31 Burst results for "Scott Horsley NPR"

Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

All of It

00:49 sec | 10 hrs ago

Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

"Of unemployment in the U. S. Triggered nearly a year ago, a stretching into another week of 2021. NPR's Scott Horsley has details. Labor Department says about 1.2 million people filed new claims for unemployment last week that includes 730,000 claims for state benefits and another 451,000 claims under the federal program for Gig workers and the self employed. Names were down sharply from the previous week, suggesting a drop in layoffs. All the bad weather and other factors may have distorted the count. As of early February, some 19 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid. Many of those benefits are set to expire next month. Congress is weighing a $1.9 trillion economic package that would, among other things, extend emergency jobless aid through August. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington

Scott Horsley Labor Department U. NPR Congress Washington
Unemployment Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 13 hrs ago

Unemployment Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

"Last week. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Jobless claims are still very high by historical standards, The Labor Department says about 1.2 million people filed new claims for unemployment last week that includes 730,000 claims for state benefits and another 451,000 claims under the federal program for Gig workers and the self employed. Claims were down sharply from the previous week, suggesting a drop in layoffs. All the bad weather and other factors may have distorted the count. As of early February, some 19 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid. Many of those benefits are set to expire next month. Congress is weighing a $1.9 trillion economic package that would, among other things, extend emergency jobless aid through August. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington on Wall Street stocks or lower the

Scott Horsley Labor Department NPR Congress Washington
Some Black-Owned Businesses Are Turning To New Banks For Paycheck Protection Loans

All Things Considered

04:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Some Black-Owned Businesses Are Turning To New Banks For Paycheck Protection Loans

"To help keep workers on payrolls. Businesses owned by black and Latino people were often at the back of the line. Those firms often had to wait longer for money, even though many were desperate for financial help. With a new round of business loans in the pipeline. Authorities are now trying to address that disparity as NPR's Scott Horsley reports like a lot of business sellers. Jennifer Kelly's income took a hit last year when the pandemic struck. She's a clinical psychologist near Atlanta, and some of her clients didn't make the adjustment to online or telephone counseling. Kelly, who has two employees applied to her regular bank for a loan under the federal government's Paycheck protection program. But she says the process was frustrating. It's kind of like trying to get the vaccine. They put my name on the list. And there they finally said, Oh, we all have anymore, And we're sorry that first round of P P p loans was exhausted In less than two weeks. Lots of businesses complained that banks were prioritizing their biggest customers. Bones were especially hard to come by in neighborhoods with a lot of black and brown residents When I needed them. They were not available to man, including. I'm not the big business, but I'm a small business and committed like with the fabric of America. When Congress okayed a second round of P P p loans last year, Kelly applied again. This time through a bank 250 miles away in Savannah, Georgia that specializes in working with black own firms. They were very patient through that entire process, and I didn't get approved for the loan, and I do hope that, especially in the small black banks will survive because We need to have those institutions that second bank Kelly worked with. Carver State Bank was founded 94 years ago with the goal of building financial freedom for its African American customers. 80% of its loans go to black owned businesses. Robert James, who sits on the bank's board, says he received P P p applications from around the country most looking for less than $50,000. Most of our applications are very small businesses individually owned gas station in the neighborhood or restaurants are people deserve a lot of credit for the hard work that they're putting in just to make sure that we get help to the customers that need it. The most According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Even before the pandemic, black owned businesses were more than twice as likely beyond shaky financial footing as white owned firms. CEO Janine Jake Oak of the Community Development Bankers Association, says that means the extra time it took for loans to reach those businesses could be costly. They had a lot less cushion to start with, which made them much more vulnerable when the economy went south. Authorities have tried to address the disparity in P P p lending in a number of ways. First they've made more money available. They also gave banks that specialize in minority and low income communities, a head start when the latest round of paycheck protection loans was launched last month. Finally, while the loans were designed to be forgiven, some black borrowers are suspicious, a legacy of the long history of discriminatory lending. So education is also important. Carver States, James says he tried to reassure African American borrowers they can use P p p loans to keep their businesses and communities afloat. I've heard a lot of stories of customers who were eligible for these funds, but didn't trust that there wouldn't be some sort of a catch. Craig Gordon runs a company that provides in home nursing care in Georgia about 30% of his business is on hold right now because many of his customers are wary of letting anyone even a skilled nurse into their home during the pandemic. With Carver States help Gordon's just been approved for a second p p. P loan. This will buy us probably three of four months, and I'm hoping that all of those vulnerable folks that we served by again will be well vaccinated. In the meantime, cordon says the forgivable loan will help him keep dozens of people on the payroll. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington

Scott Horsley Jennifer Kelly Kelly Carver State Bank NPR Ceo Janine Jake Oak Community Development Bankers Robert James Federal Government Atlanta Savannah Georgia Federal Reserve Bank Of New Yo Congress America Carver
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I was governors has all schools in the state must open for in person classes. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm nowhere. King. Educators say they'll do it, but they can't guarantee they'll be able to keep kids safe Voting technology companies, Smartmatic is suing Fox News, some of its biggest stars and two of Donald Trump's legal advisers. Alleging lies they told after the election hurt the company and President Biden offers US diplomatic support to end the war in Yemen. It's Friday, February 5th Darren Criss is 34. The news is next. Line from NPR News on Korver Coleman Stocks opened higher this morning as the Labor Department reported a modest increase in jobs. Last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 90 points in early trading. U. S employers added 49,000 jobs last month. That's an improvement from December when employers cut 227,000 jobs, but it still leaves almost 10 million fewer workers on business payrolls than before the pandemic. Bars and restaurants continued to shed workers last month. The fast spreading Corona virus has been a significant drag on in person services. Other parts. The economy have shown surprising resilience. Although factories and construction crews also saw modest job losses. Last month, the unemployment rate fell from 6.7% to 6.3%. The share of people in the workforce also declined. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington The Senate has narrowly approved a budget blueprint that lets Democrats advance President Biden's nearly $2 trillion coronavirus relief package. Wouldn't need Republicans support Vice President Harris cast the tie breaking vote early this morning. NPR's Windsor, Johnston says both sides are divided on Biden's proposal. The two sides remain far apart on several provisions, mainly the cost of the measure. Republicans have countered Biden's massive spending package with a much smaller bill that does not include additional aid for state and local governments, a major democratic demand. The amount of direct payments is another sticking point. NPR's Windsor Johnston reporting. The House passed a similar measure on Wednesday, but must vote on the Senate's version. That vote could come as early as today. Pharmaceutical maker Johnson and Johnson is asking the FDA for emergency authorization for its covert 19 vaccine data show The vaccines, efficacy is about 66%. Patients on Lee need one injection not to, as the Fizer and modern of vaccines require. The Kremlin says it cannot accept President Biden's demand to free jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. NPR's Lucy in Kim. Reports from Moscow. Alexei Navalny was sentenced to more than 2.5 years on an old conviction this week and is in court again for allegedly libeling a World War two veterans in a tweet. Giovanni and his allies have faced a barrage of legal cases since he returned from Germany, where he'd been recovering from a poisoning he blames on President Vladimir Putin. Putin spokesman told reporters in Moscow that Biden's demand for Navalny's release is aggressive and not constructive. Russian authorities have arrested more than 10,000 people since nationwide protests broke out in support of Navalny. Amnesty International says Putin's government is waging a war on Russians human rights. Lucian Kim NPR NEWS Moscow On Wall Street, The Dow Jones industrials are up 83 points at 31,138. You're listening to NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what Several state lawmakers are proposing legislation aimed at reforming the state's beleaguered employment development department. Move comes a Z, D. D has struggled to respond to a wave of unemployment claims during the recession. Recent audits show hundreds of millions of dollars have been paid out to fraudulent claims. KQED politics reporter Katie or explains. Group of lawmakers says a D D has ignored long standing problems that have been exacerbated during the pandemic. San Francisco Assemblyman David Chu says the department needs both immediate and long term changes. It's my hope that this year as we're dealing with the immediate short term crisis, we're also starting to talk about what's it going to take medium term longer term to make sure That were never back in the situation again. Among the bills being introduced includes one establishing a claimant advocate within the E. D. D another would require the agency to cross check their records in order to avoid paying claims to inmates. There's also a measure that would allow people to receive benefits through direct deposit. In Sacramento. I'm Katie or KQED News in sports. The Warriors beat the Mavericks 1 47 toe 1 16 in Dallas. The two teams face off again tomorrow. Speaking of face offs, the Sharks are back on the ice tonight after a week of Covad related postponements. San Jose takes on the Ducks in Anaheim tonight and tomorrow. College hoops. The Stanford men beat Cal last night 70.

President Biden NPR President Vladimir Putin Alexei Navalny Lucian Kim NPR Moscow KQED News Scott Horsley Senate Fox News Windsor Johnston Steve Inskeep Darren Criss Katie or US Donald Trump Republicans
Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | Last month

Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

"Today to confirm Janet Yellen is Treasury secretary. NPR's Scott Horsley has more yelling, has already led the Federal Reserve and served as a top White House economist in the Clinton administration. While Republicans on the Finance Committee expressed some differences with her policy positions, no one questioned her qualifications. If confirmed by the full Senate, Janet Yellen will be the 78th Treasury secretary and the first woman to lead the department. She's already matched the first Secretary Alexander Hamilton in scoring her own hip hop musical tribute. It only took a couple centuries. The first female secretary yet the change. Yeah. Great Public radio program Marketplace Commission that number from the artist Desa Secretary Element Service the administration's point person in addressing the economic fall out from the Corona virus pandemic. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington A full Senate vote is expected Monday on Wall Street. Today the Dow was

Janet Yellen Scott Horsley Treasury NPR Clinton Administration Finance Committee Federal Reserve White House Great Public Radio Program Mar Alexander Hamilton Senate Desa Secretary Element Service Washington
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:21 min | 2 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"People living in economic desperation, Beginning with longest federal government shutdown in U. S history, Congress is now ending a chaotic session like few others. Microsoft says its internal systems were hacked in the wide reaching cyberattack perpetuated by a group of suspected Russian agents. MPR's Bobby Allyn has more. Microsoft had previously said it was among 18,000 customers of I T company solar winds to find malware on its systems. But now Microsoft says the Attackers went farther by breaking into its systems, even viewing closely guarded company source code. Privately held Noah of software questions remain, says Dimitri All parish. He's a cybersecurity expert is that the Microsoft Cloud Services is that their Windows operating system is that Microsoft office that would be very helpful to know to understand what source code exactly was. Access. U. S. Authorities are still investigating the Russia link tact seen as the biggest cyber attack in American history. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco On Wall Street stocks closed out the year on a high note. NPR's Scott Horsley has details, both of them and the S and P 500 jumped about two thirds of a percent, while the NASDAQ rose more than 1/10 of a percent. The Dow and the S and P finished the year in record territory. The NASDAQ is just shy of its own record close earlier this week. The year and gains cap a remarkable comeback for stocks, which suffered a dizzying decline this spring when the pandemic first took hold in the US since then, rock bottom interest rates and a partial recovery in the economy have investors feeling bullish. The year The Dow is up more than 7%, the S and P gain more than 16% and the tech heavy NASDAQ Index surged. Nearly 44%. Scott Horsley NPR news Washington The Dow today closed at 30,606. This is NPR headed for a four This is KCRW. I'm Matt Gillam. As Orange County continues to shatter covert 19 hospitalization records, local health officials have opened up a mobile hospital to accommodate the overflow patients. Took a team of volunteers eight days to build the tent in the parking lot at U. C I Medical center. The facility adds another 40 beds to the hospitals 400. As of yesterday, it was already half full. We have been stockpiling.

Microsoft NPR Scott Horsley Bobby Allyn Bobby Allen MPR Congress U. S Matt Gillam Russia Orange County Noah SAN Francisco U. C I Medical center US
U.S. trade deficit in goods widened in November

The Takeaway

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. trade deficit in goods widened in November

"Trade deficit widened last month as U. S. Consumers snapped up tens of billions of dollars worth of imported goods. NPR's Scott Horsley reports the trade gap in November was larger than forecasters had expected. Imports and exports both rose in November, but the jump in imports was significantly larger. And the trade deficit widened to nearly $85 billion. Surging demand for consumer products accounted for much of the jump in imports. The U. S is now buying more stuff from overseas and it did a year ago while exports from the US to other countries have yet to recover to pre pandemic levels. Exports of food saw some of the strongest gains last month, up more than 4% from October. Food exports of sword almost 20% over the last year, even his exports in most other categories has slumped. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington President

Scott Horsley U. NPR United States Washington
Industrial production increases in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Industrial production increases in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

"As the Federal Reserve reported an increase in industrial production last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 90 points in early trading. Industrial production has now regained about two thirds of the ground it lost during the pandemic. Manufacturing output jumped 8/10 of a percent last month, largely driven by cars and car parts. However, warmer than usual weather in November meant less business for utilities. Industrial production in China also rose in November, but Asian stocks were mostly down overnight. The Federal Reserve begins a two day policy meeting that will end with the release the central bank's latest economic projections. Forecasters have to weigh the economic cost of rising Corona virus infections in the short run against the promise of a successful vaccine roll out in the months to come. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley Federal Reserve NPR China Npr News
Unemployed Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Stimulus Checks Stopped

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 4 months ago

Unemployed Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Stimulus Checks Stopped

"Now than they were early in the summer. And they're spending is likely to fall further as their newfound savings are exhausted. Kelly Griffin, a night worker in Massachusetts, so her income dropped by about two thirds wants the supplemental benefit ran out. It was hard you don't got to eat. You don't spend things unnecessarily and kind of script unscathed and kind of started the panic like Am I ever going to get a job again? Back in Cleveland. McAfee knows that feeling she's been trying to earn some extra money sewing facemask, but she'd much rather be back in a regular job. It is not A situation that I would wish on anybody to constantly be stuck in this with no foreseeable end to it like I don't know when I'm going to get a job again. Hopefully it will be soon, but Until then, it's just constant stress for everybody. The Senate is expected to consider a stripped down relief package on Monday, but hopes for a new federal help before the election. Are slim. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley Kelly Griffin Mcafee NPR Cleveland Senate Massachusetts
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:53 min | 4 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"In a large ballroom in Fort Meyers. The chairs were set up with social distance, but many in the room weren't wearing masks. Trump told the crowd. He's protecting seniors, but you have to live your lives. I'm working as hard as I can see. You can kiss and hug your Children and grandchildren very soon. That's something I missed. Also, I will be honestly. Polls indicate Trump's support with seniors isn't a strong as it was four years ago, and his handling of the pandemic is a big part of that. Tamara Keith. NPR news traveling with the president. And Democratic rival Joe Biden is campaigning in Michigan today with stops in two cities in Southfield. Biden warned a crowd at the United Auto Workers union that President Trump wants to strip health insurance from tens of millions of Americans with preexisting conditions. But mishandling the pandemic isn't enough for Trump. Top of that he's still trying to take away your healthcare. Aiden told the crowd. If he is elected, his administration will build on the affordable care act. Biden travels to Detroit for another rally tonight. Federal deficit has hit a record $3.1 trillion in the fiscal year that just ended NPR's Scott Horsefly reports the Corona virus added a waterfall to what was already a river of reading the deficit for fiscal year. 2020 was more than twice as big as the previous high set during the great recession a decade ago. It's about three times with the government had been expecting before the pandemic struck with businesses shuttered and millions of people out of work. Government tax revenue shrank at the same time federal spending balloon as Congress authorized trillions of dollars in relief payments to keep families and businesses afloat. Trump administration was already facing a $1 trillion deficits even before the pandemic hit. Despite the government's massive borrowing interest rates have remained exceptionally low. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington All street in mixed territory by the closing bell. The Dow up 112 points. You're listening to NPR news, and this is K C R. W News. I'm leery Perella. It's a Friday, October 16th of very good afternoon to you. Here's what's happening in three or four. After initially rejecting the request earlier today by Governor Newsome. The Trump administration approved California's bid for disaster relief funds. This afternoon, The Washington Post reports. The turnaround came after a midday call from Newsome to Trump. Money will assist the response to wildfire statewide, including fires and Ella Sanford, you know, and San Diego County's The Declaration frees up millions of dollars in federal relief funding, including recovery and response to the bobcat fire in the same Gabriel Mountains. Federal government says it initially rejected the request because FEMA determined the state had enough federal resource is in place. The initial denial highlighted the political animosity between the state and Trump, who has repeatedly assailed California's forced management practices. Emergency funding from FEMA can cover as much as 75% of local fire response efforts. A federal grand jury in Texas has indicted former Los Angeles Angels employee Eric came in connection with the overdose. Death of Picture. Tyler Skaggs K is accused of providing Skaggs with the fentanyl that killed the ballplayer in a hotel room in July of last year. Here's case your W's Daryl Saxman. A grand jury charged K with two counts of distributing it controlled substance. The indictment alleges that he'd been selling painkillers since at least 2017, according to the Times, which first reported the story. Authorities have alleged that Kay and Skaggs had a history of narcotics transactions. Kay was a longtime employee of the Angels Media Relations Department. He was arrested by federal authorities in August. The deadline to indict him was extended twice as his lawyers and prosecutors discussed a plea deal that was never reached. Skaggs was born in Woodland Hills and played at Santa Monica High School. He died less than two weeks before his 28th birthday. At his case here, it'll be a sterile.

Trump Trump administration Tyler Skaggs K NPR Joe Biden Federal government Kay Fort Meyers California Tamara Keith FEMA Governor Newsome Aiden president Daryl Saxman Scott Horsley Santa Monica High School
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:44 min | 4 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"People, some of them senior citizens in a large ballroom in Fort Meyers. The chairs were set up with social distance, but many in the room weren't wearing masks, Trump told the crowd. He's protecting seniors, but you have to live your lives. I'm working as hard as I can see. You can kiss and hug your Children and grandchildren very soon. That's something I missed. Also, I will be honest with you. Polls indicate Trump's support with seniors isn't a strong as it was four years ago, and his handling of the pandemic is a big part of that. Tamara Keith NPR news traveling with the president. The Biden campaign, meanwhile, says the Democratic presidential nominees tested negative again for Corona virus. He's campaigning this hour in Michigan Whole show former vice President Joe Biden with a growing lead over President Trump's so far with the administration's handling of the Corona virus. Foremost on the minds of many voters next Wednesday, just a week and a half before the election. Former President Barack Obama will make US first in person campaign appearance for the Biden Harris ticket in Philadelphia. Another concern in the middle of a pandemic. The federal deficit NPR Scott Horsefly reports it hit a record $3.1 trillion in the fiscal year that just ended A deficit for fiscal year. 2020 was more than twice as big as the previous high set during the great recession a decade ago. It's about three times what the government had been expecting before the pandemic struck. With businesses shuttered and millions of people out of work. Government tax revenue shrank at the same time federal spending balloon as Congress authorized trillions of dollars in relief payments to keep families and businesses afloat. Trump administration was already facing a $1 trillion deficits even before the pandemic hit. Despite the government's massive borrowing interest rates have remained exceptionally low. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR news. In friends. Police have shot dead the suspect in a shockingly brutal attack Today in a small French town about 50 miles northeast of Paris. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports. The incident appears to be related to the ongoing trial for the terrorist attack on satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo. Ah, warning this report may not be suitable for young listeners. Police are treating this as a terrorist attack. A man was slain in public on the street in broad daylight. Decapitated by another man with a knife. French media are reporting that the victim was a history teacher from a local high school who had shown his students pictures of caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed. Such caricatures are central to the ongoing trial of 14 people accused of helping the terrorists who attacked the magazine in 2015, killing 12 people. Charlie Hebdo recently republished the caricatures to mark the beginning of the trial. Three weeks ago, a Pakistani migrant attacked a woman with a knife near the former offices of the magazine to avenge what he said was the blasphemy of the cartoons. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS The number of American troops will be leaving in Afghanistan in the coming months is still in dispute. National security adviser Robert O'Brien says President Trump and Secretary of Defense Mark Esper have already signed off on drawing down forces to 2500 by early next year. But this week General Mark Milley Told NPR. True production still depend on conditions on the ground. So far, the Taliban have been violating the terms of their peace agreement with United States Taliban attacks in Afghanistan. Have risen. I'm Laxmi, saying NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include focus features and MSNBC films. Presenting the way I see it and inside. Look at President Obama and Reagan through the eyes of White House photographer Pete Souza.

President Trump NPR president Tamara Keith NPR US Eleanor Beardsley Barack Obama Charlie Hebdo Joe Biden Fort Meyers vice President Paris Taliban Biden Harris MSNBC Scott Horsley Pete Souza
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:26 min | 4 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"The poles in stride. We're doing very well, The polls are looking actually great. We're doing very well gonna have a big victory. I look forward to it. The Republican incumbent is back out campaigning in battleground states making up for time he lost while he was forced to stay close to home when he was sick with covert 19. And he's introduced something new in his campaign rally speech into Moine, Iowa, about his teenage son Barron. Testing positive at one point for Corona virus. First Lady Melania Trump said yesterday there son showed no symptoms. She has fiercely guarded, barren trumps privacy, but the president is now holding up. His youngest child's case is an example of why he thinks schools should fully reopen. President Trump Supreme Court nominee is a step closer to getting confirmed by the GOP led Senate. NPR's Claudia Goody SALIS reports. The date's been set for October 22nd for the Judiciary Committee to vote on recommending that the full Senate back Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. We can't say for sure what's going to happen, however, the committee has set that vote for next week to vote. Her nomination out to the full Senate floor and in terms of who might vote against state. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are two potential no votes. Democrats are still hoping That they'll have more Republicans flip and vote against this and perhaps derail the effort. But right now it looks like this could be a done deal. NPR's Claudia Chrysalis reporting more developments in the saga over early voting, a Texas State court his block governor, Greg Abbot's order. Limiting Texas counties to a single drop off side for mail in ballots. This comes just days after a federal appeals court upheld the governor's order in a parallel lawsuit. At last check on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average was down slightly 20,502. This is NPR. The Labor Department is reporting an increase in state unemployment claims last week. NPR's Scott Horsefly has details. Almost 900,000 people filed new state claims for unemployment last week that's 53,000 Mohr than the previous week. The jump in claims reflects continued weakness in the job market. The numbers may also be clouded by reporting issues. Another 373,000 people filed jobless claims under a special federal program for gig workers and the self employed. As the recession drags on passed the six month mark. People who lost jobs in the spring are beginning to exhaust their regular unemployment benefits. By late September, nearly 2.8 million people had rolled onto an emergency program. It offers up to 13 weeks of extended help. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington The Chinese government is unhappy with the U. S decision to appoint its first ever human rights coordinator for Tibetan issues. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson claiming the U. S. Is trying to destabilize Tibet. NPR's Emily Fang with details China said it considers Tibetan affairs internal issues which the U. S has no right interfering in Religion. A Chinese spokesperson said at a regular press briefing today that the decision to create a new special coordinator was quote entirely out of political manipulation. Much of what happens in the Tibetan autonomous region is unknown because it is virtually inaccessible to diplomats and foreign journalists. Regency, numerous protests and revolts against Chinese communist rule since it was forcibly annexed in the 19 fifties. Emily Fang. NPR News Josiane Province, China. I'm Laxmi saying NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include progressive insurance, comparing car insurance rates from multiple insurers, so shoppers can evaluate options in one place. Now that's progressive. Comparison's available at progressive dot com or 1, 800 progressive. The president personally called him up and say, Mr President, let's get a deal tomorrow. Let me say this. The president has sent Mr Mnuchin to negotiate. That's what we've done with other president. This is a unusual what President Bush we had who did this quite a bit, because that's how you negotiate you and then you take it to the president. This, Mr.

NPR president Mr President President Bush Senate Emily Fang Lady Melania Trump China Judiciary Committee Claudia Goody SALIS Chinese Foreign Ministry Susan Collins Moine Texas Iowa Supreme Court Judge Amy Cockney Barrett
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:09 min | 5 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. Dozens of wildfires in Oregon have forced nearly 500,000 people, some 10% of the state's population. To evacuate their homes. Hundreds of homes were destroyed. But Jonathan Levinson of Argon Public Broadcasting says the blazes air spreading so quickly. Officials can't yet tell the full extent of the destruction in southern Oregon alone, an estimated 1 to 2000 homes have been lost in the northern part of the state. No one's been able to get back to their towns to assess the damage, and fire officials say things were moving so fast that they don't have a good estimate. The neighbouring states of Washington and California are also battling massive fires that have forced evacuations. The Labor Department reports another bump in inflation, with the Consumer prices index up for third month. NPR's Scott Horsefly has details. Consumer prices jumped by 4/10 of a percent in August. Prices have been rebounding after a steep drop early in the pandemic. Jump in used car prices led the August increase. Overall, inflation remains fairly mild, with prices up just 1.3% from a year ago. Grocery prices, however, are 4.6% higher than last year. Food prices are coming back to Earth after soaring earlier this spring. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street. At this hour, the Dow is up 183 points. This's NPR from K C. R W I'm Cherry Glaser with this local news update. If you were planning to head up to big bear this weekend, you're gonna have to cancel. Officials are asking visitors to stay away from Big Bear Valley for the next several days because of the threat from the Eldorado fire. It's burned more than 13,000 acres since it started in Yucaipa a week ago. Crews are making steady progress. The fire is now about a third surrounded, but Cal fire operation Section chief Daniel Diaz says they're still challenges for firefighters on the frontlines. The west side of the fire continues to actively burned in the heavy, decadent fuels on the steep slopes. We're doing everything we can to try to get into that and secure it. But it's being very difficult..

NPR Oregon Washington Big Bear Valley Barbara Klein Scott Horsefly Scott Horsley Jonathan Levinson Argon Public Broadcasting Section chief Yucaipa Labor Department Daniel Diaz Cherry Glaser California
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:07 min | 6 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Lie from NPR news. I'm Korova Coleman. President Trump is preparing to visit Kenosha, Wisconsin, the side of a police shooting of a black man killings of protesters and violent unrest. Democratic leaders, including Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers, have asked Trump not to visit. Wisconsin State representative David Bowen is a member of the state's legislative Black caucus. He told NPR's morning edition. He agrees I think the president is only coming to fan flames. Hey, started this division. He wants us to be torn apart as Americans and I don't see his presence in Kenosha. Actually healing the community of Kenosha healing to state of Wisconsin. Republican officials say they're looking forward to Trump's visit. Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson says Trump is providing decisive leadership. September is off to a mostly positive start on Wall Street after a heady month of August. NPR's gone horsefly reports, The Dow Jones industrial Average shows little change in early trading. Despite a mostly down day on Monday, August turned out to be the best month in decades for major stock indexes. Both the Dow and the S and P 500 index gained about 7% during the month, while the NASDAQ soared nearly 10%. Gaines continued overnight in Asian markets. A new report shows factory activity in China surge last month, thanks to a jump in new export orders. Market still face considerable uncertainty over the path of the Corona virus. In a White House conference call with governors, Dr Anthony found, she warned, it's important that people use caution over the Labor Day weekend. To avoid the kind of infectious outbreaks that followed gatherings on Memorial Day and the fourth of July. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Tens of millions of Americans air facing eviction notices this month as they struggle to pay their bills amid the pandemic. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports, federal and state moratoriums on evictions are expiring in many states starting today. Renters who were shielded from the eviction under legislation passed by Congress earlier this year are no longer protected against losing their homes for being late on the rent payments. Ellie Thaxton works with families facing evictions in Georgia. I think it's going to be the most vulnerable that are going to be impacted and that's going to be single mothers, Children, people of color. Single black mothers are the most common evictions that we normally see. Tens of millions of Americans have lost $600 in additional weekly unemployment benefits that expired in July. The federal government has extended some eviction protections through the end of the year. But the extension on LY protects a small percentage of renters. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Ah House Committee plans to subpoena Postmaster General Lewis to joy. Democrats say he has failed to provide them with information about slow mail delivery after changes at the U. S Postal Service. On Wall Street. The Dow is up 33 points at 28,463. It's NPR from the David Burnett Foundation News. Her make a C R W I'm Cherry Glazer. The California legislative session came to a chaotic and last night for the year, a state lawmakers raced and sometimes failed to beat a midnight deadline for passing bills. Several Corona virus related proposals did squeak in under the wire and are heading to Governor Gavin Newsom's desk, among them new labor protections for hotel, janitorial and airport employees. Another bill would allow can strap Californians to borrow more money from the retirement accounts with tent without tax penalties, And yet another would've wore a high school diplomas to students who were unable to finish the final months of the school year due to the pandemic. Newsome has until the end of this month to decide whether to sign the bills into law. Among the measures that failed to make it out of the Legislature were a number of police reform proposals that were introduced in response to concerns about police brutality and systemic racism. Case here. W's Darryl Sanson has this roundup. One measure that did pass and now heads to Governor Newsome would require the state Justice Department to look into fatal shootings by law enforcement officers. Attorney General Javier or Bezerra opposed that bill, saying that his office lacks the resource is to oversee all police shootings. And it's not clear if Newsom will sign it. Newsome has vowed design another bill that reached his desk that would ban police officers from using chokeholds in karate. It holds a chokehold applies pressure to a person's wind pipe, while a corroded hold applies pressure to a person's corroded artery. X closed the flow of blood to the brain. Both can be deadly, and there have been calls to ban them nationwide. But many far reaching police reform stalled. Those included a bill that would strip officers who commit misconduct of their badge and hold them financially responsible. If Sude Another measure that would have established strict rules about how and when law enforcement could use less lethal projectiles. Such his rubber bullets also failed to pass and one bill had the support it needed but still failed to pass. That bill would have made it easier for members of the public to see disciplinary records of police officers accused of racist or discriminatory actions. It passed both houses but time ran out before the bill could return to the Senate for a final procedural vote. For Casey Ar w I'm Darryl SATs meant more than a million acres in California have burned this summer. The short term cause for the wildfires is running into the millions of dollars and his cap radios. Ezra David Romero reports, the price tag could continue to skyrocket. Madame Rose is an expert in the economics of disasters in climate change policy at USC, he says the probability of fires costing more than a pandemic is very likely unless something is done to curb climate change fast while fires in one year not his biggest cove it but What we should do is look at the probabilities of occurrence. I think it's fair to say the fires could be just a cz devastating as code 19 to prevent future fires and their negative economic impact. He says. Forrest need to be cleaned quickly with things like prescribed burns. A state in the federal government announced a plan last week to Finn. One million acres of force.

NPR Governor Newsome President Trump Wisconsin Kenosha Governor Gavin Newsom federal government Windsor Johnston Wisconsin State California Korova Coleman Ezra David Romero president Tony Evers David Bowen Congress
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:20 min | 6 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Home. So she worries this month's bill will be even higher. We have a very full house, There's always a computer on and there's always an Xbox playing, and there's always a TV left on economist Steve Sakala of Tufts University has been studying electric consumption as a window on how families and businesses are weathering the pandemic. In ordinary times home electricity use perks up in the morning. There's people wake up and start the coffee, then drops during the workday to colonise. The Corona virus has upended that predictable pattern. People are sleeping in later in the day, and it's like a smooth increase over the course of today because they're at home, and I think we're staying up a little bit later, too. So far. The spike in home electric use has not made up for the drop in commercial and industrial demand, But the gap is narrowing as home air conditioners are working overtime. Lease of Roman shares a tiny apartment in Philadelphia with her boyfriend, a dog and a cat. It seemed like plenty of space until they were all staying there virtually around the clock. Suddenly, those vaulted ceilings were not so attractive. The feelings make it feel like you're in a big space, but that's expensive to keep cool. Roman, who's a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, says her electric bill in June was more than double last year's She feels fortunate she can afford the increase. But she knows is a really hardship for many people, especially those who have lost their jobs. If you have no income, and you now need to have your family there all the time like it's got to be expensive, Froma noticed her water bill has gone up to, perhaps from all the extra hand washing. Shawn Chambers, who runs the water department in Greeley, Colorado, says residential customers there are using 30% more water this year than last. He blames much of the increase on this year's hot, dry weather. Let suspects the pandemic is also playing a part. People were certainly at home using water in ways they had not previously one other residential bill that's gone sky high WiFi The Andrew Ramirez says. Since the pandemic began, her family keeps going over its data limit, and she's had to pay their Internet service provider for extra gigabytes. For the first couple months. They weren't charging people for over ages, but apparently in their world. The pandemic ended in June. That's something I reached out to them about and said, Hey, we're all still stuck at home. Did you miss the memo? Ramirez expects to remain stuck at home for the foreseeable future. There are tradeoffs for all those extra expenses, she says. She likes being able to spend more time with her kids and with no work clothes to wash, she is saving a bundle on laundry. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington We now know that the risk of transmitting coded 19 is much higher people gather indoors in poorly ventilated spaces. So how khun Schools and businesses that are reopening improve their indoor air quality. NPR's Camilla Domino Ski reports Dennis Night talks to a lot of building owners who want one thing. One thing he can't give them. You cannot guarantee that someone might not get sick night is with ashtray, an organization of heating ventilation and air conditioning professionals. The group has set guidelines for preventing the spread of cove in 19 through indoor air and night says, Watch out for anyone selling a device and promising it will eliminate the risk from the Corona virus. That's when the hairs stand upon the back on that, and I get really suspicious that it's I'm being approached by a snake oil salesman. Right? There is no silver bullet, he says. Big buildings like offices and schools need better air filters in their age HVAC systems and they need better maintenance and more fresh air coming in and fans running for longer. You've got to do everything and you've got to do it with diligence, And even then there's no guarantee The guidance hasn't always been clear on what to Dio for awhile. Experts couldn't even confirm if the disease could be spread through the air beyond 6 ft. Now there's a growing consensus that is a risk. Kathleen Owen is an air filtration consultant and Cary, North Carolina. It's tricky, and it's confusing and large, but it's scary. It's tricky and confusing, in part because every building is different and the best most effective air filters. Many heating air conditioning and ventilation systems can't handle them. The answer to it is first don't panic. Second do what you can think about how we wear masks and in 95 his ideal, But not everyone, Conjugate one, so a cloth mask is better than nothing. Similarly, Owen says. If the most effective filter is not an option, used the best filter your machine can handle. Run your system for longer. Consider adding portable purifiers and don't overlook the low tech solutions like opening windows and doors. Raj said he is an engineer in Washington, D. C. Who says schools and businesses need to start thinking creatively like Can you set up a tent? Maybe you go virtual when the temperature is over 90 degrees. And then when it's under 90 degrees, you just hold class outside. His company has designed a spreadsheet other engineers can use to help think through the different options for improving air quality and reducing risk. He pulls it up to demonstrate it. Then I put in the ventilation per person. Then there's total air changes, and he starts plugging in different kinds of changes. So now is an engineer. I'm going to go. I'm going to change the filters. A number representing risk goes down. Maybe I will go down to half the population. The risk goes down. Some more, said he knows that scientists are still discovering new things about this virus. But he says engineers need to use the data. We have to make decisions right now, Look, engineers apply. Scientists do science. We have to give you a solution. That's it and when being outdoors isn't an option, and people have to gather inside a building, he says. There's no real downside to having fewer people, better filters and more fresh air. It might cost more money, but improving indoor air quality is good for human health pandemic or not. Camila Romanowski. NPR news as school district's begin their fall semester. Some are under pressure to return in person. But public health experts are warning those districts to be ready to close down again. NPR's crook, Siegler visited one rural school in Idaho.

NPR engineer Andrew Ramirez Kathleen Owen Philadelphia Shawn Chambers Steve Sakala khun Schools Tufts University Camila Romanowski Greeley Froma University of Pennsylvania Scott Horsley Colorado Washington Roman postdoctoral fellow
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 7 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Corbett Coleman, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden Sound Foran interview Tuesday with the National Association of Black Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Biden says if elected, he would not reverse President Trump's tariffs on China. He says it will take a multi layered approach to get China to change its behavior. Stocks opened higher this morning. Despite worrisome signs about the U. S. Job market. NPR Scott Horsley reports the Dow Jones industrials Roves about 200 points in early trading. A rebound in the labor market that began in May appears to be losing steam, the payroll processing company, ADP said. This morning, private employers added just 167,000 jobs last month, far fewer than forecasters were expecting. That could be a warning sign. The government's official jobs report out on Friday, may disappoint. US lost more than 22 million jobs in March and April and regained on Ly about 1/3 as many jobs in May and June. Timecard trackers Kronos in Homebase suggest Job growth slowed sharply in July as the number of new Corona virus infections took off. Stalling job market would spell trouble in an economy where unemployment still tops 11%. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington A gigantic explosion in Beirut Tuesday has left many people homeless in the port city. The BBC Sebastian Usher says at least 100 people were killed in the blast and about 4000 were injured. Those Lebanese who managed to get to sleep last night in Beirut, woke to a scene described in the local media as apocalyptic. The epicenter of the blast in the port shows buildings flattened with just the bare cliff face of a large structures still standing by the sea. The financial damage to a country already in economic collapse is being measured. In billions of dollars on with grief. A cold rage is also rising among many Lebanese against their seemingly eternal cast of political leaders with renewed demands for them to be swept aside the BBC Sebastian Usher. Republicans are calling former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates to Capitol Hill this hour. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports they will ask Yates about investigations of some of President Trump's allies. Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham plans to focus on three main areas of questioning Why Sally Yates signed off on surveillance warrants for former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. The Justice Department's probe a former Trump National security advisor Michael Flynn, in an Obama White House meeting about the Flynn investigation. The Republican led hearing is part of a broader effort to scrutinize actions by the Obama administration before and after the last presidential election. Democrats in Congress or give the hearings a waste of time. Instead, they saying lawmakers should focus on threats to the 2020 election by Russia, China and other foreign adversaries. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street, The Dow Jones industrials are up 246 points. You're listening to NPR news from the David Burnett Foundation newsroom a K C. R w I'm Cherry Glaser come to Mayor Asia Brown, another city officials are calling on California Attorney General Javier Becerra and the U. S. Justice Department. To investigate allegations of a deputy gang at the L. A county sheriff's station in Compton. Ah claim fall against Lake County alleges that a clique called the Executioner's said illegal arrest quotas sport matching tattoos of Nazi imagery and retaliated against a deputy after he reported an alleged gang member for assaulting a colleague. Here's Mayor Brown, speaking at a news conference yesterday. They terrorized the community and in the cover the phrase it is unacceptable that take this Attorney General Javier Santa to stand up for the black and brown people, something it is unacceptable for us to be terrorized in this community. Members of the community shared stories about their personal experiences with law enforcement. Restaurant owner Jemele Henderson says he was recently pulled over handcuffed and placed in a squad car by Deputy without cause. You.

Trump Sally Yates Joe Biden China Scott Horsley Sebastian Usher Carrie Johnson BBC Beirut President Washington Mayor Asia Brown National Association of Black Deputy Attorney General US National Association of Hispan NPR Corbett Coleman
2 grim reports are expected on virus' damage to US economy

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

2 grim reports are expected on virus' damage to US economy

"Stocks opened lower this morning after two discouraging economic reports. NPR's got Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average fell about 500 points in early trading. In a grim yardstick of the economic toll taken by the Corona virus pandemic. The Commerce Department says the U. S economy shrank at an annual rate of 32.9% this spring. That's the sharpest contraction in Postwar history. The drop between April and June was nearly four times as steep as the worst quarter of the great recession. By the end of the quarter economic activity began to pick up again, but I hope for recovery this summer could be short circuited as the nation continues to wrestle with a surge of new infections, the Labor Department says new claims for state unemployment benefits rose last week for the second time in a row new claims for a special federal unemployment program. Dropped. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley NPR Commerce Department Labor Department
Here’s how the stock market tends to trade after brutal selloffs like Thursday’s

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 9 months ago

Here’s how the stock market tends to trade after brutal selloffs like Thursday’s

"Stocks opened higher this morning clawing back some of the ground they lost in Thursday's big selloff and your Scott Horsley reports the Dow jumped more than seven hundred points in early trading some investors are bargain hunting this morning after the stock market steepest drop since mid March on Thursday with the Dow lost more than eighteen hundred points or nearly seven percent volatility is likely to continue as investors reassess the ongoing threat from the corona virus several states including Texas Utah and Alabama are experiencing a surge in covert nineteen hospitalizations after relaxing their stay home orders even without a fresh wave of infections the economic recovery from the pandemic is expected to be slow economists surveyed by the Wall Street journal generally agree with this week's forecast from the federal reserve that unemployment at the end of this year will likely exceed nine percent Scott Horsley NPR news

Scott Horsley Utah Wall Street Journal Texas Alabama NPR
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:53 min | 11 months ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Were significantly lower than the two previous weeks Scott Horsley NPR news Washington taking a look at the numbers the Dow was up thirty three points today the nasdaq rose a hundred and thirty nine points global temperature in March of twenty twenty was the second hottest on record NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports is up more than fifty percent chance this will end up being the hottest year ever recorded global temperatures continue to rise because of climate change that trend is clear in the latest data from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration may June and July are forecast to be hotter than average in most of the U. S. except the upper plains states that follows the second hottest March going back to eighteen eighty the water in the Gulf of Mexico had its hottest March ever this year no a climate scientists say warmer than average temperatures will likely continue this summer although it's too soon to predict exactly how hot the water will be hotter water makes powerful web hurricanes more likely the next three months are also predicted to be Rainier than average in the central U. S. and almost everywhere east of the Mississippi River Rebecca Hersher NPR news and in fact a new study finds much of the western U. S. is baking in what scientists are calling an emerging mega drop the study in the journal science blaming almost half the problem on human impacts on global warming you're listening to NPR most churches in America have moved their services entirely online but many regular worshippers are not participating that's one of the findings from a new poll on how the corona virus is affecting the nation's churches here's NPR's Tom gjelten the poll from the public religion research institute found that ninety seven percent of US Christians who normally go to church at least a few times a year did not attend in person Easter services handled by a three to one margin they think stay at home orders.

Washington NPR Rebecca Hersher Mexico America Scott Horsley twenty twenty Rainier Mississippi River Tom gjelten
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"S. will happen on a large scale soon that comment came in a tweet this morning Dr Anthony Fauci who heads the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases made similar comments to reporters yesterday it's not gonna be months it's going to be a week or so we gonna get many many more a test that will be available she acknowledges the current system of testing is inadequate the trump administration says those who can't do their jobs because of the virus may be eligible to collect unemployment insurance here's NPR's Scott Horsley the labor department is giving states the green light to offer unemployment insurance Danny worker who gets sick with corona virus has to care for a sick family member or whose employer is quarantine or shut down the administration's promise to offer financial support to those workers so they don't have to choose between going to work sick and possibly spreading the virus or missing a paycheck labor secretary Eugene Scalia says the ministration will use all available tools to assist workers who were adversely affected by the pandemic the new guidelines did not extend to workers who are already eligible for sick leave or get paid family leave from their employer Scott Horsley NPR news Washington house speaker Nancy Pelosi says Congress is close to an agreement with the White House on a bill to help Americans affected by the virus this is NPR news from Washington this is WNYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake New York state is banning public gatherings of five hundred people or more starting today at five o'clock Broadway shows also will go dark the state is making asking hospitals to find more staffing as well governor Cuomo says these are necessary steps to fight the spread of the virus we're asking former doctors and nurses to reconnect with your old hospital your old health care employer to be on an on call basis the governor says the states also preparing to meet the expected demand for hospital beds nursing homes across the state of also been directed to forbid visitors all schools and places of worship within a section of newer sheller close for two weeks in an effort to slow the virus thirty four year old Selena Perez white says her children are students at one of the shuttered schools and she's trying to keep them home and inside as much as possible I'm to keep the ball in the hole I know that my house is clean disinfect every day every morning in between everything that we do the right thing down spraying the people when those goals and just keep the disease and tenant advocates are calling for a stop on addictions because of the worry of the spread businesses say many workers will lose income now that the city and state of an ounce regulations to limit large gatherings eva Farkas is the executive director of the met council on housing she says that officials need to make sure that people can stay in their homes people are going to lose income and that's gonna really hurt people's ability to pay rent the New York City Housing Authority says it will stop issuing warrants for evictions and it's CUNY schools prepare to move classes online for the rest of the semester campus food pantries are planning to stay open WNYC she made about soup has more it's the number one question campus food pantries are getting right now will you be open this year and we're here to serve our students in the best way we possibly can that's Carol Brower director of student life at the college of Staten Island she says they've stocked up with more food than usual and they're planning to stay open unless directed otherwise in a survey of CUNY students conducted last year nearly half of the respondents reported feeling unsure about whether they'd be able to afford or access healthy foods.

Dr Anthony Fauci National Institute
Reported virus cases spike as Europe sees its first major outbreak

All Things Considered

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Reported virus cases spike as Europe sees its first major outbreak

"Corona virus contagion hit the U. S. stock market today heart the Dow Jones industrial average tumbled more than a thousand points that's more than three and a half percent investors are spooked by the growing number of infections outside China and the possible economic cost if the epidemic spreads clusters of corona virus have been diagnosed in South Korea in Italy and in a run and your Scott Horsley reports up until now the U. S. markets had seen largely immune to corona virus shocks but not anymore investors were rattled by a spike in the number of cases beyond China's borders Italy went from just three confirmed cases last week two hundred and twenty four Italian authorities have now sealed off some of the hardest hit towns near the country's business capital of Milan they also canceled soccer matches and the last two days of carnival in Venice J. Bryce and Wells Fargo securities says that may not be enough about your operate very very open borders and if people are affected in Italy could very well spread to other European countries that's the last thing Europe's already slow growing economy needs Diane Swonk whose chief economist at grant Thornton says as other countries work to control the virus is likely to further dampen economic activity yeah I went there you know telling people to stay and they're shutting down schools and institutions and plant the same thing in northern Italy now parts of northern Italy actually canceling conferences and telling people to stay N. swung was attending a conference of business economists here in Washington where the spread of the corona virus and the resulting stock market plunge were very much on people's minds this is not a health pandemic yet but it's becoming rapidly in economics and Dominic some U. S. companies were already feeling the effects of China's massive quarantines and the spread of the virus will only amplify that like China South Korea is a major exporter supplying the U. S. with nearly eighty billion dollars worth of goods last year Bryson says some of those exports are finished products but others are components used by American manufacturers of electronics computers and cars we import for amount of auto products from South Korea and if the country were to shut down for any reasonable length of time then you could have supply chain repercussions here in the auto industry in the United States Ford shares were down more than four percent today apple shares lost close to five percent many forecasters have been expecting a rapid rebound from the economic pain the corona virus outbreak but Swonk now worries it could take longer with the virus still spreading she warns businesses consumers and tourists could make lasting changes in their sourcing shopping and traveling plants combat in the outbreak is actually feeding into this years that people have out there which is a tax on the global economy itself numerous business meetings and trade shows in Europe and Asia have already been canceled that has an immediate toll on airlines hotels but also a more lingering cost in deals that don't get done for shoppers and travelers within this country the fear factor remains fairly muted to date there have been just thirty five confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States and only two of those were contracted here so far in North America there's been a mild response people don't walk around wearing masks they haven't canceled events yes David Kotok is chief investment officer at Cumberland advisors he's been saying for weeks that the stock market was underestimating the risk of coronavirus today he thinks the pendulum may have swung the other way one has to now say is the market now going to extremes is it going to panic Kotok is still cautious about the virus itself he's the rare person in Florida who actually does wear one of those protective face mask these days he's bolder though about the financial contagion on the day the Dow was losing more than a thousand points Kotok was buying stocks Scott Horsley NPR news

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Up on fresh air first news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Laxmi saying the Democratic Party is looking for a reset in New Hampshire after the reporting to buckle in Iowa where there's still no one clear winner and peers Osman college says senators Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren are hoping a little New England home turf advantage will make a difference while a third candidate decides to move on before the polls even close while most democratic presidential candidates are in New Hampshire tonight former vice president Joe Biden is skipping out on his own party and bouncing down to South Carolina instead by dimples much better with African American voters and South Carolina which is the fourth state to vote has a larger share of black democratic voters Biden plans to speak to New Hampshire supporters via live stream it's a sign of the extremely low expectations his campaign has for New Hampshire he's getting squeezed by moderate candidates to judge and Minnesota senator any club shower a small college NPR news Manchester Roger stone could now be looking at last time behind bars after president trump took to Twitter to protest federal prosecutors recommendation that is long time ally should serve seven nine years the justice department led by Attorney General William Barr is taking the unusual step of revising that recommendation a justice department prosecutor who worked under former special counsel Robert Muller today filed a notice of withdrawal from the case Roger stone was accused of breaking the law as an intermediary between trump's campaign wikileaks in twenty sixteen he was convicted last fall of witness tampering making false statements and obstruction the corona virus disease global health officials are now formally recognizing as covert nineteen shows no sign of abating more than forty thousand people have been infected about twenty percent of these patients develop the disease caused by the virus but a thousand people have died from the illness for which there may not be a vaccine for eighteen more months the vast majority of the cases remain in China where the no evil corona virus was first detected in December on top of the human toll the outbreak is taking an economic toll and the federal reserve is watching to see how disruptions in China will affect the US economy we have this from NPR's Scott Horsley helpful looking rational committee at the central bank is monitoring the outbreak closely the new corona virus itself along with Chinese quarantine efforts are disrupting travel demand for US exports and the supply of components used by American manufacturers bounces it could be sometime though before the extent of the damage can be measured with any confidence we do expect that there would be some a fax the question really will be what will be the the the size and scope of them and also will be processed or will be something that just passes through hell knows China's central bank has already taken steps to cushion the economic blow but he says it's not yet clear whether similar actions will be needed in the U. S. Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR news live from KQED news I'm terrace Siler the port of Oakland saw a jump in volume last month KQ these Brian what looks at what's changed port officials say seven point three percent more import cargo passed through Oakland last month compared to January of twenty nineteen export volumes were up as well in officials hope the port is now in recovery from the trade war between the United States and China the two countries made an agreement that included a commitment by China to purchase more farm goods from the US the new potential concern says the ports maritime director is that the spread of the corona virus in China could tamp down on trade he's already hearing from shipping companies that cargo volumes could fall off over the next few months I'm Brian white KQED news judges in the ninth circuit court of appeals have heard arguments on a lawsuit filed by the city of Oakland against Wells Fargo which alleges the bank discriminated against people of color by issuing riskier mortgages he could easily Chang reports the city says a risky mortgages ementa more foreclosures which lowered property values and a loss in property tax revenue but Wells Fargo once the case thrown out essentially saying that Oakland's argument is a stretch for the city doesn't have standing to sue the bank and wells Fargo's lawyer Neil Patel argued that if the lawsuit is allowed to go forward if permit flower shops or neighborhood businesses to see you because the the harm from the additional vacancies and property degradation the judges have yet to make their decision I'm Julie tank KQ reading news and there's more online at KQED news dot org I'm terrace either and support today comes from.

Washington Democratic Party NPR
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Workers who had been on the sidelines suggesting that maybe more slack in the labor force than the low unemployment rate would indicate Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR news from Washington high temperatures and gusty winds have returned to Australia where another quarter million people are being urged to evacuate their homes because of bush fires those fires have killed at least twenty seven people and destroyed more than twenty one hundred homes since September NPR's Jason Beaubien is on the south coast of New South Wales the fires a season or so extensive that authorities say there's no way they can protect everyone's property hundreds of fires continue to burn in with temperatures rising to close to one hundred degrees things could get even worse some communities remain cut off without power or running water firefighters have been struggling to gain control of a blazing Kangaroo Island had to evacuate their own base further delaying efforts to contain that fire in the coastal town of Eden a wood chip pilot a lumber plant caught fire a week ago and continues to billow huge plumes of smoke into the air and farmers are trucking in hate to feed livestock in pastures that have been blackened by the flames Jason Beaubien NPR news Nowra New South Wales environmental activists in Germany are demonstrating today outside the offices of engineering firm Siemens for calling on the company to back away from a coal mining project in Australia citing the impact of emissions from coal fired power plants on global warming the company's bidding to supply signaling systems for the and Donnie mine Wall Street is coming off another day of record highs.

Washington Australia Jason Beaubien New South Wales Kangaroo Island Germany Scott Horsley NPR bush South Wales Siemens
U.S. Manufacturing Shrinks for Fifth Month

Science Friday

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. Manufacturing Shrinks for Fifth Month

"The nation's manufacturing activity declined in December for the fifth month in a row NPR Scott Horsley reports a survey of senior executive show the weakest performance in more than ten years the trade war continue to weigh on manufacturing last month even as the trump administration announced progress in trade talks with China Canada and Mexico an index of manufacturing activity fell to its lowest level in more than a decade factory employment production and new orders all show declines in December manufacturing more vulnerable to trade tensions than other parts the economy the much larger services sector has not experienced the same kind of slump analysts say factories will likely continue to face pressure in the new year from the trade war factory output will also suffer as a result of Boeing's decision to temporarily halt production of its troubled seven thirty seven Max jets Scott Horsley NPR news

Scott Horsley China Canada Mexico Boeing Senior Executive NPR
The Ups and Downs of the U.S. Economy in 2019

All Things Considered

03:52 min | 1 year ago

The Ups and Downs of the U.S. Economy in 2019

"The US economy is heading into twenty twenty on a positive note the stock market is near record high unemployment is near record low and I'll trade tensions haven't been resolved completely they have settled down for the moment and here Scott Horsley recap some of the ups and downs of the economy in twenty nineteen and takes a look at what lies ahead next year when CNN asked Americans this month how they're feeling about the economy three out of four describe conditions as good or very good that's the most positive rating posters of found since two thousand one and no wonder lots of people are working paychecks are growing faster than inflation and while there were some storm clouds on the economic horizon this year most of us didn't get soaked I spoke to a commissary house at the busy office of Wells Fargo securities confidence remains pretty darn hot so consumers so feel very good about the overall position of the economy especially the jobs market and that does suggest that consumer spending should remain pretty strong as we head into twenty twenty U. S. employers added nearly two million jobs in the first eleven months of this year and while that's down from the two point four million in the same period last year it's still pretty strong the eleventh year of an economic expansion average wages rose a little over three percent in the last year slightly more for those at the bottom of the income ladder and the stock market spent much of December setting new records even if I have a lot of consumers these days aren't directly invested in the stock market you know they see the headlines and see it as a good sign the market's performance looks even better because last December was so lousy the Dow Jones industrial average is up twenty two percent for this year but the game would be only half that large if you count from the end of November twenty eighteen before government shut down and the threat of an all out trade war triggered a stock market swoon last Christmas this year the government managed to keep the lights on manta commas Nermin bear of ash of H. as market says trade tensions with China and other countries have been turned down to a slow boy well we're not out of the woods area and there's there's still a fair amount of uncertainty although the good news is it looks like we sort of step back from the precipice on a lot of these issues still some of the damage from the trade war has already been done manufacturing's been in a slump for the last four months factories are especially sensitive to global forces and nervous business owners have been reluctant to invest a year ago at this time federal reserve officials thought they would be raising interest rates to prevent the economy from overheating instead an abrupt about face fed chairman drone palace colleagues cut interest rates three times between July and October anything anybody saw coming the challenges that we face this year they were a surprise houses in his college were forced to change course when confronted with the president's trade war and a slowdown in global growth I am pleased that we would move to support the economy in the way that we did I think our moves will we'll prove appropriate and again I I I think both the economy and monetary policy right now I think we're in a good place lower interest rates have given a boost to the housing market but there are still challenges out there president trump has a media with China will be signed in a couple of weeks but most of the terrorists are still in place and Boeing's announcement that it's temporarily halting production of the troubled seven three seven Max jet will put a noticeable dent in first quarter growth economic growth was already slowing to about two point three percent this year and somewhat less than that next year still says the economy is not likely to grind to a halt it looks like we've dodged the recession it looks like manufacturing activity may have had a trough we have lowered now the probability of a recession both in the U. S. in the world about twenty percent that should give consumers the confidence they need to keep spending in the new year Scott Horsley NPR news

United States
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KCRW

"The BBC's Nick fake reporting the US Supreme Court is scheduled to take up its first major gun rights case in a decade NPR's Nina Totenberg reports the justices on Monday will hear arguments on now defunct gun regulations in New York City several gun owners and the New York affiliate of the NRA challenged regulations for having a handgun at home in New York City under the regulations as they existed when the case began a license to have a gun at home only allowed the gun owner to transport the weapon to seven shooting ranges inside the city limits that meant these pistol owners could not transport their guns to a home elsewhere in the state for instance or the shooting ranges in competitions outside the city this year the city change those rules to be more permissive but the gun owners are pressing the Supreme Court to lay out yet more permissive rules for gun ownership and transport Nina Totenberg NPR news Washington nearly six out of ten companies in the S. and P. five hundred index are at risk of losing assets because of climate change and PR Scott Horsley reports that's according to a new guide for climate savvy investors the guide evaluate some fifteen thousand companies around the world to see which are most exposed to a changing climate many of those companies have assets a growing risk of physical damage from wild fires hurricane droughts or other problems associated with rising carbon in the atmosphere analysts also flag businesses that could be adversely affected by regulatory changes such as a carbon tax those risks are higher in the US and Australia than in other countries which have already adopted more aggressive policies to combat climate change even companies in the same industry often have widely varying exposure to climate risk the assessments were conducted by true cost which is an arm of S. and P. global Scott Horsley NPR news Washington you're listening to NPR.

BBC Nick fake US Supreme Court NPR Nina Totenberg NRA New York City Washington Scott Horsley US Australia New York
China tol lift punitive tariffs on U.S. soybeans and pork

Forum

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

China tol lift punitive tariffs on U.S. soybeans and pork

"China's state news agency says the country's lifting tariffs on U. S. pork and soybeans NPR Scott Horsley reports it's the latest sign of easing trade tensions ahead of a new round of high level talks next month China had been a huge market for American pork and soybeans but those sales all but dried up during the trade war now Beijing's is is lifting terrace the thirty to thirty five percent on farm goods China also made its first large scale purchase of American soybeans in three months the moves come as US and Chinese negotiators are preparing for another round of talks in early October earlier this week president trump elated terrified increase on some two hundred fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese goods that was to take effect October first the conciliatory gestures have raised hopes of a de escalation in the trade war well there's still no obvious path towards a comprehensive trade agreement Scott Horsley NPR news

China Scott Horsley Beijing United States President Trump NPR Two Hundred Fifty Billion Doll Thirty Five Percent Three Months
Divide on display in Democratic debate

Morning Edition

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Divide on display in Democratic debate

"Healthcare was a major issue in last night's twenty twenty democratic presidential debate in Texas the top ten candidates in polling data out squared off at Texas Southern University in Houston in a debate hosted by ABC news and your Scott Horsley has more former vice president Joe Biden defended his incremental approach to overhauling healthcare while leading rivals like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders favor a single payer Medicare for all approach Biden prefers to build on the existing affordable Care Act I know that the senator says she's for Bernie well I'm from Iraq I think the Obama Kerr worked I think the way enough to we had to replace everything has been cut at a public option guarantee that everyone will be able to have affordable assurance candidates also mixed up on prison reform gun control immigration and foreign policy but in a debate that stretch more than two hours there was not one question about the economy Scott Horsley NPR news

Iraq NPR Barack Obama Medicare Vice President Scott Horsley ABC Kerr Senator Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Houston Texas Southern University Texas Two Hours
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Need that bi partisan support while he said he was open to closing loopholes on background checks he's also casting doubt on the effectiveness of that policy it wouldn't have stopped any of the last few years worth of these mass shootings which is a problem in the days after shootings in Ohio and Texas trump said he wanted to expand background checks but later he backed away from the issue and this talk more about addressing mental health ice Roscoe NPR news Washington stocks finished higher on Wall Street as tech companies led a broad rally the Dow was up almost one percent you're listening to NPR news. the US trade deficit shrank in July as Americans exported more and imported less NPR's Scott Horsley reports so far this year the trade gap is bigger than it was in twenty eighteen new numbers on the census bureau said the trade deficit narrowed in July to fifty four billion dollars one and a half billion dollars less than the trade deficit in June the trade deficit with China also narrowed in July by about half a billion dollars the ongoing trade war has limited commerce in both directions with many goods now subject to terrace imports from China trying by about two percent in July while exports to China shrank by three percent despite the smaller deficit in July the trade gap for the first seven months of the year has widened substantially imports during that period exceeded exports by nearly three hundred seventy four billion dollars an increase of more than eight percent from a year ago Scott Horsley NPR news Washington a nearly eight month investigation by the national transportation safety board has found a design flaw in electric car maker Tesla is auto pilot driving system the agency says driver inattention combined with the flaw because the model S. sedan to slam into a fire truck parked along a California freeway earlier this year investigators say the driver was overly reliant on the system and its auto pilot design let him disengage from driving fortunately no one was hurt. stocks finished higher on Wall Street today the nasdaq added one hundred two points up more than one percent. this is NPR news..

Ohio NPR Scott Horsley census bureau China Washington Tesla Texas US California billion dollars one percent three hundred seventy four bil fifty four billion dollars eight percent three percent
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Restart stalled trade talks since then trump complaints China is not following through on its promise to increase purchases of US farm goods trump insists his terrace on Chinese exports will shift manufacturing back to the United States though there's little evidence of that so far Scott Horsley NPR news Washington for German automaker Volkswagen made it official today they're teaming up in an effort to bring out Thomas an electric vehicles to market more quickly B. W. says will sing two point six billion dollars and what Pittsburgh based autonomous vehicle company this mostly owned by Ford as part of the partnership stocks gained ground at week's end the Dow up two hundred and forty three points today the nasdaq was up forty eight points you're listening to NPR from KQED news I'm Alex I'll make governor Gavin Newsom says he fired the head of the agency that regulates much of California oil and gas industry because Ken Harris was not consistent with his opposition to fracking the firing of oil and gas supervisor Harris also came after report from anti fracking groups showing senior officials in his division held stock in companies they were responsible for regulating Harris has yet to comment a spokeswoman for the department of conservation which oversees the oil and gas division did not respond to a request for comment meanwhile the agency is looking into a facility run by chevron that has leaked more than a quarter million gallons of oil in the Central Valley field over the last two months KQED state Goldberg reports the massive leak is located on the remote sim recoil field about thirty five miles west of Bakersfield it started in early may and state officials say since then close to eight hundred thousand gallons of oil and water mixture has seeped out of the ground and about a third of that is oil Holland crates and it is with the center for biological diversity lifelines whether twelve winners refineries every stage of the process has some sort of risk unfortunately in this case that's resulted in a very large scale disastrous accident chevron says it is contained the leak is investigating its cause and that no wildlife has been affected state regulators have issued a notice of violation against chevron and ordered a.

KQED Central Valley supervisor California official Scott Horsley Holland Bakersfield Goldberg chevron Ken Harris China Gavin Newsom Alex NPR Ford
"scott horsley npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Restart stalled trade talks since then trump complaints China is not following through on its promise to increase purchases of US farm goods drop in says his terrace on Chinese exports will shift manufacturing back to the United States though there's little evidence of that so far Scott Horsley NPR news Washington fourteen German automaker Volkswagen made it official today they're teaming up in an effort to bring a Thomas an electric vehicles to market more quickly B. W. says will sing two point six billion dollars and what Pittsburgh based autonomous vehicle company this mostly owned by Ford as part of the partnership stocks gained ground at week's end the Dow up two hundred and forty three points today the nasdaq was up forty eight points you're listening to NPR this is W. NYC in New York I'm lance lucky immigrants and their advocates are preparing for deportation rates that president trump has promised will begin Sunday windy AS one immigrant with a deportation order she says she's scared of getting arrested and but that she's aware of her legal rights if he comes into contact with federal authorities I just called and I do not wish to talk to them and they come and knock on my door is alright David seal on the street you just ask them if they have any that it says your name on a like for example I'm not for us to tell them exactly maintaining it they don't have those papers mining the legal aid society says it's extending hours for its immigration helpline seven days a week and other groups are holding know your rights workshops across New York City this weekend the NYPD's top uniformed official says police officers should not be parking in bike lanes chief of department Terrence Monahan address the issue which is a constant complaint of many cyclists at an event in the green space last night we shouldn't be in bike lanes absolutely it because of the danger and it's something that we we address a cop still gonna go it it's going to happen on occasion and I guarantee you go outside somewhere right now you'd find a cop parked in the bike lane somewhere Monahans comments come after increased criticism about the way the NYPD ticket cyclists including at the scene of crashes involving cars and bikes fifteen cyclists have died this year from car crashes and the police are in the middle of a ticketing blitz focused.

Terrence Monahan David president Scott Horsley official NYPD New York City trump NPR China Ford Pittsburgh B. W. Thomas Volkswagen Washington United States six billion dollars