35 Burst results for "Scott Horsley"

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 2 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And her husband have also been cutting back on travel. We love to vacation in our motor home, but we have not gone anywhere in our motor home at all this year. Because of the cost of diesel. Now diesel prices have come down from their record high in June, but the price is still averaging nearly $5 a gallon nationwide. Our people viewing the state of the economy through the lens of their particular politics, in many cases, yes, economic attitudes like so many things are politically polarized right now. In our poll, Republicans like Morrison were nearly four times as likely as Democrats to say their financial situation has gotten worse in the last year. But even among Democrats, economic attitudes have deteriorated since the last time this poll was conducted back in February. So how are people responding to this? About one in four, say they've drawn down their savings in order to make ends meet. And many people say they are spending less. For example, more than half of the people surveyed say they're eating out less now than they were 6 months ago. Now a little reality check just yesterday, the commerce department reported that actual spending in restaurants is up nearly 7% from 6 months ago. But there's no question many people feel as if they are having to tighten their bells. Lavender justice is a pizza delivery driver in suburban Atlanta and says tips this summer are substantially down. People are struggling and it's kind of tragic, even on Fridays and Saturdays I've been making probably only 75% of what I was about a year ago. As a result, justice has also had a scale back on favorite hobbies like costume camping. I would imagine Scott that there are people who are making enough that they have a cushion, even if they're expenses go up, they've got the money, or even if they're for the moment spending more than they're earning, they've got some savings, but there must be other people who have real difficulty here. Not surprisingly, it's the people who had last night to start with that are cutting back the most. In our poll, families making less than $50,000 have to tighten their belts more than those with upper incomes. We know lower income families start with less of a cushion. They also tend to spend more of their household budget on things like rent and groceries that have gone up the most. I talked to Connor slayton, who works at a KFC in Kansas City. He recently got a promotion and a pay raise to $14 an hour, but he told me he still has trouble scraping up the rent each month. I don't think there's anywhere in America where 14 hour can adequately pay for a one bedroom apartment and everything else that you need. Missing a rent or a mortgage payment is still relatively rare in our survey, but among families making under $25,000. Nearly one out of four said they felt that kind of housing hardship. And Scott horsley, thanks so much. You're welcome

Morrison commerce department Atlanta Connor slayton Scott KFC Kansas City America Scott horsley
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:45 min | 11 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And Michael hill it's morning edition from NPR and double you in my city Here are words we don't want to hear new omicron variant This version seems more contagious but there is some reassuring news in there too European leaders are trying to lower the tension as they work to address Russia's threat against Ukraine and will look at the history of studying dreams It's Thursday January 27th the news is next Live from NPR news I'm jeanine Hirst Justice Steven breyer is expected to appear at The White House today to announce plans to retire from the U.S. Supreme Court The 83 year old has been on the court since 1994 NPR's Kelsey Snell says Senate Democrats plan to move quickly to confirm President Biden's choice to replace prior Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer says he'll mirror the timeline Republicans used during the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett according to a source familiar with shoes thinking The Senate confirmed Barrett roughly one month after former president Trump nominated her Assuming breyer announces as planned Democrats speedy timeline could be difficult to achieve Democrats and Republicans each control 50 votes in the Senate That even split could cause procedural hurdles that could slow down the confirmation process For his part Biden isn't naming any names but during the campaign he promised that given the chance he would nominate a black woman to the Supreme Court Kelsey Snell and PR news Washington Although the U.S. economy is still strong the pandemic continues to slow it down In less than a half hour the commerce department releases its report on economic growth for the gross domestic product for the fourth quarter of last year and Piero Scott horsley has more on what the GDP is expected to show The top line number is expected to show solid growth for the fourth quarter that growth was not consistent if you think back for example employers hired three times as many people in October as they did in December Chief economist Mark sandy of moody's analytics says that's just one illustration of how the economy has been moving in fits and starts And Paris Scott horsley this a day after the Federal Reserve signaled it plans to raise interest rates soon to combat inflation A new version of the omicron variant is spreading rapidly in Asia and parts of Europe As NPR is Michelin duke klepper reports the virus has also been detected in several states including California and Washington This new version of the virus is related to omicron is officially called BA .2 It contains many of the same mutations as omicron and given that doctor Peter Chen Hong at the University of California San Francisco says the vaccine and booster shots will likely work just as well with it I have no guarantee that you wouldn't get reinfected meaning that you might have a sniffles when I feel like you got another cold But I feel very very confident that you would be protected from serious disease in the general population Preliminary evidence suggests this new version is just as transmissible as the first omicron and will likely spread here in the U.S. over the next month or so Mike lean duke left NPR news U.S. futures contracts are trading mixed NASDAQ futures are up more than a half percent down futures are trading flat S&P 500 futures are up about three tenths of a percent You're listening to NPR news You're listening to WNYC at 8 O four Michael hill Good morning Clear and 20 out there sunny and 20 out there Sunny and 31 today ahead of a big snowstorm starting Friday evening into Saturday We have transit elays this morning on the a DQ and number two and three trains in the city and NJ transits Morrison Essex and rare and valley lines Former New Jersey Senate president Steve Sweeney who lost reelection in November has been kicked off the state's redistricting commission WNYC's Nancy Solomon explains The removal of Sweeney by the state Democratic Party continues the realignment of political power across New Jersey that began with his election defeat in November the longtime Senate president was a top lieutenant in the south Jersey democratic machine which opposed governor Phil Murphy at every turn early in this administration When a new Senate president was selected after the election Murphy had a place at the table in picking Sweeney's successor and now Sweeney will lose his role as kingmaker with lawmakers across the state who live and die with redistricting Sweeney has signaled that.

Kelsey Snell Senate NPR news jeanine Hirst Steven breyer President Biden Michael hill Amy Coney Barrett NPR president Trump U.S. Supreme Court Piero Scott horsley Mark sandy moody's analytics Scott horsley Chuck Schumer Michelin duke klepper breyer Peter Chen Hong
"scott horsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Drehle Snyder on Capitol Hill today, House lawmakers are set to hold the first public hearing on the Biden ministrations withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said to take questions from members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee this afternoon, Democratic representative Kristi Hoolahan of Pennsylvania will be among them. I think the American people, frankly just want to understand what's happening. Why decisions were made. You know what? Where we can trace those decisions to and how we can frankly continue and out of this 20 year war. Lincoln is set to appear before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee tomorrow. Meanwhile, the Senate is returning today from its summer recess with Democratic leaders seeking to complete work on their $3.5 trillion budget package. It's packed with President Biden social spending priorities. But opposition to the price tag, notably from West Virginia, Senator Joe Manchin could force Democratic leaders to scale the bill back. Stocks opened mixed this morning after ending last week in the red, the Dow Jones industrial average now up 236 points. As NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Asian stocks were mostly higher overnight. Japan's Nikkei average rose 2/10 of 1% after a report that wholesale prices in that country or near a 13 year high Wholesale prices in the U. S are also climbing. The Labor Department is set to report tomorrow on consumer prices for August. Consumer prices in July were up 5.4% from a year ago. That's more than double the Federal Reserve's long term target. But the central bank says high levels of inflation are not likely to last. Crude oil prices are up with the U. S benchmark topping $70 a barrel triple A says the average price of regular gasoline is holding pretty steady at around $3.18 a gallon. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington and NPR Investigation finds the top.

Scott Horsley Senate Foreign Relations Commi House Foreign Affairs Committe Kristi Hoolahan Drehle Snyder 2/10 July $3.5 trillion NPR Afghanistan August U. S 13 year Senate today Capitol Hill Senator Federal Reserve Democratic tomorrow
"scott horsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The US withdrew at the end of August about 200 people are aboard, including some Americans. They're supposed to fly to Qatar. Meanwhile, protesters in Kabul defined a Taliban ban on demonstrations again today, the BBC's Dan Johnson reports. The Taliban interior minister said he was restricting protests because some people were taking to the streets at the instigation and with the financing of malicious parties using demonstrations as cover to breach security. Armed citizens and create chaos. Yesterday, protesters were held back, beaten and lashed Taliban militants fired in the air to try to control crowds. Some journalists were detained and beaten and had cameras and footage examined. Pictures show people on the streets again this morning, apparently defying the ban, the BBC's Dan Johnson reporting, Japan will extend its Covid 19 state of emergency covering the capital and other regions for a third time. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul. New case numbers have declined, but hospitals are still stretched thin. The emergency was due to expire Sunday, but will be extended until the end of the month. The extension applies to 19 of 21 Prefecture is now under restrictions. The government is also drawing up plans for easing social distancing 1 70% of the population is vaccinated, which they're aiming to achieve by November. The plan may include easing restrictions on holding events with 5000, or more Spectators, bars and restaurants serving alcohol and something Japan's largest business lobby has been pushing for shorter quarantines for international travelers. Some health experts warned, though, that signaling the easing of restrictions could tempt exhausted citizens to let down their guard Anthony Kuhn. NPR NEWS Seoul stocks are up this morning as the Labor Department reported another drop in new claims for unemployment benefits. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average rose more than 80 points in early trading applications for new state unemployment benefits fell sharply last week with 310,000 people filing federal claims were also down. By the Labor Department's count, just under 12. Million people were receiving some form of jobless aid in late August. About nine million of those were enrolled in pandemic programs, which officially expired this week. The Federal Reserve says the U. S. Economy continues to grow at a moderate pace, but adds that growth down shifted slightly in July and August as rising concern about the delta variant made people more cautious about eating out and traveling. Supply shortages also weighed on growth, and many businesses say they're still struggling to find workers. Scott Horsley, NPR NEWS Washington You're listening to NPR.

Anthony Kuhn Dan Johnson Qatar August Scott Horsley Kabul BBC November 310,000 people Sunday July Seoul NPR Taliban last week 5000 late August NPR NEWS Yesterday today
"scott horsley" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WBUR

"Scott Horsley offers a closer look into Jerome Powell's latest assessment of how the U. S is faring so far under a coronavirus pandemic. If you look at the total number of people who are collecting any form of unemployment During the week of June 26 that fell to 13.8 million down about 370,000 from the previous week. What that shows is both that there's been an improvement in the job market and more people finding work. It also reflects the fact that a number of states have now prematurely ended the special pandemic unemployment benefits and and so that's showing up in the decline in the total number of people getting getting help as well. NPR's Scott Horsley reporting President Biden's nominee to lead the U. S. Census Bureau is a step closer to confirmation. After testifying before the Senate today, NPR's Hansi Lo Wang, reports Robert Santos could become the first person of color to have the agency as a permanent director. During the hearing, Robert Santos, who is Mexican American and the American Statistical Associations, president pledged to build more transparency and independence. At the Census Bureau. Republican Senator Rob Portman of Ohio. Asked whether Santos would commit to ensuring 2020 census redistricting data is out by mid August. I am confident that the Census Bureau will produce it by August 16th. But you won't make a commitment to getting it done. I do not have the information to make a commitment. The bureau says it's sent to release that data. By August. 16th has been delayed to read more quality checks after the count was upended by pandemic and Trump officials. Last minute schedule Changes. Hansi Lo Wang NPR news State lawmakers in Texas remain at an impasse over ending a walkout by many Democrats in the Legislature that's brought a special legislative session in the state to a standstill. Most of Texas House Democratic lawmakers traveled to Washington, D. C earlier this week to protest the Republican back Voting bill and push for federal elections. Legislation from Texas Standard. Guillemin has more Texas Democrats say parts of the voting bill that prohibit 24 hour and drive through voting and increase the presence of partisan poll watchers amount to voter suppression. Republicans pushing the measure claim it would enhance election security. Despite the deadlock, Republican Governor Greg Abbott says his party will stand its ground were no mood. For additional compromise. It's time to get for people to get back to work and vote on the issues that are on the agenda. Both sides appear to be digging in for a long fight, and Abbott says he plans to call as many special sessions as it takes to get the elections bill passed. I'm Jill Ayman in Austin. This is NPR. This is 90.9. W bur. I'm Sharon Brody in Boston. The Bristol County Sheriff's Office is deploying what it says is the nation's first canine unit.

Jerome Powell Robert Santos Jill Ayman Scott Horsley Hansi Lo Wang Abbott Sharon Brody 13.8 million Boston Census Bureau June 26 Austin Washington, D. C U. S. Census Bureau 24 hour mid August Texas NPR August. 16th August 16th
"scott horsley" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"We'll start with the news update from NPR and NEWS 88 7 State Live from NPR News in Washington. I'm Corvette Coleman. Senate Democrats have reached an agreement among themselves on a major budget deal. The plan spends $3.5 trillion over the next decade on issues such as climate change, healthcare and social services. NPR's Susan Davis reports. The spending plan is a priority for President Biden. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced the deal along with all 11 Democrats on the Budget Committee. 3.5 Trillion is far less than progressive Democrats had hoped for, but near the maximum of what moderate Democrats were willing to spend. Few details of the plan are locked in. But Schumer said it would expand Medicare to help seniors pay for dental vision and hearing coverage. Virginia Senator Mark Warner said the plan would be fully paid for Democrats have previously indicated they plan to roll back some of the trump tax cuts affecting corporations and the wealthy to pay for expanding the social safety net for the middle class. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington The National Interagency Fire Center says there are 67 large fires burning in the U. S. And nearly all of them are in the West. One of the largest wildfires is in California. The backward complex fire is on the state's eastern border with Nevada and has scorched nearly 150 square miles, and it's about two thirds contained. California resident Rose Roberts says her house survived the fire, but her neighbor's homes have been destroyed Its devastating you know, you feel sorry for him, but We're lucky we got out with their lives in south central Oregon. The so called bootleg fire has charred more than 300 Square Miles. That's uncontained. Officials in southern Florida say the death toll has risen to 95 people from the collapse of the condominium building in Surfside. Recovery teams have continued to search the rubble of the 12 story building. Authorities say that 14 people remained potentially unaccounted for. Stocks open higher this morning as investors wait to hear from Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell, NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 100 points in early trading. The Fed chairman's testifying both today and tomorrow before congressional committees in his prepared remarks. Powell points to strong economic growth. Thanks to ongoing vaccinations and a reopening from the pandemic lockdown. House has the job market has improved, but still has a long way to go to get back to full employment. The Fed chairman acknowledges inflation has increased notably and says price hikes are likely to remain elevated in the coming months before eventually moderating The Labor Department said yesterday. Prices in June were 5.4% higher than a year ago. That's the sharpest increase since 2000 and eight Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington on Wall Street. At this time, the Dow is now up 95 points at 34,983. The NASDAQ is up 96 points It's at 14,773..

Corvette Coleman Susan Davis Rose Roberts Jerome Powell June NPR 14,773 California 5.4% 14 people $3.5 trillion 34,983 Schumer 95 people Scott Horsley U. S. 95 points 3.5 Trillion 12 story tomorrow
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR's Scott Horsley reports had millions more are set to lose their benefits in the coming weeks. Congress authorized the supplemental benefits as a lifeline during the pandemic, and millions of people have relied on the aid, which includes an extra $300 a week. Now the economy is bouncing back, though some Republican governors argue the extra benefits are discouraging people from looking for work, making it hard for employers who were eager to staff up. The benefits are set to run through early September, but 25 states have announced plans to end the payments ahead of schedule. Mississippi, Missouri, Iowa and Alaska are leading the way in that effort. More than 300,000. People in those four states will see their extra benefits expire today. Scott Horsley, NPR news Washington and you're listening to NPR news. California Governor Gavin Newsom has signed an executive order that lifts and most of the states coronavirus rules. The order takes effect on Tuesday. But while California is joining other states and cities and reopening Capital of Chile is going back under a lockdown today as authorities try to curb a surge in Covid 19 cases, new infections up sharply in Chile, especially among those under 50 years old Funeral will be held for the four members of a Muslim family killed in an alleged hate motivated attack in London, Ontario nearly a week ago. Dan Carpenter Chuck reports of Families nine year old son remains hospitalized with serious injuries. 46 year old Salman Afzal, his wife, Medea, daughter Yuna, Salman and grandmother Talat died while out for a walk when a vehicle mounted the curb and struck them. The nine year old son is the sole survivor of the attack. Thousands of people attended a vigil in the aftermath of the attack and gathered outside the mosque in London to show their support for the family. Thousands more took part in a multi faith march Friday in London against racism and Islamophobia. Meanwhile, donations from two fundraising campaigns have been pouring in to support the surviving son as of Thursday, more than $1,800,000 have been raised. A friend of the family says people have donated from all over the world from different races and religions. For NPR News. I'm Dan Carpenter Chuck in Toronto Women's title on the line today at the French Open tennis tournament. Barbara critical over the Czech Republic facing Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia, the championship match. Scheduled to get started this hour. It's the first Grand Slam singles final for.

Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova Talat Salman Scott Horsley Yuna Medea Barbara Congress Salman Afzal Tuesday French Open London Thursday NPR 25 states London, Ontario Washington Iowa More than 300,000 more than $1,800,000
Biden Administration Outlines Measures to Address Supply-Chain Issues

Closer Look

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Biden Administration Outlines Measures to Address Supply-Chain Issues

"Is setting up a task force to address supply chain bottlenecks now plaguing a number of industries. The goal is to boost U. S manufacturing and reduce shortages of vital products like computer chips. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington The White

Scott Horsley NPR Washington
Unemployment Claims Dip to Another Pandemic Low

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Unemployment Claims Dip to Another Pandemic Low

"Now for five weeks as the U. S. Job market continues to rebound from the pandemic recession, 385,000 people filed state claims for benefits last week as of mid May, more than 15 million Americans were receiving some form of unemployment assistance. Millions of workers were set to lose that help in the coming weeks, says 25 States have now opted to phase out jobless benefits ahead of schedule, in some cases as early as next week. Meanwhile, the payroll processing company ADP says private employers added nearly a million jobs. Last month. The Labor Department issues its own monthly jobs. Snapshot tomorrow. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

U. ADP Labor Department Scott Horsley Npr News
"scott horsley" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"The change comes as major retailers like Target. Wal Mart and Costco have also dropped their mask rules for fully vaccinated people. Kroger operates more than 2700 stores and 35 states. Under such banners is Fred Meyer, Dylan's and Harris Teeter for NPR News. I'm Tana Weingartner and Cincinnati. Fewer people applied for unemployment benefits. Last week, In a sign of continued improvement in the job market, NPR's Scott Horsley reports on the latest weekly figures from the Labor Department. New claims for unemployment benefits have been dropping steadily as the economy rebounds. State claims fell to 444,000 last week, while claims under a special federal program for gig workers and the self employed dropped as well, well, the job market's improving it remains far from healthy. As of early May, nearly 16 million Americans were receiving some form of unemployment assistance that includes nearly 12 million enrolled in emergency programs. For those who've exhausted their regular benefits, or who wouldn't ordinarily qualify. Those federal programs were set to run through early September. But nearly 20 states plan to end them early amid complaints from some employers who argue the aid is discouraging people from looking for work. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington You're listening to NPR news. The Taliban have taken over a district in eastern Afghanistan that lies a few miles from the provincial capital. It reflects a pattern by insurgents to try to surround urban centers. NPR's DEA. Hadid has details. Government spokesman said Afghan forces undertook a tactical retreat from the dollar charge district. It's located less than 30 miles from the provincial capital material. Um Local media reported. Those forces withdrew after they were surrounded by the Taliban for months. The Taliban gains reflected patent throughout Afghanistan. The insurgents and nibbling away at the district's close to provincial capitals and close to the Afghan capital, Kabul. Analysts say the Taliban appear to be readying themselves to try to save those capitals as US another foreign forces withdraw their expected to have completely left Afghanistan by September. 11. The indeed NPR news. The European Union's executive arm, has signed on to a deal with visor and buying Tech to keep supplying their covert 19 vaccine through 2023 their third contract visor by and take a greater produce An additional 1.8 billion doses. The European Commission says the agreement will allow the purchase of 900 million doses of the current shots and of a serum for more contagious variants of Corona virus, and the contract offers an option to buy 900 million more doses. U. S stocks are trading higher the Dow up more than three quarters of a percent, or 242 points of 1 34,038. The NASDAQ has risen 1.5% SMP also up more than.

Wal Mart Costco Scott Horsley September. 11 Target 242 points 2023 444,000 1.5% Tana Weingartner 35 states Kroger Washington Hadid NPR Labor Department Afghanistan European Union European Commission Taliban
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"P r It's 6 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. Just a few hours ago, economists were expecting strong jobs numbers to come out today. Now those numbers air out and they fall into the category of way below expectations. The numbers for April show the unemployment rate stayed about the same in 6.1% and the economy created far or jobs than the experts thought. NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is here, Scott. Good morning. Good morning, Steve Scott. They were predicting a million jobs, maybe as many as a million jobs anyway. In April, and instead about a quarter of a million what happened? It's hard to know exactly. But the reason the projections had been so high is the consumer spending data for April was really pointing to a robust recovery in a lot of newly vaccinated customers have been venturing out spending more freely. That was expected to generate a lot more demand for workers at restaurants and retail shops and in person entertainment. We do see some of that. Restaurants and bars did add a lot of jobs last month, so did hotels and recreation centers. But there's also some payback as people started coming out of their pandemic Cocoons delivery services, which boom during lockdown cut lots of jobs. Grocery stores, which thrived when people were eating all their meals at home, also cut jobs in April. And manufacturing lost jobs last month. That's partly reflection of the trouble that automakers have had sourcing computer chips, so they've idle idle lot of workers temporarily and that weight on the whole factory sector. Finally see if some employers say they would have added more jobs last month, but they just can't find the workers they need. Well. That part is a little surprising, because just told me there's a lot of delivery workers and others who are newly on the job market, and there are millions of people who've been unemployed this whole time. Right. But remember most the country's not yet fully vaccinated, So a lot of workers are understandably nervous about going to work, especially in a setting where they might be exposed to a virus. You also have people who are busy taking care of sick loved ones. And you have a lot of parents who are looking after Children whose schools have yet to reopen, So it's not surprising. Some employers are having challenges, especially those on the lower end of the pay scale. Tim Quinlan, who's economist with Wells Fargo in Charlotte, says some employers were going to extraordinary lengths to recruit workers. The fast food restaurant in town here as a sign looking for people to staff, the window the drive through and they're offering a $500 signing bonus. Some employers also complain that the relatively generous unemployment benefits the government's been offering are enabling people to stay out of work longer than they otherwise would. Although the researchers say there's little evidence of that The real sign of a worker shortage would be higher wages, and today's report does say average wages in stuff about 20 cents an hour last month, the Labor Department says that could be a sign of growing wage pressure, but it's hard to draw any firm conclusions. I love that example that you give of the fast food worker. Somebody in a more upscale kind of tech sector job might be a bit of work from home while taking care of the kids doing school remotely or whatever the fast food worker has to show up. You can't do that remotely. And so maybe they just don't need of apply for the job. So people remain out of work and a large scale compared to before the pandemic when the white might that change. There's still a long way to go. There's 8.2 million fewer workers on payrolls and there were before. Before the coronavirus struck. This week, Montana announced an interesting experiment. They're going to stop paying those extra unemployment benefits the extra $300 a week at the end of June, two months ahead of schedule, and they're also offering a Bonus to workers who do go back to work, so it's sort of a carrot and stick approach. We'll see how that works. Scott. Thanks. You're welcome. That's NPR's Scott Horsley. Thanks to covert 19 vaccines, the U. S military is normalizing its operations and that includes a massive joint training exercise now starting across Europe and into North Africa. Jay Price of member station W. U. N. C sent us this report from Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Stepping.

Tim Quinlan Steve Scott Steve Inskeep Noel King Wells Fargo Scott Horsley North Africa Europe Scott $500 6.1% 8.2 million Jay Price NPR Charlotte April NPR News Fort Bragg, North Carolina This week 19 vaccines
Consumer Prices Rise More Than Expected, Pushed by Jump in Gasoline

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Consumer Prices Rise More Than Expected, Pushed by Jump in Gasoline

"Reported a sharp increase in consumer prices. Last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the Dow Jones industrial average fell about 120 points in early trading. Consumer prices jumped by 6/10 of a percent last month. That's the sharpest increase in 2012. Higher gasoline prices accounted for nearly half the monthly increase. The prices for food, recreation and furniture were also higher. Over the past year, Prices have risen by 2.6%. That's well above the Federal Reserve long range target for inflation of 2%. But the central bank says the sharper increase coming out of the pandemic is likely to be temporary and not a big cause for concern. Inflationary figures are also somewhat magnified by the sharp drop in prices a year ago when the coronavirus first took hold in the U. S. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington

Scott Horsley NPR Federal Reserve S. Scott Horsley U. Washington
New State Unemployment Claims Rose Again Last Week

All Things Considered

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

New State Unemployment Claims Rose Again Last Week

"Modest jump in state unemployment claims last week more from NPR's Scott Horsley. New State Claims for unemployment benefits rose for the second week in a row last week as 744,000 people sought help. Some of that increase was in states like Michigan, which has seen a sharp jump in new Corona virus infections. Jobless claims under a federal program for gig workers, and the self employed were down last week. As of March,

Scott Horsley New State NPR New Corona Michigan
Jobless claims fall to their lowest level since pandemic

All Things Considered

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Jobless claims fall to their lowest level since pandemic

"Last week fell to their lowest level since the pandemic took hold in the U S more than a year ago. Now, applications for jobless benefits are still high by historical standards. But in his news conference this afternoon, President Biden pointed to the drop in claims as a sign of progress. They're still too many Americans out of work. So many families hurting. They still have a lot of work to do. I can say to you, the American people. Help is here. Hope is on the way. NPR chief Economics correspondent Scott Horsley joins us

President Biden NPR Scott Horsley
Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

All of It

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

"Of unemployment in the U. S. Triggered nearly a year ago, a stretching into another week of 2021. NPR's Scott Horsley has details. Labor Department says about 1.2 million people filed new claims for unemployment last week that includes 730,000 claims for state benefits and another 451,000 claims under the federal program for Gig workers and the self employed. Names were down sharply from the previous week, suggesting a drop in layoffs. All the bad weather and other factors may have distorted the count. As of early February, some 19 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid. Many of those benefits are set to expire next month. Congress is weighing a $1.9 trillion economic package that would, among other things, extend emergency jobless aid through August. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington

Scott Horsley Labor Department U. NPR Congress Washington
Unemployment Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Unemployment Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

"Last week. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Jobless claims are still very high by historical standards, The Labor Department says about 1.2 million people filed new claims for unemployment last week that includes 730,000 claims for state benefits and another 451,000 claims under the federal program for Gig workers and the self employed. Claims were down sharply from the previous week, suggesting a drop in layoffs. All the bad weather and other factors may have distorted the count. As of early February, some 19 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid. Many of those benefits are set to expire next month. Congress is weighing a $1.9 trillion economic package that would, among other things, extend emergency jobless aid through August. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington on Wall Street stocks or lower the

Scott Horsley Labor Department NPR Congress Washington
Biden won't pull Tanden nomination, says she'll get the votes

All Things Considered

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Biden won't pull Tanden nomination, says she'll get the votes

"Bind today told reporters he is sticking with his nominee for White House budget director despite objections from Democratic Senator Joe Manchin. NPR's Scott Horsley reports matching says he'll vote against nominee Neera Tanden because of her past partisan remarks. Neera Tanden is a longtime Democratic policy advisor who served in both the Clinton and Obama administration's. But it's her sharp elbowed Twitter feed. That's put her nomination in jeopardy, with critics on both the right and the left. Hand and apologize for tweets, comparing Senator Ted Cruz to a vampire and Lycan in GOP leader Mitch McConnell to a Harry Potter villain. But mansion warns her overtly partisan statements could have a toxic impact on congressional relations with the budget office. Given Democrats razor thin margin in the Senate Mansions defection could Sink Tendons nomination unless a Republican senator across the aisle and supports her.

Neera Tanden Senator Joe Manchin Scott Horsley Obama Administration Senator Ted Cruz NPR White House Clinton Mitch Mcconnell Twitter GOP Senate
Some Black-Owned Businesses Are Turning To New Banks For Paycheck Protection Loans

All Things Considered

04:02 min | 1 year ago

Some Black-Owned Businesses Are Turning To New Banks For Paycheck Protection Loans

"To help keep workers on payrolls. Businesses owned by black and Latino people were often at the back of the line. Those firms often had to wait longer for money, even though many were desperate for financial help. With a new round of business loans in the pipeline. Authorities are now trying to address that disparity as NPR's Scott Horsley reports like a lot of business sellers. Jennifer Kelly's income took a hit last year when the pandemic struck. She's a clinical psychologist near Atlanta, and some of her clients didn't make the adjustment to online or telephone counseling. Kelly, who has two employees applied to her regular bank for a loan under the federal government's Paycheck protection program. But she says the process was frustrating. It's kind of like trying to get the vaccine. They put my name on the list. And there they finally said, Oh, we all have anymore, And we're sorry that first round of P P p loans was exhausted In less than two weeks. Lots of businesses complained that banks were prioritizing their biggest customers. Bones were especially hard to come by in neighborhoods with a lot of black and brown residents When I needed them. They were not available to man, including. I'm not the big business, but I'm a small business and committed like with the fabric of America. When Congress okayed a second round of P P p loans last year, Kelly applied again. This time through a bank 250 miles away in Savannah, Georgia that specializes in working with black own firms. They were very patient through that entire process, and I didn't get approved for the loan, and I do hope that, especially in the small black banks will survive because We need to have those institutions that second bank Kelly worked with. Carver State Bank was founded 94 years ago with the goal of building financial freedom for its African American customers. 80% of its loans go to black owned businesses. Robert James, who sits on the bank's board, says he received P P p applications from around the country most looking for less than $50,000. Most of our applications are very small businesses individually owned gas station in the neighborhood or restaurants are people deserve a lot of credit for the hard work that they're putting in just to make sure that we get help to the customers that need it. The most According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Even before the pandemic, black owned businesses were more than twice as likely beyond shaky financial footing as white owned firms. CEO Janine Jake Oak of the Community Development Bankers Association, says that means the extra time it took for loans to reach those businesses could be costly. They had a lot less cushion to start with, which made them much more vulnerable when the economy went south. Authorities have tried to address the disparity in P P p lending in a number of ways. First they've made more money available. They also gave banks that specialize in minority and low income communities, a head start when the latest round of paycheck protection loans was launched last month. Finally, while the loans were designed to be forgiven, some black borrowers are suspicious, a legacy of the long history of discriminatory lending. So education is also important. Carver States, James says he tried to reassure African American borrowers they can use P p p loans to keep their businesses and communities afloat. I've heard a lot of stories of customers who were eligible for these funds, but didn't trust that there wouldn't be some sort of a catch. Craig Gordon runs a company that provides in home nursing care in Georgia about 30% of his business is on hold right now because many of his customers are wary of letting anyone even a skilled nurse into their home during the pandemic. With Carver States help Gordon's just been approved for a second p p. P loan. This will buy us probably three of four months, and I'm hoping that all of those vulnerable folks that we served by again will be well vaccinated. In the meantime, cordon says the forgivable loan will help him keep dozens of people on the payroll. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington

Scott Horsley Jennifer Kelly Kelly Carver State Bank NPR Ceo Janine Jake Oak Community Development Bankers Robert James Federal Government Atlanta Savannah Georgia Federal Reserve Bank Of New Yo Congress America Carver
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To fix the economy. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us now and Scott, these numbers sound. Very crim. How bad was this report today? Body. It was pretty bad. We saw another 19,000 jobs lost in bars and restaurants. That's on top of the 400,000 jobs lost in those industries in December. In person services have really been hammered by this winter wave of Corona virus infections. And even industries that had been pretty resilient up till now, like construction and manufacturing also solved some job declines in January. Even the tepid job gains we saw on the whole last month may have been artificially inflated by some seasonal adjustments. So the real picture maybe even weaker than these numbers would indicate. Congressional forecasters said earlier this week, it could be 2024 before we see a full jobs recovery at the snail's pace of job growth we saw last month it would take a lot longer than that. We heard earlier, President Biden acknowledging that road ahead. How else is the White House responding? The president and his aides say This just underscores the urgency of passing the big aid package that Biden's been pushing. There is some skepticism from congressional Republicans and even some Democrats who think that another $1.9 trillion is overkill, especially on top of that $900 billion that was approved in December. And the three trillion or so that was approved last spring. But the president said again today he is determined to go big. A lot of folks are losing hope. I believe the American people looking right now to their government for help to do our job to not let them down. So I'm going to act. I'm gonna act fast by and he said he would prefer to act in a bipartisan manner, but he's prepared to push the package through Congress on a party line vote if necessary. And both the House and Senate have been laying the groundwork for that this week with budget resolutions that would allow Senate Democrats to sidestep the GOP filibuster and passed by this bill with a bare 51 vote majority in the Senate. Are there any areas of compromise? Well, yes, the president has said he's open to some modifications. One example is direct payments. Biden wants to send $1400 payments to most Americans. That's on top of the $600 payments that were approved by Congress in late December for a total of 2000, which is something Democrats campaigned on. There is a group of moderate Republicans in the Senate who would like to scale that back. They proposed $1000 payments to a smaller group of people. Biden has said he won't budge on the $1400 figure. But he is willing to adjust who qualifies for the money so it would be more targeted to low and middle income families, and not so many people earning six figures and up Speaking of which, what about the minimum wage of $15 minimum had been a big part of Biden's platform. There seems to be some resistance among some members of Congress. That's right. We have seen some opposition in the Senate in particular to raising them in our more age, especially at a time when so many businesses are hanging by a thread during the pandemic. Biden and his team say they are still backing the $15 minimum. Although this is you know something they've been pushing for years. The White House's is marketing as pandemic related. They are highlighting the low wage grocery workers or home health aides who have kept punching the clock during the last 10 months or so at some personal risk, And they say those workers deserve more pay. It's still an open question, though, of this is what whether this is something the Senate could do on a 50 vote margin, increasing the looks as though Congress may take up the minimum wage as a separate standalone measure. That's NPR's Scott Horsley. Thanks for your reporting, you're welcome. The Oscar.

President Biden Senate Congress president Scott Horsley NPR White House Oscar GOP
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"19 coordinator Andy Slavitt says it's not key to the by administration goal vaccinating 300 million Americans against the virus that causes covert 19 by late in the summer. Congressional forecasters say they expect the U. S economy to rebound to pre pandemic levels later this year. There's NPR's Scott Horsley explains. Employment may not fully recover until 2024. The new forecast from the Congressional Budget Office is rosier than the one issued last summer, although analysts say they're still considerable uncertainty surrounding the economic outlook and the course of the pandemic itself. Congressional analysts say the $900 billion relief package passed in December should provide an economic boost this year. The forecast is not assuming any additional federal aid, although both the Biden administration and Senate Republicans have proposed more help. CBO forecast predicts the unemployment rate will average 5.7% this year. Down from the current 6.7%. Forecasters expect some people who dropped out of the labor force will return as the job market improves. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Lumbering Winter Storm has dumped snow from Virginia to New England continues its slow motion crawl up coast After dropping several inches of snow in the mid Atlantic. The storm appears to be taking aim in New York City in northern New Jersey Summaries of New York are bracing for us much as 22 inches of snow. Stocks gained ground on Wall Street today, the Dow was up 229 points. You're listening to NPR. This is W. N. Y C. New York on Shawn Carlson. We will have more on that storm in just a moment. NEW YORK City health officials are urging Corona virus vaccine providers to double down on collecting racial and ethnic data for people who get vaccinated. About 40% of people who got inoculated last month did.

New York City Scott Horsley NPR Congressional Budget Office Andy Slavitt coordinator Biden administration New England Shawn Carlson U. S Senate Republicans Virginia Washington
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As part of the relief bill passed last month, Congress Okay. Another round of business loans totaling $284 billion So far other process of issuing those loans has been slowed by technical glitches. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington You're listening to NPR news. Live from KQED News. I'm Brian What? In Oakland, The number of Californians who filed for unemployment benefits for the first time dropped substantially last week. The latest data from the U. S Department of Labor show about 53,000. Californians made initial claims for the benefits last week compared to 117,000 in the week before. Nearly three quarters of Californian surveyed in a new poll say they would definitely or probably get the Corona virus vaccine when it becomes available to them. Cake you beauties Tara Siler reports on other findings in the survey by the California Health Care Foundation. Most Californians. 83% say that addressing the pandemic by the state government should be a top priority this year, and that view is shared by large majorities across race, and I think groups and political parties Though at 63%. That opinion is not quite as popular among Republicans. The survey also found nearly a quarter of Californians say they know someone who has died of covert 19 with even larger numbers represented among people of color. Survey of some 1500 adults was conducted between mid November and mid January. I'm terrorists. Tyler KQED news. In sports. The Stanford women's basketball team beat Washington State last night 71 to 49. Tonight, the Stanford men take on Arizona, and this morning in just a couple hours. ST Mary's men host Portland. In the pros. The Warriors beat the Timberwolves won 23 to 1 11 last night tonight, the dubs head to Phoenix for a game. The Sharks face the Avalanche again tonight in Colorado. I'm Brian What? KQED news. Support for NPR today comes from noon, providing an online evaluation and the tools to help people lead healthier lives through behavior change. Or information that new ma'am and 00 m dot com and the listeners and members.

KQED KQED News NPR Scott Horsley Tara Siler Congress Washington Washington State U. S Department of Labor Oakland Stanford California Health Care Foundat Sharks Warriors Portland Phoenix Arizona Timberwolves Colorado
Wall Street stocks open higher Thursday

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Wall Street stocks open higher Thursday

"Steep losses on Wall Street yesterday, stocks opened higher this morning, even as the Commerce Department reported that 2020 ended with a slowdown in economic growth. As NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the Dow was up more than 300 points in early trading. The U. S economy grew just under 1% during October, November and December of last year. That's a marked down shift from the previous three months when the economy grew nearly 7.5% as businesses reopened following pandemic lockdowns in the spring, a surgeon new Corona virus infections continues to weigh on in person services like restaurants. All told, the economy ended 2020 about 2.5% smaller than when the year began.

Scott Horsley Commerce Department NPR U.
Stocks Down After Federal Reserve Maintains Rates

All Things Considered

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Stocks Down After Federal Reserve Maintains Rates

"S stocks and the day sharply lower the Dow down 634 points more than 2%, ending a 30,300 to the NASDAQ ended the day down more than 2.5%. SMP lost more than 2.5% as well. All this following disappointing earnings today. Officials from the Federal Reserve wrapped up their two day policy meeting. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the central bank renewed its promise to keep using all of its tools to support the U. S economy. In a statement, the Fed notes the pace of economic recovery has slowed in recent months, with weakness concentrated in industries such as restaurants, bars and in person entertainment, which are most susceptible to pandemic disruptions. New vaccines offer hope for a rapid rebound this year. But there are still a lot of questions about the vaccine rollout and the potential impact of new variants of the virus. The feds is it will continue to monitor these and other factors and will adjust his policies as needed. For now the central bank's leaving interest rates near zero and says it expects to keep them there until theres return to full employment.

Scott Horsley FED NPR U.
Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

"Today to confirm Janet Yellen is Treasury secretary. NPR's Scott Horsley has more yelling, has already led the Federal Reserve and served as a top White House economist in the Clinton administration. While Republicans on the Finance Committee expressed some differences with her policy positions, no one questioned her qualifications. If confirmed by the full Senate, Janet Yellen will be the 78th Treasury secretary and the first woman to lead the department. She's already matched the first Secretary Alexander Hamilton in scoring her own hip hop musical tribute. It only took a couple centuries. The first female secretary yet the change. Yeah. Great Public radio program Marketplace Commission that number from the artist Desa Secretary Element Service the administration's point person in addressing the economic fall out from the Corona virus pandemic. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington A full Senate vote is expected Monday on Wall Street. Today the Dow was

Janet Yellen Scott Horsley Treasury NPR Clinton Administration Finance Committee Federal Reserve White House Great Public Radio Program Mar Alexander Hamilton Senate Desa Secretary Element Service Washington
Unemployment Claims Rise Sharply, Showing New Economic Pain

Morning Edition

01:32 min | 2 years ago

Unemployment Claims Rise Sharply, Showing New Economic Pain

"President Biden promises and aggressive federal effort to get control of the Corona virus. We will get through this. We will defeat this pandemic. Into a nation waiting for action. Let me be the clearest on this point. Help is on the way we will need it. Another 1.3 million people filed new unemployment claims last week. MPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is following this story. Good morning, Scott. Good morning. Well, so we have a new administration. But the same eternal mystery businesses air closing. Millions of people can't get work. And yet the markets are soaring. Why is that? Well, it's always a risky to try to make sense the stock market, But part of what's happening, I think is that investors see an eventual into this pandemic there, also betting that Congress will provide at least some of the economic aid that Biden is pushing for. It's also the case so well that the pain of this pandemic recession has been really unevenly spread. You know, some industries have already enjoyed a strong recovery like construction manufacturing. Tech companies that help people stay connected. They're doing just fine. And the roughly one out of four employees who can work from home have not had to worry about losing their jobs. The workers who have really suffered are those in jobs that depend on face to face contact with customers. Restaurant servers, bartenders, people who work in live entertainment. Those industries lost almost half a million jobs in December, and so long as thousands of people are dying from covert every day. The jobs are not likely to come

President Biden Scott Horsley MPR Scott Biden Congress
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Once he takes office, and Wall Street's betting he's going to get it. Okay. NPR's Scott Horsley. Thanks, Scott, You're welcome. Mm hmm. And it's time now for StoryCorps. Today we hear about a man who inspired the best in human nature with his words. Robert Sherman was a lyricist and one half of the Sherman Brothers, the song writing duo behind many of Walt Disney's great musicals. At StoryCorps. His son, Jeffrey Sherman, talked about how evac seen sparked the creation of one of his father's most famous socks. My dad always filtered everything down to its simplest form. People thought maybe he wasn't listening. But he would always listen. And then he would form his words very carefully. Words were like his Religion. He brought word builders on my mom and dad's honeymoon. My mom complaint. He wanted to just no words. And he loved the sound of words and how they felt on your tongue. My dad and uncle had a favorite song that they created for Mary Poppins called the Eyes of Love. But while Disney said, could you write something that's more in line with the philosophy of Mary Poppins? And it was all just falling flat. They're both really depressed. Well, it happened that that day. I was It's school. I was about six years old. And they were giving us the oral polio vaccine, you know, wasn't the shot. So I you know, stood in line with all my friends, and we all just took this thing and then I got home and my dad looked depressed. All the shades were closed. It was very dark in the house and I said Oh, we had the polio vaccine at school today and he looked at me because you let someone give you a shot at school. Did it hurt? I said no, no, no. They took out this little cup and put a sugar cube in it and then drop the medicine and you just ate it and my dad looked at me and start shaking his head. And he went over to the phone and he called Dick and told him he had something. And the next day they wrote a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.

Mary Poppins polio vaccine Scott Horsley Walt Disney Robert Sherman Jeffrey Sherman Sherman Brothers Dick NPR
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"It appears that they have addressed all of the security concerns in terms of allowing members to be back in the chambers. Reporters have been able to talk to these members in the hallways again. It's as if they're just resuming business as usual. It's amazing more than five hours later. Here we are after this long stretch of paralysis. And crisis that we saw at the Capitol that they're able to do this, But at this time, they're just focusing on resuming the business at hand and businesses usual trying to wrap this up quickly. Indeed it Scott Horsley. Tell me what you've got from your vantage point. Well, that return of the lawmakers may explain why the law enforcement officials outside the capital here move just about 30 minutes ago to disperse of a small group of pro trump demonstrators who were gathered on the The northwest side of the Capitol about 02 blocks from the From the building itself. They had continued T stand here and make their feelings known about 90 minutes after the curfew into effect and undisturbed by the by the law enforcement, But About 7 30 local time. The police in face shields and technical vast, made up sort of show of force and And pushed the remaining demonstrators away without incident, but certainly with plenty of grumbling from the from the pro Trump faction. No, no, A curfew has been in place since since the clock since six o'clock in Washington. Can you tell whether people are respecting the curfew? Is it being enforced? Yeah, not not happily..

Scott Horsley Washington
"scott horsley" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"To be something that was not normal out of place and Nobody. I know who would be president would do something like that to a secretary of state. Trump, for his part, is campaigning internally in Georgia on behalf of two GOP candidates in tomorrow's Georgia Senate runoff. Trump has yet to concede the election. Washington, D C's mayor called for calm today, while the same time announcing upwards of 340 National Guard troops are being deployed to city streets. That's ahead of expected protest Wednesday around a routine talent of the election results by Congress that will affirm President elect Joe Bynes victory over Donald Trump in November. Stocks close sharply lower today after hitting record highs late last week more from NPR, Scott Horsley. First day of trading in the New year was Iraqi one for the stock market. All the major indexes lost ground after finishing out 2020 at or near record highs. Investors are counting on new vaccines to overcome the economic losses associated with the Corona virus pandemic. But initial distribution of the shots in the United States has been slower than expected and their fears the country's already sky high infection rate could climb even higher after many Americans ignored warnings to avoid travel during the holidays. Markets are also keeping an eye on Tuesdays runoff elections in Georgia, which will determine whether Republicans or Democrats have the upper hand in the U. S. Senate. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Today I was down threadbare in 82 points today. You're listening to NPR news. In the late hour move, the Trump Administration is playing to reissue grazing leases to the organ ranchers who inspired an armed takeover of a federal wildlife refuge. Five years ago. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports. The move follows extensive legal battles and a presidential pardon. The administration and its Bureau of Land Management of proposing to reissue grazing permits to Dwight Hammond and his son, Steven. The pair were convicted of federal arson charges during the Obama administration and were alleged to have had a long history of harassing and intimidating federal workers. Hammond's fight with the federal government partly inspired militiaman Amon Bundy to lead an armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in 2016, where the Hammonds had held federal grazing leases. President Trump later pardoned the two men, but it hasn't been clear whether they'd ever ranch on federal public land again. Environmental groups, including the Idaho based Western Watersheds project are filing protests to decision to reinstate their grazing leases. Kirk Siegler. NPR NEWS Boise All 10, living former secretaries of defense or drawing a line in the sand in terms of any use of the military and trying to overturn November's election results on the part of the outgoing president Trump and his administration. Former civilian leaders of the military, both Republicans and Democrats putting their names on an opinion piece published over the weekend in The Washington Post. Former defense secretaries write quote the time for questioning. The results of the election is past. Say any attempt to involve the military would take the country and what they termed dangerous on lawful and unconstitutional territory. Piece did not name President Trump but comes as Trump continues to falsely claim fraud in the November election. I'm Jack.

President Trump president NPR Kirk Siegler Scott Horsley Georgia U. S. Senate Washington Dwight Hammond Piece GOP Malheur National Wildlife Refu United States Bureau of Land Management Obama administration Congress National Guard
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"The variant of covert 19 1st reported in Britain has come to California. The same strain was also confirmed in Florida and Colorado. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University say nationwide more than 346,000 people have died. The New year could be a time of healing for the nation's pandemic scarred economy. NPR's Scott Horsley reports on what economic forecasters expect from 2021. Business. Economists are increasingly optimistic about prospects for the new year. Nearly three out of four surveyed by the National Association for Business Economics expect GDP to recover all the ground that was lost to the pandemic sometime in the second half of this year. Likewise, officials at the Federal Reserve have raised their outlook for 2021. On average. They expect the economy to grow more than 4% this year, while unemployment should continue to fall, hitting 5% by year's end. Much depends, of course, on getting control of the coronavirus. Forecasters are encouraged that effective vaccines are now in hand, even if those shots are not yet in very many people's arms. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington The United Kingdom has completed its formal separation from the European Union, ending a year long transition period. The new era means a new kind of border with custom checks reinstated between the UK in mainland Europe for the first time since 1993 Rebecca Rossman reports the first ferry to sail the English Channel under the new regulations arrived in Cali Friday morning. While there were no incidents, Port authorities warn things could get messy commit January when traffic on the channel is expected to pick up Under the new regulations, and estimated 220 new customs rooms will have to be filled out every year. In order for trade to flow between the UK and you countries. The French.

Scott Horsley NPR Johns Hopkins University National Association for Busin United Kingdom Federal Reserve Britain Florida California Rebecca Rossman Cali Port Colorado European Union Europe Washington
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"People living in economic desperation, Beginning with longest federal government shutdown in U. S history, Congress is now ending a chaotic session like few others. Microsoft says its internal systems were hacked in the wide reaching cyberattack perpetuated by a group of suspected Russian agents. MPR's Bobby Allyn has more. Microsoft had previously said it was among 18,000 customers of I T company solar winds to find malware on its systems. But now Microsoft says the Attackers went farther by breaking into its systems, even viewing closely guarded company source code. Privately held Noah of software questions remain, says Dimitri All parish. He's a cybersecurity expert is that the Microsoft Cloud Services is that their Windows operating system is that Microsoft office that would be very helpful to know to understand what source code exactly was. Access. U. S. Authorities are still investigating the Russia link tact seen as the biggest cyber attack in American history. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco On Wall Street stocks closed out the year on a high note. NPR's Scott Horsley has details, both of them and the S and P 500 jumped about two thirds of a percent, while the NASDAQ rose more than 1/10 of a percent. The Dow and the S and P finished the year in record territory. The NASDAQ is just shy of its own record close earlier this week. The year and gains cap a remarkable comeback for stocks, which suffered a dizzying decline this spring when the pandemic first took hold in the US since then, rock bottom interest rates and a partial recovery in the economy have investors feeling bullish. The year The Dow is up more than 7%, the S and P gain more than 16% and the tech heavy NASDAQ Index surged. Nearly 44%. Scott Horsley NPR news Washington The Dow today closed at 30,606. This is NPR headed for a four This is KCRW. I'm Matt Gillam. As Orange County continues to shatter covert 19 hospitalization records, local health officials have opened up a mobile hospital to accommodate the overflow patients. Took a team of volunteers eight days to build the tent in the parking lot at U. C I Medical center. The facility adds another 40 beds to the hospitals 400. As of yesterday, it was already half full. We have been stockpiling.

Microsoft NPR Scott Horsley Bobby Allyn Bobby Allen MPR Congress U. S Matt Gillam Russia Orange County Noah SAN Francisco U. C I Medical center US
U.S. trade deficit in goods widened in November

The Takeaway

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. trade deficit in goods widened in November

"Trade deficit widened last month as U. S. Consumers snapped up tens of billions of dollars worth of imported goods. NPR's Scott Horsley reports the trade gap in November was larger than forecasters had expected. Imports and exports both rose in November, but the jump in imports was significantly larger. And the trade deficit widened to nearly $85 billion. Surging demand for consumer products accounted for much of the jump in imports. The U. S is now buying more stuff from overseas and it did a year ago while exports from the US to other countries have yet to recover to pre pandemic levels. Exports of food saw some of the strongest gains last month, up more than 4% from October. Food exports of sword almost 20% over the last year, even his exports in most other categories has slumped. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington President

Scott Horsley U. NPR United States Washington
Jobless claims hit a nearly 4-month high as coronavirus-induced layoffs grow

Forum

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Jobless claims hit a nearly 4-month high as coronavirus-induced layoffs grow

"Deepening. Now. This morning, we learned that first time unemployment claims went up again last week to 885,000 more on that for NPR's Scott Horsley. New applications for unemployment benefits continue to climb as a surgeon coronavirus cases imposes new limits on economic activity and prompts a higher level of layoffs. 885,000 people apply for state jobless benefits last week, while another 455,000 sought help under a special federal program for gig workers and the self employed. As of late November, some 14 million people were relying on emergency unemployment benefits that are set to run out the day after Christmas. Congress is close to a deal to extend those benefits is part of a last minute covert relief package, but that additional help is expected to be short lives. Scott

Scott Horsley NPR Congress Scott
Industrial production increases 0.4% in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Industrial production increases 0.4% in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

"Stocks opened higher on Wall Street this morning after the Federal Reserve reported an increase in industrial production. Last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 170 points in early trading. Industrial production has now regained about two thirds of the ground it lost during the pandemic. Manufacturing output jumped 8/10 of a percent last month, largely driven by cars and car parts. Over warmer than usual weather in November meant less business for utilities. Industrial production in China also rose in November, but Asian stocks were mostly down overnight. The Federal Reserve begins a two day policy meeting that will end with the release the central bank's latest economic projections. Forecasters have to weigh the economic cost of rising Corona virus infections in the short run against the promise of a successful vaccine roll out in the months to come. Scott

Scott Horsley Federal Reserve NPR China Scott
Industrial production increases in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Industrial production increases in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

"As the Federal Reserve reported an increase in industrial production last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 90 points in early trading. Industrial production has now regained about two thirds of the ground it lost during the pandemic. Manufacturing output jumped 8/10 of a percent last month, largely driven by cars and car parts. However, warmer than usual weather in November meant less business for utilities. Industrial production in China also rose in November, but Asian stocks were mostly down overnight. The Federal Reserve begins a two day policy meeting that will end with the release the central bank's latest economic projections. Forecasters have to weigh the economic cost of rising Corona virus infections in the short run against the promise of a successful vaccine roll out in the months to come. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley Federal Reserve NPR China Npr News
Biden unveils economic team, nominating Yellen for treasury secretary

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Biden unveils economic team, nominating Yellen for treasury secretary

"Secretary There's NPR's Scott Horsley reports, a woman will shatter another barrier in her new role on Biden's team. Cecilia Rouse is has been tapped to lead the Council of Economic Advisers where she would be the she had previously served on that council and she would be the first African American to head the council. NPR's Scott Horsley reporting Amazon warehouse workers in Alabama have notified federal labor authorities of

Scott Horsley Cecilia Rouse NPR Council Of Economic Advisers Biden Amazon Alabama