have Google back that all right Mara. Why can't you like what I can't let go of is the current it candidate in the democratic field Pete Buddha? Judge otherwise known as mayor Pete. He is the thirty seven year old vendor. Canned mayor of south bend, Indiana, who is getting tremendous amounts of buzz in the democratic primary and raising a lot of money and in my inbox. This week was a article he wrote in two thousand and three which for him is not that long ago when he was a student at Harvard where he had a very thoughtful analysis of new album by Dave Matthews, but it got me thinking what can't this guy? Do. He is a Norwegian speaking jazz, pianist Arabic interpreter gay married roadscholar veteran. He's thirty seven years old. Did I say that before and he's running for president and the great. Thing. What I can't let go is the great thing about being the current it candidate is he isn't going to be subjected to the same kind of scrutiny that other candidates are people can just revel in all the wonderful things about him. The thing that jumps out to me. The most is that he was at Harvard in college in two thousand three I was attending college in and around that he's incredibly young for someone who is not only a candidate for president but running his own town. And and is rising in the polls. Wait, wait, wait. Did he say the Dave Matthews was good or bad because that could really affect his president him. It wasn't. It was thoughtful exegesis about the current the the the new two thousand and three album of Dave Matthews and how it compared to previous ones and how it fits into the post nine eleven political climate, right? Why can't you like so I'm gonna shift gears a bit into the world of sports who so? Also going to give a bit of a shout out to my roots. So I grew up in Wisconsin. I can't call myself a lifelong bucks fan because the bucks were horrible for most of my life to be quite Frank. But the bucks are finally back. They are legitimate. They with four games left in the NBA season. They have a two and a half game lead atop the Eastern Conference. This is something that I very much enjoy to see I never thought that I would necessarily see this happen that the bucks could win win the conference. Winning an MBA crown is something else entirely. We'll see what what happens, but this has been a fun year as a temporary bucks fan or a resurrected bucks fan. And I can't actually say that I've watched a game this year. But I do check the standings. You're still very exciting. I'm still very excited about this Tam. Why can't you like, oh, I'm going to shift gears a little bit too? I mean, my my Clegg this week is about nipsy hustle. He's he's a rapper who was killed this week. But I don't want to focus on the on the downside of that. I want to focus on his legacy and what he leaves behind. I mean, this is a fascinating character. Nifty hustle is is a is a deeply motivational rapper who came from a life of poverty and escaped a life of gang violence. He had been associated with the crimson his early years to become a very successful rapper who was intensely interested in investing back into his own community. He was really interested in diversity in Silicon Valley and tech. He was really interested in getting some sort of pipeline between the inner city and Silicon Valley, he even started a community center. Just so that youth in in Crenshaw, California could get interested in technology and inside. Science, and it it's it really raises bigger questions about the kind of character, we expect not only from our politicians. But also from the people we put on when we listen to music, and when we watch movies and things like that as well. Yeah. And then tragedy is he was supposedly about to meet with the police to work with them on solving gang violence. Right. The day after he was killed. He was supposed to have a meeting with the LAPD about. How do we get kids out of? Plus Bryce one slice. Not to digest swamp. We'll be back as soon as there's news you need to know about. In the meantime, head to NPR dot org slash politics newsletter to subscribe to a roundup of our best online stories and analysis. I'm Keith I cover the White House. I'm Mara Liasson. National political correspondent, I'm to MEK political reporter. Cover the Justice department and thanks for listening to the impair politics. Hustle price. One slice got the bone guys. Swap. So I suppose this means that you had heard of him before he was killed. Yes. And he he's very popular. And did he earned himself after nipsy? Russell. I know is a comedian. I don't long past. I think but I'm assuming that's why he took that name. I'm gonna have to get back to you get back to you because. Yeah. Nipsy russell. I mean, we can Google them. Let's cut this embarrassing question for I don't know the answer to that question. I'm going to look that up. You've never heard of nipsy. I don't know. Russell is. Nipsy hustle. Well, he Russell nipsy hustle. American comedian. Let's see nipsy Russell do. You have a picture. Yeah. He's stage. Name a play on the name of comic nipsy. Russell originated Maher for being so old. And so right dight was Russell born nineteen eighteen about that. That.

president President Trump United States NPR Mara Liasson White House Democrats Trump congress Mexico White House correspondent Philadelphia vice president Google reporter Atlanta IRS Scott Horsely
Trump Escalates Trade War With China; China Retaliates

NPR Politics Podcast

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Trump Escalates Trade War With China; China Retaliates

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from internet essentials from Comcast, connecting more than six million low income people to low cost, high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more now they're ready for anything. Hey, this is can be. I'm currently in Juneau Alaska where I just finished my first day as general assignment news, intern Kato, public media. This podcast was recorded at three twenty nine PM on Tuesday. The eighteenth things may have changed by the tiny here. Thanks, enjoy the show. Junior sprout. Hey, there. It's the PR politics podcast. The Trump administration announced new tariffs on China yesterday afternoon and China has already struck back if there's a retaliation against our farmers and our industrial workers are ranchers. If any of that goes on, we're going to kick in another two hundred fifty, seven billion dollars. I'm tamra, Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Scott Horsely. I also cover the White House. I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent. So this is just the latest round of tariffs in what seems to be a ping pong game. Wilson ping pong game where you keep hitting the ball harder and harder. It's an escalation in President Trump's trade war. He adjusts late yesterday, announced tariffs on another two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports to the US and while up until now they have sort of tried to avoid consumer products. Now, these are going to be things that consumers are going to see in the stores. And Donald Trump says that if CHAI. China retaliates with tariffs of their own, which trying to has already done to the first round of this trade work. He'll put even more tariffs on. We don't want to do, but we probably will have no choice. So eventually tariffs have the kind of affect that. Every single economist will tell you, which is they will raise prices for consumers, and we're very much near that point. Now where near that point now, the big question is, is the US economy big enough as Trump cabinet officials will say that it can absorb this. Even President Trump says, there's going to be some short term pain for farmers for other people. But in the end we're going to win. Yeah, we'll so Wilbur Ross. The commerce secretary was on TV this morning and said, you know, it'll be spread out. It'll be on so many different things. People won't even really notice. Wilbur Ross has been minimizing the effects of Trump tariffs from the beginning. You might remember his his TV appearance with the Campbell's soup can where he talked about the fractional sense it will put on on extra cost. A steel can. But if you're talking about two hundred billion dollars in Chinese goods and hitting them with a ten percent tariff to start with ratcheting up to a twenty five percent tariff in the new year, you're talking about billions of dollars in additional cost. It is spread out it is, you know, not a huge chunk of our overall economy, but these are going to start to show up. Absolutely. And on top of the increase prices for US consumers, you are also seeing the effects of the retaliatory tariffs that China and other countries have have hit back with. Initially, you remember the, the Trump administration said, oh, we don't think China's gonna hit back when they hit back immediately. Why wouldn't? Why wouldn't they and surprise prize. They've already hit back again to this next round. Just just this morning, China announced tariffs on another sixty billion dollars in US exports to China. So folks who are in the export business are already certainly feeling the effects. And that includes a lot of. Farmers. We are now in a trade war. This is war looks like, and this is what Donald Trump famously tweeted. Trade wars are good and easy to win. We're now going to find out if he's right or not. Okay. Let's start from the beginning. What is President Trump trying to achieve with these sort of escalating trade fights? Well, that is an excellent question. You know, this is can be confusing because what many economists think should be done about China is that China is a trade cheat. China steals intellectual property. China makes force technology transfer. China doesn't play by the rules. Those are problems that there is a bipartisan consensus around that. Those problems need to be fixed. Donald Trump on the other hand, seems fixated on the trade deficit number. He wants that number to come down. He talks about when you take out five hundred billion dollars from us as if as if you if you have. Trade deficit with a country, they're stealing money from you. What Donald Trump seems to want is that we have a trade surplus with everyone. Wait, this is maybe a dense question. What is the trade deficit? So the trade balance is how much you buy from me, measured against how much I buy from you. The United States today buys a lot more goods from China than China buys from the US. Therefore, we have a trade deficit with China, but that doesn't mean China is stealing money from the United States. That means at the end of the year, we have a lot of Chinese goods. They have fewer American goods, but they have more American dollars. Sometimes when we have a lot of times when an economy is very strong, one of the signs of that is the trade deficit goes up because American consumers have money and they want to buy a lot of stuff. Donald Trump was asked, hey, since you started talking about tariffs the deficit trade deficit has gone up. He, you know, he's talks about, we're being ripped off by China. We're being ripped off by the EU. He sees the trade deficit as some. Kind of a metric of an economy success or failure. And so here when you ask, what is the president trying to achieve with these tariffs? Are these tariffs a means to an end as he trying to get China to change its behavior and stop stealing intellectual property and stop forcing American companies to transfer their technology to China, or does he see these tariffs as an end in themselves that will discourage Americans from buying Chinese goods? And I think it's probably the latter because he according to Bob Woodward's scribbled in the margin of speech, trade is bad. Donald Trump doesn't like trade with other countries somehow or other. He thinks if you buy a foreign product, that country has ripped you off, they've taken your money, but you know, because he's the president of the United States. He gets to prosecute this. And what's so interesting is there is a bipartisan consensus that China is a trade cheap, but there is no. Bipartisan consensus, that tariffs are the way to correct that problem. And not only is there a bipartisan consensus within the United States, but there's an international consensus that China is is been a bad, a bad actor on the trading scene, but instead of marshalling an international coalition to go after China and put pressure on China from all sides, President Trump and his trade policies of managed to alienate lots of other countries who should be allied with the United States in pressing that case against China. So folks who might be working with us against China are instead matters because he's slap tariffs on the EU or slap tariffs on Canada. Once upon a time, there was an actual official coalition of countries had tried to do something about it, and it was called the TPP and it was every country that had you know a border on on the Pacific that was going to basically gang up against China. They were gonna make a free trade pact. It was specifically excluding China, what Donald Trump do. One of the very first things he did when he came into office was pulling out of that, okay. We are going to take a quick break and when we get back, we're going. To look at how the trade war is affecting the midterm elections support for this podcast, and the following message come from discover- discover believes that getting cash back on your credit card makes great financial sense and getting twice the cash back is even smarter. That's why at the end of your first year, as a new cardmember discover will match all the cash back. You've earned dollar for dollar, no caps, no catch. So not only do you get your cash back bonus. You get it matched learn more at discover dot com. Slash match cash back match, offer only for new card members limitations apply. Hi on the neon undergone host of NPR. Spanish-language putt cuts slam will into this week a year after the earthquakes devastated the country. Mexico is still dealing with the aftermath. Schools were especially damaged and the government promised to rebuild them fast, but to journalists discover that the truth about that reconstruction is much more complicated and we're back and President Trump in his campaign. One of his big items, something that he. Really talked up, especially in the upper midwest, those states that he ended up winning like Michigan and Wisconsin. He said the Trans-Pacific Partnership is terrible, and we're gonna tear it up. And he said, NAFTA is no good and and voters in the upper midwest, those states that he won Michigan and Wisconsin voters responded to that. The question now is he's taking action. He's he is doing the things that he said he was going to do in the campaign. Is he being rewarded for it or not? You mean politically? Yeah, right now, I mean, we're headed into the mid Wales right now. You know the question. Donald Trump famously said I could stand on Fifth Avenue and shoot someone and I wouldn't lose any voters. Now he's testing a corollary of that. Could I stand in a soybean field or on the floor of small manufacturing company and shoot someone and not lose any voters? I think voters in the mid west who liked Donald Trump or willing to give him a lot of leeway, see if this tack works, but. We do see in polls is there's been a thirteen point swing shift against Republicans and the generic ballot in the mid west. When you ask voters all over the country, do you approve or disapprove of Trump's performance in trade negotiations, thirty nine percent approve sixty. One percent disapprove trade itself is getting more and more popular, tariffs getting less popular polls show. So we have to assume that even Trump voters in the midwest, which was his target audience are concerned about the results of his trade war. But when you're talking about the mid-term, elections, tennis is an interesting issue that doesn't break neatly along partisan lines. It's not as if a vote for a democratic congressional candidate is necessary. A repudiation of Donald Trump's trade policy or a vote for Republican candidate is an enthusiastic thumbs up for Donald Trump's trade policy. Because when you look at the folks who are in congress. Right now, some of the Democrats like Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown are more or less cheering the president on they. They tend to support his trade policies and some of the fiercest opponents of the president's trade policies have been farm state Republicans whose constituents have been paying a price for the retaliatory trade tariffs and other countries slapped on the US. And you talk about Ohio and shared Brown. He is benefiting from all of the talk about trade and being able to connect himself to President Trump and a state that President Trump won by a significant margin in two thousand sixteen. Then you go to North Dakota where President Trump is also quite popular one by ton in two thousand sixteen and you have democratic Senator there, Heidi Heitkamp fighting for her life, and she has a new ad out where she is going after her Republican opponent on trade China, his canceling their contracts to buy soybeans. This is a farmer standing in a soybean field. You. Kevin Kramer why he supports the trade war. He criticizes farmers. You're all kinds of hysteria. There's potential short term pain. We don't have a very high pain threshold, the United States of America. Mr Cramer, that trade war is costing my family lot of money and you don't seem to care. That's a pretty powerful ad. One of the things as Scott said, the trade wars, a political issue is really complex cuts across partisan lines. But one thing it clearly does is it is a wedge issue inside the Republican party. I mean, the vast majority of Republicans in congress are against this trade war. It's one of the very few issues where Republicans are even willing to speak up against Trump and the president, not Kevin Kramer, but but many others and the president and his administration have tried to tamp down some of that opposition, especially in farm states red states. That's why you saw the agricultural department take us multibillion dollar rescue package for farmers had heavily weighted towards soybean and pork producers, because since those are a couple of commodities have been hard hit by retaliatory, Tara. That cushions the blow, but you'll hear the farmers say, I don't want a government bailout. I want the government opening up these markets. It's kind of humiliating for them. Why do they need welfare? I call it that strategic soybean reserve. Why do we have to do that? These farmers say, I can sell my product. I don't need a welfare check. And one reason farmers are being targeted is a farm states went for Donald Trump. So the other countries figure, this is a way to put some pressure on the White House, but also American farmers are very productive. We have a trade surplus in agriculture is it's an area where the United States is extremely competitive. We produce commodities at a at a low cost, high quality. Other countries want to buy those products. And the trade war is definitely hurting agriculture. And so if you are dividing Republicans, if this is a wedge issue for Republicans, does that become a problem for Republicans running for office if you, if there are some voters who are suddenly not that enthused, we'll sure and also makes it hard. Order for Republicans to sell the to great success stories that they feel they've had a good economy and tax cuts and the trade war not only muddies the message. It also threatens to undermine the positive economic effects of what they think they're rain has has produced the trade war can take some of the bloom off the rows of a great economy, and you can see concern about that in this latest round of tariffs directed at China. Again, these are going to hit some consumer products when the White House initially talked about this, it was going to be a twenty five percent tariff as they've rolled it out. They said, no, it's going to be ten percent for the rest of this year and it'll go to twenty-five after the New Year's. So they wanna get past the the Christmas shopping season when there's going to be a lot of Chinese goods in the stores. And most importantly, they wanna get past that midterm election in November. And what you hear heard Kevin Kramer say in that Heidi Heitkamp add is what Donald Trump says. There's going to be a little short term pain. We just gotta get through this. But the goal was to make a deal with China. The goal was to have the tariffs be an ago, sheeting tool, but so far we haven't had any results with talking to the Chinese at all, and it's not exactly clear that that was the president's goal in a tweet that he sent out a couple of weeks ago. He, he said, and, hey, we could get money from those tariffs and yes, as if tariffs were an end in in another himselves, he's also said, we're making a lot of headway. It's kind of hard to see wherever they're making that headway in terms of actually bringing China the table, changing China's behavior, striking new trade deals at the president's talking about there hasn't really been any new trade deals since he's taken this aggressive approach. So in voters, go to the polls in states all over the country in November, will they be paying more for their iphones or will they will they be seeing or their ten cans there, Campbell Soup? Will they see the effects of this fight? Will they? Will they be. Feeling the pain and the gain part hasn't happened yet. The game port definitely hasn't happened yet. The pain is there. It may be a mild headache because opposed to a migraine. But for some folks in certain select industries that have been hardest, it's it's a migraine. You certainly know if you're in a small manufacturing plant and all of a sudden the cost of your steel and aluminum has gone through the roof or you're the nail manufacturer who had to lay off everyone in clothes. Then you really know if you're just a consumer. It's hard to tell there's no sign on the grocery store shelf that says your Campbell Soup. Now cost five cents more because of Donald Trump's tariffs, you know, there's not information like that out there. Okay. We are gonna leave it here for today, but we will certainly be back in your feet soon. Just as soon as there is news that forces us to run back into the studio. I'm tamra, Keith. I cover the White House for NPR. I'm Scott Horsely now cover the White House. I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent, and thank you for listening to the NPR politics podcast.

President Trump China US president Trump White House Scott Horsely Mara Liasson Comcast Campbell Soup congress Kevin Kramer NPR tamra national political corresponde Wilbur Ross Juneau Alaska migraine
Unemployment Rate Falls To 13.3%; Payday Loan Lenders Target The Poor

Here & Now

42:34 min | 6 months ago

Unemployment Rate Falls To 13.3%; Payday Loan Lenders Target The Poor

"From NPR and Wbz I'm Jeremy Hobson. Im Tanya Moseley. It's here now. Today's new jobs report finds that the US actually add it two and a half million jobs in May at the Rose Garden this morning. President trump praised the economy. Today is probably you think of it the greatest comeback in American as you. It's not gonNA stop here. It's going to keep going. The president is now pushing for all states to reopen, and even though the unemployment rate dropped to just over thirteen percent last month, they're still more than thirty seven million people, claiming unemployment benefits, NPR, chief economics correspondent Scott horsely joins us now and Scott. This report actually stunned many economists. The President of course sees this as a turning point. Could it actually be one? It, certainly, a turning point we've gone from losing jobs for a couple of months to now gaining jobs in May. So that is a turning point, but it's important to keep some perspective here in March and April. The country lost more than twenty two million jobs in May. We regained. Eleven percent of those that's absolutely better than losing more, but we're still in a pretty deep hole here that unemployment rate of thirteen point three percent. That's still well above the worst rate. We saw it anytime during the great recession after the financial collapse. Let's talk a little bit about what happened in May to bring about these numbers. Yeah, I think what happen is businesses around the country began reopening, and that happened faster than I think forecasters were expecting the real surprise here is not that the economy started adding jobs again. I think most people expected that to happen in June. It just happened a month earlier than than most of the economists had been expecting. We knew the pace of pandemic layoffs had been slowing in recent weeks, and we had been looking at all the the sort of weekly data for any sign of of jobs, actually being added. We haven't really seen that signal yet in things like the weekly unemployment claims or the number of people who are continuing to collect unemployment. Bear in mind that even with this positive news about may jobs more than thirty seven million people are either collecting unemployment or in the line for it. We should stress that as you mentioned. There are still millions of people out of work as you said. What industries though are we actually seeing a comeback? The lot of the ones that were hardest hit when we voluntarily lockdown the economy and sort of desperate bid to slow the spread of the pandemic that is bars and restaurants, retail stores, also construction, manufacturing and healthcare, which is usually pretty recession proof, but even healthcare lost jobs in April is a lot of doctors and Dennis close their offices for anything but but emergencies. So those have all seen a comeback. Although the gains have not by any means or race, the job losses that we saw in in March and April, there are other industries that continue to lose jobs. Air travel lost another fifty thousand jobs in May on top of the jobs that were lost in April, and importantly state and local government lost more than half A. A million jobs in May that's on top of nearly a million jobs that governments lost in. April, that's a sign that there's kind of a delayed effect on local government budgets as the rest of the economy turned south, and unless the federal government comes through with some help for state and local governments. We could see more job losses. They are going forward. This morning the president waved off questions from journalists about the unemployment figures for black and Asian Americans today. What do these numbers tell us about unemployment in these communities of Color? Well certainly African Americans and Latinos in particular still face a challenging job picture their their unemployment rates were higher than the national average before the pandemic, and they're higher now as well. The jobless rate for African Americans actually ticked up a little bit in May even as the overall number was coming down now that could be some statistical noise. The unemployment rate among african-americans bounces around a little bit just with some sampling air but we do know that a great number of African. African, Americans who are still working are holding those kind of front line, essential jobs that also put them at greater risk of infection. So that's another thing to keep in mind. We did see a drop last month. In Latino unemployment, Latinos are concentrated in some of the industries that did make a partial recovery like food, service and construction, but again the jobless rate for Latinos is above that for both African Americans and whites. All this is just a sign of the kind of. Structural inequality that has been persistent in this country, which sadly is sort of fueling some of the the demonstration that we're seeing around the country. That's NPR chief economics. Correspondent Scott horsely as always thank you. My pleasure. Will the demonstrations we've been seeing around? The country are also playing out on social media. Let's bring infamy. Okay, hosted the stream on Al Jazeera English Femi-. Jeremy. And there's just so much to talk about with you. Let's with something that's trending today Hashtag. He's seventy five. This is after police in Buffalo. New York pushed an older man to the ground during a protest yesterday listen. Oh! He's bleeding out of his years. They're saying get a medic. A Buffalo Police spokesman told CNN that two officers have been suspended because of that incident, and the is in the hospital in serious but stable condition. What do we know about what happened here? And what has the reaction been like online? The reason we know what happens because NPR station WB F. O.'s shared video of the old senior, being pushed to the ground earlier yesterday evening, the police spokesman said that one person was injured when he tripped and fell, it became very clear from the video. There was no tripping although there will some falling and people were incensed, which is why he's seventy five Trindade results of that immediately when that video was out, it's the power video on social I would say the man is now in a in a stable condition to officers have been suspended without pay buffalo. Police Commissioner has asked for immediate investigation. We give you a little sense of the. The response and reaction on twitter Peter Morley says the other officers just left him on the sidewalk bleeding after he was pushed and shoved by Buffalo police officers. He seventy-five is this. Half our country has fallen remarkably though Jamie. Not Everybody was saying the same thing in the defense of the place. Many people saying well the the gentleman should never be near police line. What do you expect you would get pushed? He's old enough to know better. Stay home if we don't want to be facing the police, so there's a split conversation. Even though we see the video, we see them out on the ground and we're here. He's head hitting the ground as well. We've also seen celebrities speaking up about George Floyd's death. Here's Meghan Markle. The Duchess of Sussex, in a virtual graduation speech for the Immaculate Heart High School in Los. Angeles she called events in the country devastating. The only wrong thing to say is to say nothing. George Lloyd's life mattered and Briana Taylor's life matter and Falungong castells life mattered Tamir Rice's life mattered. And so did so many other people whose names we know and whose names we do not know. Now Meghan. Markle has been open about some of the racism. She has faced in her life. But how are celebrities like her? Being viewed for talking about race? I this the celebrity dilemma because you're criticize if you don't speak out your criticize when you do for instance reaction to Meghan markle's videos both positive and negative. People were saying you're not really black. You're making George. Floyd steph about yourself to attention seeking so it's really difficult for celebrities to get it joust right because they using this liberty platform, and then some people are pushing back and they don't like them for using that platform. Now one of the things that I saw this week and I'm sure you saw. It was the blackout on Tuesday of social media where everybody was just posting just a black square on instagram or on facebook, and usually with the Hashtag blackout, Tuesday people just voicing their solidarity with victims of police violence and with the protesters. What are people saying about that whole exercise and how it worked? Say the social campaign, the the was very laudable. It was to support the black lives matter organization are a couple of practical issues that surfaced almost immediately. If people are posting a black square using Hashtag, black lives matter, it meant that very important. More practical information was literally buried on the black squares. Supporters of the Black Lives Matter Movement takedown. Take Down Your squares. Take Down your posts and then reposted using the actual hash type of the campaign, which is blackout, Tuesday. That's one practical problem. The second issue that came up was one of intention, so some people interpreted blackout choose. They as do nothing. Say Nothing and black lives matter. Matter supporters were saying actually. This is the time to raise your voice to have conversations to use any privilege that you might have so. There was pushback about that, and then finally a third criticism the I noticed, and this one is one of all social media campaigns is that maybe you should be doing something more than post? Brandy Riley's tweet jumped out at me. Went Viral. She says thank you for your black lives matter graphic. May I please see a picture of your executive leadership team and company board, which means I know that you're posting? I know you'll support in fact you so much, but are you really practicing what post? We'll leave it at that family because that's an important point. Host of the Stream on Al Jazeera English. Thank you so much. Congestion! Slipping. And Music about police violence. It's also been climbing the spotify charts this week. Including this is America by Childish Gambino. Whitman listening to here now. American! I got. I got to carry them. It feels like nothing in the news. These days makes any sense. So Husselmann Hajj turned to his father, and his faith for answers he said, don't worry about the number of questions. Just worry about which questions become more clear and solidified comedian Hasan bin Hajj on how his spirituality is getting him through listening, subscribe to. It's been a minute from NPR. Three men are facing terrorism related charges in Nevada after allegedly planning to incite violence at protests over the death of George Floyd federal prosecutors say the men are connected to the BOO, Gulu, movement associated with far right extremists. This is just one example of a disturbing trend at peaceful demonstrations across the country. Alex Goldenberg has a new report out this week on extremists and protesters, and he's lead intelligence analyst with network. Contagion Research Institute welcome. Thank you very much for having me Tanya your research, began even before this latest wave of protests over systemic racism, and you and others have found that extremists are also inserting themselves in also some of the corona virus reopening protests. Who are these groups that you have been tracking? So our recent report outlines certain extremists subgroups coalescing all over social media into what we describe as the militia sphere. The groups that we paid particular attention to. We're groups like the oath keepers, three percenters, and then the Google Movement as well, and we found that the militias fear has grown increasingly extreme across platforms as the pandemic lockdowns have continued to view such lockdowns as government overreach, or even a plot to justify a police state, and it's apparent that these communities have attempted to even explore recent protests, regarding the George George Floyd incident and we've seen enthusiasts from the Google Movement in particular. WHO'VE BEEN DONNING HAWAIIAN? Shirts at over forty protests the past week and they've even adopted George Floyd as a symbolic martyr. Yeah, so you're giving us a bit of a sense of how widespread these groups are, but do you have numbers, and and this is interesting this idea of malicious fear, so we have seen Bugaku chatter in particular doubling on social media platforms. Like Reddit, twitter, facebook and Instagram, and to give you a sense of the numbers. According to the Tech Transparency Project, there are over one hundred forty facebook groups. Connected to the Google Movement. And some of these groups boast tens of thousands of followers. Now they're out in the streets. You gave a number of the projected number of those who are infiltrating these protests like the George Floyd protests as well as corona virus reopening protests. Is there any sense of what they want? And what they're asking for? With the purpose of infiltrating these protests are so I earlier this year many of the platforms that we tracked. The Term Boo Goo was initially used to describe an uprising against a tyrannical government. In response to a perceived threat of widespread gun. Confiscation I we. I saw them in person actually at the Richmond, Virginia rallies. Earlier this year. But as we've outlined in our recent report, the animus is quickly shifted from theme to seem, and this really exemplifies the flexibility of this particular ideology. They're seeking the co-opt. These recent protests movements to further their own objective, and the objective is to promote sedition in civil war Attorney General William Bar said yesterday that he thinks it's mostly outside actors starting violence at these protests. Let's listen in many places. It appears the violence is planned. Organized and driven. By an Arctic and left. Extremist groups far-left extremist groups using Antifa like tactics, many of whom travel from outside the state to promote the violence buyers talking about far left extremists. But how much evidence is there to his point? How much are we seeing far left extremists stoking violence as well as far as you can tell from your research well current researching for left violence is on our radar, and most definitely in line with the mission of NCRI as the organization seeks to chart extremism on all political polls. we currently have some preliminary data on the nature of more extreme, leaning left-wing communities, but we are still very much in the preliminary stages, however on Wednesday. Federal prosecutors in Nevada charged three boo glue enthusiasts with terrorism offenses for plotted used Molotov cocktails explosives to incite violence George. Floyd protests. And, this is an isolated example of bugler adherence apprehended by police at recent protests. One young man from Denver Colorado self-described Bogu boy just last week was arrested near protests with numerous weapons, including several assault rifles and Tennessee a man who was armed with an era, fifteen was arrested at a protest who had earlier posted about the boo blue on social media. As you mentioned. These groups are mobilizing online and then going out into these protests. What do you think can be done and needs to be done to stop this type of thing from happening? I believe that social media companies need to be more proactive in identifying these groups once they crossed the line and Begin inciting violence and Organizing on highly politically volatile events to hijack the media narrative and I think some good steps have been taken. Read it just recently. SHUT DOWN SEVERAL BOO! Related Sub Brett's for. Inciting and glorifying. And that's step in the right direction and also from my understanding, facebook is now making it more difficult for users to find groups associated with the term Boo Goo. That's Alex Goldenberg. He is with the Network Contagion Research Institute, which has a new report out on extremists inserting themselves into protests. We will post link at here and now dot Org Alex. thank you so much. Thank you very much. Tanya happy to be here. Many of you may remember watching video from late May. Taken in Central Park. It was a white woman, threatening a black man who was bird watching. The man asked her to lead her dog in an area that we're that was mandated. The woman purposely called out the man's race in a phone call to police, and now this incident has sparked lots of action online Julie Grant from the allegheny front reports on a new social media trend called HASHTAG black burgers week. Monique Pipkin studies birds for the PhD. She's working on Cornell University, so when she saw a call for Black Blackburn to post a bird photo, she chose the chipping sparrow. That's the animal. I learned COMPATIB- bird with and these tiny little sparrows who have US lovely trill songs with a single, not repeated. Tweeden Martinez the PhD Student at University of Louisiana helped organize Hashtag blackbirds week on twitter instagram. She tweeted the northern mockingbird. Most people sometimes find. Find them annoying. I think they're really cool. It was one of a handful of photos. She posted of what she calls. Backyard birds just to show everyone out there. Especially Black Burgers that are just beginning you can probably find these birds or see them around very easily event co organizer. tikey James says as a kid in Philadelphia. His friends couldn't understand why he would get up early on weekends to go bird watching, but he remembers the. The thrill of seeing a bird he'd studied in a book out in nature, and I see a belted kingfisher female, sitting on a cattail, then swoops across Cops Creek, and you know makes that call that you know it's always gonNA be etched in my mind in I was just so president that moment that something that was on paper, turned into something real, but James wasn't surprised by the video in central park of a white woman calling. Calling the police on a black burder when I first saw honestly, it was just another video of in the long list of videos of white people entitlement weaponising police brutality to manage an inconvenience in their life. That involves a person of Color James says blackbirds week was conceived when a group called black AF in stem was talking online about it I initially didn't even watch the video because I knew exactly how it was going to end. I was wrong. Lead into blackbirds weak. The weak is included blackbird, posting photos of themselves in nature twitter check called ask a black burder, a data highlight, female murders and alive discussion called birding wall black on facebook hosted by the national. Audubon society where James Works. tweeted Martinez is amazed at how much attention they're getting I could never have imagined this I. Don't think any of US could have. This was something that was needed. And really the support means everything to all of us. Most images of birds and others in nature online are older, white people and Children Martinez hopes. Black Burgers Week will help Malays. Images of black people in the outdoors. She says for a black woman. Getting Ready to go. Birding can take a lot of effort. I have to look like a bird. Percent I make sure. I either a field guide in my hand of birds dry, so people can see that I'm I'm just here to bird. I'm not here to do anything else Martinez. Remembers being purposely splashed by a passing truck and others say they mostly bird in urban areas, and with white friends to avoid confrontation with people who might feel uncomfortable with a black burder, monique? Pitkin says she's only been able to go birding with other black people once in her life, just being able to see all of the amazing black naturalist, black biologists out there or just back, burgers or anyone who spending time in nature is. It's just signed. It's affirming and it's exhilarating, and it's really comforting. Honestly, we didn't pick our moment. But. We are rising to the occasion. James says the group effort to quickly put together Blackburn's week has meant a lot of long nights. He hopes it sets a precedent for future generations, not just that everyone has a place outdoors, but also that they can work together towards positive change. I have had something in my life that has been so fulfilling and that I could put so much of my energy into and get so much joy out of it. We were talking on one of the calls that we were just like. I'm exhausted but I will not stop smiling for here. Now I'm Julie Grant! Across. The Nation monuments to the confederacy are coming down in Alexandria. Virginia Birmingham Alabama and Tampa. Florida statues are being trucked away and confederate flags lowered in response to mass protests in the wake of the death of George Floyd, but perhaps the most notorious monument to be designated for removal, so far is the six storey statue of Robert E in Richmond Virginia and for more. We have with US Roberto. Role Dan. He's been covering the story for NPR member station V.. VP M. in Richmond and Roberta welcome. Thanks for having me on you. Yes, so yesterday governor North announced. Virginia will remove the Statue of Robert e Lee as soon as possible and set that Richmond is no longer the capital of the confederacy. What's been the response been they are? Well. I think it depends on who you ask right so richmond has until recently been a majority African. American city and a strongly democratic city, many residents, and especially the thousands of protesters who've been out in the streets have wanted to see these monuments taken down for a while, and you have some vocal opposition from pro confederacy groups, but From my reporting on this I think the majority of Richmond Irs are supportive of taking down the monuments, or at the very least not opposed to it. Yeah as you mentioned? This has been a discussion for a long time. There have been other calls to do this after the Charleston south. Carolina Church shooting for example or unite the right rally in Charlottesville Virginia, the other side of this is that we're reading. That confederate history groups don't want to see their statues destroyed by protesters, so they'd rather remove them to keep them safe. Can you say more about this? Year, so I mean I've seen that happen with the protest up in Alexandria believe but. I! Don't think that's the case here in Richmond just went through some of the facebook pages for the Virginia Flags Group, which is one of the big groups here. And they're calling. Protesters quote terrorists, and and saying that Democrats are using the protests as an excuse to pull the monuments down the Monument Avenue Preservation Group, which is a another pro confederacy group has a number of petitions directed at President Donald Trump, asking him to step in and stop the removal of the statues here so I'm not really hearing a whole lot of folks in Richmond saying. Let's take them down. You know preventatively. So of course, the Robert Elise statue is the most iconic statue of the confederacy, but there're others in July. The city council plans to vote whether to remove them all What can you tell us about that? Is that a real possibility? Yeah, that's right, so I mean before the protests and Corona virus happened. And we all sort of became health reporters might be is covering city hall, so the Mayor's office and City Council and what I can tell you. Is that just weeks ago? I don't think anyone would have predicted that the monuments would be coming down. City Councilman Michael Jones tried twice in the wake of Charlottesville and the death of heather higher at the hands of White Supremacists to put monument removal up for a vote here both times it failed to get a majority of Richmond City Council, but as of this morning, and in the wake of the protests that have been happening since Sunday here in the city of Richmond every member of Richmond City Council has now put out a statement saying that they will vote to take the confederate monuments down. That's reporter Roberto Role Dan of Richmond's. Member station VP am Roberto. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. For the first time since March, New York City has reported daily Cove One nineteen death toll of zero. That was yesterday zooming out. Cases are still on the rise in the US but at a slower rate than in April. Let's bring. Dr Rochelle Walinsky Chief of Infectious Diseases at Massachusetts. General Hospital and professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr Welcome and there were no new confirm cove nineteen deaths in New York yesterday, although three people who were untested, may have died from the disease, but still when you compare that to the peak in April when the city was losing at least five hundred people to the pandemic each day. What does it tell you? Well I. I think we should just celebrate an extraordinary event. Given how sick people have been how we've seen footage of morgues just been It's been a rough many weeks and so I think we should celebrate this really extraordinary achievement. What I will say is that when you start seeing the markers of death, they happen five six seven weeks after your intervention to prevent them, and so that's actually quite frustrating. Frustrating because you will have an intervention like closing everything down like the masks like the social distancing, and you can't see the benefit immediately, and what this tells you is all of that incredibly hard work that we did to stop everything in its tracks worked on. We're seeing it today, and so I think that that's really important to recognize that that the marker of yesterday is because we worked so hard in April. Okay, so then given that timeline of five six seven weeks. Let me bring two items to your attention Jacksonville Florida reopened its beaches on April seventeenth, which was seven weeks ago. We talked about it at the time. A lot of people were worried that that was going to Meena Spike. In cases they haven't seen that. Georgia allowed many businesses to reopen six weeks ago. Do you think that the fact that we haven't seen significant spikes in those states? Means that. What they have done is not catastrophic to the goal, which is to reduce the amount of cases and deaths not yet so I think that this is a. One person infects people infects four people, so I think you know we are starting to see the data. We have to watch it really carefully. I think we should wait another four or five weeks for us to say this was a win I. think is way too early to say that it's a win. If you look at the map of Florida, the cases that have been considered hotspots and Florida are along the. The coasts that's also wear. There's more crowding along the coasts. I'm I'm not ready to say that that this was all success, and we should go back to life as normal by any stretch of the imagination, time will tell I'm and certainly the day that you open the beaches. We shouldn't say seven weeks later is when you're gonNA. See the deaths, I. Mean I I think we really just need to wait? President. Trump says we shouldn't wait in his news conference today. He's saying states that are still lockdown should reopen that schools should reopen. What are your thoughts on how that reopening can take place at this point? A lot of people are wearing masks taking steps to lower their risk of transmitting the virus. Is there a way at this point that we can start to open things up? In a different way than maybe a month ago or six weeks ago. Yeah it's a really good point, and and I have one of the big challenges with this for the last three months. The public has heard from us all the things you can't do. And I really think now is the time to say these are all the things you can do, and here's how to do it safely. Because what very clear as we can't stay in our current state for forever right and people are going to be anxious to go out and start. Recuperating in some. Of Life so the question is. How do you do that safely and I think we need to start offering some more guidance in that space. I don't think it's. Public spaces no masks, lots of crowding I. Don't think that's the answer, but I do think if we had shifts or or sizes of numbers of people that could be entering stores, everybody wearing masks, people in different sections of the store so that they're not all on top of each other. There should be some guidance that we can give people to sort of say. This is the safe way to to re engage in in a shopping mall or in a hairdresser, and I think that that's on us. I'm and their statewide guidance in many different states in order to do that and I think it's really important to do. The public wants to know that information. Let me finally. Ask you just maybe for some glimmers of hope here. Is there anything you've seen? When it comes to a possible vaccine or treatment in the last week or so that encourages you. So I think that there's a lot of exciting news in vaccines. There has been in the last two weeks or so the modern are a vaccine. is in phase two trials. They're still talking about face. Three large scale trials starting as early as July similarly the Astra Zeneca I'm no virus. Vaccine is really looking to scale up and Dr. Chee has been very vocal that he's really quite optimistic about the time line here. I want to be cautious and say we're going to have a vaccine by X. Date, but. Do believe that by the fall we'll have three or four of these vaccine options in phase, three large-scale clinical trials I was like to state something with regard to the vaccine trials. The best quickest way to get a vaccine trial is to have a lot of disease out there right so you you vaccinate a whole bunch of people. They all get exposed because there's so much disease out there and and then you know who got prevent it. Who was prevented by the vaccine of not getting disease the problem with summer, and it's a good problem to have is. We're really hopeful. We don't have a lot of disease out there and so. You know probably in the fall we were are likely to see more disease, and that's really where we're going to be able to see the end point of these some of these vaccine trials, but I do think that it's good news that these vaccine trials are are enrolling in large scale or or looking to buy the summer, and that by the fall, and hopefully by the end of the year we should have some efficacy data to be able to roll some of these out. That is Dr Rochelle. WILL HIS Chief of Infectious Diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, Dr Thank you again for joining us. Thanks so much for having me. Well in Russia Vladimir Putin has declared a state of emergency after a giant fuel spill in a remote Arctic region, Putin his angry at the slow response to the accident, which took place a week ago. Environmentalists are comparing it to the nineteen eighty nine Exxon Valdez oil spill off the coast of Alaska. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow. President Putin held an emergency teleconference on Wednesday after news trickled back to Moscow, an environmental catastrophe north of the Arctic Circle. WHO, in this new citizen, institution and delivery or Putin glared. Giant teleconference screen Gina grilled them over there sluggish response after fuel reservoir at a power plant collapsed. Spilled more than twenty thousand tons of diesel. We're going to list it was. Virginia. Putin asked why local authorities only found out about the via social media's declared a state of emergency. Stop Bit. Television show rescue workers had put up special booms on the contaminated river to contain the spill. But as a Friday morning, only one hundred fifty tons of oil products had been recovered. The company responsible for the accident risk nickel is one of Russia's largest metal producers. It plans to clear away contaminated soil and collected toxic mix of water and fuel from the river Alexei conditioning cuff of the World Wildlife Fund. Russia says a big problem is the remoteness of the location eighteen hundred miles from Moscow that has no roads there, so it's twelve difficult. Difficult to bring enough storage capacity to keep this fuel it's it's huge amounts. He says the spill is comparable to the Exxon Valdez disaster thirty years ago in terms of volume, but not environmental impact, since the polluted water is unlikely to make it to the open sea. My understanding the the main victims of this conversation will be fish in river and lake. Of says that most of the diesel fuel isn't cleaned up will simply evaporate greenpeace. Russia is less optimistic, it says the spill poison, the delicate Arctic environment for many years to come with global warming. The Arctic environment is changing rapidly as permafrost, the layer of soil that stays frozen throughout the year is beginning to thaw in the summers. A Real Skinny pickles has thawing frost may in fact have caused a diesel fuel tank to collapse in the first place on national TV, the real nickel vice president, Sergei to Chango, insisted the company did not try to hide the catastrophe where national super super. Repulsive. The local mayor knew about the situation should have informed the governor who answers? From those Thursdays local law enforcement or form at the power plant where the accident took place. He faces up to five years in prison for violating environmental protection rules. Lucian Kim NPR News Moscow. During the great recession, payday loans, quick loans with high interest rates surged, and now with unemployment numbers just over thirteen percent and an unclear economic future. Some experts predict a new uptick for more on this we're joined by Charles, Rios a researcher with the Center for responsible lending. Welcome, thank you Tonya. Thanks to your listeners for having me, so let's start with the two thousand nine financial crisis. We actually saw an uptick in borrowers taking out. payday loans during that time despite the high interest rates of those loans. Now is the country faces record unemployment in an economic uncertainty? Do you anticipate this same pattern to repeat at Sierra? We anticipate payday lenders are going to continue to target distressed borrowers, because that's what they have done best. Since the two thousand nine financial crisis, and before that payday lenders have marketed themselves as a quick financial fix, and it says that in their marketing often when you go to these websites are into a storefront, you'll see signs or advertisements for quick cash money today, words that imply a things around getting money fast right. All the rhetoric mix. It seem like they're safe place, but they're encouraging people to get into these. Debt traps with triple digit interest rates upwards to three hundred or four hundred percent. we won't see of course the hard data until next year embiid, even then it will be on a state by state basis, because there isn't a central place with our federal government that requires all states to report on payday lending. Let's talk about that debt trap for a moment. What happens to to people who typically take out these high interest loans? Do you have data on what happens to those that turned to payday loans during the Great Recession for instance? Yeah, we do so. We know that people who take out. These loans will often be stuck in quicksand of consequences that lead to a debt traps that they have an extremely hard time getting out of if they're able to get out of it, the process of getting a payday loan a for your listeners. That are not familiar with the product is that the money is often lent without any confirmation of any ability to repay that loan? The lender gets access to that borrowers bank account. The lender collects the funds during the next payday, because they have direct access to that bank account putting them first in line to be repaid so inevitably the borrowers end up at their next pay period with their other bills do in the lenders tend to flip the borrower into a new long, and we've seen through research. That typical payday bar were nationally is trapped in ten loans year. Some of those long term, consequences can be really dire thinking about bank penalty fees when your accounts are overdraw damaged credit that stays on your record years. Even worse bankruptcy, there's some research to that. His link use of payday loans to worse health outcomes as well. Some states have actually banned payday lending, arguing that they lead to people as you mentioned incurring this unpayable debt to high interest fees, but for those states without those bands. Are there any protective or regulatory measures in place? Yeah, I'm so. There's been a few that have been put in place, so we know for example one was in Wisconsin where payday lending is. That the state regulator issued a statement cautioning payday lenders. increasing interest rates, fees or costs during this Cova nineteen crisis. In that failure to do so may result in license, suspension or revocation, which is a great thing that the state has done considering the harms of payday lending overall, there's also some states that have such as California that capped their loans at thirty six percent for longer term installment loan, which was a huge win. An we see bipartisan support across the nation for things such as thirty six percent rate cap. You've mentioned. Mentioned the state by State interventions, but are there any federal regulations that we see on the horizon? Yeah, that's a great question There's one that we're keeping our eyes on which is from the consumer financial protection bureau so in two thousand seventeen. They did issue a Brule to look at a person's ability to repay a payday loan, but it seems like based on what is being set forth by the PB. PB does far that that rule may be rescinded, and that will result in folks who take out payday loans, not looking at their ability to repay before they take out that loan inevitably that results in them, being stuck in that debt trap by taking out one loan, having it be repaid by another loan, and so forth I wanna go back to what recourse people have so with banks clamping down on loaning what? What can people actually do? Although a marketers are marketing themselves as a quick financial fix? The reality of the situation is that more often than not people are stuck in a debt trap that has led to bankruptcy that his lead to rebar, wearing his lead to damage credit and to avoid that. If at all possible, that's Charles Rios a researcher for the Center for responsible lending. Thank you so much, thank you. And here now is a production of NPR in Wvu are in association with the BBC World Service I'm Tanya loosely. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now.

George Floyd NPR president facebook US Virginia Tanya Moseley Jeremy Hobson Meghan Markle Richmond Donald Trump twitter Scott horsely New York City Roberto Role Dan Richmond James Works.
February 13, 2019: Hour 1

Here & Now

42:12 min | 1 year ago

February 13, 2019: Hour 1

"Support for here. And now comes from legalzoom for those wanting to start a business or secure their family's future from wills and trusts to LLC's and trademarks legalzoom is committed to helping people. Get started legalzoom dot com slash now. From NPR WB. You are I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Robin young. It's here. And now congress has reached a border deal that House Democratic chair Hakeem Jeffries says they'll likely vote on tomorrow here. He is speaking at a press conference this morning, I me- based on a conversation that we had today that the overwhelming majority of the House Democratic caucus will support of this legislation that will be presented on the house floor tomorrow. President Trump has said he's not thrilled by the compromise. But he sent it. He would sign it though with add-ons. And now there's word that the White House is looking for other sources of funding to build a wall since congress will likely only pay for a fraction of what the president wanted. NPR White House. Correspondent Scott Horsely is here. Hi, scott. Good to be with you. So people can. Probably repeat after me of the president is going to get just one point three seven five billion for new fencing along the border with Mexico. That's short of the five point seven billion. He asked for less even than the deal that he rejected in December. But what might he do to get this extra funding with is this using an executive order declaring a national emergency. What what why did he do the White House talked about a number of ways at the president might try to make up some of that large gap between the border wall that he demanded and the border wall that congress has actually authorizing in this Bill. He's talked about declaring a national emergency which would give him emergency powers to move money around. But short of that, he's also talked about simply repurposing some money. There is some flexibility within the executive branch to to move money around. It's not unlimited. So. It's not probably enough to to make up the three quarter difference in in wall funding that we're talking about here, but it would be a way for him to sort of declare victory without running the risk of the national emergency with some of his own fellow Republicans have discouraged the president from pursuing. We understand from reports that Republicans are kind of trying to appease the president hoping that he will sign this avoid the shutdown, and that's what happened in December and saying things like Lamar Alexander Tennessee, suggesting using eight hundred million dollars in drug interdiction funding to apply that to the wall. But that's gonna pinch a tow somewhere else. That's right. I mean, all that money that's year. Marked for one purpose presumably has a constituency and as soon as someone sees their funds being drained to to bankroll the president's border wall. There will be complaints. Now, if it's Republican allies, the president those complaints might be a little bit more muted. But there were certainly, you know, defense hawks who aren't happy about seeing military funds drawn down. There are people with construction projects lated for their own home districts that are not happy about seeing that money drawn down. So the president can't simply rob Peter to pay Paul here and think no one's gonna complain about it. How does the president's read this needle given that his allies who've been able to sway him before Sean Hannity from Fox News? For instance, call this deal garbage deal and called her and Coulter pretty much called the president a coward saying it was his yellow deal. How does sure do this? Of course, it was an Coulter. And other mean girls of talk radio that persuaded the president to veto the border security agreement back in December and really led the president and his Republican congressional allies into what turned out to be a blind canyon. And they they paid a price for that. So I think even even the professional provocateurs are being a little bit more careful today in daring, the president to veto this because another shutdown really would be damaging to the president and to to his congressional allies. You have Mitch McConnell, for example, who was pretty hands off in December being much more hands on this time and really urging the president to. Take his lumps settle for a quarter of a loaf and move on. I just want to raise the green new deal. This is coming from the Democrats. It's a resolution not a Bill, but Mitch McConnell says he wants to put that to a vote in the Senate Republicans are having a field day with this. They're saying things like well McConnell says I want to see how many Democrats want to end air travel and cow farts. That's a reference to the proposals language on limiting methane emissions from livestock, Republicans are very gleeful about this. They say it's far too progressive ambitious Alexandria or Casio Cortez's office had to apologize for releasing a fact sheet that didn't accord with the main resolution it said things like there should be security for people who were unwilling to work Republicans are seizing on. This have Democrats may be you know, bungled this rollout. What what what's your sense? Absolutely. There have been some some rookie mistakes in the way the rollouts been handled. And in calling for a Senate vote on the green new deal. Mitch McConnell is not trying to signal his own a newfound concern about global warming or other threats to the planet. He is trying to put Senate Democrats in particular, those Senate Democrats who are running for president on the hook to either say, yes, I support this this green new deal and all that goes with it. And then open themselves up to sort of a caricature that President Trump's already painting of of socialists. Hus co-respondent, Scott Horsely. Thank you. You're welcome. Well shock is the feeling in parts of California today after the new democratic governor Gavin Newsom announced in his state of the state address yesterday that he is cancelling. California's planned high-speed train from San Francisco to Los Angeles. This is a plan voters approved in two thousand eight it was championed by the former governor Jerry Brown Newsome says there isn't enough money, and he'll only allow part of the train line to be completed. Joining us now is Scott Shafer senior editor for politics government desk, and host of the podcast political breakdown. He's in San Francisco. Hi, scott. Hey, germany. So here is the governor making that announcement. Let's be real current project as planned would cost too much and respectfully take too long. There's been too little oversight and not enough transparency. Now, Scott, first of all we're you surprised by that. And what kind of reactions are you seeing today wasn't surprised? The governor has been critical of his project for quite some time and has been. Signaling even last year when he was running for governor that he probably wasn't going to be able to support the full Los Angeles to San Francisco project. That's how it was sold to voters Jeremy a decade ago. And so yeah, there's some surprise. But what they're what people are saying. In response is kind of a kind of a political roszak test to be clear Newsom isn't killing it. He's just recognizing reality that there isn't federal money and private investment to make this happen right now so longtime critics like Bakersfield Republican congressman Kevin McCarthy said it's dead. Hallelujah. Essentially, he's been doing his best at choke off federal funding for years. But then you've got high speed rail supporters who are saying, hey, it's really short sighted. And you've got some of the most powerful legislators in Sacramento the assembly speaker whose from Los Angeles the Senate president who's from San Diego saying, hey, wait a minute. What's the point of building this? If we're not going to reach some of the largest cities in California. So the reaction has been mixed. Well, this is the always the thing with building a high-speed rail line is that in order to get it approved and get it to go through parts of the. Where there aren't huge population centers, you have to allow it to stop in those places, and that was going to be part of the plan here. And in fact, the governor said that he would allow the train between Mercer and Bakersfield to to go forward. Why? Well, because those parts of California the central valley have some of the highest rates of unemployment and poverty. So and it's already under under way. I mean, there's some two thousand construction workers that are building the thing right now. And so he doesn't wanna just waste it. And just stop it. And then it would be a train to nowhere. He wants to build that middle portion continue with the environmental investigations and studies for the other parts of it. And basically by himself, some time, the hope is that by building the center portion of it'll it'll help to diversify the economy there, and you know, maybe help connect ultimately people were the cheap housing is in the central valley with jobs elsewhere. And then would he be open to the possibility of eventually finishing the larger project later? Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, I think he would like to see that. Done. But unlike Jerry Brown, he's not going to stake, his reputation on it. He knows that we need more federal money private investment as I said, he also, you know, is promising more transparency and accountability. But you know, some of the big rail advocates are worrying that the speech might send the wrong signal or was misinterpreted. And that includes one state Senator Scott Weiner from San Francisco, he's a big public transit advocate. And here's what he had to say. Some people are inaccurately interpreting the governor's remarks of killing high-speed route to the bay area and lock down to us. It's not what I heard not what I think the governor impact, and I should say that San Francisco is already laying the groundwork for that train to pull into downtown spending a lot of money for that. Jeremy? So if it doesn't automatically get Bill that's going to be a very expensive bus terminal. There are a lot of people that try to go back and forth everyday between the bay area and Los Angeles. I was looking the San Jose Mercury news reports there are more flights between LA and San Francisco than any other. Route in the United States. There's clearly demand is it possible that private industry like an e LAN musk will step in and say, I'm gonna do this myself. Well, possibly, you know, but it's not cheap and it would have to pencil out. And the key is going to be time. I mean, this was sold as I said as a two and a half hour train ride from LA to San Francisco, and it's going to be hard to to make that happen with with private money alone. I think did the governor make any other news in his speech. He did he actually killed and another project of Jerry Brown a twin tunnels under the Sacramento delta that takes water down south. He says he's for one tunnel. Not to talk a lot about housing this housing and homelessness healthcare wants to create a California mandate to shore up the Affordable Care Act, and then he named Maria Shriver to head up a Alzheimer's task force. So just some of the things he talked about would you say then that based on that that he he's looking like he's going to be more moderate than Jerry Brown. On some things, but in other things, no he's really embracing a big agenda that includes parental leave more childcare free community college education. So I think he's really embracing some of these more liberal positions. But at the same time, he's going to be fiscally prudent and not tied to the agenda of Jerry Brown who he never really got along with that. Well, interesting Scott, Shafer, senior editor for politics and government desk, and host of the weekly podcast political breakdown. Thanks so much. You bet. Final voting for the Academy Awards began this week. How will detainment fair our look at this nominated short film may not be for young ears. Although it stars children, in fact, because of that thousands of people in Britain, feel it shouldn't be considered at all. And over a quarter of a million signed a petition saying as much detainment tells the horrifying story of two ten year olds James and Robert who are shown on security cameras abducting two year old James Bolger from shopping center and mercy side England in nineteen Ninety-three leading him to a nearby railway line pass, dozens of adult then torturing and killing him the film uses young actors to recreate the boys police interrogation. Change by the hand. And that amount of destroying shows. We we note we robot is saying that you took him by the hand not relevant. You did it. Why would rub it say that about? Well, the victim's mother Denise Fergus has asked director Vincent Lam and the academy of Motion Picture Arts and sciences to remove the film from Oscar consideration and both have declined joining us from London BBC arts and entertainment reporter, Ian Young's. Ian, welcome. Thank you. And just remind us here in the states. This was a crime that horrified Britain in nineteen Ninety-three. It wasn't absolutely shocking crime that was one of the most horrific and notorious cases of the last century in this country. The fact that the victim was so young. But also the fact that the perpetrators were so young with things that really shocked the nation out, and they serve the two ten year olds serve time and catch us up on this because we cover this in about two thousand one they were released they were given new identities by well, yes, they serve time in secure facilities. But because of their age at the time, the they committed the murder they were. Were then released and given you identities because the crime was so notorious that it was felt that they would not be able to be rehabilitated if they kept their original names and to understand one of them had been rearrested. I mean, how are how do we know at all how they are doing officially we don't know very much. No will you know, one of them was rearrested as you say on child pornography charges. But there is a ban on identifying them in public on revealing their new identities because they still have this anonymity, which means that they can try and rehabilitate themselves in some way, but apart from that arrest, we know as a you know, what they're doing now. And this I'm sure as part of the controversy would be in this country because there's a debate over child murderers child of fenders people who have perpetrated crimes against children sex offenders how much people get to know about them once they're released and maybe in the very neighborhood. Good. So there's that. But we also understand there's a question of the way that the director did this film that he went straight with the tapes and pretty much a factual. Here's what happened. Yes. This film detainment is half hour foam. Most of it is recreating the police interviews with these two boys, which were the types. From those interviews played in court join the trials, and so the in the public domain, and so he that the director has to child actors who were eleven at the time playing the boys. He also does recreates a few scenes outside that, but he decided he wanted to try and keep it as a factual as possible as sticking to the original transcripts, so that he couldn't be seen to be putting any particular spin on the story or any kind of opinion. But that also means that you don't see really they lives outside that police interview room very much. Don't see all that much of how they came to to get there. And why they did this thing. Well, and that is because nobody else was involved me. And that's what the mother of James Bolger has said she wasn't consulted. I mean. Yeah. So he could attract down her could have tracked down the families of the boys shaped some understanding of what happened. Yes. Well, he Vincent Lam. The director said he'd deliberately didn't consult James bulges mother because he wanted it to be a factual as possible than he thought that he had all the facts that he needed from the original tapes. And he said if he hits consulted her they would have been pressured to tell it the way one side would want it to be told. And then you'll suppressing information and telling version of the truth that is one of the main complaints that she has had that she wasn't consulted. And she says she would have been willing to talk to him, although she wouldn't have been willing to allow him to make the film in the way that he has them. A recreation says something where she's she and others have had to see what happened is a popular there. I mean, do people go to watch the movie it has been screened film festivals? And things like that. But it's not on general release. But it has caused huge outcry hair. Most of those people waiting to see in the films Bill and his, but I think even just watching the trailer online, you get a good sense of film. And it's it's a very powerful very very harrowing production many films have been made recreating notorious murders. This one though is casting eleven year old and the director said he was very careful with them one is extraordinarily weeping throughout. So there are questions about what will happen to them having recreate this. But this the academy motion picture sciences has expressed deep sympathy for all involved. But said that it can't get involved because it doesn't want to influence voters. It doesn't look like they're going to acquiesce to this petition demand. We'll people there say I mean, how heated is this is Percy Jones bulges mother has paid on chat shows in his country complaining about this film, and how the directors handled it and she's got. Huge sympathy. Understandably given everything that she's going through a now having this to see child portraying her son on film, and that moment that he was snatched. I mean, you you just can't imagine what it's like to have that dredged up again. It'll be very interesting to see whether this controversy how much of it percolates through to the Oscars voters. I know it's been reported in the Hollywood press, but whether those considerations overcome the filmmaking considerations because it is a well made film, and that's why it's on the Oscar nominations list. I think if it wins the Oscar then the outcry will just intensify. And the outcry is over the Oscar nominated short film detainment we've been taking a look at it with BBC arts and entertainment reporter, Ian Young's. Ian, thank you so much. We'll see how this unfold you well to another somber story involving kids here in the US and active shooter drills. They've increased in the years since the Marjory stoneman Douglas high school massacre in parkland, Florida, w UNC's Audubon moody found out that's affecting students. I'm sitting in Therese GARRETT'S home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She's invited her sons friends in their parents for a plea. The kids are in kindergarten and preschool, I'm talking to Matic's we had a lockdown practice. What does that mean? Hi room and be quiet during the lockdowns. They called the threat the lockdown, man. Yeah. I asked Garretson Kayla and Matic's if they're afraid of him. Anything? Not afraid anything there, but the drills affect their friend as read differently. It's just a tiny bit. As teachers said he got really scared and anxious and started crying during the lockdown drill. But when his mom tried to talk to him about it later. He wasn't able to put his feelings into words. Therese Garrett calebs mom is also the medical director at Carolina outreach a mental health services clinic. She specializes in child psychiatry and works with children who have undergone serious trauma. She says she's not to worried about her kids dealing with the drills, but for kids with underlying Zaidi disorders or significant prior exposure to trauma, it can be a very different thing. She says schools have to pay attention to kids who are more likely to be triggered by unexpected stress, especially with unannounced drills. You know, a kid that has active PTSD or ongoing exposure to community violence or family violence or a kid with autism or other special needs should really be finding out about these things head of time there, it says that little research has been done about whether these lockdown psychologically affect students because the drills. Themselves differ from school to school? This makes them very difficult to study and to even conclude whether they're effective in saving lives, but statistically Moscow shootings are pretty rare. According to the centers for disease control and prevention, the odds of a multiple victim homicide happening in a school for the two thousand seventeen two thousand eighteen school year was one in ten million but many schools hold lockdowns. Anyway, even if the threat isn't a shooter to Greeley response, the response to school suiting. I'm now gets to be used for other things. Right. Exactly linski teaches at the university of Toronto Mississauga with the focus on school safety and risk management in his research. He's found many schools go into lockdown to avoid lawsuits for not preparing for disasters. Robbery in the neighborhood or another school has a gun, and you have like things like holding secure and your partial lockdown. He says administrators and teachers are tied to confront the shooter with similar lawsuit concerns in mind and some students like Dalia Marquez a junior from east Chapel Hill high school in North Carolina. Says lockdown drills have become so common that kids. No longer seemed to take them seriously people like giggling or they're like on their phones, and you can hillock whispers and stuff. But I remember after the parkland shootings in the protests that everybody was like completely silent. She says after parkland students feared their school could be next Esther Ramani a senior at nearby carbo. High school says in the aftermath she initially felt triggered by the drills. Even today if she starts to think about it. She can feel like nothing in life matters. Because like somebody could come in and kill all of us at once easily Zachary Levinsky says schools will continue to do lockdown drills because it makes people feel safe it gives schools proactive. To combat it threat largely out of their control for here. Now, I'm other d bundle. Moody after de story is from guns and America of public media. Reporting project on the rule of guns in American life. This message comes from here. And now sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. With indeed posted job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsored jobs. New users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR, podcast, terms, conditions, and quality standards apply. Here's a disturbing statistic. We've talked here about nervousness over Car Loans, which have been surging with record car sales. But subprime auto loans to people with poor credit surged as well, a now Car Loans have a new record of their own seven million Americans are now three months behind on their car payments. That's the highest number ever. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Heather long reported on this for the Washington Post high other high so from your writing it seems like a perfect storm because these are in general working class people who need their car to get to work some may be young with student loans as well is this like the housing crisis where maybe they were preyed upon with higher loan rates. Or were they living beyond their means. What happened here? I think you're right. It's it has a lot of echoes. So that housing crisis in the early two thousands. What we're seeing is these car dealerships and car loan operation. They make money they make fees off giving people alone. And so they're incentivized to just bring more people in and get them in these loans, and what we're seeing is the length of the car contract is going out. So instead of being for usually a Car Loans like four or five years, instead, we're seeing six seven and even eight year contracts as they try to force people into thinking, hey, you can afford this. When really they end up paying so much more than the actual value of the car, and you spoke to some analysts on this who noted that the loan failures are at a little over six percent from car loan companies, but only about one percent from credit unions or banks are ninety days late. So there's a lesson there there is generally speaking, the banks and the credit unions tend to offer those lower rate loans. So what more can we learn from this? Why are Car Loans so important to figuring out the economy, well because in the financial crisis that we've all lived through ten years ago, the debt that people always wanted to pay was their car loan, and because you can lose your house, but still live in your car without that car? It's so much harder to get to work or the doctor or anywhere else that you need to go in many parts of America. And as you say people living in their cars. So this is a double whammy for. I'm presuming a lot of these people who are defaulting because they're not going to just lose a car. They're gonna lose a home, which should people take from this. What else should they know? Well, I I would say the one difference between what we're seeing in the auto loan market. And what we saw on the home mortgage market is an leading up to that big financial crisis. Yes, there are a lot of parallels between what's going on in the auto loan market. It's a big red flag for the economy but the auto loan market. It it's unlikely to tank the entire financial system in the way that the mortgage market did because the mortgage markets close to attend trillion dollar market. There's a lot more securitization of mortgages the auto loan market is about a one trillion dollar market in there's far less securitization those loans. But is there anything that? These people can do who are in this pickle right now. It's once you're three months behind. It's gonna be hard to avoid having your car repossessed. I was flooded with emails after this article came out yesterday of people in this very situation. They said to me, I I didn't want to go to that. I knew it was shady car lot. I didn't wanna go there. But I already had bad credit, and I didn't have any other choice hetero on of the Washington Post. Thank you so much. Thank you. A member of the public radio family is in a desperate search for a match. So she can get a bone marrow transplant twenty nine year old journalist lineup. Anwar is in the hospital in southern California. With leukemia line is a podcast producer at the L A time she used to work for story core. And with me at marketplace lineup is of Indian descent in her ethnic background is proving to be a challenge when it comes to finding a transplant match, according to be the match dot org. An African American has a twenty three percent likelihood of finding a match a white person. Seventy seven percent, that's because some ethnic groups have more complex tissue types than others. Joining us now is line is brother a boss who is thirty three. He unfortunately is not a match. Neither are her parents about thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me, and I'm just so sorry personally to hear that line is is going through this has been undergoing chemo. How is she doing right now? Right now line is doing remarkably. Well, she she's had you know, a couple rounds of chemo. And now is just a waiting some further testing to see what the next step is. But in terms of her spirits, and how she's acting everything is pretty pretty much normal. You know on the outside. So it's very encouraging and hopeful to see her like that right now. And what does she have exactly talked about her diagnosis? Yes. So she has an aggressive form of leukemia called acute myeloid leukemia, which is often just abbreviated as AM L. And you know, this is a pretty aggressive form of leukemia that needs very urgent therapy. And so that's kind of what we've been dealing with over the course of the last six or so weeks, and what she needs here. What the doctor say that she needs is a bone marrow transplant, right? Yeah. So line a-, you know, in terms of acute mile only Keaton lukaemia a lot of it. Kind of depends on the very specific genetic mutation abnormalities that are involved in with her abnormalities that they found on their testing. It looks like yes stem cell transplant is is our best hope of cure in the long run and in order to do that. And have it be affective. You have to be very specific about where you get the transplant from. And in line is case a South Asian person is going to be the best bet. Right. Right. Yeah. So there are specific markers. They look at in the cells, and there has to be, you know, ideally, perfect match, and they they look at about ten different markers initially, and there's further testing after that. But those ten initial markers. You know? There hasn't been a perfect match. And so, you know, we're we're out there kind of. Kind of looking to get more people on the registry. But yes, South Asian is definitely the best chance in terms of match, you know, at necessity plays a large role, but that's not to say that other ethnicities don't, you know, people people match from other ethnicities, it's happened many times before so, you know, I I also don't want to discourage other ethnicities from you know, joining the registry, but the nonprofit be the match says of the nineteen million people in the registry less than three percent are of South Asian descent. Why do you think that is, you know, I think you know, it's hard to know exactly why that is. I think you know, sometimes these communities don't get as much outreach. And you know, they're they're minorities in America itself. So their representation on the registry is obviously going to be a little bit lower. But regardless I think the ultimate goal is to diversify the registry and just get more people on the registry. Because right now, the chances of any South, Asian or. Any person of color finding a match or a lot lower. And then you know, a Caucasian person on on the registry. So what you and your family did in order to try to find a match is to go onto social media and encourage people of South Asian background to sign up for the registry to see if they might be a compatible donor for line a-, and you really got a lot of attention people like the actress Mindy Cailing, the comedian Hasan Manashe tweeted out support and tried to to get more people to sign up. Yeah. Yeah. You know, we we were kind of overwhelmed and shocked by all the love and support that we received. Yeah. We just kind of went out there. And you know, we decided, you know, let's just put this message out there on our on our social media, and, you know, lineup being the charismatic and outgoing and friendly person that she is she she has a lot of friends in a lot of friends were very open to putting the message out there on their social media accounts. And kind of one thing. Led to another, and you know, how viral things go these these. This message got out to. Yeah. Some of these south Asians celebrities who realize that this is such an important thing to deal with in our in our community. So they were kind enough to help us spread the word. So over, you know, forever grateful for not only the celebrities, but also all of all of Linus, friends and family and people that she doesn't even know who who have kind of been supporting her how difficult is it to sign up to be in the registry. Are there restrictions there? There are first of all I it is very easy to sign up to be on the registered the only real restrictions. Are they prefer people between the ages of eighteen and forty four but aside from that as long as you're relatively healthy you can sign up to be on the registry. And it's very easy. Sign up process. I it's just registration online that takes probably less than five minutes. And then once you sign up, you get sent a cheek swab in the mail, and that that swab, you know. Takes literally like twenty seconds to do. You pop. It back in the mail and the pre marked envelope and within a few weeks year you're on the registry. So getting on the registry is is very very easy. Are you hearing any fear from people out there who want to help and they want to register? But they're they're actually worried about the process if they are the match to have their bone marrow extracted in order to help lineup right? The there is a lot of fear. And you know, honestly, there's some misconceptions about the the whole process becoming a match and actually becoming a donor. You know, the chances are pretty low. But if that happens, I it's really an opportunity for you to to save a life. Now, the process of donation, I think has is where the misconceptions come in. You know, there are what what line unease in what people with these conditions. Need is is called a stem cell transplant, and there's two ways of extracting stem cells. There's kind of the older technique where it which is called the bone marrow donation where they take a piece of your bone marrow from your pelvis, and then they. Use that to extract the stem cells, and that requires general anesthesia, and and it can and can have some associated pain with it for a couple of days. There's another way and a newer way to extract stem cells, and that's through peripheral blood donation. And so this process involves, you know, taking a medication for a few days to stimulate your stem cells. And then you come to the hospital, and you sensually it's like a blood draw for you know, three or four hours where they draw your blood, they extract the stem cells, and then they put the blood back into your other arm, and that process is very much easier. And it is not is not painful, and it is a lot quicker, and that that is actually the process that our doctor would like to use for Linux. So in terms of you know, being scary. It really isn't a scary process. It's a it's, you know, relatively painless. And in the process, you could be saving a life. It's amazing. When you go through something like, this you. It's like going to med school. You become an expert on on how it's all done. Totally. Yeah. It's a lot of research. How does line of feel about all of this all the outpouring of support and just the situation in general? Yeah. No line is line is overwhelmed by all the love and support. You know, there was a certain time where she was having trouble. Even looking at social media because she was kidding. So overwhelmed by everything that people were posting. So she is super thankful for everyone trying to help her in terms of just the situation at south, obviously, it's a tough situation. But she she's one of these people that just hasn't complained at all throughout the whole process. She's been in the hospital for now six weeks, and we haven't heard an ounce of complaints from her and she's staying very very positive. And I think just everyone's support has also kind of helping her maintain that positively. Well, I hope that somebody listening today is a match and is able to sign up on the registry. Will of course linked people to to that at here. Now. Dot org. And I hope that line a- gets what she needs because she is just a wonderful person. And she's got obviously a very carrying a brother as well. A boss Anwar. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having. You say Valentine's we say chocolate and with a day to go. Someone's got it through the hard work of finding the best here. No resident Cathy chef Kathy chef Kathy guns once chocolate rat now. Right now, the CBD one over right? That's to come. She's been on the hunt. She sent a few of her fines and joins us from San Francisco. Cathy. I am a Hershey. Kisses girl myself, there's always a Cup on my desk. This is not that this is so not that Robin. I have been tasting lots and lots of chocolate, and it's jobs go, it ain't bad. I wanna take you guys through a few basics. And then we'll start tasting the chocolate Kathy is tasting chocolate like tasting wine like you smell it. I and you do in. So I got a little help from a friend named granny. Yo a former chemist and pastry chef turn chocolate educator. She wrote something called the chocolate tasting kit. So here's there is a better way to taste chocolate. And I never understood this. But before we start. Yeah. So robin. This is not the milk. Chocolate. Candy, you grew up with which is essentially sugar is sophisticated craft chocolate. It is a lot. Like the specialty coffee and craft brewers were ten years ago. This is what's often called a bean to bar these chocolate bars are all about the nuance. And flavor of what happens when cacao beans, which are found on trees grown about twenty degrees above or below the equator, and these cacao pods have seeds inside them that are for mentored dried, and then roasted into what we know as chocolate and then chocolate makers add sugar. Spices nuts fruits. But. Okay, here we go ready. All right. So here's what I'm going to ask you to take out number one, which is an integrator from Epping New Hampshire. This is a chocolate bar from Honduras from Llamas Skikda, and it is seventy five percent dark chocolate. So what does that mean? The percentage you see on the label tells you how much Powell mass. So of it seventy five percent. It's seventy five percent cacao mass or cacao liquor and then twenty. Eighty five percent. Is that right? If my mouth, right? Yeah. Interesting look on his face. There's a little bit. Yeah. It's dark, but there's something a little bit different about it. Yeah. Okay. Look at the color. I and so one of the things you do is pale Brown or dark Brown, and then smell it. Really? Just I'm doing it as well. Is it earthy? Does it take? Does it smell whiny or floral or even herbal? And then when you're ready to taste, it let it just melt in your mouth take a small piece and let it slowly melts and observe the flavors there, again, we're not gonna get pretentious. Here. Are we Jeremy? Let's go to number two, Kathy. Because we've got gotta get through six. Okay. So that was an chocolate number two is from dictator. This is made in San Francisco. No actually in Humboldt county and miss chocolate bar has black figs in it. So we're gonna know we're going to take it across. I we're gonna listen to the snap. Ooh. Right. You get a nice snap. This is made with cacao and cane sugar seventy two percent, and it's got black California mission figs and what I really like about. This is how chewy the figs add to this sort of Zilkha milky. Dr CHA is also a saltiness to it which I love with chocolate. I know you do and speaking of salt number three is the good chocolate company. And this is their Himalayan salt. This is sixty five percent dark chocolate made in San Francisco. I included this because it has no sugar in it. What no sugar it done legal, right? Okay. Don't panic too much has stevia which is ner and sugar. Substitute extr. Acted from the leaves of the plant stevia, but see tastes this slowly. Jeremy you're gonna love the south, Robin. Tell me if you miss the sugar you start to taste the chocolate. You know, it's interesting. This is the one that tastes the most like milk chocolate. And it doesn't have a cigar. We'll you're really tasting the chocolate there. They also do a mint flavor that I really like we'll have all of these here now dot org. But all right. You guys. So I'm on the west coast. So we gotta be groovy here. Number four is the CBD chocolate coin. This is a small coin shaped in a like a coin gold foil. It's sixty one percent cacao. But what is interesting is that there is twenty five milligrams of hemp extract, so relaxed my body only. You sound different. Have bottles of this stuff from a natural food store at home because it's supposed to help with asleep and everything exactly nothing. So now, I'm going to pour it into my chocolate and drop it into your coffee. Although that'll keep you this. This contains a very small amount of CBD. It will not get you high. But you will have a reaction in your body. That's very subtle know hemp edibles are huge here. Jerry amount imported on Kathy Kathy lightning round here on five and six because we're running out of time. So number five number five. Interestingly is from Hawaii. It's an American grown cook cow the rich vertical soil Hawaii, and this has cocoa nibs. This is by the Wia layer estate against snap. It this is a single origin chocolate from Oahu in Hawaii. And I love the texture of this. The sixth one is ho chocolate Brooklyn, salted Rosemary. I love anything that you know, when you put her thanksgiving wonderful. Your Turkey met your. It'd be great. This is their salted Rosemary. They have super sexy. Labels. Really fun shock. We'll have it all and here. Now dot org are here. Now resident chef Kathy guns. Thanks has always been happy Valentine's Day, happy Valentine's Day. Hope you guys feel relaxed here now.

San Francisco president Jeremy Hobson California Senator Scott Weiner Mitch McConnell Democrats President Trump America Los Angeles Senate director Scott Horsely Robin young Ian Young United States James Bolger
Weekly Roundup: Thursday, October 4

NPR Politics Podcast

36:55 min | 2 years ago

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, October 4

"This message comes from NPR sponsor, national cooperative Bank. Choose a Bank that shares your values, national cooperative Bank offers online checking and savings accounts that positively impacts communities more at NC dot coop, slash banking member FDIC. Hi, this is Rachel, and this is Stephen were sitting in central park enjoying the last days of t. shirt weather. It's been really nice amid a pretty difficult week. There's a big mud puddle over here that some people's dogs are bound to jump in. This podcast was recorded at two nineteen PM on. October, fourth things may have changed. So keep up to date at NPR dot org. And on your local NPR station. Hey, there. It's the NPR politics podcast here with our weekly roundup of the biggest political stories. The f. b. i. has concluded its report on allegations of sexual misconduct by supreme court. Nominee, Brad, Kavanagh, and NAFTA is out the door, President Trump unveiled a new trade deal with Mexico and Canada. Not unlike the old trade deal. I'm tamra, Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Kelsey Snell and a cover congress Lucas. I cover the Justice department and I must Mukalla political reporter. All right. We are here. It is the afternoon. This morning. Senators started going to look at the f. b. i. background investigation into Brett Cavanaugh the expanded reopened background investigation the FBI concluded the report last night Ryan. Do we have any idea what was in it in any sort of specific form? No, it's more like we're. Looking at the shadow of the tree than at the tree itself. We can try to kind of figure out the contours of what's in here based on what we know on the margins, which is how many people were talked to and some of the people who were talked to. So at this point, we know from from the White House that they say the f. b. I spoke to nine people as part of this background supplemental investigation, I have confirmed six individuals who they have spoken with. The focus appears to be on the allegations made by Christine Blasi Ford about sexual misconduct that she alleges the FBI interviewed a friend of Ford's by the name of le- Leland Kaiser as well as four friends of Brett Cavanaugh. One of whom is Mark judge name. That's come up quite a bit in our discussions about this case. The sixth person who I've confirmed as a woman by the name of Deborah Ramirez, which is another name that has come up. She's the second woman who came forward with allegations of sexual misconduct from the from the time they were classmates at Yale. She says that basically cavenaugh exposed himself at a party back in the. Early to mid eighties beyond that, we don't know. But this has led to a lot of frustration on the part of Democrats who feel that the scope of this was so narrow and was so confined that it didn't really give kind of a fair shake to the allegations that the women who came forward made. And we've definitely heard from lawyers for both Ramirez and blahsy Ford saying, hey, we gave you a whole list of people who you could've talked to and you didn't like the FBI didn't didn't go out searching necessarily for like a wide group of people who could potentially corroborate any of this, right? And in the case of Ramirez, her lawyers say that she gave more than twenty names of people who could possibly corroborate the events saying that they are witnessed it at the time or heard about a contemporaneous -ly. Her lawyers say that none of those people were actually contacted. But again, this is not up to the FBI to determine the scope of this investigation. It's very important to say again that this is the White House that dictates this. The White House has said it. You've talked about this a lot. The president said, I'd be happy for the FBI to talk to anybody that they want to, but it feels like the scarecrow who is like, what direction do I go? And they like twelve arms point in different directions. Not me not me not me. There's been a lot of confusion about what the scope of this says. A lot of kind of mixed signals, conflicting tales. But the bottom line is the president can decide the scope of this investigation. He has said he was basing his guidance to the f. i. off of what Senate Republicans wanted. And I should say that Senate Democrats as part of their house because they have been asking all along for the totality of this report to be released. But they're also now saying that they want that directive that was written to the FBI for from the White House with the guidance of Senate Republicans to also be released. So Kelsey, the ball or the report, whatever it is, it's now in the Senate it in a secure room in the basement of the capitol. Yeah, it's it's one floor below the the basement actually. So. A sub and it is it's secure room that only senators have access to and and some select staff, and they've been rotating in throughout the the days. It's we're now in the mid afternoon, and there are still Republican senators in their reading through there is one copy in the room and as they've been coming out, we've been asking senators, kind of describe what the report is because they can't tell us what's in it on the things that we do know is that it's about forty five pages long. There's the one copy and each person's interview is its own separate section, and we're hearing that they see they're a little confused about exactly how many people were interviewed here. It looks like there are nine to ten people who were contacted and who have some sort of transcribed version of their contact in this report. Kelsey. I mean, we've been waiting to hear the reaction from a couple of key senators in particular. Have you heard anything from some of those key senators who likely could swing this vote? About what they've seen in the report so far? Yes. Several of them who they say that they are not done reviewing the totality of the documents. But Susan Collins was one of those people who she's a Republican from Maine. She was in there. She read part of it left to go have lunch, and we were told she was coming back. Collins said that it appears to be a very thorough investigation. She didn't have any comments about how she was going to vote, but she seemed to think that it was quite thorough Jeff flake. Also, he's the one who actually insisted on having this investigation. He's a Republican from Arizona who is retiring, and he also found it said he found it reassuring. So there is this sense from many of these Republicans going into the room to review this that the FBI investigation is making it a little easier for them to say us, Kelsey, have you heard from Senator Joe Manchin in West Virginia yet, or Lisa Murkowski of Alaska or Kelsey did go in and she looked at it, but we don't know what what her takeaway was. She is also somebody who left him said she was going to come back. We have not heard for mansion though. I. Expect that he may not make up his mind right away. There's not a huge incentive for some of these undecided Democrats to make a decision in until it's clear how Republicans are going to vote. No, it's kind of funny that Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota completely defied that expectation just a few minutes ago when she announced that she is going to be voting. No. Now she is in a very tight race and depending on who you ask and who's inside polls, you look at. She is down right now and it may just be that she decided that she needs to vote her conscience. And can you know that this is just something that she feels she can't vote for or she may be making a calculation that she's a democrat, you know, she's a democrat. She needs to vote with Democrats to turn out Democrats at the polls guilty. I'm curious whether there's any sense of kind of buyer's remorse among Democrats that they pushed so hard to get this FBI investigation. When if you kind of look at it from the outside, this is this is really backfired. They'd push push push. And if this comes off being well, nothing corroborated the allegations of the women who came forward. We can now vote with our conscience and everything's just fine whether there's a sense that they got perhaps outmaneuvered politically here when it's they should have known that it's the White House that can ultimately control the scope of an investigation like this. That's something that Tam you. And I were just talking about right is did they feel like they were already losing the battles and the Cavanaugh was eventually going to be confirmed. And now this gives them a kind of sense of anger or thing to motivate voters of in saying that Republicans were unfair and they forced this through and they, they can now say that you know that Republicans stack the deck for cavenaugh or is this actually ultimately going to be a blow for them that creates all this kind of new momentum and energy around the Republican side. It's so hard to tell right now because I mean, honestly, we just haven't even voted yet. We won't know and the votes supposed to happen. Sometime the first vote, the procedural vote will happen sometime on Friday, which setup likely final passage on Saturday. So until we see how that happens until we see whether or not people remain as engaged and excited on the Republican side, I just don't I, it's too hard to tell right now. I mean, it's it's kind of like there's been a week that has passed and what is different now than before, not not much. It doesn't seem in terms of the political calculation except that the f. b. i. report seems to have given Republicans, some cover to say that they engaged in the full extent of the opportunities to investigate these claims and that they are satisfied that the claims don't have merit. But one of the things I wanted to ask you Ryan because people are saying this as they're coming out is they want this report to be made public and they want they want the that this would clear things up that voters would have a better understanding. Hussein Democrats, Democrats are of some Republicans beforehand. You're saying. So though they seem to backing away from that, so Ryan, can you kind of help us understand how how that all works? Why it can't be made public? Why it's one document. In a room secure room with these. These are files that contain buckets and buckets and buckets of highly personal information. There was a recent case of a woman who's running for congress who used to be in the CIA and and basically her background clearance form was leaked somehow got out and you have medical history. You have emotional history like there is just reams of personal data in there that is not supposed to be for public consumption. It's just supposed to be able to to allow authorities to kind of gauge your, you know how firm of a candidate, how solid of a of a candidate you are for a for a particular job. We've been talking about the mechanics here of all of this, but on the political side of things Osma we have some new polling, a new NPR PBS NewsHour Marras poll, and that that shows how this is playing with the public. Can you. Walk through some of the, the really standout numbers there should. I think the big takeaway was that we saw a change in overall enthusiasm. And so basically you've seen the democratic advantage for enthusiasm, more or less evaporate according to our latest poll. Just to give you kind of an exacts since of the numbers in July, there was a ten point gap between the number of Democrats and Republicans saying that the November elections were quote, very important. That gap is now down to two points which when you look at polling that's within the margin of error, right. I mean, that just means that essentially, there's no difference. I think that that sort of when you also look at the exact figures of who is hitting things are very important. You've also seen a big shift. So like when you you look at men, you've seen an uptick in men's saying that it's more important. You've also seen an uptick in in women as well. But I think we are seeing some questions of whether or not this entire saga. In debate is really galvanizing sort of the the grievance politics of Republican men that the Donald Trump very successfully captured during the two thousand sixteen election. And I've been doing some reporting on that. I know you have as well. You've been out talking to folks. I've been spending a lot of quality time listening to conservative talk radio, the blood drenched jihad against this innocent man, this good and decent man. Well, finding now that the if you are a white male, it's okay to be against white guys. You're out, you're, it's done. It's over. I think it's hatred of men. And I said this and there is a reason why this week President Trump made a turn where he went from previously saying, she's very credible, Christine, Blasi Ford. She's credible to sort of criticizing her and almo- almost you could say mocking her at this rally earlier this week, and he also has. He's always sort of had a focus on what does this mean for Brett Cavanaugh? What does this mean for men, but more so this week where he says, this is a very. Scary time to be a young man in America where he at at have rally started telling this imaginary story about a son who did everything right, and went to college and got his dream job, and then was wrongfully accused and goes to tell his mom, mom, a person would never met said that I did things that will horrible. And they're firing me from my mom. I don't know what to do. Mom. What do I do? What do I do? Mom. What do I do. It's a damn sad situation. Okay. This gets to a. An idea that certainly is is a strong undercurrent in particular among white Republican men that that they're in peril that this is that they are victims too. But I think also what we've begin to here is his sort of this galvanizing around the traditional Republican party. So I was I did a lot of reporting over the summer with Republican base voters. And some of these people had told me they were really lukewarm Trump supporters. They will you call kind of casick Republicans and I was basic exactly John Republican who is kind of always at odds with President Trump is point. And so I was calling some of these people back and I connected with one guy in the suburbs of Georgia specifically who had made this comment to me and I asked him to wear you at what are you thinking now? And he feels like this entire thing more or less. I mean, I'm summarizing yours is kind of a sham. He feels like it's a distraction and that that bright cavenaugh is extremely well qualified. And I think we've begun to see. See a lot of sort of this coalescing of the Republican party behind President Trump because of this Brett cabinet fight. I mean, I think the other clear example to me is Ed enough. You'll remember Eric, Erikson, who is this conservative blogger talk radio host. He joined the two thousand sixteen election was one of these like famously never Trumpers right? He uninvited Donald Trump from attending his very famous red state gathering. He has been probably one of the most vociferous critics on Twitter defending break Cavanaugh, and I've just been so amazed to see this defense given where he was himself on President Trump just a couple of years ago. Reuniting the right. Do you feel like that's something that can last though? Is that I mean, we've seen so many situations where Republicans have been situationally in support of this president, and then he goes and does something and they are. They are reminded why they found him distasteful in the first place I didn't. I think that's a very good question. I think the only example we can have though, is that when you talk to people about. Out why they may have been lukewarm about President Trump and why they ultimately voted for him in two thousand sixteen. The most consistent explanation I've been given is the supreme court. And so I think if that's our one guiding lesson from two thousand sixteen, it may indicate that that's the one thing that holds true now as well. The way to sort of reunite the Republican base is the supreme court, and perhaps that's what we're seeing. Now, Chelsea, that's a the question that you asked a question that can also be directed at Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins. Yeah. I talked to activists at the very beginning of the cavenaugh confirmation process, and they told me that they thought that this was going to be the very last time. Democrats failed to realize the importance of the courts, and they thought that there would be a lasting impact. Cavanaugh gets confirmed because it will change the way democrat view, both the courts and the relationship between congress, the White House and the it's that it's basically not just about congress. Passing bills that they'd like or president signing executive orders, but that the last line of defense is the court. I just I will be fascinated to see how that shakes out. I think you'd be hard to say right now that are taking the course for granted because they are literally marching in the streets right now, at least some of them. If I walk out the door where I'm sitting right now inside the capitol and look out the window, I can see hundreds of them standing outside right now marching. Yeah. And there are. My view on the Senate side looks out on the supreme court, and I can see all the protesters across the lawn of the capitol and they've been there all day. All right. We are going to put a pin in this for now, but we will no doubt be back to it, Ryan and Kelsey, we're gonna let you go. Thank you. And when we come back President Trump's new deal with Canada and Mexico and can't let it go. Support for this program comes from SimpliSafe home security SimpliSafe itself installed wireless protection for your home. The company was founded by an electrical engineer whose friends were burglarized. They wanted home security, but most systems were too complicated and too expensive. So he built simply safe. Now they protect over two million people and with SimpliSafe there are no annual contracts learn more about simply safe today at SimpliSafe dot com. Slash NPR politics support for NPR. Politics also comes from rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans, introducing their own new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender to get started, go to rocket mortgage dot com. Slash NPR politics rate shield approval, only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions, additional conditions or. Exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans, data and comparisons of public data records equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states in m. l. s. consumeraccess dot org. Number thirty thirty. On the latest planet money, especially report inside the business of the silent. We go inside and underground network of professional story writers coaches and scammers gaming the asylum system and how the FBI frackdown that's on the latest planet money. And we're back, and now we've got Scott Horsely and Dominica Montinaro with us, hey guys, hey, jam. And Scott, we have brought you in because, well, we're talking about trade and who you are. The only man on our team who gets so excited about trade still unknown day President Trump made a big announcement. NAFTA is no more. And now we have pending congressional approval. The US Mexico, Canada agreement US MCA. That'll be the name. I guess that ninety nine percent of the time. We'll be hearing US MCA. One thing. Donald Trump was very clear on it was not to be called NAFTA. He wanted to have a new name. And as you heard the president thinks it's got a nice ring to it. I talked to a trade expert at the pro-trade Peterson institute for international economics, Chad bound. He was not so sure. No, it's sort of has too many letters to be nice and simple, and yet not enough vowels to make it into a word that is, that is a man who is an expert on trade and who is an expert on brand. Let me let me quote Eminem when he says that it all depends on how it's pronounced. I mean us macaca certainly could be a word that you pronounce the acronym US m. Mm. Wow. I. Options? Yeah, I, I don't know. Maybe maybe this will catch on. I I kind of like who's mecca. That's the way our one of our managing editors was saying it, but even the president's own White House team, Larry cudlow the head of the National Economic Council was struggling a little bit. As he discussed the new agreement has week USA had to get this rat USA, MC right, close, but no cigar. We'll work on it. It's got minus the name, whether people can actually pronounce this or not. It feels like some of the major feedback that we have been getting about this. Is that to some degree, it's not substantively dramatically different from NAFTA in any way. I mean, right at eight accounts for new things that we didn't have like digital tr-. Right in the digital realm or maybe the farm around, but it's not hugely substantively different, is it? No, that's right. One of the questions you sort of have to answer in evaluating this new agreement is what should you compare it to? Should you compare. To NAFTA, which is the deal that's been in place for a quarter century. Should you compare it to the big Asia Pacific trade deal that the Obama administration negotiated the so-called t p p which Trump pulled the plug on on one of his first days in office had that gone into effect that also would have taken into account some of the new digital commerce and that sort of thing that that has grown up in the last quarter century. But it's it's not a radically different trade deal than what we've had in place. It preserves North America as a basically free trade zone. It gives you a dairy farmers slightly more access to the Canadian dairy market, but on the whole, it doesn't make a whole lot of changes. Another question about this, which is we have been talking a lot on this podcast and elsewhere about how President Trump is waging a trade war with well, basically the whole world, and there are all of these tariffs on various things including steel and aluminum. Does this address that? Does this resolve any part of the trade war? It resolves a little bit of it. I I described this is a partial ceasefire because the president had been threatening to tear up NAFTA and maybe slapped big auto tariffs on on cars from Canada and Mexico. He didn't do that. So in that sense, he has dialed back the volume on the trade war a little bit. But as you point out, this agreement doesn't change the steel and aluminum tariffs at the US has leveled on Canada, Mexico, Europe, Japan, China, most of the rest of the world, those remain in place. And so do the retaliatory tariffs that the other countries imposed in response. So US companies that rely on stealing aluminum are still having to pay more for that. We're seeing that in higher cost for soda cans, and that sort of thing, and US companies that want to export are are in some cases running into these retaliatory tariffs, you know the thing with this that was interesting. You know, Twitter's been around. And so long now that it actually I think has like cliche memes, and there's like the cliche Meam now with the guy walking down the street, holding one girl's hand, but seeming checking out another girl. Right? And the thing that got re tweeted. So often on this was over one woman's head was NAFTA and over the other one was NAFTA. So Scott, is that an accurate portrayal or use of that meme, or is there enough substantively here that's change? I think I think that's a pretty apt description, but I will quit over the over the girl who's who's turning the head. I think I would have put who's mecca. You know, on the sort of political ramifications of all of this, I guess I have two quick thoughts and questions. So one is, I mean, this has to get approved by congress right in this could presumably go on into. We have a new congress. Be the name. So my question is, I have no inclination to think that if Democrats have a majority in congress that they would be inclined to work with this president on trade, not that some Democrats might not actually agree with some provisions of this, but I feel like that's one big question Mark, and that's an argument that the president himself was making. But then I went to a briefing with his top officials, including Jared Kushner, and. Trade Representative lighthizer and they were arguing NAFTA already exists. This isn't a huge, dramatic change. So they don't think it's going to be nearly as big a fight this time around as it was twenty five years ago when when after I went in and it was a big political fight, maybe. But you know, elections are going to are these elections might have an effect on the outcome because you know, in the mid west, we've seen the president's approval ratings tank in a lot of places over the summer because of tariffs and you know, more and more we're seeing Republicans say that these tariffs are a good thing, but Democrats saying that they're not if the outcome of the elections in the midwest or elsewhere have some, you know, kind of dilatoriness affect on the Republican numbers, and it's clear that there was a a draining in the midwest or places that could have been affected by trade than there might be a rethinking among Democrats and some of those free trade. Republicans. That's interesting. And I guess also the that kind of raises questions about how if at hold this is even political galvanizing tool ahead of the midterms because you know, did a lot I, I was gonna say, I don't. I don't think it is at all right. Like I went out all throughout the summer to do a lot of reporting on hearing from members of what we would call the Republican base right Trump's coalition. And you do hear about trade from a small subset of those base voters. And those are traditionally some of the more working class folks who live in the midwest. But I would argue that trade was one of the few issues that I heard Republicans raised the alarm bells about when it came to President Trump. I mean everything else word there were talking about tax reform or the supreme court nominees. Everybody was lockstep behind the president, and this was one of the few things where I actually heard your more traditional Republicans raise questions about whether or not the president's approach with tariffs was the right approach are we're gonna take a quick break. And when we get back, can't let it go. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Rowett Google digital scales are becoming more and more important in today's economy. That's why grow with Google is providing free online training and tools to help Americans learn the skills they need to succeed, learn more about grow with Google and get started by visiting Google dot com. Slash grow support also comes from Exxon Mobil over the next five years. Exxon Mobil plans to invest fifty billion dollars in the US economy. That kind of investment will not only create jobs in energy, but also help support millions of US jobs in other industries to find out more about ExxonMobil's planned investments at energy factor dot com. Exxon Mobil energy lives here, a rent prices leveling off what's the best job after college and is our labor market actually healthy, listen to planet money's daily podcast. The indicator to find out. And we're back and we're going to end the show like we do every week with can't let it go. I'm gonna go first. And while we were all very focused on Cavanaugh and President Trump and all of that, it turns out congress despite their very public partisan fighting has been quietly doing things in a bipartisan fashion. They passed spending bills that prevent a government shutdown, at least for a couple of months. And this week, a bipartisan Bill to deal with the opioid crisis is now headed to the president's desk until him. This is something you learn organically covering the two thousand sixteen campaign that this is going to play very well because this is obviously huge concern out there in the country. Yeah. And this Bill contains a lot of the things that experts have been saying need to be dealt with. It tries to prevent Fenton hill from getting into the country. Basically, it is an. Up and debt up and down comprehensive piece of legislation and all of these lawmakers in states that are affected by this voters really care about this. They're going to be able to go home and say, look what I did. This is one of those rare instances where good politics mix with policy, Scott, do you wanna go next, will you know there's a new movie trailer out this week, and I know a lot of people have been saying, when are we going to get the bio pic of Dick Cheney? And if you've been saying people definitely like like nobody. I have to say I was skeptical too, but I watched the trailer for the new movie vice about former Vice President Dick Cheney. And so this isn't the TV channel not not the TV channel, but I feel this name could be read in a lot of different ways. Well, maybe that's part of it. I think that is part of it and I, I was a little skeptical, but at the trailer was was very engrossing. I want be. I want you to be a you. You my vice, George, Honey, the movie stars, Sam, Rockwell as George W Bush and Christian bale as a very lookalike, dick Janeth vice-presidency name, mostly symbolic job. However, if we came to a. Different. Understanding now that chain is not bad. He looks eerily similar. It's amazing. It's amazing how Christian bale could be able to get to look like Dick Cheney when he was like so ripped for Batman will unveil is super method. Eight, so much ice cream. If you remember him as the Emesa did guy in the machinist. Oh, this is this is the opposite end of the the girth spectrum it's it. It's it's, it looks like an interesting movie again, I, I'm not sure folks were clamoring for Dick Cheney bio-pic, but this is from seven people who brought you big short and that's a movie that growth seventy million dollars. Even though I don't think people were clamoring for a movie about the financial crisis. So sometimes a an unlikely topic can be a hot movie, so we don't do this is happening. I believe. We can make this work. One thing that became apparent as we were talking about this in the newsroom is that some of our colleagues. Have a little trouble telling Christian bale from Christian Slater. Another child actor turned grown up movie star. So I, I prepared just a little. No, you're Christians cheat sheet alien Chris Christian bale English Christian Slater, not English, Christian bale, Batman, Christian Slater, dead shot. What's dead shot? Yeah. He he voiced a an animated. Another DC comics superhero. That's right. They they both had watery roles Christian bale laurel, canyon, Christian Slater, hot tub, time machine to. Let's. Uncreditworthy Lord q.. I am db database. What can't you like go up? What I can't let go of is the presidential alert system and we're not gonna make the buzzing noise because apparently you're not allowed to replicate anything like any kind of alert system of the FCC will come after us all staff Email about that. Correct. But I will say that what really struck me what I can't let go of is not so much the alert system itself, but the reactions to it, how hotly partisan it was, and I'm not trying to be somebody who puts my head in the sand here doesn't understand that. Of course, there are going to be partisan reactions, but you know, in theory, it's a good idea right to have a system in which the government can have alerts that go out to all people wherever they are, but I don't know. Good idea Dominica I feel like that could go haywire. There has been a presidential system that people had used to reach television sets because a lot of people were on television would see televisions or listen to radio stations during the Cold War for fifty or sixty years. So I don't really see the difference. Was it a presidential alert system? That's the weird thing. They called it a presidential Lert system. Maybe they could have mitigated some of this if they had just called it an emergency alert mobile system or something it, it certainly seems like a good idea to have emergency alert system that you can reach out to people on their cell phone since fewer people are watching television all the time or all those cord cutters out there. Okay. So I like removed the alert without reading it. What did President Trump had to say to us? I think it just said, this is a test of the national wireless emerge. So it didn't even say, what is the president did actually at the very time, see that did the very top of the alerts said presidential alert, which that's that's part of the issue. And I ended a story this week with Brian Naylor who did this piece on the alert system and some of the fear. That people have that President Trump this president particular would misuse that system, and that's what you saw a lot of the backlash Osma. What can't you go up the SNL sketch of the calf, not hearing Judd. Cavanaugh. Are you ready to begin? Oh, hell. Yeah. We tell you this. I'm going to start at an eleven. Take it to about fifteen rim quick. I just think it was somewhat comically. Brilliant. Even though I would argue, some of the portrayals were sort of less funny than you might expect from SNL, but. Objective. So eighty. What I think to me really stuck out was Matt, Damon was portraying bright cavenaugh as is really angry, privileged guy who is just not accustomed to being questioned in any way. What I take from that is I think some of the criticism that we've heard in the last week about Brett Kavanagh has come up not based on whether or not what he is saying about the alleged sexual assault incident is accurate, but about his temperament. And we've heard a lot of questions about that, and I thought that this caricature of him kind of really got it. Those questions. You know, SNL in some ways can cement our ideas of people like so Sarah Palin never said I can see Alaska from my house, but totally don't tell me that because I saw it on us and l. Sean Spicer never use the squirt gun. Exactly a road is putting him second. Second, although he probably wanted to. But you know, like I think that in part Brett cabinet is going to be remembered as a guy who likes beer because of this portrayal on Saturday Night Live as much as the twenty four times or whatever it was that he referenced it in the hearing. I mean, what SNL often does like your noting is create a character of someone that's often what you think of as the first thing you think of when you hear that person's name as opposed to the actual person in real life. All right. Those are the things we can't let go of this week, politics or otherwise, and it's our promise that we will be here when there's political news that you need to know about whenever that is. So with a vote over supreme court nominee Brett Kavanagh's confirmation looming. We will probably be back here sooner rather than later. I'm tamra, Keith cover the White House. I'm Scott Horsely. I also cover the White House. I'm medical Montonero, political editor, and political reporter, and thanks for listening to the PR politics podcast. Support for this podcast and the following message come from answer net essentials from Comcast, connecting more than six million low income people to low cost, high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more now they're ready for anything.

President Trump president Brett Cavanaugh White House FBI NAFTA congress US Scott Horsely Canada Kelsey Snell Ryan NPR Republican party Senate Deborah Ramirez supreme court Dick Cheney Mexico Brett Kavanagh
Weekly Roundup: Thursday, November 1

NPR Politics Podcast

35:28 min | 2 years ago

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, November 1

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from e-verify focused on supporting the legal hiring and employment eligibility their fixation process for employers. Let's go higher. Get started at either fi dot gov slash go. Hi, this is Julie Anne that noise. You just heard is a sounded democracy where printing are absentee ballots here in Vienna. Austria to make sure Arvo counts on November six this podcast was recorded at five six pm on Thursday, November first things may have chain. And who are we kidding things will have definitely changed by the time. You hear this? Here's the show. Hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast here with our weekly roundup of the week's biggest political stories, President Trump gave a White House speech on immigration just days before the midterm elections. And an NPR poll found that eighty percent of Americans think incivility in our politics will lead to violence. But who do they blame I must McCullough political reporter? I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent, and I'm Scott Horsely. Now, also cover the White House says, Scott, let's start with you. You're there at the White House. The president gave this speech this afternoon around what four fifteen in the afternoon. It was televised on a lot of places billed as an immigration speech. But did we get a sense of if there's sort of anything new in this speech? There wasn't a lot new. This was nominally speech directed at that caravan of Central American migrants, slowly making its way through Mexico and the president said turn around go back. You're wasting your time. But what this was really aimed at. It was the the red meat base of the Republican party, the people in Donald Trump's base who are most concerned about illegal immigration, and to whom he has really tailored his message in these final days of the two thousand eighteen midterm election campaign and not just the people who care about it. He wants to make more of his supporters care about this. Because he believes that this is something that will motivate them to come out. And I was waiting to hear is he going to do away with asylum. There had been reports that he would do that. He certainly wants to make it harder. He told us that next week. He'll have an executive order that will flesh out the details of this. But to me, I was at the rally last night in Florida in this speech was very very similar to what he said at the rally. He says once these people arrive the democrat party is vision is to offer them free healthcare and the right to vote. This was essentially like a campaign speech given in the lens of the White House. And you've got to wonder the optics about this. Then is because he he wanted to reach. Audience that maybe he can't always I think he's frustrated, and he feels this is the issue that's going to help Republicans. He wants to get more coverage for it. And maybe he feels the rallies aren't enough, but he decided to use the venue of the White House to press this idea that these criminals are coming there in it's an invasion is the word he used and we have to stop them. So there is a certain seriousness that comes with a White House speech with a podium. This isn't the president in front of a crowd at a rally. This isn't the president on the lawn of the White House shouting over the helicopter by doing it in this setting. He was saying, hey, pay attention. There's going to be a serious policy discussion here, or that's the signal that he's they sent to the media that made CNN carry it live, whereas CNN, and even FOX has not been carrying his rallies live on TV anymore. This did get carried. But there was a little bayton switch there because underneath the rhetoric. There was very little actual substance. The president talked about finalizing a plan to maybe tweak the way, the United States deals with asylum seekers he talked about maybe indefinitely detaining migrant families, while their asylum claims are being processed he talked about things that are sure to face legal challenges if he ever actually does them, and which probably are facing legal challenges within the White House itself. He's probably got some smart lawyers who telling him, Mr President. You can't do that. He's frustrated. He wants to say something he wants to throw some red meat to the base. And that's why we got we got some degree that we have seen that immigration does play very well with his base. In fact, I was just looking at some research from Google which has been tracking into sort of an uptake in search trends and whatnot. And they they say that they've seen an uptick, I think it was about twenty five percent of house districts are sort of an increase in search around immigration. So I mean, look it's one metric, but perhaps it does seem to be working with a potential sector of his base and Google searches are like a lots of people complain. About that as being a really mediocre metric for a lot of things. And I don't fully understand all the arguments about Google, searches bowed. I'll say is that there's a Kaiser family foundation poll done very recently. Asking voters, what is your number one issue and among Republican voters? The thing that ranked the highest that got the most people saying this is my number one issue was immigration with independent voters and with democratic voters. It was way down on the list it wasn't anywhere near as important as it is for Republican voters. And in fact, it may be turnoff for some of those independent voters, and is some of the suburban voters in the in those kinds of districts where the house races may be decided. This is the big bet that Donald Trump is making that he can juice up his base with with this kind of argument that spaced on immigration race crime fear, and he's willing to take the risk of turning off independent voters turning off. College educated women. This is a real risk. I mean, he could. Win in the short term boosts some turnout among his base. But over the long term he is chipping away. I think at the Republican party's appeal Mara you, and I were watching this video that President Trump tweeted out yesterday, it has this man. This convicted murderer who killed police in California and has all of this. He's like laughing about killing police, and then it has this imagery of the caravan and people pulling on fences, and this is very violent imagery in this video. And clearly the president is trying to build up that fear. Right. And with the Chiron Democrats led him into the country. Eat it at the video that that we've been talking about it's been pinned to Donald Trump's Twitter account. So clearly, he's banking on the fact that this is a successful strategy for him. And maybe his calculation is that he just wants to focus on the Senate and that he will help Republicans maintained control of the Senate maybe do well with a few governors races. And. And that may be for him is considered a win to some degree. And that's why he's focused so much on immigration, despite the fact like Morissette, you said that this is not necessarily a a winning strategy in a number of these house races and over the long term for Republicans. But look the Senate battleground is Trump is Trump states. It's where he can go. It's where he has some ability to move voters. And that's where he's been focusing. All right. We're going to leave that there. Thank you so much Mara Tamin, Scott. You're welcome. And we're going to let you go. And when we come back, we're going to have a new crew, and we'll be talking all about how scared people are about the culture of incivility in this country. Support for this program comes from SimpliSafe home security. Simplisafe is self installed. Wireless protection for your home. The company was founded by an electrical engineer whose friends were burglarized. They wanted home security, but most systems were too complicated and too expensive. So he built simply safe now, they protect over two million people and with simply safe there are no annual contracts. Learn more about simply safe today at SimpliSafe dot com slash NPR politics support for NPR politics also comes from rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans. Introducing their own new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home, Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started goats are rocket mortgage dot com slash NPR politics rate, shield approval, only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions additional conditions or. Collusions may apply based on Quicken Loans data and comparisons of public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m L S consumeraccess dot ORG number thirty thirty Florida is one of only three states that don't let ex felons vote. Three years old. I don't have no more criminal background. I work pay tax. I'm partisan. Why can they met me? Here. Why that might change on embedded, and we're back and joining me now is I Roscoe Ron Elving Dominica Montinaro. Hey, guys. Hello. Hey. All right. Well, let us just take a minute to take stock. I would say of the past two weeks because I think they've felt rather turbulent for a lot of people between the mail bombs that were sent to democratic leaders, and then the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue Dominica. You've been reporting about a new NPR PBS merit poll that focuses on this question of civility and one sort of top line result from that I found somewhat startling, but also really intriguing and this is that eighty percent of voters say they are concerned that the lack of civility will lead to violence. You know, it's one thing that in the poll people actually across ideological lines agree on that they say that they're concerned that that tone can lead to violence and some would argue in already has right. So the, but the issue here is who do they blame right, and who and that is starkly divided. And frankly, you know, I was going to say a lot of people are just in their corners, very polarized. I mean, but if we look at who people say, they blame more people blame President Trump than a Democrats and Republicans bickering or the media for how it's reported on some of the stuff how many per- like how large percentage so overall of forty percent of Americans say that they blame President Trump when you look at the media twenty nine percent of people say they blame the media for the lack of civility in tone in the poll. Do we also have a sense of whether or not people are aspiring to a different tone. Or if they do want this civility to be different than what it looks like right now, what they do say is that the tone three quarters of people say that the tone has gotten worse under President Trump, and that's significant because. It's far higher than when Barack Obama was president President Trump is a different president a different politician than what the US has seen in modern history. And he is someone who is known for name calling insulting his opponents and very personal ways. And when he talks about immigration illegal immigration is crime. And these criminals are gonna come into the US and hurt people. And that is what he is feeding to the people that support him to his supporters. And so they're getting worked up because they're being told the Democrats love crime. And if you've over Democrats crime is coming those are very stark terms, those aren't terms where we're all gonna come together that language is just not going to do the perennial question that people have an asking about Trump ever since he came into office, which is whether he created the these these conditions or whether he tapped into. Pre existing conditions that were already apparent in this country listening to the poll and who's to blame one thing is not in. There is the American people which we are. We're all Americans lay some of this is just a reflection of the people who were answering how I'm not saying that they're bad. What I'm saying is as human beings when these people are elected if you don't like the politicians, they are elected by American people the media, they may not be hired by. But the the media is a reflection. If you don't like it, you won't read it you won't look at it. You won't you can't take the the personal responsibility out of that. This is a reflection of America as a whole. Yeah. I mean voters it's a great point that Asia's making because voters do not reward bipartisanship in the fact, the matter is the more bipartisan, you are the more that you're seeing as reaching across the aisle and being friends with somebody or giving them a hug, or whatever that image is what goes on. Around in primaries in particular, and these people wind up getting voted out of office. You know, it's funny people will say that they want compromise. But really what they want is people to compromise to their position and think it's say though, that if everyone in the country voted there's a better chance that some degree of bipartisanship and cooperation would be rewarded, but that's not the case the people who do vote, especially in primaries. But also in November, a tend to be the people who care the most and the people who tend to care the most are not in favor of cooperation and by partisanship. So that's the portion of the electorate that actually gets out there and gets the job done. And that's then the reason we have the politicians we have and the kind of politics that we have one of the things you see in a lot of polls is that people have a sense of Zion in part because of impending demographic change that that folksy is inevitable. Right. I was looking at the American values survey that PRI does every year, and they asked this question about the impact of the US becomes. Majority nonwhite by twenty forty five and you see that about two thirds of Republicans see that as a negative change. And yet a very small percentage. Maybe nineteen percent of Democrats that is negative and it falls clearly along partisan lines. But it's got me thinking a lot about this is something that is like an inevitable demographic reality that is very hard to reverse at this point. And it seems to be exacerbating the way that people feel I don't think there's any question about it. This is what is different from other periods of turmoil, and our politics, we had great racial strife in nineteen sixty eight we had riots in many of our major cities, and what is different about this is that there was no question in nineteen sixty eight what the relative size of the races was going to be in the future. There was no question that the white people of America, we're going to be the majority. But now, we are literally talking about a very different looking country a-, demographically transformed country much more diverse, many, more people, speaking Spanish. And that has changed the attitude of a lot of folks who used to think of themselves as kind of tolerant kind of fine. But now, they don't feel the same way and these ideas of a country in which they're kind they're Anglo personality is no longer dominant. But actually, maybe only a plurality or something like California where it's less than forty percent and people find that upsetting. They don't like it, perhaps an even if they don't find it upsetting. It's a little unsettling asthma. You've brought up before the fact that the majority of kindergartners or ready non white. So even if you put up a wall and adds some fence to it, and, you know, at a bio dome over the United States, so that nobody can get in or any planes or anything it's already at the point where it's going to be that way because the majority of kindergartners already. Exactly. Yeah. And I do think that that, you know, concerns people, but it also to me kind of heightened this feeling that people have a very tribal politics for a long time. We had seen African American voters vote more democratic, but I think what we are seeing is increasingly also Latinos and Asian Americans vote more democratic since the nineteen nineties, right? And and so increasingly we are in the situation where your race you could argue your religion as well. Kind of. I don't wanna say as a predictor because who knows what's the cause or the effect, but it aligns with your party politics. No after this election in November of this year more than eighty percent something like eighty five percent or more of the Republicans in the house of representatives are going to be white males more than eighty five percent of the Republicans in the house of representatives are going to be white males. How many white males are there? Among the democratic caucus in the same body in the house of representatives that number is going to fall below forty percent as. Fascinating that we have kind of two things going on in this country when it comes to place, you know, there's this urban is aviation where you have a lot of young people moving to cities and moving to urban areas. Well, the same time we have a lot of older voters who are the exactly the kinds of people who moved out of cities during the race riots. And you have all this white flight. I grew up in a place where you have already have multiple languages on on ballots where you know, they're in queens in flushing, queens particular. I mean, you know, what is this huge South Asian population? They're very few white people and it used to be a largely white area. And now, I mean is just not at all. I mean, there's no English on the on a lot of the business signs. And in the end the downtown portion and a lot of the people in Long Island are people who left because they didn't like what was happening with the demographic change, and now that that's sort of happening in different. Parts of the country UC, President Trump firing up a lot of the white grievance that some of those folks have feeling like it's getting closer to them. I do think that when we talk about that were tribalism which a lot of people will take issue with that word. I think when you talk about people kind of dividing up and voting either we don't know whether because of race or or voting along racial lines. I think you you you also have to take very seriously that a lot of people when they're involved in politics, and they're talking about politics. They're talking about things that they feel like are threats to their lives. So if you are a black person, and you are concerned about police brutality and things like this. These are life or death situations. And so you feel like you are going to align with a party that is going to do the most to protect you. And another party that you feel like may not be protecting. You like your life could be on the line. I think sometimes it can be minimalized like, oh, well black voting for Democrats. They are reasons and rational reasons, why people may vote the way they do. And some of it is that they feel that their that their issues. That need to be addressed. And have to be addressed see no one thing that we cannot ignore is that we're living in a time with social media where we can access and see so many different points of view put also increasingly avoid, those points of view, right, and sort of just reinforce what we already think. And I I don't know that we can really have this conversation about civility without talking about social media and technology and the role that that is playing in in just the overall tone of our politics social media heightens tensions because people get on social media. And it's like, you are trained to say your point of view, not care about what anyone else thinks and basically to kind of it's it's so different from face to face interactions. You don't have to be polite. You can just tell someone. I'll I don't want to hear what you have to say that stupid or whatever you can black the. And you can't do that easily real life. Yeah. Exactly. And so when you're behind a computer screen, people get really bold and talk the way, they would never talk. If they were facing someone in person, many people have compared to thousand eighteen to that other tumultuous year fifty years ago nine hundred sixty eight and one of the biggest issues of that year. Perhaps the overwhelming issue was the Vietnam war, which was real to people as no war had ever been before. Because television was taking us to the war every single night on the evening news. They called it the living room war and that had a tremendous effect on the antiwar movement and on people's sense that it was futile. And the scent also just of helped bloody and destructive. It was for the Vietnamese. Well, as of course, for our men, and it was overwhelming the sense that technology had changed. This key issue of war and peace, and now, I think with technological changes of our time. This course, just the way we. Encounter, politics, and each other has fundamentally changed because of technology. So Ron you were just talking about nine hundred sixty eight and that was a year of our history that was really turbulent in terms of racial strife, and you know, that was fifty years ago at this point. And so I'm curious if you have some thoughts, I mean, we inevitably as a country did move on from that point. So are there lessons learned that? Could maybe be instructive for where we are right now with our politics. Absolutely. The that was a terrible time of tumult and racial rioting in our major cities. It was a presidential election year in which one of the candidates for president was. After winning the California primary and Martin Luther King's assassinated in that same welter of violence that we went through in the spring of nineteen sixty eight it was a terrible year in many respects. However, if you go back over what happened in the years after you can find terrible things that happened. You can find enormously heartening things that happen. Whole lifetimes of good and bad happened after nineteen sixty eight and as a body politic. We've probably came to a greater understanding of each other. We probably came to at least some degree of progress with respect to all of these divisions. That this is not to say they've been radicalized. And now as we've learned they can be brought back to the four. They can be excited again, they can be aggravated and they can be agitated again. But we did learn. Lyle took awhile and not everything got better after nineteen sixty eight not everything got worse after nine hundred sixty eight we went on. And we in many respect we found our way to resolutions on many issues ain't talking about the sixties my father, my uncle and aunt they all grew up. They grew up in Newark in the sixties. So they lived through. So I've heard my uncle tell stories about the riots, and they were in the projects tanks pointed out of the project. I hearing the stories about it. And how the chaos of it. I was I was shocked, but I would also say that. There's a sense of. Well, we got through those times there are people that didn't get through those times. And and from my uncle he always talks about how out of his neighborhood his friends. He's won a him and his best friend are like one of the only ones that are left the rest of the. Yeah. And he's he's turning sixty five this year. They did not survive. So I think that we have to be very mindful when we talk about these issues in these tough times that people go through that you don't just get through it. Some there are casualties there. Are there is suffering in that? I do think that in all plausibility, if even if we look at history, there's a high likelihood that things will get worse that they could get worse before they even get better. And look we see these demographic shifts are going to happen down the road, and you can make the argument that until these demographic shifts are actually reality will continue to see this tension because it's going to be under the surface and is still going to keep like is a constant simmer for a number. Of years, it could potentially be with all that happened in nineteen sixty eight and all of the awful memories. That people carry we have tried as a country to come to terms with some of the things that happened then and and tried to expiate to some degree of for the loss of all the people who did not survive and among other things Martin Luther King's birthday is now holiday and when in the nineteen sixties when he was when he was assassinated. I think is is one way to put it a Martin Luther King was regarded widely in the United States as an agitator many in the F B. I thought he was a communist he was in many people's view gunned down by that attitude by people who thought he needed to be taken out of. And that was not just a fringe attitude. There were great number of people who felt that way about him. And today he is revered among the great heroes of American life. He is honored on the National Mall in a way that very few people are and that shows that at least some lessons. Have been learned since nineteen sixty eight. Here's the thing that I keep coming back to you know, when you're in this kind of era of volatility where you have to parties and people within the country feeling like they have to very different views of what it means to be an American, and what they want America to be in the near to mid, you know, distant future. The one thing that we all have and agree on for the most part is that we have the right to vote and our elections are happen. And you have a peaceful transfer Trent peaceful transfer of power to from one party to another one things change, you know, when you look at the heart of democracy that really is the heart of democracy. And when people try to talk about, you know, whether or not we're lurching toward autocracy or something different. That's we're not there. We're not some banana Republic. And if people like what the direction that President Trump is taking the country they can vote for that. And. Continue to do. So and you have to respect that when it comes to the will of people, and if people don't like it in this country who have the power to change it. Well, that brings us to election night next Tuesday. And as a heads up, you can hear NPR's live coverage of election night from your phone. You can start to hear that Tuesday night at eight PM if you hit play on the NPR one app and follow the instructions to tap your screen. It'll take you to live coverage after the newscasts many of us here on NPR politics podcast team will be there. Live with results. Okay. Well, we are going to take a quick break. And we'll be right back with can't let it go. Support for this podcast and the following message come from role with Google digital skills are becoming more and more important in today's economy. That's why grow with Google is providing free online training and tools to help Americans. Learn the skills they need to succeed. Learn more about grow with Google and get started by visiting Google dot com slash grow Olympic gymnastics. Doctor Larry Nassar, abused hundreds of women and girls for more than twenty years before he was caught here. How a team of women brought down a serial sexual predator believed a new podcast from Michigan radio and NPR and we're back, and we're going to close this show. Like, we always do by talking about the one thing that we just cannot stop thinking about politics or otherwise Aisha would you like to start? Yes. So this week was Halloween happened and one of my. Favorite celebrities that people listen to the pod, we'll know is beyond say, and she did different costumes, but the favorite costume shit like a costume change. Yeah. She does some costume changes. But the one that I really liked was she did Toni Braxton, she basically, she called herself phony Braxton, and she had like the short Toni Braxton here and this went from Toni Braxton's first album, she did like another set the cover of another sad love song, which was hunting. Braxton's first album, which was the first album that I ever knew word for word. And I definitely know another sad love song. But I'm not going to sing it but first comes to strings than somebody screams. Have you seen this picture, by the way, she she looks here? Good job. To manage to make yourself look beautiful. It was an Antoni Braxton gave her props for it. And was like, you're never phony. Never Brexit owned the ninety s right on break, my heart. Was like the anthem at all like my high school. Now, she is the legend living legend, Toni Braxton's, I just thought it was great to see like the melding of like two of my favorite different generations generations different times in my life. So nice. It's a nice non when I went for Halloween. This year is Ron. The different generation. Strange when you came to my house. All right. That's awesome. Dominica you want to go next. Sure. Speaking of Halloween sparingly, something that one member of the Senate can't let go is the fact that he that people confuse him for the zodiac killer. And of course, everyone knows that's Ted Cruz. Not that Ted Cruz is the zodiac killer, but he's happy to lean into into that. And he tweeted out, you know, whatever combination of coded letter. You know that said happy Halloween, and he just tweeted that out. So you know, he's trying to lean into it. But it's a little bit like my dad's on Facebook. Because because it's like, you know, it's like a joke where people are doing it because they're making fun of him everyone to embrace right? Not known for being like the most like commerce little Fender likable, right? Like people complain about Ted Cruz that way. So maybe he's trying to show a lighter side of himself. So soon. He didn't tweet out the costume. I mean is was addressed as I don't. I don't know what he looks like. All right. Well, I'm going to go next. And I cannot let go of blacks it. Oh. Says is an abbreviation the blacks at fallout the simple. The simple. Folks, that don't know blacks, it is an abbreviation of the phrase black exit, and we are talking about this pretty much because of one man who if you listen to this podcast, you know, that we cannot let him go because we bring him up all the time, and that is kind. Yay. West. So Konya tweeted out earlier this week that he did not take credit for designing these blessed t shirts. So there were these t shirts going around through turning points. USA? It's this conservative group that had basically the goal of it was to urge black people to leave the Democratic Party. Right. That's what the the theory is behind blacks it. So can you took to Twitter, and he said, I never wanted any association with Brexit. I have nothing to do with it. But then he added a sort of more interesting tweet, he said, my eyes are now wide open. And now realize I've been used to spread messages. I don't believe in. I am distancing myself from politics and completely focusing on being creative three exclamation marks. He's. Running winning. Kindly out into the towns on out. I think some people were saying that the t shirts, and they were kind of really basic in like nothing. Yeah. The design and so he was like I can't handle parts of that. That's amazing. All that is like a bad design on the low. Yeah. I mean, the design struck me when I first looked at it. I was like the the the X looks like a cross between like a really like Chinatown knock off Air, Jordan logo. And like, and like, maybe the United way, you know. It was like what is this? Thing and Candice Owens. Turn behind that. And so she's like taking flow of responsibility for this. And saying that it this is just about her. She's not about it's not about because President Trump. We don't know if he knows about what happened with ganja and what he did. But he was asked about Kanye yesterday. And he said he's he's a good guy. So he doesn't seem to feel like there's a fallout. All right. We'll ride why don't you close things up for us? I think it's time for something really serious. If we turn our eyes to the south Shetland islands part of Antarctica. There is a. Like, it's just like to know where this is. Well, I've worked on this. It's the Belling shows in research station, and it is actually a Russian not German facility and the Russians who are there. You know, there's not a lot to do at the station in the south Shetland. And so they have a library. They have books, and they have a certain number of books, and they read them, and apparently it's really important to the people who are reading them that they be left undisturbed, and this one particular individual's name is Sarah gate was reading books and being interrupted in a sense by having one of his colleagues there tell him the ending. Oh, you're reading that. What? It turns out of and she is not that at all. And and surrogate got a little upset about this. And. Stabbed his colleague. This this and. Extreme and all has been evacuated to Chile where he's apparently recovering in a hospital is going to be ok does it. Does it? Turned himself into the director of the station and has been repatriated to Saint Petersburg and arrested and charged with attempted murder. So is there not like an argument that he's trying to make that you know, there are some. Grievance that, you know, telling you, you know, spoilers sudden, I'm not an attorney. I'm not an attorney but justified so the guy is justified homestore. But he didn't kill the guy. The temple. So that's right. But, but I think when you stab somebody it is regarded as at least an attempt to do the form. So if you stab them is it not an attempt to do me harm. When I when you give away the ending. That's what I wore. I think it's I think it's a warning to everyone that spoiler alerts can be taken very seriously. All right. Well that is it for now. I must Mahala political reporter. I'm Sharon go. I covered the White House. I'm Dominican Montenero political editor, and I'm Renova editor correspondent and thank you. For listening to NPR politics podcast. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything.

President Trump president United States White House NPR NPR Google America Senate California Republican party Martin Luther King Florida Scott Horsely Roscoe Ron Elving Dominica Mon White House Twitter Toni Braxton reporter