35 Burst results for "Scott Horsley"

Unemployed Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Stimulus Checks Stopped

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | Last week

Unemployed Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Stimulus Checks Stopped

"Now than they were early in the summer. And they're spending is likely to fall further as their newfound savings are exhausted. Kelly Griffin, a night worker in Massachusetts, so her income dropped by about two thirds wants the supplemental benefit ran out. It was hard you don't got to eat. You don't spend things unnecessarily and kind of script unscathed and kind of started the panic like Am I ever going to get a job again? Back in Cleveland. McAfee knows that feeling she's been trying to earn some extra money sewing facemask, but she'd much rather be back in a regular job. It is not A situation that I would wish on anybody to constantly be stuck in this with no foreseeable end to it like I don't know when I'm going to get a job again. Hopefully it will be soon, but Until then, it's just constant stress for everybody. The Senate is expected to consider a stripped down relief package on Monday, but hopes for a new federal help before the election. Are slim. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley Kelly Griffin Mcafee NPR Cleveland Senate Massachusetts
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:53 min | Last week

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"In a large ballroom in Fort Meyers. The chairs were set up with social distance, but many in the room weren't wearing masks. Trump told the crowd. He's protecting seniors, but you have to live your lives. I'm working as hard as I can see. You can kiss and hug your Children and grandchildren very soon. That's something I missed. Also, I will be honestly. Polls indicate Trump's support with seniors isn't a strong as it was four years ago, and his handling of the pandemic is a big part of that. Tamara Keith. NPR news traveling with the president. And Democratic rival Joe Biden is campaigning in Michigan today with stops in two cities in Southfield. Biden warned a crowd at the United Auto Workers union that President Trump wants to strip health insurance from tens of millions of Americans with preexisting conditions. But mishandling the pandemic isn't enough for Trump. Top of that he's still trying to take away your healthcare. Aiden told the crowd. If he is elected, his administration will build on the affordable care act. Biden travels to Detroit for another rally tonight. Federal deficit has hit a record $3.1 trillion in the fiscal year that just ended NPR's Scott Horsefly reports the Corona virus added a waterfall to what was already a river of reading the deficit for fiscal year. 2020 was more than twice as big as the previous high set during the great recession a decade ago. It's about three times with the government had been expecting before the pandemic struck with businesses shuttered and millions of people out of work. Government tax revenue shrank at the same time federal spending balloon as Congress authorized trillions of dollars in relief payments to keep families and businesses afloat. Trump administration was already facing a $1 trillion deficits even before the pandemic hit. Despite the government's massive borrowing interest rates have remained exceptionally low. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington All street in mixed territory by the closing bell. The Dow up 112 points. You're listening to NPR news, and this is K C R. W News. I'm leery Perella. It's a Friday, October 16th of very good afternoon to you. Here's what's happening in three or four. After initially rejecting the request earlier today by Governor Newsome. The Trump administration approved California's bid for disaster relief funds. This afternoon, The Washington Post reports. The turnaround came after a midday call from Newsome to Trump. Money will assist the response to wildfire statewide, including fires and Ella Sanford, you know, and San Diego County's The Declaration frees up millions of dollars in federal relief funding, including recovery and response to the bobcat fire in the same Gabriel Mountains. Federal government says it initially rejected the request because FEMA determined the state had enough federal resource is in place. The initial denial highlighted the political animosity between the state and Trump, who has repeatedly assailed California's forced management practices. Emergency funding from FEMA can cover as much as 75% of local fire response efforts. A federal grand jury in Texas has indicted former Los Angeles Angels employee Eric came in connection with the overdose. Death of Picture. Tyler Skaggs K is accused of providing Skaggs with the fentanyl that killed the ballplayer in a hotel room in July of last year. Here's case your W's Daryl Saxman. A grand jury charged K with two counts of distributing it controlled substance. The indictment alleges that he'd been selling painkillers since at least 2017, according to the Times, which first reported the story. Authorities have alleged that Kay and Skaggs had a history of narcotics transactions. Kay was a longtime employee of the Angels Media Relations Department. He was arrested by federal authorities in August. The deadline to indict him was extended twice as his lawyers and prosecutors discussed a plea deal that was never reached. Skaggs was born in Woodland Hills and played at Santa Monica High School. He died less than two weeks before his 28th birthday. At his case here, it'll be a sterile.

Trump Trump administration Tyler Skaggs K NPR Joe Biden Federal government Kay Fort Meyers California Tamara Keith FEMA Governor Newsome Aiden president Daryl Saxman Scott Horsley Santa Monica High School
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:44 min | Last week

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"People, some of them senior citizens in a large ballroom in Fort Meyers. The chairs were set up with social distance, but many in the room weren't wearing masks, Trump told the crowd. He's protecting seniors, but you have to live your lives. I'm working as hard as I can see. You can kiss and hug your Children and grandchildren very soon. That's something I missed. Also, I will be honest with you. Polls indicate Trump's support with seniors isn't a strong as it was four years ago, and his handling of the pandemic is a big part of that. Tamara Keith NPR news traveling with the president. The Biden campaign, meanwhile, says the Democratic presidential nominees tested negative again for Corona virus. He's campaigning this hour in Michigan Whole show former vice President Joe Biden with a growing lead over President Trump's so far with the administration's handling of the Corona virus. Foremost on the minds of many voters next Wednesday, just a week and a half before the election. Former President Barack Obama will make US first in person campaign appearance for the Biden Harris ticket in Philadelphia. Another concern in the middle of a pandemic. The federal deficit NPR Scott Horsefly reports it hit a record $3.1 trillion in the fiscal year that just ended A deficit for fiscal year. 2020 was more than twice as big as the previous high set during the great recession a decade ago. It's about three times what the government had been expecting before the pandemic struck. With businesses shuttered and millions of people out of work. Government tax revenue shrank at the same time federal spending balloon as Congress authorized trillions of dollars in relief payments to keep families and businesses afloat. Trump administration was already facing a $1 trillion deficits even before the pandemic hit. Despite the government's massive borrowing interest rates have remained exceptionally low. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR news. In friends. Police have shot dead the suspect in a shockingly brutal attack Today in a small French town about 50 miles northeast of Paris. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports. The incident appears to be related to the ongoing trial for the terrorist attack on satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo. Ah, warning this report may not be suitable for young listeners. Police are treating this as a terrorist attack. A man was slain in public on the street in broad daylight. Decapitated by another man with a knife. French media are reporting that the victim was a history teacher from a local high school who had shown his students pictures of caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed. Such caricatures are central to the ongoing trial of 14 people accused of helping the terrorists who attacked the magazine in 2015, killing 12 people. Charlie Hebdo recently republished the caricatures to mark the beginning of the trial. Three weeks ago, a Pakistani migrant attacked a woman with a knife near the former offices of the magazine to avenge what he said was the blasphemy of the cartoons. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS The number of American troops will be leaving in Afghanistan in the coming months is still in dispute. National security adviser Robert O'Brien says President Trump and Secretary of Defense Mark Esper have already signed off on drawing down forces to 2500 by early next year. But this week General Mark Milley Told NPR. True production still depend on conditions on the ground. So far, the Taliban have been violating the terms of their peace agreement with United States Taliban attacks in Afghanistan. Have risen. I'm Laxmi, saying NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include focus features and MSNBC films. Presenting the way I see it and inside. Look at President Obama and Reagan through the eyes of White House photographer Pete Souza.

President Trump NPR president Tamara Keith NPR US Eleanor Beardsley Barack Obama Charlie Hebdo Joe Biden Fort Meyers vice President Paris Taliban Biden Harris MSNBC Scott Horsley Pete Souza
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:26 min | Last week

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"The poles in stride. We're doing very well, The polls are looking actually great. We're doing very well gonna have a big victory. I look forward to it. The Republican incumbent is back out campaigning in battleground states making up for time he lost while he was forced to stay close to home when he was sick with covert 19. And he's introduced something new in his campaign rally speech into Moine, Iowa, about his teenage son Barron. Testing positive at one point for Corona virus. First Lady Melania Trump said yesterday there son showed no symptoms. She has fiercely guarded, barren trumps privacy, but the president is now holding up. His youngest child's case is an example of why he thinks schools should fully reopen. President Trump Supreme Court nominee is a step closer to getting confirmed by the GOP led Senate. NPR's Claudia Goody SALIS reports. The date's been set for October 22nd for the Judiciary Committee to vote on recommending that the full Senate back Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. We can't say for sure what's going to happen, however, the committee has set that vote for next week to vote. Her nomination out to the full Senate floor and in terms of who might vote against state. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are two potential no votes. Democrats are still hoping That they'll have more Republicans flip and vote against this and perhaps derail the effort. But right now it looks like this could be a done deal. NPR's Claudia Chrysalis reporting more developments in the saga over early voting, a Texas State court his block governor, Greg Abbot's order. Limiting Texas counties to a single drop off side for mail in ballots. This comes just days after a federal appeals court upheld the governor's order in a parallel lawsuit. At last check on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average was down slightly 20,502. This is NPR. The Labor Department is reporting an increase in state unemployment claims last week. NPR's Scott Horsefly has details. Almost 900,000 people filed new state claims for unemployment last week that's 53,000 Mohr than the previous week. The jump in claims reflects continued weakness in the job market. The numbers may also be clouded by reporting issues. Another 373,000 people filed jobless claims under a special federal program for gig workers and the self employed. As the recession drags on passed the six month mark. People who lost jobs in the spring are beginning to exhaust their regular unemployment benefits. By late September, nearly 2.8 million people had rolled onto an emergency program. It offers up to 13 weeks of extended help. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington The Chinese government is unhappy with the U. S decision to appoint its first ever human rights coordinator for Tibetan issues. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson claiming the U. S. Is trying to destabilize Tibet. NPR's Emily Fang with details China said it considers Tibetan affairs internal issues which the U. S has no right interfering in Religion. A Chinese spokesperson said at a regular press briefing today that the decision to create a new special coordinator was quote entirely out of political manipulation. Much of what happens in the Tibetan autonomous region is unknown because it is virtually inaccessible to diplomats and foreign journalists. Regency, numerous protests and revolts against Chinese communist rule since it was forcibly annexed in the 19 fifties. Emily Fang. NPR News Josiane Province, China. I'm Laxmi saying NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include progressive insurance, comparing car insurance rates from multiple insurers, so shoppers can evaluate options in one place. Now that's progressive. Comparison's available at progressive dot com or 1, 800 progressive. The president personally called him up and say, Mr President, let's get a deal tomorrow. Let me say this. The president has sent Mr Mnuchin to negotiate. That's what we've done with other president. This is a unusual what President Bush we had who did this quite a bit, because that's how you negotiate you and then you take it to the president. This, Mr.

NPR president Mr President President Bush Senate Emily Fang Lady Melania Trump China Judiciary Committee Claudia Goody SALIS Chinese Foreign Ministry Susan Collins Moine Texas Iowa Supreme Court Judge Amy Cockney Barrett
Stocks drop after Trump tweets stimulus talks are over

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Stocks drop after Trump tweets stimulus talks are over

"Up much of the ground they lost Tuesday when President Trump abruptly pulled out of talks aimed at crafting a new Corona virus relief package. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrials rose more than 340 points in early trading. It's been a dizzying 24 hours for investors trying to make sense of the president's conflicting tweets. Stocks tumbled late Tuesday after Trump pulled the plug on stimulus talks until after the November election. Then, late last night, the president reversed course again tweeting that he would go along with more limited Corona virus relief, challenging lawmakers to pass on Ly the part of the package he likes. Restaurants and retailers complain that without more help from the federal government, it could be a long, cold winter for many businesses. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell also warrants of tragic consequences of inaction with a slower and more painful recovery from the pandemic recession. Scott

President Trump Donald Trump Scott Horsley Federal Reserve Federal Government NPR LY Jerome Powell Chairman
Economy plunges 31.4% in spring but big rebound expected

Morning Edition

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Economy plunges 31.4% in spring but big rebound expected

"Revised GDP figures from the Commerce Department show. The second quarter downturn was not quite so disastrous as initially reported, though the economy still shrank at a jaw dropping annual rate of 31.4%. A revision show consumer spending in the quarter was somewhat stronger than first reported, while exports and business investment were somewhat weaker. The economy has enjoyed a partial rebound in the third quarter, which ends today. But there are signs that recovery is losing steam as federal relief payments dry up negotiations over a possible new round of relief payments continue in Washington, but there's been no breakthrough yet. Scott Horsley.

Scott Horsley Commerce Department Washington
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:07 min | Last month

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Lie from NPR news. I'm Korova Coleman. President Trump is preparing to visit Kenosha, Wisconsin, the side of a police shooting of a black man killings of protesters and violent unrest. Democratic leaders, including Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers, have asked Trump not to visit. Wisconsin State representative David Bowen is a member of the state's legislative Black caucus. He told NPR's morning edition. He agrees I think the president is only coming to fan flames. Hey, started this division. He wants us to be torn apart as Americans and I don't see his presence in Kenosha. Actually healing the community of Kenosha healing to state of Wisconsin. Republican officials say they're looking forward to Trump's visit. Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson says Trump is providing decisive leadership. September is off to a mostly positive start on Wall Street after a heady month of August. NPR's gone horsefly reports, The Dow Jones industrial Average shows little change in early trading. Despite a mostly down day on Monday, August turned out to be the best month in decades for major stock indexes. Both the Dow and the S and P 500 index gained about 7% during the month, while the NASDAQ soared nearly 10%. Gaines continued overnight in Asian markets. A new report shows factory activity in China surge last month, thanks to a jump in new export orders. Market still face considerable uncertainty over the path of the Corona virus. In a White House conference call with governors, Dr Anthony found, she warned, it's important that people use caution over the Labor Day weekend. To avoid the kind of infectious outbreaks that followed gatherings on Memorial Day and the fourth of July. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Tens of millions of Americans air facing eviction notices this month as they struggle to pay their bills amid the pandemic. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports, federal and state moratoriums on evictions are expiring in many states starting today. Renters who were shielded from the eviction under legislation passed by Congress earlier this year are no longer protected against losing their homes for being late on the rent payments. Ellie Thaxton works with families facing evictions in Georgia. I think it's going to be the most vulnerable that are going to be impacted and that's going to be single mothers, Children, people of color. Single black mothers are the most common evictions that we normally see. Tens of millions of Americans have lost $600 in additional weekly unemployment benefits that expired in July. The federal government has extended some eviction protections through the end of the year. But the extension on LY protects a small percentage of renters. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Ah House Committee plans to subpoena Postmaster General Lewis to joy. Democrats say he has failed to provide them with information about slow mail delivery after changes at the U. S Postal Service. On Wall Street. The Dow is up 33 points at 28,463. It's NPR from the David Burnett Foundation News. Her make a C R W I'm Cherry Glazer. The California legislative session came to a chaotic and last night for the year, a state lawmakers raced and sometimes failed to beat a midnight deadline for passing bills. Several Corona virus related proposals did squeak in under the wire and are heading to Governor Gavin Newsom's desk, among them new labor protections for hotel, janitorial and airport employees. Another bill would allow can strap Californians to borrow more money from the retirement accounts with tent without tax penalties, And yet another would've wore a high school diplomas to students who were unable to finish the final months of the school year due to the pandemic. Newsome has until the end of this month to decide whether to sign the bills into law. Among the measures that failed to make it out of the Legislature were a number of police reform proposals that were introduced in response to concerns about police brutality and systemic racism. Case here. W's Darryl Sanson has this roundup. One measure that did pass and now heads to Governor Newsome would require the state Justice Department to look into fatal shootings by law enforcement officers. Attorney General Javier or Bezerra opposed that bill, saying that his office lacks the resource is to oversee all police shootings. And it's not clear if Newsom will sign it. Newsome has vowed design another bill that reached his desk that would ban police officers from using chokeholds in karate. It holds a chokehold applies pressure to a person's wind pipe, while a corroded hold applies pressure to a person's corroded artery. X closed the flow of blood to the brain. Both can be deadly, and there have been calls to ban them nationwide. But many far reaching police reform stalled. Those included a bill that would strip officers who commit misconduct of their badge and hold them financially responsible. If Sude Another measure that would have established strict rules about how and when law enforcement could use less lethal projectiles. Such his rubber bullets also failed to pass and one bill had the support it needed but still failed to pass. That bill would have made it easier for members of the public to see disciplinary records of police officers accused of racist or discriminatory actions. It passed both houses but time ran out before the bill could return to the Senate for a final procedural vote. For Casey Ar w I'm Darryl SATs meant more than a million acres in California have burned this summer. The short term cause for the wildfires is running into the millions of dollars and his cap radios. Ezra David Romero reports, the price tag could continue to skyrocket. Madame Rose is an expert in the economics of disasters in climate change policy at USC, he says the probability of fires costing more than a pandemic is very likely unless something is done to curb climate change fast while fires in one year not his biggest cove it but What we should do is look at the probabilities of occurrence. I think it's fair to say the fires could be just a cz devastating as code 19 to prevent future fires and their negative economic impact. He says. Forrest need to be cleaned quickly with things like prescribed burns. A state in the federal government announced a plan last week to Finn. One million acres of force.

NPR Governor Newsome President Trump Wisconsin Kenosha Governor Gavin Newsom federal government Windsor Johnston Wisconsin State California Korova Coleman Ezra David Romero president Tony Evers David Bowen Congress
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 2 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"The National Economic Council and Special assistant to President Trump and NPR's Scott Horsley is still with us. Scott What stood out to you from what we just heard from from California? Well, Mr Pneumonia is right that we did see a rebound in the economy. Mork quickly than a lot of forecasters were expected expecting. We saw job gains in May that a lot of folks didn't think we would see until June because, frankly, the economy did reopen. More quickly than a lot of people expected. We may, however, be seeing the the ill side effects of that with the surge in Corona virus cases, and as we've said many times, we are not going to get a sustainable economic recovery in this country. Until we get a until we're able to get a handle on this virus. And while some of the economic indicators have been better than some forecasters thought, I think that health metrics has certainly been far worse than most of us fears. And so as we move into late summer and early fall, what economic numbers are you going to be watching to see if there are signs of the US pulling its way out of this historic economic tailspin? We are certainly going to be watching those July spending numbers that Mr Lorna mentioned. I think those air out later this week will also of course, continue to watch. As we always do. Job gains. The job gains in July were much lower than they had been in June. And we'll we'll we'll see where that Tran goes. And then we'll also be watching for, you know measures of economic hardship. We do have more than 30 million people collecting unemployment benefits right now In this country, those benefits have shrunk a lot in the last couple weeks, they might get a little boost of the president's action. Over the weekend, but we'll be watching for signs of distress. Whether it's evictions or late rent payments, Missed car payments, Miss credit card payments, that sort of thing. What is NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley. Thanks as always, good to be with your.

Scott Horsley National Economic Council NPR Mr Pneumonia Special assistant to President Mr Lorna US California Mork Trump president Tran
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 2 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Corbett Coleman, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden Sound Foran interview Tuesday with the National Association of Black Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Biden says if elected, he would not reverse President Trump's tariffs on China. He says it will take a multi layered approach to get China to change its behavior. Stocks opened higher this morning. Despite worrisome signs about the U. S. Job market. NPR Scott Horsley reports the Dow Jones industrials Roves about 200 points in early trading. A rebound in the labor market that began in May appears to be losing steam, the payroll processing company, ADP said. This morning, private employers added just 167,000 jobs last month, far fewer than forecasters were expecting. That could be a warning sign. The government's official jobs report out on Friday, may disappoint. US lost more than 22 million jobs in March and April and regained on Ly about 1/3 as many jobs in May and June. Timecard trackers Kronos in Homebase suggest Job growth slowed sharply in July as the number of new Corona virus infections took off. Stalling job market would spell trouble in an economy where unemployment still tops 11%. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington A gigantic explosion in Beirut Tuesday has left many people homeless in the port city. The BBC Sebastian Usher says at least 100 people were killed in the blast and about 4000 were injured. Those Lebanese who managed to get to sleep last night in Beirut, woke to a scene described in the local media as apocalyptic. The epicenter of the blast in the port shows buildings flattened with just the bare cliff face of a large structures still standing by the sea. The financial damage to a country already in economic collapse is being measured. In billions of dollars on with grief. A cold rage is also rising among many Lebanese against their seemingly eternal cast of political leaders with renewed demands for them to be swept aside the BBC Sebastian Usher. Republicans are calling former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates to Capitol Hill this hour. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports they will ask Yates about investigations of some of President Trump's allies. Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham plans to focus on three main areas of questioning Why Sally Yates signed off on surveillance warrants for former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. The Justice Department's probe a former Trump National security advisor Michael Flynn, in an Obama White House meeting about the Flynn investigation. The Republican led hearing is part of a broader effort to scrutinize actions by the Obama administration before and after the last presidential election. Democrats in Congress or give the hearings a waste of time. Instead, they saying lawmakers should focus on threats to the 2020 election by Russia, China and other foreign adversaries. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street, The Dow Jones industrials are up 246 points. You're listening to NPR news from the David Burnett Foundation newsroom a K C. R w I'm Cherry Glaser come to Mayor Asia Brown, another city officials are calling on California Attorney General Javier Becerra and the U. S. Justice Department. To investigate allegations of a deputy gang at the L. A county sheriff's station in Compton. Ah claim fall against Lake County alleges that a clique called the Executioner's said illegal arrest quotas sport matching tattoos of Nazi imagery and retaliated against a deputy after he reported an alleged gang member for assaulting a colleague. Here's Mayor Brown, speaking at a news conference yesterday. They terrorized the community and in the cover the phrase it is unacceptable that take this Attorney General Javier Santa to stand up for the black and brown people, something it is unacceptable for us to be terrorized in this community. Members of the community shared stories about their personal experiences with law enforcement. Restaurant owner Jemele Henderson says he was recently pulled over handcuffed and placed in a squad car by Deputy without cause. You.

Trump Sally Yates Joe Biden China Scott Horsley Sebastian Usher Carrie Johnson BBC Beirut President Washington Mayor Asia Brown National Association of Black Deputy Attorney General US National Association of Hispan NPR Corbett Coleman
2 grim reports are expected on virus' damage to US economy

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

2 grim reports are expected on virus' damage to US economy

"Stocks opened lower this morning after two discouraging economic reports. NPR's got Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average fell about 500 points in early trading. In a grim yardstick of the economic toll taken by the Corona virus pandemic. The Commerce Department says the U. S economy shrank at an annual rate of 32.9% this spring. That's the sharpest contraction in Postwar history. The drop between April and June was nearly four times as steep as the worst quarter of the great recession. By the end of the quarter economic activity began to pick up again, but I hope for recovery this summer could be short circuited as the nation continues to wrestle with a surge of new infections, the Labor Department says new claims for state unemployment benefits rose last week for the second time in a row new claims for a special federal unemployment program. Dropped. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley NPR Commerce Department Labor Department
Stocks close higher amid optimism around potential vaccine

All Things Considered

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Stocks close higher amid optimism around potential vaccine

"Hiram and early but encouraging news about potential Corona virus vaccines. NPR's Scott Horsley is more investors. Welcome to report in the New England Journal of Medicine showing a vaccine candidate developed by Madonna appeared safe and triggered the hope for immune response in a small trial with a few dozen patients. Is also a phase. One trial of another potential vaccine from AstraZeneca and Oxford University are expected next week. Vaccines will have to pass much bigger test to win approval. But the preliminary results were enough to push stocks higher. The S and P 500 index jumped 9/10 of a percent. The Dow climb more than 8/10 and the NASDAQ rose six tents. Federal Reserve reports that U. S industrial production rose nearly 5.5% last month that was still down about 11% from its level before the pandemic.

Scott Horsley New England Journal Of Medicin Federal Reserve Hiram Astrazeneca NPR Oxford University Madonna U. S
Latest week brings 1.51 million new first-time claims for unemployment benefits

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Latest week brings 1.51 million new first-time claims for unemployment benefits

"Weekly unemployment claims may be dropping but they're still at record highs in Pierre Scott Horsley reports an additional one and a half million people filed last week first time claims for state unemployment last week were down only slightly from the previous week claims for a separate federal unemployment program rose federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell told lawmakers Wednesday Congress will likely need to extensible metal unemployment benefits in some form past the end of July when they're set to expire the fed has projected unemployment will remain above nine percent at the end of this year that Scott Horsley reporting this is NPR

Pierre Scott Horsley Jerome Powell Congress NPR Chairman
Here’s how the stock market tends to trade after brutal selloffs like Thursday’s

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Here’s how the stock market tends to trade after brutal selloffs like Thursday’s

"Stocks opened higher this morning clawing back some of the ground they lost in Thursday's big selloff and your Scott Horsley reports the Dow jumped more than seven hundred points in early trading some investors are bargain hunting this morning after the stock market steepest drop since mid March on Thursday with the Dow lost more than eighteen hundred points or nearly seven percent volatility is likely to continue as investors reassess the ongoing threat from the corona virus several states including Texas Utah and Alabama are experiencing a surge in covert nineteen hospitalizations after relaxing their stay home orders even without a fresh wave of infections the economic recovery from the pandemic is expected to be slow economists surveyed by the Wall Street journal generally agree with this week's forecast from the federal reserve that unemployment at the end of this year will likely exceed nine percent Scott Horsley NPR news

Scott Horsley Utah Wall Street Journal Texas Alabama NPR
U.S. new weekly jobless claims drop below 2 million

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

U.S. new weekly jobless claims drop below 2 million

"The labor department issues a report this morning on the number of people who applied for unemployment benefits last week NPR's Scott Horsley reports that jobless claims are expected to drop below two million for the first time since mid March the weekly unemployment claims have become a gram barometer the economic damage being done by the corona virus while claims are still extremely high by historical standards they have been falling steadily since peaking nine weeks ago at six point eight million economists will also be keeping an eye on continuing claims for unemployment which word down the labor department's most recent report as businesses reopened some people are dropping off the unemployment rolls and going back to work even so a monthly snapshot due out tomorrow is expected to show that unemployment jumped in may to its highest level since the

NPR Scott Horsley Labor Department
U.S. labor market appears to stabilize as private payrolls fall less than expected

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

U.S. labor market appears to stabilize as private payrolls fall less than expected

"Stocks open higher today after a better than expected report on private payrolls and B. R. Scott Horsley reports the Dow Jones industrial average jumped more than two hundred points in early trading the report from payroll processor ADP shows private employers cut two point eight million jobs last month by ordinary standards that would be disastrous but it's not nearly as bad as the nine million jobs that forecasters have been expecting the ADP report is seen as possibly foreshadowing the official job market snapshot from the labor department later this week more than twelve million people filed initial claims for unemployment between April and may but the eighty P. reports suggest a substantial share of laid off workers are being re hired as businesses begin to reopen the unemployment rate for may is still expected to climb to levels not seen since the nineteen

B. R. Scott Horsley Labor Department Official
U.S. Personal Income Soared in April, Not Consumer Spending

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:33 min | 5 months ago

U.S. Personal Income Soared in April, Not Consumer Spending

"New numbers from the commerce department show consumer spending plunged more than thirteen percent in April the steepest drop since the government began to keep records more than sixty years ago and it's an ominous signal for a country where consumer spending is the main driver of economic activity and here Scott Horsley joins us Scott thanks so much for being with us good morning where their particular kinds of spending that dried up in April or was it pretty much across the board it was really widespread Scott of course that's partly because there weren't a lot of opportunities to spend money lots of restaurants and retail shops were closed so we saw a sharp drop in in just about every kind of purchase spending at barber shops and beauty parlors alike was down by seventy four percent even healthcare spending which is usually pretty recession proof plunged by twenty nine percent last month a lot of doctors and dentists offices were closed for all but emergency appointments for and how much of the cutting spending we seem to have been driven by the massive layoffs you know there was a pretty steep drop in paychecks last month either because people were laid off or or even those are working have their hours cut many cases but what's interesting is that was more than offset by huge spike in government relief payments between the unemployment benefits and those twelve hundred dollar stimulus checks that went out Americans overall personal income actually shot up last month by more than ten percent we just wound up banking some of that extra income overall Americans saved about a third of their disposable income last month that's about four times the usual savings rate now some of that might have been involuntary savings by people who just couldn't go out to a movie or a ball game as they would like to do but it also could reflect people deliberately squirrelly money away in anticipation of lean months ahead and now that more businesses and more states are opening their doors in many parts of the country should we look for spending to come back to it's gonna be interesting to watch if you think about it a revival of consumer spending is gonna depend on three things one is the opportunity to spend too is money in consumers pockets to spend and then three is just the confidence that it's safe to go out and spend money we are starting to see more opportunities as as businesses open their doors as far as money in your pocket you know some people are going back to work but with double digit unemployment wages are likely to remain depressed for awhile to calm and we can't necessarily count on the government to make up the gap with those big relief payments in the twelve hundred dollar payments are gone they're not set to be repeated and the extra six dollars a week in unemployment benefits the Congress authorized during the pandemic those are due to run out at the end of July so ability to spend is kind of a question mark he also said that consumers have to feel safe about being able to go out and spend money how do we judge that right now that's the big unknown and of course it depends in part on the path of the pandemic this is something for reserve chairman Jerome Powell talked about yesterday in a webcast hosted by Princeton University a full recovery of the economy will really depend on people being confident that it's safe to go out and say to engage in a broad range of economic activities that's how the economy will recover and eat you see people testing the limits now probably every day all of us are doing things you might not have done two months ago and you're just seeing how that works we're in the midst of a big national experiment some people gonna respect their favorite restaurant as soon as the doors open others are gonna be more cautious and the some of those millions of individual decisions will determine the direction the economy we know we're in a deep hole right now the big question is how soon can we climb

US-China relationship grows more complicated and potentially dangerous

Morning Edition

03:44 min | 5 months ago

US-China relationship grows more complicated and potentially dangerous

"Hong Kong is on its way to losing its autonomy China's legislature has now approved a plan to pass a sweeping new national security law president trump is warning of possible sanctions against China over its treatment of Hong Kong and in recent days the trump administration has blocked the sale of sensitive technology to Chinese companies and your Scott Horsley has more it seems like a lifetime ago but it was only back in January the president trump was celebrating a trade deal in which China promised by hundreds of billions of dollars worth of additional American goods we're delighted that the Chinese consumers will now enjoy the greater access to the best products on earth those may grown and raised right here in the USA hog farmers were among those who saw big opportunity China has lost much of his own pork production to an outbreak of African swine fever and Marie is he above the national pork producers council says American farmers were eager to fill the void so far though sales have fallen short of their potential unfortunately when the Chinese have the chance to buy pork they're going to go to where the price is low and even with the trade deal American pork still faces a much higher tariff in China than its global competitors exports of farm goods factory products and crude oil are all running far behind what was promised in the trade deal Syracuse University economist Mary lovely says those targets were always going to be a stretch and the corona virus has made things worse the world has changed and clearly China's purchases are going to be affected one because their demand collapsed secondly American supply collapsed in so you had sort of a double whammy on their reaching these purchase target last week foreign policy magazine ran a story headlined trump's China trade deal is as dead as can be White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow told fox business the deal is still alive but not as important to the president as it once was right now it's been a lot of miscues from China trump has been harshly critical of China over its handling of the pandemic China was slow to acknowledge the corona virus can spread from person to person still China appear to been much more successful than the US at controlling the outbreak you and soon had wrecked the China program at the Stimson center says Beijing reach trump's criticism as an effort to deflect from his own government's missed S. I think the Chinese reaction as wait a minute maybe we are responsible for part of it but for you to completely blame everything on us that's not fair Bernie Glaser of the center for strategic and International Studies has historically China has been cautious about sape flexing its muscle in Hong Kong because it wanted to maintain a working relationship with the U. S. but with both countries now throwing sharp elbows lasers as the brakes are coming off in my view the pandemic is really just an acceleration of the downward spiral in the relationship which now appears to me to be honest in free fall I don't know where the bottom is but I feel like we haven't reached it yet the trump administration has been ratcheting up its restrictions on exports of sensitive technology to China and its calls for reduced dependence on China for critical goods like medical supplies are growing louder glazier once there's so much anti China sentiment in the U. S. the relationship may suffer even if there's a new president in the White House next year both Biden and trump are trying to position themselves as being the toughest on China and nobody is is talking about what in this US China relationship needs to be preserved that's ominous for the kind of cooperation between the two countries the world needs to tackle challenges like climate change and the

Hong Kong China
China approves plan to impose national security laws on Hong Kong; Trump threatens sanctions

Morning Edition

03:44 min | 5 months ago

China approves plan to impose national security laws on Hong Kong; Trump threatens sanctions

"Hong Kong is on its way to losing its autonomy China's legislature has now approved a plan to pass a sweeping new national security law president trump is warning of possible sanctions against China over its treatment of Hong Kong in recent days the trump administration has blocked the sale of sensitive technology to Chinese companies and your Scott Horsley has more it seems like a lifetime ago but it was only back in January that president trump was celebrating a trade deal in which China promised by hundreds of billions of dollars worth of additional American goods we're delighted that the Chinese consumers will now enjoy the greater access to the best products on earth those may grown and raised right here in the USA hog farmers were among those who saw big opportunity China has lost much of its own pork production to an outbreak of African swine fever and re is he above the national pork producers council says American farmers were eager to fill the void so far though sales have fallen short of their potential unfortunately when the Chinese have a chance to buy pork they're going to go to where the prices low and even with the trade deal American pork still faces a much higher tariff in China and its global competitors exports of farm goods factory products and crude oil are all running far behind what was promised in the trade deal Syracuse University economist Mary lovely says those targets were always going to be a stretch and the corona virus has made things worse the world has changed and clearly China's purchases are going to be affected one because their demand collapsed secondly American supply collapsed in so you have sort of a double whammy on their reaching these purchase target last week foreign policy magazine ran a story headlined trump's China trade deal is as dead as can be White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow told fox business the deal is still alive but not as important to the president as it once was right now is that a lot of misuse from China trump has been harshly critical of China over its handling of the pandemic China was slow to acknowledge the corona virus can spread from person to person still China appears to been much more successful than the US at controlling the outbreak you and soon had wrecked the China program at the Stimson center says Beijing reads trump's criticism as an effort to deflect from his own government's missed S. I think the Chinese reaction as wait a minute maybe we are responsible for part of it but for you to completely blame everything on us that's not fair Glazer of the center for strategic and International Studies has historically China has been cautious about safe flexing its muscle in Hong Kong because it wanted to maintain a working relationship with the U. S. but with both countries now throwing sharp elbows lasers as the brakes are coming off in my view the pandemic is really just an acceleration of the downward spiral in the relationship which now appears to me to be honest in free fall I don't know where the bottom is but I feel like we haven't reached it yet the trump administration has been ratcheting up its restrictions on exports of sensitive technology to China and its calls for reduced dependence on China for critical goods like medical supplies are growing louder glazier ones are so much anti China sentiment in the U. S. the relationship may suffer even if there's a new president in the White House next year both Biden and trump are trying to position themselves as being the toughest on China and nobody is is talking about what in this U. S. China relationship needs to be preserved that's ominous for the kind of cooperation between the two countries the world needs to tackle challenges like climate change and the

Hong Kong China
Germany, France reach deal on bailout

Morning Edition

03:26 min | 5 months ago

Germany, France reach deal on bailout

"Well let's talk about Europe or countries feats are tied together in ways and that the U. S. doesn't have to think about so German chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Emmanuel macron reached a deal on a relief package but it was a long time coming it didn't happen quickly No Way Out took awhile because European leaders have disagreed on how to fund this relief plan up to now Europe southern states have wanted to be funded by the entire E. U. S. sort of collective approach where member states would share the debt but a handful of countries known in some circles as the frugal five Austria Germany the Netherlands Denmark and Sweden they wanted a more individual push that each member state would take out a loan for its own needs now the proposal that the krona Mericle agreed on this week shows the southern states got their way under this plan the E. you would borrow half a trillion dollars and share the data month all member states even though the aid would primarily benefit southern states like Italy and Spain it's important member here that this package is only a proposal and all twenty seven EU members including their national parliaments will need to approve it so this is far from a done deal but the fact that angle Americal has agreed to the shows an interesting change of heart for her what's behind that why did she agree to this big relief package of it's not going to benefit Germany that much yeah one reason is this pandemic was not the fault of Italy or Spain it's a natural disaster and unlike the eurozone crisis a decade ago this is not rooted in the fiscal policies of southern U. member states secondly angle Americal is at the end of her tenure as chancellor and her management of this crisis has restored her popularity her approval ratings are skyrocketing in Germany so she now has the political capital to solidify her legacy by supporting a recovery package that aims to unify the easier not further separated what an interesting trajectory for her Scott we don't exactly know when recovery will happen everyone kind of admits that at this point do we know what it will look like you know what with the sign to be you know it depends on the path of the virus and also on public attitudes how quickly do people feel comfortable going back to the shopping mall how quickly they feel comfortable going to restaurants or getting on an airplane again there are some small signs of improvement if you squint hard to look at him but on the other hand there are also huge holes in state and local government budgets which could trigger another round of layoffs and of course all bets are off if we see another spike in infections okay so a lot we don't know here in the U. S. rob in Germany the country starting to slowly be open is the picture a little brighter where you are yeah a little you know Germany just announced it's officially in recession and its economy has shrunk by more than two percent the first quarter of this year but you know thanks to German Germany's government and its tradition of keeping a balanced budget the country is better positioned than others you know Germany ended last year with the surplus and spending that in more on an eight hundred billion dollar relief package Germany's been able to keep workers employed thanks to its Kurds are by program instead of the US approach of unemployment checks in Germany companies are subsidized to keep workers on the payroll so workers won't lose their jobs and companies don't have to retire after the crisis nearly a million German companies have applied for this program and much of the country's recovery package is going to radically into that to keep germs employed but the question going forward is how long can Germany for to pay into these programs before the money starts to dry up be interesting to see what each country learns from others when this is all over and here's rob Schmitz in Berlin and Scott Horsley in DC thanks you guys

Europe
U.S. weekly jobless claims remain elevated as millions more seek benefits

Morning Edition

04:10 min | 6 months ago

U.S. weekly jobless claims remain elevated as millions more seek benefits

"Three point eight million people filed claims for jobless benefits last week well that's down from the previous week this brings us to a new disturbing total thirty million people have applied for unemployment in this country in the six weeks since the corona virus began and Pierre Scott Horsley joins us now to talk about these numbers he's got good morning Rachel all this doesn't get any easier does that with each passing week what are these what are these numbers say ritual that total of thirty million jobless claims over the last six weeks since the pandemic started taking a wrecking ball the job market that represents nearly one out of five people who had a job back in February so the pandemic has really put a very large crater in the job market and while initial claims last week were lower than the week before they weren't a lot lower we continue to see very high volumes of people filing for unemployment week after week and that's a just the initial shock from the stay at home orders issued more than a month ago now is continuing to ripple out and due to broader damage in the economy it's not just restaurants and retail shops but other businesses that supply those firms that have now been affected and then they're sort of unrelated things you'll Boeing just announced they're gonna cut ten percent of the company's work force I mean the steep decline in air travel from the pandemic has just exacerbated Boeing's earlier problems with its troubled seven thirty seven Max jet so we're also going to get the overall unemployment rate soon parade that's not gonna look good isn't no we'll get that official number next week and it's probably going to be higher than anything we've seen since the Great Depression of the nineteen thirties certainly well above the ten percent mark we saw during the worst of the financial crisis and as bad as that official unemployment number is it will almost surely understates the depth of the job losses for one thing it's based on a survey that was taken a couple weeks ago and we've now seen millions more people filing for unemployment since then what's more people who are still in lockdown you know won't be searching for new jobs and if you're not actively looking for work you don't get counted in the headline unemployment number so we might look at other measures you know just this week and P. R. released a new survey along with our partners at PBS newshour and Marist college which found fifty percent of Americans had either lost jobs or lost working hours as a result of the corona virus pandemics of the pain has really been widespread and Entercom after such low unemployment rate I mean it's just such an abrupt turnaround yeah that's right we've got for having the lowest jobless rate in half a century to the highest since the Great Depression in the span of two months so there really is some economic whiplash here federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell talked about this yesterday and he noted once again that the long running job boom had been really good for workers who are often on the sidelines of the economy minorities people with less education these marginalized workers had finally begun to see some gains it is heartbreaking frankly to see that all threatened now all the more need for our urgent response and also that a Congress which has been urgent and large and to do what we can to avoid longer run damage to the economy Congress has authorized unemployment benefits that are both more generous and more widely available during this pandemic period but those expanded federal benefits only run through the end of July and it's not all clear we're going to be out of the woods by them right and there were so many problems with people of the phone lines being one of them they just couldn't get through it to start the process to get the benefits absolutely you know state unemployment offices have just been overwhelmed trying to distribute the regular state benefits and they're only beginning to distribute these expanded federal benefits offices have been adding staff but they're saddled with antiquated computer systems that the safety net is really stretched in here Andy Stettler who's an expert on unemployment insurance at the century foundation says anyone who spent time talking with displaced workers knows that it's exasperating and confusing between filing and actually getting your unemployment

U.S. Economy Slumped in First Quarter: Live Updates

Morning Edition

06:16 min | 6 months ago

U.S. Economy Slumped in First Quarter: Live Updates

"And the economic toll has hit so suddenly that it is hard to compare directly with anything in memory this morning the commerce department shows how quickly the economy has crashed and the new NPR poll shows how widely the painting is sprint NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is with us along with NPR senior political editor and correspondent to medical Montanaro gentleman good morning to you both good morning morning Steve and we are all properly distant in our own homes Scott how bad is the GDP number likely to be for the first quarter what we learned today forecasters expect the GDP report this one will show the US economy shrank during the first three months of the year for the first time in six years and worse that's all because of the corona virus for the first two and a half months of the year the economy is actually chugging along at a steady if not spectacular pace but then we got to the middle of March and there was a sharp and sudden downturn that's of course when restaurants and retail shops all over the country store to close their doors tens of millions of Americans were ordered to stay home been hers on who is an economist with IHS Markit says that triggered a sharp decline in consumer spending and that alone was enough to erase whatever gross income before whenever you have the entire country changing behavior at one time in a way that would be suspending it certainly enough to wipe out any gains that we saw earlier in the year her son is expecting that the first quarter growth declined at an annual pace of almost five percent and some forecasters expect even bigger number I'm just trying to think through the math two months two and a half months of pretty good growth and then just two weeks everything being stopped and the stoppage is so bad that the total is down sharply that makes me worry about the second quarter that we're in now where things are going to be stopped for a whole lot longer yeah that's what's kind of scary just half a month of hunkering down sent the economy into reverse what happened this quarter when we're looking at you know a full month in some parts the quarter of more than that in other parts of the country economists expect to see a really deep contraction in the second quarter when those numbers come out in the summer her is not expected to show the economy shrinking at an annual pace of thirty seven percent between April and June you know in just the last five weeks we've seen some twenty six million people are joining the unemployment rolls millions more could be added to that list before we're done this is all shaping up to be the deepest recession in the US since the nineteen thirties okay so those are the overall numbers what do they mean for individuals we have some clues about that from an NPR PBS newshour Marist poll and Domenico what does it say on sticking a pretty harsh toll on most people fifty percent of Americans say they've either been laid off or lost hours at their job because of it that's up from just eighteen percent a month ago and the pandemic is having a harsher financial impact on people of color people without a college degree younger people and those making less than fifty thousand dollars a year Steve let me stop there for a second because you just said fifty percent which is a mind blowing figure half of Americans have you lost a job or lost some kind of pay lost part of their paycheck and you're telling me in certain groups it's even worse than that worse than fifty percent absolutely we're talking about household here so at least fifty percent of Americans or fifty percent Americans have been touched by this and you know Americans are large largely pretty cautious also though about re opening too quickly you would think people would want to you know open much faster if they're being affected economically but eighty percent or more of Americans are saying that they do not want schools restaurants are large sporting events to start taking place again as normal until there is further testing two thirds say they don't want us to physically go back to work without widespread testing but a majority of Republicans say it's time to get back to work so there is a partisan difference here and some of these findings in the way people view your vents up to now as always there are some partisan findings in in a lot of these numbers well what do voters think of the president's handling of the economy in this election year well about forty four percent of trump's approve of trump's handling of the pandemic is pretty similar to what his overall approval has been we talk about this partisan splits you've got Democrats and independents disapproving and Republicans largely very strongly approving of the job the president's been doing on current virus most people think the other governors are doing a far better jobs in the present and handling corona virus by two to one margin and overall they're huge gender and educational divides on how trump's handling it men approve of how trump is dealing with it women overwhelmingly disapprove if you have a college degree you overwhelmingly disapprove if you don't you do approve of the job he's doing I think it's slightly higher marks for his handling of the economy half still approving of the job he's doing on that but I have to say it's interesting when you look at the twenty twenty election the presidential election more Americans think Joe Biden the democratic the presumptive democratic nominee would do a better job handling both of those things I just have to observe also after nine eleven George W. bush also polarizing president had something like a ninety percent approval rating for a little while because of his handling of the crisis in here the president has forty four percent but we are now moving toward a new phase where academies might begin to re open at least a little bit in certain states what might that recovery look like Scott Horsley you know the commerce department numbers look backwards not forwards but the kind of Mr certainly trying to figure out what's ahead economist her son's been looking at industries like airlines and restaurants which have been hit so hard by this pandemic there's really nowhere to go but up traffic is down ninety five percent from year ago levels seated diners from OpenTable is down a hundred percent you can't go lower than that you know all these indicators are a really bad right now at some point they'll turn we'll just have to keep an eye on on when that happens best case scenario if the economy starts to stabilize this summer and then we begin to see a rebound later in the year but it depends you know if there's a big danger but the second wave of infections that requires another round of lockdowns then I guess we have to ask if by then we've found measures to get businesses open and keep them open safely and safely enough that consumers would think that it's safe to go out and shop or go to the restaurant or anything else that's

NPR
"scott horsley" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:53 min | 6 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Were significantly lower than the two previous weeks Scott Horsley NPR news Washington taking a look at the numbers the Dow was up thirty three points today the nasdaq rose a hundred and thirty nine points global temperature in March of twenty twenty was the second hottest on record NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports is up more than fifty percent chance this will end up being the hottest year ever recorded global temperatures continue to rise because of climate change that trend is clear in the latest data from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration may June and July are forecast to be hotter than average in most of the U. S. except the upper plains states that follows the second hottest March going back to eighteen eighty the water in the Gulf of Mexico had its hottest March ever this year no a climate scientists say warmer than average temperatures will likely continue this summer although it's too soon to predict exactly how hot the water will be hotter water makes powerful web hurricanes more likely the next three months are also predicted to be Rainier than average in the central U. S. and almost everywhere east of the Mississippi River Rebecca Hersher NPR news and in fact a new study finds much of the western U. S. is baking in what scientists are calling an emerging mega drop the study in the journal science blaming almost half the problem on human impacts on global warming you're listening to NPR most churches in America have moved their services entirely online but many regular worshippers are not participating that's one of the findings from a new poll on how the corona virus is affecting the nation's churches here's NPR's Tom gjelten the poll from the public religion research institute found that ninety seven percent of US Christians who normally go to church at least a few times a year did not attend in person Easter services handled by a three to one margin they think stay at home orders.

Washington NPR Rebecca Hersher Mexico America Scott Horsley twenty twenty Rainier Mississippi River Tom gjelten
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 6 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You got to wait for paper check for your really spent all right if you have a question for NPR's Scott Horsley send it to us at NPR dot org slash national conversation or share it on social media using the hashtag NPR conversation and we have a question from Veronica from Massachusetts who has a question about supplemental Schick security income and she writes that if I receive a supplemental security income check will I get a stimulus check Scott and we have some new information on this to have that right yes Veronica is eligible for the stimulus payment and we learned just a sheep she shouldn't have to wait for a check just today the government said SSI recipients do not have to file a special tax return to get relief payment it's take a little while but but SS I recipients are now in the same boat as social security recipients and disability or SS DVI recipients so if you don't ordinarily have to file a tax return and you get your benefits through direct deposit you should automatically get your coronavirus release pain relief payment that way as well now however if you receive social security SS DVI or SSI and you don't typically file a tax return and you have a child or children under the age of seventeen you should still go to IRS dot gov look for the non filers section and let the government know about those dependent kids because you may be eligible for an extra five and dollars per child under the garage relief act okay Scott squeeze one more in here we've gotten so many questions about when people will start to see those relief checks those twelve hundred dollar relief checks from the government the treasury said today was supposed to be the day for millions what do we know those payments did begin showing up in people's bank accounts this week we've heard from some grateful people who got their money obviously it won't solve all the problems but that twelve hundred dollars or so will certainly help and if you want to see what's happening with your payment again you can now go to IRS dot gov and click the get my payment feature and you can track what's happening with your your payment that is NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley Scott thank you so much you're welcome show some good news in there you can hear much more of our extensive coverage when you download the NPR one app go to the Exploratorium and click on the.

NPR Scott Horsley Veronica Massachusetts treasury Scott Horsley Scott IRS
Stocks jump as virus deaths slow; oil falls on OPEC+ delay

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

Stocks jump as virus deaths slow; oil falls on OPEC+ delay

"Coleman stocks opened higher this morning even as the US braces for what public health officials say will be a difficult week in the battle against the coronavirus NPR's Scott Horsley reports the Dow Jones industrials jumped around eight hundred points in the first few minutes of training while the death toll from covert nineteen here in the United States is nearly ten thousand and climbing investors were cheered by signs that the spread of the virus is slowing in Europe the Dow surged close to four percent of the opening bell the S. and P. five hundred and the nasdaq or also up sharply stocks in Europe and Asia also gained ground as deaths from the coronavirus slowed in Italy and France oil prices tumbled however after much anticipated meeting today between OPEC countries and others to discuss possible production cuts was pushed back the benchmark price of crude in the U. S. fell about four and a half percent it's got worse the NPR news

NPR Scott Horsley United States Europe Asia Italy France Coleman Opec
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:40 min | 7 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Scott Horsley reports regulators have a simple message for customers who might be tempted to pull money out of the bank during this anxious time as a kind of security blanket your money is safe as they say when it's in the back there have been anecdotal reports of people making large cash withdrawals Janak Williams who chairs the FDIC says even if a bank branch closes or shortens its hours customers will be able to put their hands on cash ATMs are functioning as as usual payment systems are functioning functioning as always I know anecdotally that we heard from several banks that they're actually using extra caution in cleaning the ATMs and sanitizing them some banks are getting extra deliveries of cash from armored trucks the people who drive those trucks are considered essential workers Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR and this is W. NYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake governor Cuomo says New York is still working to get the medical equipment it needs to handle the surge of covert nineteen patients the governor said finding more ventilators is the state's single greatest challenge right now no one has a stockpile of these the federal government has to acquire them the same way we have to acquire Cuomo says the state's still needs about fifteen thousand ventilators to meet the projected number of patients New York City is closing some streets to traffic starting tomorrow the more is the move is an effort to give more people more space to give social distance in order to slow the spread of covert nineteen in Manhattan Park Avenue between twenty eight and thirty fourth streets will not allow vehicles between ten in the morning and seven at night there will also be closures on Bushwick Avenue in Brooklyn thirty fourth Avenue in queens and the grand concourse in the Bronx the NYPD will be on site to ensure safety and social distancing officials are considering additional closures in the future governor Cuomo says New York is still working to get rather no well he's also saying that we're looking to get them the for them we're gonna move on to the next door because my computer froze up theme restaurant chef Floyd card does has died of complications from covert nineteen is companies that car does died earlier this week at morning side Medical Center in Montclair New Jersey he was admitted a week ago with a fever Carlos was the winner of the third season of top chef and had a hand in numerous Indian restaurant in his hometown of Mumbai and here in New York City he told WNYC back in two thousand sixteen that he always aim to mimic his family's cooking for the longest time I still get people asking me when you get the best Indian folk and they ask every Indian person there no way to get the best Indian food and ninety nine point nine percent of the bill would stay at home Carlos was fifty nine years old and new York city's top athletes are dealing with the emotional toll of the postponement of the Olympic Games Natasha Hastings is a two time Olympic gold medalist in track and field from Brooklyn she gave birth to her first child last year and has been training to get back in shape for the summer she says while the delay is necessary to save lives she's still needed to process her feelings the night of the postponement I hear that some of my girlfriends and was like Hey I need you guys can we do a happy hour we had a a facetime group chat we all have a glass of wine I will just stop Hastings is spending her stay at home taking care of her newborn and recalibrating her training schedule for twenty.

Scott Horsley
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 7 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Scott Horsley reports regulators have a simple message for customers who might be tempted to pull money out of the bank during this anxious time as a kind of security blanket your money is safe as they say when it's in the back there have been anecdotal reports of people making large cash withdrawals Janak Williams who chairs the FDIC says even if a bank branch closes or shortens its hours customers will be able to put their hands on cash ATMs are functioning as as usual payment systems are functioning functioning as always I know want to totally that we heard from several banks that they're actually using extra caution in cleaning the ATMs and sanitizing them some banks are getting extra deliveries of cash from armored trucks the people who drive those trucks are considered essential workers Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR two million Americans without access to clean running water have become some of the most vulnerable to the corona virus on the Navajo Nation forty percent must hold water and use outhouses from member station KJZZ laurel Morales reports Sheila yes he drives fifty miles for her drinking water groceries and other necessities since health officials have encouraged frequent hand washing her family's using more water my mother was asking but what are we taking the trash out we have four bags of trash and we have to try to get to the city to do that doing laundry I'm scared to go to lunch right now we have a small line you might hear a community kind of risky for us right now in two thousand nine American Indians and Alaskan natives died from each one and one at four times the rates of all other racial and ethnic groups combined that's according to a study by the national institutes of health for NPR news and more more Alice in flagstaff the suspect accused of killing fifty one people at two mosques in Christchurch New Zealand last year has unexpectedly pleaded guilty to all charges the shocking attacks triggered new gun laws in New Zealand critics called for changes on social media roles as the government's live streamed his attacks the FBI says a man suspected of plotting to bomb a hospital in Missouri has died after agents attempted to arrest him the suspect was the subject of a long running domestic terrorism investigation the FBI says he was a potentially violent extremist motivated by racial religious and anti government hatred I'm korva Coleman NPR.

Scott Horsley Janak Williams FDIC Washington laurel Morales Sheila flagstaff Christchurch New Zealand FBI Missouri NPR New Zealand
Trump seeks stimulus package potentially worth more than $1 trillion, including direct payments to Americans

Morning Edition

04:49 min | 7 months ago

Trump seeks stimulus package potentially worth more than $1 trillion, including direct payments to Americans

"One trillion dollars that is how much the trump administration is requesting from Congress the money would be used to help people and businesses suffering in this pandemic and just to be clear this package would be on top of the one hundred billion dollar package already passed by the house Charlie secretary Steven Mnuchin said many Americans need money in hand as quickly as possible we're looking at sending checks to Americans immediately and what we've heard from hard working Americans many companies have now shut down whether it's bars or restaurants Americans need cash now and the president wants to get cash now and I mean now in the next two weeks the secretary said if something is not done the unemployment rate could jump to as high as twenty percent I want to bring in NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley has got good morning David let's begin with this new leave propose funding package we're hearing about this trillion dollars what exactly would it cover the administration has not offered a lot of details but we do know that this plan includes a financial lifeline for big industries like airlines which have been hard hit help for small business in some fashion and then the centerpiece of the plan ease these direct payments to Americans in rolling out a rescue package of this scale yesterday the administration's essentially acknowledging that the very aggressive public health measures that they have put in place to try to slow the spread of the corona virus pandemic are gonna put a really big dent in the U. S. economy and they need to be equally aggressive in trying to you know build a bridge over that so Americans don't get hurt worse than they otherwise would what if I want to ask you about these direct payments I mean almost like a paycheck from the government going to a lot of Americans to help I mean what how much are we talking about here and and does is everyone entitled to get to get these checks the number that's been floated is a thousand dollars but we again we haven't seen the details as possible there could be more than one check Steven Mnuchin did suggest yesterday in talking with reporters that there might be some income limits that millionaires for example might not need this kind of rescue others a house house version of this idea that had a threshold of a hundred and thirty thousand dollars people bold making below that would be eligible but those are some of the details that could still be worked out and this was sort of a change right I mean that the president had previously been talking about doing something with the the the payroll tax to help people that this would be different right that's right in their number of problems with the presence of payroll tax proposal one it wouldn't help people who need it most to suddenly been dropped from the payrolls it wouldn't help workers who rely on tips for a big share of their income and we know that wait staff and bars and restaurants have been among the hardest hit in this crisis even for those who did benefit from a payroll tax cut it would it would be slow to pay out you know that that the tax relief is sort of dribbled out a little bit of time every week or two with your paycheck and as you heard the treasury secretary say that the administration wants to get this money in the hands of Americans fast so they settled on this direct payment option instead so if we're talking about a trillion dollars and and you think about that the national deficit that we hear so much about I mean to what extent can can the country afford on a package like this right now this will add to the the federal deficit which obviously was already running in the trillion dollar range but there are lots of people who are happy to lend money to the federal government this time and frankly economists say this is the kind of crisis where it makes sense for the federal government to run a deficit with the private sector is shutting down and the public sector needs to step in and help patch the hole great man Q. economist at Harvard who was one of those George W. bush's top advisers had a blog post last week where he said yes there are times when it's important to worry about the rising government debt this he said is not one of those times I think I just have to walk around our communities and and feel the streets and and how quiet they are to understand that life has really changed I mean you've been looking specifically at which businesses industries across the U. S. have been particularly hit hard what do you learn it's been really widespread airlines course with some of the first to sound the alarm they're saying this is been a a bigger blow to them than the September eleventh attacks hotels have been deeply affected Marriott announced furloughs yesterday for tens of thousands of workers obviously bars and restaurants are largely shut down some are still offering takeout but that's a greatly reduced staff and and some of closed altogether the U. A. W. sexually asked that the automaker shut down they haven't gone that far yet but they have made adjustments and and living staff I heard yesterday from a bookstore in my hometown of Denver the tattered cover that has cut most of its workers it's still offering a limited service of mail order delivery and curbside pickup obviously a lot of people stuck at home will have some extra time to read these

Congress
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:11 min | 7 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Update you're welcome NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley has been with us throughout this day all right let's talk about testing after weeks of delays and shortages officials now say that nearly two million corona virus tests will be available and labs across the country will be able to test thousands of people a day starting this week the White House also said this will include drive through and walk through testing sites set up in the hardest hit states but this is also the same White House the promised millions of test kits weeks ago and was forced to admit that there was a supply shortage so how and where can people get tested for the coronavirus and peers global health and development correspondent Jason Beaubien joins us now to help answer that question hi Jason Hey good morning so where are these new tests going to come from where they going I mean how are they going to get to where they need to go you know in it's going to be different in different places some of it is going to be sort of put on top of what it is already been rolled out in some states but we are expecting to see testing popping up in parking lots all of walmarts and Walgreens and people having the ability to go online find out where a particular testing site is make an appointment go in and and get tested the government is saying however that they really are gonna try to prioritize this for first responders health care workers and the elderly particularly the elderly who are showing either some symptoms or have some underlying conditions initially they do know that there's a huge pent up demand for testing all they want to make sure that that the people who really need it the most get access to it but it is this entirely new model that they're gonna try to roll out to get testing to thousands and thousands of people after you know last week the only be able to test out a few thousand people a day the idea here is that each individual location could do two to four thousand people a day right which is still we should say south Korea's been testing fifteen thousand people a day so the United States is way behind on this way behind playing though what difference this is going to make when we talk about flattening the curve so to speak so you know in terms of attacking this outbreak in in this country if you don't know where the the flare ups are happening you can't really put the resources they are you can't isolate people you you're gonna have people still wandering around who are infectious so by testing you can really identify where the hot spots are up try to get those people if the care that they need and and get people isolated also make people more careful in those particular places so knowing exactly what's happening with the spread of this outbreak it is one of the the keys that will come out of more testing at least that is the hope again they're starting to roll this out the equipment is gonna start moving out it could still they're saying they're going to do this this week you know it might not be till the end of the week that we really are getting set this thing up and running okay so we've been talking a lot about how US hospitals are really vulnerable they just don't have the capacity to deal with this pandemic what are you hearing right now from folks on the ground hearing at hospitals that they are very concerned about getting inundated with patients and that's part of the reason that they're trying to to do this testing in parking lots to the testing part of it can be outside of the hospital to the hospital can focus on actually helping treat the people who are actually sick hospitals are also very worried about the amount of protective equipment that they have on on hand and with the different have enough in the coming days if they do get thousands and thousands of people showing up at emergency rooms all across the country with with this this disease so that's a big concern for them we also heard that US Surgeon General announced in recent days that hospitals surgeons because should think about canceling elective surgeries so just another another change afoot and here's Jason Beaubien we appreciate it you're welcome just a few days ago it's still seemed fine to go to restaurants now several states say it's not Illinois governor JB Pritzker explained why he put out a statewide order I tried earlier this week to appeal to everyone's good judgment to stay home to avoid bars not to congregate in crowds it's unfortunate that many people didn't take that seriously the time for persuasion and public appeals is over the time for action is here a bit of frustration there same in New York City and Ohio Washington state Massachusetts Kate Grossman is a senior editor with member station WBEZ in Chicago and I guess you won't be eating out today I will today well but starting tonight I will definitely not locating out okay was there some specific event that made the governor act well there sure was this was clearly prompted by early St Patrick's day celebrations here in Chicago over the weekend in particular on Saturday afternoon and into the evening this is the you know the big weekend this was a big weekend before St Patrick's day and it is famous in Chicago for partying and the governor Saad took the big crowds and on Saturday he I'm you know tried to say I am appealing to your good judgment please don't do that but by Sunday he said I'm not playing anymore and we're shutting down how much trouble are restaurant owners and their employees and now well there's a deep deep concern we had our reporter out yesterday at a group of chefs got together to listen to the press conference where the governor announced this news of the closing for dine in customers and we have this picture of them congregated with their heads all hanging low as they're listening to the press conference you know it's it's gonna be pretty devastating you know they're talking about you know closing down this to to be you know take out and drive through but you know we have an alderman for example Chicago who owns a longstanding restaurant here and he said eighty percent of his revenue is dine in customers so I think that's pretty common so there's a really deep concern about how this will impact them although I'm glad you're specifying this is a ban on dine in customers that means the restaurant can stay open they can serve to people are doing take out is that right that's right they can do what they're calling curbside pickup and they can do drive through so so hopefully they'll still have some staff and they're obviously in in their kitchens making food this must be part of a wider shut down the schools are closed in Chicago right I that's right well effective I am tomorrow morning no school for two weeks in not just in Chicago but the whole state of Illinois so how quiet have the streets better are they going to be getting in Chicago in the next couple of days well you know it's funny so I was the corona virus editor this weekend and I was furiously up my computer and working all weekend and then I went out for a walk and they were actually like tons of people outside kind of acting normal and I thought wow how are you acting normal things are so crazy but the people of people are definitely you know social distancing and staying at home but it was a sunny day yesterday people are we're outside you know I sensed in Washington DC that maybe people are getting out for a final weekend before things really close down maybe that's what's happening in Chicago too yeah I would imagine people are getting getting some sunshine cholesterol okay thanks so.

Scott Horsley NPR
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 8 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"S. will happen on a large scale soon that comment came in a tweet this morning Dr Anthony Fauci who heads the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases made similar comments to reporters yesterday it's not gonna be months it's going to be a week or so we gonna get many many more a test that will be available she acknowledges the current system of testing is inadequate the trump administration says those who can't do their jobs because of the virus may be eligible to collect unemployment insurance here's NPR's Scott Horsley the labor department is giving states the green light to offer unemployment insurance Danny worker who gets sick with corona virus has to care for a sick family member or whose employer is quarantine or shut down the administration's promise to offer financial support to those workers so they don't have to choose between going to work sick and possibly spreading the virus or missing a paycheck labor secretary Eugene Scalia says the ministration will use all available tools to assist workers who were adversely affected by the pandemic the new guidelines did not extend to workers who are already eligible for sick leave or get paid family leave from their employer Scott Horsley NPR news Washington house speaker Nancy Pelosi says Congress is close to an agreement with the White House on a bill to help Americans affected by the virus this is NPR news from Washington this is WNYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake New York state is banning public gatherings of five hundred people or more starting today at five o'clock Broadway shows also will go dark the state is making asking hospitals to find more staffing as well governor Cuomo says these are necessary steps to fight the spread of the virus we're asking former doctors and nurses to reconnect with your old hospital your old health care employer to be on an on call basis the governor says the states also preparing to meet the expected demand for hospital beds nursing homes across the state of also been directed to forbid visitors all schools and places of worship within a section of newer sheller close for two weeks in an effort to slow the virus thirty four year old Selena Perez white says her children are students at one of the shuttered schools and she's trying to keep them home and inside as much as possible I'm to keep the ball in the hole I know that my house is clean disinfect every day every morning in between everything that we do the right thing down spraying the people when those goals and just keep the disease and tenant advocates are calling for a stop on addictions because of the worry of the spread businesses say many workers will lose income now that the city and state of an ounce regulations to limit large gatherings eva Farkas is the executive director of the met council on housing she says that officials need to make sure that people can stay in their homes people are going to lose income and that's gonna really hurt people's ability to pay rent the New York City Housing Authority says it will stop issuing warrants for evictions and it's CUNY schools prepare to move classes online for the rest of the semester campus food pantries are planning to stay open WNYC she made about soup has more it's the number one question campus food pantries are getting right now will you be open this year and we're here to serve our students in the best way we possibly can that's Carol Brower director of student life at the college of Staten Island she says they've stocked up with more food than usual and they're planning to stay open unless directed otherwise in a survey of CUNY students conducted last year nearly half of the respondents reported feeling unsure about whether they'd be able to afford or access healthy foods.

Dr Anthony Fauci National Institute
Trump Wrongly Blames Europe and Bans All EU Travel into US

Morning Edition

02:57 min | 8 months ago

Trump Wrongly Blames Europe and Bans All EU Travel into US

"Years right so the travel industry is is obviously gonna take ahead because of an announcement that president trump made last night new limits on people traveling to the United States from some parts of Europe the president in his oval office address seem to blame European policy in part at least for the coronavirus cases here listen the European Union fail to take the same precautions and restrict travel from China and other hot spots as a result a large number of new clusters in the United States were seeded by travelers from Europe we should just note there's no evidence to support that we don't have a clear understanding of how many cases here in the United States were caused by Europeans coming to this country we also need to know that there was a lot of confusion about the present smart remarks in general I mean he said that these restrictions would include goods they do not he also said all of Europe would face travel bans that is not true can you explain those Scott the real restrictions on what they could mean for the economy will the real restrictions apply to travelers from continental Europe so not the U. K. there there have been excluded from yes for thirty days but this doesn't apply to U. S. citizens or their immediate family members or green card holders this was rolled out pretty abruptly there was apparently no warning to the Europeans and so that just added to the confusion and the white house's have do some clean up on that this restriction will serve surely be another hit for airlines hotels tourist attractions which have already been hurting during the corona virus outbreak European visitors account for about thirty percent of international travelers to the U. S. at this time of year and of course the industry was already suffering from loss of visitors from China now on top of that you for domestic consumers you have a lot of entertainment sporting events big gatherings of all kinds have been canceled or postponed obviously a highlight NBA or low light the NBA announcing last night that suspending its season that means less going out to bars and restaurants less spending money might be a silver lining for Netflix and Amazon but it's a hit for the broader economy and you know hospitality has been a really strong sector adding tens of thousands of job in recent months this could really change that around so the White House has outlined this plan to help the economy but yet it still doesn't seem to be helping the stock market can you explain what the plan is why it's not helping on the yeah and that's a contrast what happened earlier this week when the market really rallied on a promise of a rescue package for the White House but when investors actually saw with the president's offering last night they were clearly disappointed too little too late and too little detail he's talking about low interest loans for affected businesses maybe postponing next month's tax deadline most important perhaps help for workers who don't have sick leave and are forced to stay home so they don't miss a paycheck but again we're waiting to see the details of how that might be a top accomplishment we should say house Democrats plan put out their own plan on the floor later today Scott Horsley impairs chief economics correspondent thanks

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:51 min | 8 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"January NPR's Scott Horsley says the latest jobs numbers are due out in about an hour forecasters are expecting the labor department report another solid month of job gains but the news may be outdated as soon as its published reports based on surveys conducted three weeks ago that was before the sharp jump in reports of coronavirus outside of China where the epidemic began since then growing fears about the virus and the damage it might do to the economy have triggered a sharp sell off on Wall Street major stock indexes tumbled again on Thursday industries that could see job cuts as a result of coronavirus include manufacturing and hospitality factories have already had trouble getting parts from China travel and tourism could also take a hit Scott Horsley NPR news Washington at least twenty states are now reporting cases of the corona virus Maryland is reporting its first cases all three related to overseas travel the virus is blamed for at least twelve deaths in the U. S. all but one in Washington state vice president pence acknowledges there aren't enough test kits to meet demand nationwide he says the federal government is working on that president trump is expected to sign the bill allocating more than eight billion dollars to combat the virus this is NPR news from Washington president trump is canceling today's visit to the centers for disease control and prevention in Atlanta the White House is offering no explanation later today the president will be in Tennessee to get a look at the damage done by Tuesday's tornadoes they left twenty four people dead the Taliban are denying responsibility for today's deadly attack in Afghanistan's capital at least twenty seven people were killed and more than fifty wounded when gunmen opened fire at a ceremony honoring a former Shiite leader and P. ours did the deed says one of the country's former presidential candidates escaped unhurt special forces rushed to the area where gunmen opened fire on the ceremony from a nearby building under construction according to local news outlet tolo the chief rival of the president his name is on Dunlop Dunlop was bundled away but his deputy described the attack as suspicious that's because of the law doesn't recognize I should've honey as a legitimate president of Afghanistan but a spokesman for honey condemned the attack the tensions in Kabul complicate an already tricky deal signed between the United States and the Taliban that would see thousands of American forces withdrawal by the middle of next year that's because the deal calls for negotiations between the Taliban enough guns to settle the country's future but I've gone to divide it and they have to reconcile for those talks to go ahead do you have date NPR news Islamabad Dow futures are off more than six hundred points this morning I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington you're listening to morning edition on KCRW I'm Evan Kleiman on.

Taliban NPR vice president Washington Evan Kleiman Dave Mattingly United States Kabul Dunlop Dunlop Afghanistan Scott Horsley Tennessee president White House Atlanta trump federal government pence
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:45 min | 9 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Scott Horsley is our chief economics correspondent and of course was a long time White House correspondents so to help us understand how he's trying to frame these specific numbers wage wages have been rising faster than inflation that's good for workers there read real purchasing power's been going up but wage gains of actually moderate in recent months in the twelve months ending in December average wages rose just two point nine percent compared to three point four percent earlier in the year and that deceleration in pay hikes is a little surprising given the very low unemployment rate we have now is encouraging is the president says that wages for people at the bottom of the income ladder have been rising faster than those the top that's partly because a lot of states have raised their minimum wages the present also talked about the very large stock market gains that we've seen since the election of twenty sixteen it is way up not seventy percent as he said but the Dow's up fifty seven percent stock ownership are is heavily concentrated among the rich eighty four percent of those gains have gone to just the top ten percent of earners and forty five percent of Americans don't own any stock at all I want to pause for a second and go to Ron Elving because when you think about the last impeach president he was giving a seat at the union he's also the person we attribute this it's the economy stupid kind of sloganeering and so is this something that the president should lean hard into especially given what his democratic rivals are talking about why would he not why would he not take credit for weather caught a condom use today presidents have suffered when the economy was poor even if it wasn't their fault and even when it wasn't really that bad and even when it was recovering I'm thinking here by George HW bush in nineteen ninety two very short very shallow recession and yet he was pummeled with it and that has happened in other occasions and we've also seen presidents come in office riding on a long recovery such as the one from say about two thousand nine two thousand ten forward into two thousand seventeen and to back on a few more years with policies and there's no question that this president has cut regulations and cut taxes what particularly for a corporations and to some to be wealthy individuals which has juice the economy if you're further but he did come in riding on a long recovery which may be slowing down a little bit now but he basically takes credit for all of it and says that when he came into office it was a situation of American carnage I want to come back to Scott Horsley here because another issue one of factcheck health care promises the president spoke about also Michigan governor Gretchen Widmer who delivered the democratic response here is an example of something the president spoke about one hundred and thirty two lawmakers in this room have endorsed legislation to impose a socialist takeover of our healthcare system wiping out the private health insurance plans of one hundred and eighty million very happy Americans to those watching at home tonight I want you to know we will never let socialism destroy American health care Somers we talk about the language is using their this is obviously divisive issue even within the Democratic Party some of the presidential candidates on the democratic side Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren have favored a single payer plan that would eliminate private insurance in warrants case over a period of time other Democrats though want to preserve a role for private insurance for those people who want it we should also point out the president did make what he called an iron clad pledged to protect patients with pre existing conditions did he explain how we do that he he did not in this this is surely the biggest Whopper in tonight's speech the president knows a protection for patients with pre existing conditions as popular so he pays lip service to it but if anything his administration has has whittled away at those protections and of course they're they're fighting to overturn the affordable Care Act which is where those protections come from I want to talk about another big issue border security the president talked about this will even before he you know what it was the nominee and hit that theme again tonight my administration has undertaken an unprecedented effort to secure the southern border of the United States this statement seems vague but it's got a a believe you've kind of dug into it what do you know the administration has made a series of sweeping changes to limit access to asylum seekers at the border I'd sent tens of thousands of migrants back to Mexico to wait for their day in immigration courts and administration credits those policies for a very sharp drop in the number of migrants who are being taken into custody the border in a last may we saw that number peek at a recent high about a hundred forty thousand last month the number was down to around twenty nine thousand so a drop of about eighty percent our allies in this gets at some of what we would call kind of red meat or culture were issues that we heard the president talking about he said he was calling upon members of Congress to pass legislation banning late term abortion of babies he talked about the idea of a sanctuary cities and kind of going after sanctuary states how did he balance this part of the speech with what we heard about the economy well I think those are the two parts of the president's campaign message one is to say you're better off now than you were four years ago the economy is great he said it's greater than ever before in American history but also the president is at heart a culture warrior and he believes that cultural issues are more powerful than economic ones and there is some evidence that might suggest he's right for instance the parts of the country that are reaping the most benefits from the trump economy are the ones where his approval ratings are the worst and the parts of the country that are not reaping the benefits that are doing badly record farm bankruptcy is a manufacturing recession those are the parts of the country where his numbers are the highest why I think because of the cultural issues he's pretty they the voters in those places think he's protecting them against criminal immigrants he talked about those he highlighted once again this is a staple for him a family whose family member has been killed by an undocumented immigrant so these are the two parts of his message one is you never had it so good and the other is you know the Democrats want to ruin your your way of life and that's the message to the public we want to talk about what it was like inside the capitol congressional correspondent kills the smell is there tonight moments ago she spoke with the second highest ranking Republican representative in the house that Steve Scalise we did see a pretty tepid response from Democrats on most things including things other were bye bye first things that should have been bipartisan that always have been bipartisan it almost is is like they have this personal hatred against the president and they're letting it see through where they're opposing good policies and you should always put your personal differences on the side you you should debate each issue on its merits you should support a good idea no matter who it's coming from when president Obama killed Osama bin laden we applaud it it was the right decision to make we disagreed with present a bomb on a number of issues but that was the right thing to do when we celebrate it of the fact that they can't even celebrate and applaud the killing of soul money who was one of the most bloody terrorists in the history of our country literally the blood of hundreds of men and women in uniform from the of Americans he was in Iraq plotting killing more Americans when we killed them and they can't celebrate that I think it just doesn't look good for them as a party if that's what they're gonna project to the country and that's Republican Steve Scalise speaking with our own congressional correspondent kills the smell I want to come back to two of our guests here need email show me who was a former chief of staff to the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi can you give your final thoughts is this a speech that opens the door in any way forward or are we kind of where we started which is you know on the eve of a Senate impeachment vote not this is speech opens the door for the official reelection campaign of president trump and for Democrats protecting the house and for the presidential candidates on the democratic side to make the case we are the alternative to the to president trump and president trump play that his vision as philosophy a why he should be reelected and wide Republican shuffle forum in in twenty twenty amik Republic Democrats how the I have the opportunity down they've responded and in the race is on and Brendan Buck I want to go to you because in so many ways this party is not the party of your former boss house speaker Paul Ryan so what did you hear what does this mean for public and going forward yeah but it's a a party with the president in complete control of it you saw the reaction that you saw from the Republicans in the chamber was raucous that is a reflection of the constituents that they're representing the president is in complete control of them and into the as a matters and the way that he goes out there now and is able to talk about his accomplishments still play the populace I don't think you would be a Donald Trump speech without playing into a little fear and getting people are worried about the they know their their future he did that again tonight so I think he actually did a relatively good job if you are if the goal here was to set up a twenty twenty campaign where you're getting Republicans excited for what's to come and drawing a contrast with Democrats and and making people fear little bit about what would happen under a democratic president and again this is going to conclude our coverage this evening of president trump's state of the union address for twenty twenty we've got lots of news continuing you can hear more in the NPR politics podcast we also want to thank all of our public radio stations that are carrying this special tonight on Capitol Hill we had NPR congressional correspondence kills the smell and Susan Davis we had the chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley handled our fact checking things so much that also in the studio and peers national political correspondent my allies in an NPR senior Washington editor in correspondent.

Scott Horsley White House
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 10 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some Chinese subsidies and pure Scott Horsley forces warnings got thanks you're welcome it's morning edition on WNYC I'm Richard hake the backlash continues against new York's new law that ends most forms of cash bail and it's Karen dewitt reports Republicans in Albany are ramping up the pressure on Democrats to change the law New York ended most forms of cash bail on January first Republicans who are in the minority in the Senate say they are concerned about the growing number of instances of repeat criminal offenders released without bail well then gone on to commit yet another offense Senate GOP leader John Flanagan says Democrats need to act to restore cash bail for some more serious crimes and to give judges more discretion to set bail if the defendant is believed to be a danger to the community they are tone deaf they're not listening to people back in their districts between last week and this week there's been almost a hundred bills introduced through the powerful rules committee not one not one on criminal justice not one on anything that we've talked about not one on anything modifying a law repealing law from last year the Republicans are also objecting to new proposals by some Senate Democrats they would allow people in prison to become automatically eligible for parole review when they turn fifty five senator Fred action are is a former Broome county deputy sheriff today is just another step in the wrong direction but to think that just because someone is fifty five if they're a serial murderer or a serial rapist that they would get parole I think every New Yorker needs to know just how bad a piece of policy that is equally as bad as before some Senate Democrats from Long Island have proposed bills to modify the bail reform laws senator Jim gore and has proposed a bill that would add manslaughter and some terrorism related charges back to the list of crimes that would be eligible for cash bail senator Monica Martinez his bill would give judges more power to hold the defendant in jail before their trial if they're deemed to be dangerous to themselves or others Senate leader and restored cousins was non committal well we will certainly look at those bills like we look at any number of bills store cousin says no one should interpret her comments as a lack of urgency but she says the law needs to be given a chance to work before changes are made I try and keep it all in perspective changes hard change around this system is particularly hard and it's been two weeks and I want to be able to sort out the facts from fear mongering I want to be able to look at reality and data as opposed to just reacting to you know whatever people are saying who are not necessarily trying to reform a system that we know has been broken family members of crime victims were planning a rally on Long Island to advocate for changes to the bail reform laws in Albany I'm Karen to wet support for NPR comes from member.

Scott Horsley
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 11 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"The BBC's Nick fake reporting the US Supreme Court is scheduled to take up its first major gun rights case in a decade NPR's Nina Totenberg reports the justices on Monday will hear arguments on now defunct gun regulations in New York City several gun owners and the New York affiliate of the NRA challenged regulations for having a handgun at home in New York City under the regulations as they existed when the case began a license to have a gun at home only allowed the gun owner to transport the weapon to seven shooting ranges inside the city limits that meant these pistol owners could not transport their guns to a home elsewhere in the state for instance or the shooting ranges in competitions outside the city this year the city change those rules to be more permissive but the gun owners are pressing the Supreme Court to lay out yet more permissive rules for gun ownership and transport Nina Totenberg NPR news Washington nearly six out of ten companies in the S. and P. five hundred index are at risk of losing assets because of climate change and PR Scott Horsley reports that's according to a new guide for climate savvy investors the guide evaluate some fifteen thousand companies around the world to see which are most exposed to a changing climate many of those companies have assets a growing risk of physical damage from wild fires hurricane droughts or other problems associated with rising carbon in the atmosphere analysts also flag businesses that could be adversely affected by regulatory changes such as a carbon tax those risks are higher in the US and Australia than in other countries which have already adopted more aggressive policies to combat climate change even companies in the same industry often have widely varying exposure to climate risk the assessments were conducted by true cost which is an arm of S. and P. global Scott Horsley NPR news Washington you're listening to NPR.

BBC Nick fake US Supreme Court NPR Nina Totenberg NRA New York City Washington Scott Horsley US Australia New York
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"R. Scott Horsley reports investors will be listening closely for any hints of upcoming changes on the central bank's policy on interest rates the federal reserve's interest rate setting committee meets later this month and many observers expect the committee to lower rates for the first time since the beginning of the Great Recession more than a decade ago that appear to be moving in that direction last month would emphasize growing uncertainty with both the US and global economies the feds calculation could change however after a better than expected jobs report last week president trump is standing by labor secretary Alex Acosta make calls for a constitutes that down over his handling of a sex trafficking case in Florida involving the wealthy financier Jeffrey abstain trump is praising Akon stuff but also says he will be looking closely at a cost as role in the plea deal under scrutiny as being too lenient the Emmy winning actor rip torn is died towards publicist says he passed away peacefully at his home in Connecticut he was eighty eight for many made his film debut in nineteen fifty six and turned to comedic roles later in life appearing in movies men in black and Dodge ball in which he played a legendary player turned teacher you've got to learn the five these love wall nods two one one is in before a key role in the Larry Sanders show you're listening to NPR news United Nations nuclear watchdog the I. A. E. A. is preparing to hold an emergency meeting today the meeting is set to get underway in a couple of hours with Iran's nuclear program on the agenda U. S. called for the meeting after you run twice preach to the twenty fifteen nuclear deal at the trump administration withdrew from a year ago Iran says it is responding to the economic sanctions the ministration reimposed Delaware could soon see its first openly transgender state senator Sir McBride is currently the national press secretary for the Human Rights Campaign Serra Mueller from Delaware public media reports on big brights run for a seat in the Delaware Senate to twenty twenty Sarah McBride is a Wilmington Delaware native with a long history in politics at the twenty sixteen Democratic National Convention she made history by becoming the first openly transgender person to speak at a major party convention but big bright says she's not campaigning to make history she's campaigning to make a difference I'm not running to be a transgender state senator I'm trying to be at I'm running to be a senator who was born and raised in this community and I'm right who cares about my neighbors he fried says expanding access to affordable healthcare tops our agenda her passion for the issue comes from caring for her late husband who died of cancer for NPR news I'm Serra Mueller in Dover Delaware and you're listening to NPR news trying to adopt a child in the United States is complicated expensive and sometimes heartbreaking most of my friends have tried and had terrible experiences several of them have actually ended up pulling out of the foster to adopt them entirely your stories and how one journalist experience sheds light on a broken system that's next time on the take away from W. NYC and P. R. I. that program heard of.

R. Scott Horsley