18 Burst results for "Scott Harrison"

"scott harrison" Discussed on Typology

Typology

13:36 min | 5 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Typology

"6 weeks and we had a little bit of travel. So we're just getting situated, but we really like it so far. So you are in somebody called this the COVID shuffle the other day. I like that. And they're like, oh, this is your third place. You're doing the COVID shuffle. Yes. That's funny. Yeah. Well, I did the COVID shuffle, but I don't think it was COVID inspired. But I certainly did a shuffle in the middle of COVID. Yeah. So you were on the show two or three years ago. It might be three years. I think it's three years ago. I think it was on kind of book tour. I just written a book. I think it was three years ago. Yeah. And you are in enneagram 8. I want to be a 7. You want to be a 7? I was able to be a 7 during COVID at the farm. There's maybe just activating that 7 women in a big way. I'm curious to know because I know that you're a reflective person. More than 8s typically are, in fact, what have you learned about yourself in the last three years since I last spoke to you? And maybe you can answer that through, perhaps even the lens of your type. Yeah. Well, maybe a little bit of our COVID experience. So we were 26 years living in New York City, fighting it out in a two bedroom, 1200 ft² apartment, that if I told people what we paid, you just couldn't believe it. This is the perfect way to sum up New York City economics. We leased a Kia Sorrento for $326 a month. We parked it for 600 miles. And insured it for 300 a month. Yes. It's like a $1200 a month Kia. And drove it twice. To take the kids to the zoo. No, we actually used it. We saw grandparents and mildly father. COVID happened and we just said we can't imagine living a pandemic on the 21st floor of a high rise in New York City. Also with a huge loss of income from speaking and traveling and so we wound up moving to a really rural setting and I think what I learned about myself was I loved the anonymity. I love stepping off of the public stage. I loved going from 88 flights and a hundred speeches to zero. Sleeping in my own bed. Waking up with my kids reading, splitting wood. Cutting down trees. Getting a chainsaw. Riding an ATV. I did some hunting. Canoeing kayaking. I loved being in silence in the outdoors. And I kept expecting to miss the buzz in the energy of I got off stage in 10,000 people where I got to open up for a president or the kind of the energy of the airports and the travel and the book signings. I had to miss it one bit. And I was we were all in the same boat, but we were able to kind of run the organization successfully remotely. I went up to this little attic and I would open up zoom, like everybody else. And it worked. And I kind of didn't want to go back to the former hurry. You have this really. Colorful past. Let's put it that way. So let's just sort of do a very 80s past. Let's kind of review it. Born in Philadelphia middle class family, mom becomes disabled when I'm four due to a carbon monoxide gas leak. I grew up in a caregiver role, only child. Deeply conservative, faithful family. They would call themselves non denominational, but they didn't sue the gas company because they were Christians. God would heal mom one day. They would be a sense of this accident. So his mom was the victim of a carbon monoxide gas. So her immune system shut down and she was never able to function normally again. Effectively, everything chemical in the world made her sick. So it's interesting. I grew up with masks. I've had masks in my family for 40 years. She would never I would never see my mom's face. She would always wear one of the 3M family masks where there was an N95 or a charcoal mask because soap would make her sick. The print from a book would make her sick. The ink smell. So I lived in a pure environment. And this is something I've kind of been able to reflect on a little bit later. If I went out, let's say I came home from this podcast and I was going into my childhood home. I would strip naked in the garage and I would put on hospital scrubs or clothes that had been washed in baking soda 5 times. So I would leave the impurity of my experience outside the home in the garage and then I would kind of step into a sterile environment. So this is my whole childhood. I thought I wanted to be a doctor as a kid so that I could help sick people like my mom. And instead, I became a nightclub promoter for ten years. So I woke up one day at 18 so my parents had me. I have to tell you what this Christian school they had needed assemblies of God basement for the 9th grade for freshman year in high school. I remember wearing these uniforms that were yellow and green. It was kind of urine colored yellow. Starched uniforms. And I wanted to rebel so much against the uniform that I would bring clothes and I would hide it in the bathroom underneath the sink. There was these doors that it would open. And the minute the bell rang, I would go down in the bathroom, I'd put on my street clothes and kind of assert my non conformity identity. Wow. So there were 9 people in my freshman class God bless them. The church couldn't afford teachers. So they wheeled in a VHS cart. Do you remember those the steel carts with the rubber mats on them? Like if you spilled something it would be just nasty inside the little rubber grooves. And then they would put it in the VHS and I swear. It wasn't even in color. Wow. So science was somebody teaching science on my video cassette. I guess his dates me a little bit too. Anyway, I told my parents that if I finished school there, I would just run away from home and they would never see me again and they needed to put me into the 4000 person high school. What they said, if we put you into the 4000 person high school, you're gonna be corrupted. We know how this story is gonna end. And they were right. So it led to me becoming an I clipped promoter in New York City. It might have been that VHS machine. There you go. Well, I fell in with the crowd that was I joined the band. I grew my hair out of my shoulders, which was a terrible idea. And one by one started to rebel against the rules and when I was 18 and graduated, I said New York City's only an hour and a half away. I'm going to go make it rich and famous. And I'm going to explore the opposite of the rules. I'm going to live my own life. My first idea was actually to join a band. That lasted about two months. But I'd imagine myself selling out Madison Square gardens. Sure. So there was this kind of big dream of what was possible. Maybe because of my caregiver role and because of the fact that I wasn't needed in the household growing up. I wasn't only child. There was a sense of confidence that was instilled through that. So I moved to New York, the band breaks up and then I learned that if one wants to rebel, you can rebel in style as a club promoter, that you can actually get paid to party for a living. And you can drink for free and you can do drugs for free, and if you get the beautiful famous people in the clubs, this is a lifestyle. And the next ten years flashed by. Or really blurred by, and it worked at 40 different clubs. It started with the smoking, then the drinking, then the drugs, then the girls, then the gambling, then the pornography, then the strip clubs. It was this kind of slow decline of all the things I said I would never do as a kid. That just, you know, the dominoes started toppling. And from the outside, I drove a BMW, I had a Rolex watch, my girlfriend was in the cover of fashion magazines. I flew to Milan in Paris for fashion week and through parties and was kind of this world traveler that new people in South America and Brazil and would be on yachts and private planes and inside I was just slowly rotting and decaying. Because it was a hedonistic selfish sycophantic existence. I was living only for myself. I was betraying the foundation of morality and spirituality that my parents had instilled in me. And this kind of came to a head at 28 years old where I realized I'm the worst person I know. I'm leaving a meaningless life and legacy. And I want out. I've made a mess. You know, it was kind of the proverbial pig stand and pig sty where I just was in deep despair. So you then make a wild shift. Yeah, I mean, I realized a small pivot was not in order here. Not for me. This was not a course correction. Aids don't do that. I just remember specifically Ian saying what would the opposite of my life look like? How could I change everything? How could I change every single intention thought word action and make everything extremely opposite? And my idea was, and this came from my Christian upbringing, take one of the ten years that I've selfishly pursued money fame power girls and all that. And tie it and see if I could be of service. Give one year, sell everything, so there was this kind of idea of starting life over. And asking the question, would any of my skills be useful in a humanitarian setting? There was something maybe alluring about that idea of someone selling everything they had to go live in a village across the world and find a way to be useful. So applied to ten famous organizations, the world visions and save the children's and Doctors Without Borders, they all of course rejected me because they wouldn't know what to do with a club promoter, reformed or not. And then this one organization said, if you're willing to come live in post war Liberia, on a hospital ship and pay $500 a month, you can join us. And I mean, imagine, for me as a day, I'm like, this is truly the opposite. The poorest country in the world, and I'm going to go broke doing it. I have to pay to serve. And there was something later so symbolic about it was a 522 foot hospital ship that 350 people were living on. And when I saw a picture of the ship, I imagined myself walking up the gangway, leaving my entire former life of vice behind. And sailing away to a new life and a new continent. And I went out with a bang. I think I told you this last time, but the night before I walked up the gangway and surrendered my passport, I smoked 60 cigarettes. I got fantastically drunk. They're still stories of me walking up reeking of alcohol. But I knew that that would be it. I knew I would never smoke again or touch drugs again or look at a pornographic image again. I was one of being celibate for 5 and a half years until I got married. I went all in. Wow. We're extremely back. Yeah. And I think this is really, you know? You know, it's oftentimes make gigantic decisions. Quickly. Some people would take a couple of years and they sort of think about reflect. It's like, no, it's like, boom. This is what I'm doing. This is where I'm going. It's going to be this huge change. I'm all in. Right. And all in is maybe the operative phrase there. All in. And you know, one of the questions I want to ask you is, in my experience, people who indulge in a lot of drugs and drinking and, you know, semi addictive behavior. In your case, semi addictive. Some people go all the way in as addicts. The question isn't to ask why the behavior why the addiction? The question is why the pain? That's the real question. So.

New York City COVID Kia Sorrento Madison Square gardens foundation of morality and spi Philadelphia Milan South America BMW Brazil Paris New York
"scott harrison" Discussed on Typology

Typology

02:05 min | 5 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Typology

"Welcome to typology the show on which we explore the story of you through the lens of the enneagram. My name is Anthony skinner producer of the show. Happy to have you here with us today. We've got a great friend who is stopping by the typology studios today, talking about guest Scott Harrison, founder of the nonprofit organization charity water. Get this, he's raised more than $550 million in funded over 78,000 water projects in 29 countries when all of those projects are completed, they will have provided over 13 million people with clean safe drinking water. So Scott as a bona FIDE rockstar and we're excited to have him here. Of course he's been recognized in fortune magazine's list of 40 under 40 and Forbes impact 30 list and fast companies 100 most creative people in business, where he earned the number ten spot. He's author of The New York Times bestselling book thirst, and we are happy now to call him neighbor. He and his family have moved to Franklin Tennessee. So when I say stop by, I literally mean he stops by today and we have a fantastic conversation with Scott Harrison, any gram 8 wing 7, hey before I turn it over to the host of our show, don't forget that Ian has a brand new book the story of you and enneagram journey to becoming your true self that is up for presale. Right now and as a matter of fact, this past week it just hit number one new release and popular psychology personality study on Amazon, so we're super excited about that. This is a very special book. You can pre order it today by going to Amazon.com or the story of U book dot com and it will also be available on the shelves of your bookstore on December 28th. So that's some great news. Super excited about that book. Hey, that's it for me, Anthony skinner, we're excited to have Scott Harrison here and now here is the host of our show. Ian chrome..

Anthony skinner Scott Harrison fortune magazine Scott The New York Times Franklin Tennessee Amazon Ian Ian chrome
"scott harrison" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"Do I wash my kids school uniforms? Do I let them wash their bodies? Do I garden and grow food? She said, I always put my family's needs first 'cause that's what Ugandan women do. And she said, now, that there's a clean water in my village right next to my house. She says this Peter. She says, now I am beautiful. We're like, honestly, we didn't get it. We're like, of course, Ellen, you're a beautiful Ugandan woman. What do you mean? She said, no no, you don't understand. For the first time in my life, I have enough water to wash my face, and my body and my clothes and she said, now I'm beautiful. To look at me, I am looking so smart. So you know, the dignity, the dignity, right? Here you have a woman who is stuck in a terrible situation is trying to do the best she can for her family who is out there on the road walking for water. You know, walking probably an extra distance to a faraway well so that it's clean water. And now she can be clean. Now her clothes can be clean. You know, and what she was using is still probably a fraction of what we would take for granted, you know, every single day coming out of taps and out of our rice machines. So there's stories like that all over the world. We've seen schools where the girls rate of tuition will jump up after a water project. Because the girls don't have to walk for water anymore, they can go to school. They don't have to stay home four or 5 days every month, because this school has no water in toilets. So these things you don't even think about it's an awesome issue to work on because everyone can stand for clean water. Whether you're a Republican or a Democrat or an independent or a libertarian, everyone thinks people need water. If you're a person of faith or, you know, you think like faith is anathema and the stupidest concept ever. You can still stand for clean water. So it's actually allowed us to build a pitch a pretty big tent and invite a diverse group of people who might fight about politics, social issues, fiscal policy, but can come together and stand for clean water. If it's done in a transparent and effective way. Wow, okay, so let's get into the numbers. Let's talk about the economics. Early on, you said you separate the operational costs from the project cost, which I think super interesting because one of my Friends was working for a charity at one point. I won't get the number correct, but he told me something like for every pound they raise like 78 pence is used to run the charity. It was some ridiculous number. I was like, it should be about the opposite of that..

Ellen Peter
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

03:15 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"Them to only do one thing would just share that spring video with every single person there network. That's it so it's literally a copy paste on every on facebook if all fifty thousand did that with thousand people each that's like five million people like right off the bat. Seventeen percent of them convert to spring members holy crap that's immediate billion spring members. Ride to win. That solves those problems case. That's three got what fourteen got us your two or three other top ones that you think. Let's move the needle right. Because what i love about this is this could apply to anyone doing anything right. It could apply to business. It could apply to somebody else who runs a nonprofit. It could apply to somebody that wants to support charity water and wants to think about how they can help. So and i love the idea of levers that you could pull when lever is go to all the people that are already familiar with the cause that are already investing get them to further their investment by raising awareness through their own networks. Okay so what else. Yeah i would say the next thing is pick your top hundred influencers who have donated who have raised the most money for you for charity water and have them always promote thirst. Whenever there another person show something. I do when somebody asked me for a book recommendation. I always said that. The number one book. I've ever read thirst by scott harrison. I do that for two reasons one because it is. It's my top three but the other reason is because i would rather promote that book that's actually going to do something for the human race than promote the other two books in my top. Three that people can just before. So that's another thing i do. Well left lewis house. Did that at every podcast attended. Imagine how much traction that book would get would-be absolutely crazy. And the same way that most of his copies that got sold was because of jerry vs community gary. You promoted the crap out of scott when he interviewed him. I'd just wish everyone else would do that. Because everyone needs access to clean water so that would be. The third tactic would give and the fourth tactic. I would give is making sure that everyone who's liking the charity water. Facebook pages also bought a copy of thirst so one strategy. I gave him the book launch. Actually to the rest of the group is. I told them on shirty water and see who in your friend group has already liked their facebook page. So you see on facebook. This person has liked whatever and them personally and say there's a book out. Most people idea said oh. I didn't know there was a book and they bought the book right away. If every single person did that we would sell easily hundred thousand copies of thirst and that would really increase the personal brand because we would have that in every household read the book there inspired. They feel connected. They want to be a part of the mission. Okay so for somebody. That's watching or listening right now to this. What would be your advice to them clearly. It's read thirst. What else and become a member of spring. What else could they be doing. Proactively to support scott in his mission and or could they be doing to to study scott to learn more about him. Like you've done right and here's the principal. I want to show that everyone is find your scott right fine..

facebook lewis house scott harrison scott jerry
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

03:46 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"So they'll raise hundreds of millions of dollars a year and they'll be able to solve this thing before scott harrison. You know god forbid dies or retires. The ceo of charity water. That's the idea. So now the question is how do you scale from fifty grand to a million. So what i would think about and i would do this with scott like we'd spend our couple of hours doing this over some lunch or something is we would go through. All of the influencers. Steady currently doesn't have relationships with gay. I want to emphasize doesn't and make a list of all the big podcasts. And then my responsibility and the people that. I know who are big in the spaces. What i'm going to do in five years. I guess i'm giving giving my master plan on live but it's to people are watching. Let's okay then what's going to happen is through. Every single person does have a relationship with. I'm personally going to dive into my own network to make sure he gets intros to all of the other big shows after i get on them. That's the big play and then going to live events or communities of people who have very high networks for example. He's not very involved in the tony. Robbins community. nobody knows who he is. All those people are multimillionaires. A lot of those individuals are. And i'm the one who's doing that for him. And you know that. Because i'm going into that community and i'm promoting charity water so it's also about thinking about quarter the members of your well and what communities especially in the personal development space that you can enter and quickly get them aligned to what your brand is and what your viciousness dowd. Probably be the second thing. Okay well yeah and it makes perfect sense right if you have influencers that you're untapped at this point getting them to obviously believe and support and be advocates brand basser for the mission of charity water would be valuable and then to your point your first point which is prepare and give people the knowledge to be able to effectively share the reason why they are part of charity water why they are so passionate about mission and then they could then obviously helped spread it and i think that goes with anyone. That's brandon ambassador for the organization soon. Now that you've done those two things what else would you suggest because to your point to go from fifty thousand to a million. That's a big delta. It's a big gap and you could do it with influencers for sure. But i'm sure there's another thing up your sleeve..

scott harrison scott Robbins dowd brandon
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

04:38 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"How much attention. I don't know how much you know about the nuance. How much attention is solving systemic issues versus putting a band aid on the problem. And the reason. I say that where my mind goes is. We could do a great job of continuing to raise money to provide water to places where they don't have clean water. What would make sense to me. Is the infrastructure to allow them in. I'm speaking generally them collectively the six hundred and fifty million people. Which is you know. One eighth practically or one tenth of the global population the monumental number of people so. I'm curious how much of the effort is spent on solving. Because to your point you said if he had the money you could do it. How much is spent on figuring out ways to solve systemic issues so that people can get watered on ongoing basis very question so i don't want to complicated here but i'm happy to give the review so the water crisis dissolution is already invented resolve. The technology already exists so most of the capital that charity water funds. They've water partners in different countries around the world and most of the money to your point goes into infrastructure and the rest goes into maintenance of that infrastructure. i'll give an example in. Africa forgot which country and specific within africa. But let's just use that as a global to explain. This is in africa for the most part. A lot of the water is actually fresh but it requires a drilling rig to get access to the water at the bottom so what happens is charity. Water needs to invest significant more money in africa to get the water which is different than other countries made a bit later and then after the water comes out somebody needs to maintain that well what google did a few years ago. They gave charity water. I believe the number was ten million or something to design. Gps tracking devices for all their wells. So well in. The world is tracked in a database ensure water and mechanics are running around and motorcycles around africa..

africa Africa google
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

06:01 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"Them when. I meet them someday but i believe he's actually closed most of those well people in one on one dinner conversations. Okay so clearly. His personal brand. There's a status piece. He's also doing the legwork himself by having one on one conversations closing them he is a hero to you and in many ways. You revere him so much that you you're modeling and lot of what you're doing after him. What haven't we explored yet about. Scott people wouldn't know that maybe you know if you're not familiar with his story and as much as he does have a personal brand. I guess that a good percentage of people may not know who he is at all and if they do they know very little about him. We know now through this conversation. Some of those pieces but what else is so impressive about him. That would make it worth sharing right now. His subscription model so he has a subscription recurring revenue stream model for his nonprofit called the spring so the spring is basically where you donate thirty bucks a month. It's forty now and with that forty bucks. You get one percent clean water. So i have a member of the spring as an example blitz. scott hurson is very well and he's the only nonprofit i know of. Who's done this. Like at a level that is unheard of is he creates a whole community out of it so the spring is not just you give money and that's it you get an email every month with an update they tell you where the well is literally where the well is where it is on the websites. You can actually go see the well. You're helping fund it's actually bonkers when you're spending forty bucks a month or something and the other pieces even have book clubs. You can actually go meet other members of the spring. So he's made it this entire community the way that he describes it. It's a movement rather than the money so it doesn't matter if you donate five dollars a month or five thousand dollars a month. It's about art. You are you in on this party. Are you in so that we can join together as a group to solve this big problem. That's what he's done really well through his marketing. And as you see. 'cause i know you wash this twenty minute video. The call to action is joined the spring so joined the well which is like sixty grand a year. It's hey can you give five bucks a month and you get thirty bucks a month. And he got daniel act the founder of spotify..

scott hurson Scott daniel spotify
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

05:44 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"That scott harrison has done exceptionally well. That i would argue. No other nonprofit executive in the world has done at the level he's done it is understanding who is core customers and where they're coming from so most people right in the nonprofit space and i'm generalizing row bid right. They don't focus enough on their top clientele who are the richest people who are funding most of the revenue right. So let's say somebody's worth five million dollars dir donating to a nonprofit because they wanna give back they wanna do something important so there needs to be a big accountability piece there which is what are you actually doing with my money. Play by play. And what level of empathy showing for that scott takes to a whole the level where he calls it the well but the well is a lot more than just a group of people who give money to charity water. It's an accountability group. It's a community group. Everyone in the world knows each other. He he gives them special gifts and things like that special status roles it's like there's a certain status about being in the well because a lot of people in the well are extremely impressive. I'll give you a couple of names right now. Daniel the founder of spotify. Reid hoffman founder of linked. Dan gary viner chuck. There's some examples of people core in the well and what's interesting is the way it how he markets a very exclusive..

scott harrison scott Dan gary viner chuck Reid hoffman spotify Daniel
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

04:58 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"That i was meant to solve one problem too. And that later ended up. Becoming master talked two years later. When i had the idea for it for public speaking but basically what this does is it. Gives a blueprint for any change maker in the world who actually wants to make a difference in the world to know exactly how to do it. Play by play dots. what scott. Harrison's book is for so for anyone who actually wants to make a difference that's must read in my opinion. Do you think the change maker who this would apply. Four is someone who's solving a problem for. Let's call it. You mentioned people who are in the lower ten percent from just a standpoint of financial wellbeing. Is that who it's meant for anybody that wants to solve a world problem. Great great follow up. This is more of a personal opinion. I think it's relevant for everybody whether you're tried to build the next test or whether you're trying to build next nonprofit you definitely want to rereading scott's book and i'll tell you why whenever we think most of problems in the world. It's very depressing. Billy you're like oh this is happening. Everyone's always complaining about everything that's happening in the world and it's just bad energy bad. You don't wanna do it. You don't feel you could accomplish it. Scott harrison is a textbook example of someone who wasn't supposed to change the world and who did at a at a level that is unfathomable for the world. So that's why. I'm a big advocate of what he does and also the principles that he teaches in. The book was Entrepreneur or someone who's trying to solve a problem for the bottom ten. Got it okay. So let's talk about some of those principles you call it a blueprint. What are some of the key tenants of the blueprint that stand out. Obviously somebody needs to read the book to get all the the nuance in the detail. Let's use broad strokes here. What are some of the key elements that stand out yes. So let's summarize a couple of points that touched on earlier so people have a nice clean bullet. Los number one is storytelling. Your ideas in a way that includes everybody not just yourself. That's probably the biggest insight. I got from thirst. So for example and this is good feedback for even me introspective as we're talking when i started master talk whenever i would communicate. It was always. Hey billy. I'm starting this youtube gentle. Because i want to make public speaking videos to see what i can do to show. What the expertise. That was the word i would use and today that messaging has changed dramatically from the i to the league where hey master talk us for the seven year old girl who can't afford any part of the world. I'm creating videos for them. That they grow up watching my videos and become much better much better. Communicated that was so notice how my languaging has changed from. I two other people. And that's something that scott harrison does not just from a messaging perspective but also from a branding and marketing perspectives. Like the example..

scott Scott harrison Harrison Billy Los billy youtube scott harrison
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

03:33 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"The problem pretty much for no money and actually ended up profiting significantly from it so hope that logic makes sense for people listening but scott convinced me up and he was absolutely correct on this is you can't do that with every problem. And the reason is because in problems where only the bottom ten percent of the human population is affected. Capitalism doesn't work period for the most part because we can't fund these innovations through money from the bottom ten because they have no money. Here's other quick easy example to demonstrate this bit long winded here. When vhs tapes hdmi cables hdtv started and iphones. The i sold to the rich and extremely high premium to make up all the research and development costs. Hdtv's used to be in the tens of thousands of dollars as you probably know yourself and then the cost went down incrementally so all of us can afford a tv. That doesn't apply what the water crisis. Yeah it's a good distinction. And i mean look having worked at tesla i know very well the model the ilan set out when he did his master plan part one clearly. It's produced something that's high ticket that you're going to target people who are affluent and have the means to afford that was so then fund a more affordable car which will then fund the most affordable car so and he executed on that perfectly. So you find scott win. Did you read the book. And then what are the principles of the book that are most meaningful because this is your favorite book every book you've read. This is your favorite one. Why is it your favorite one and win. Did you read it. How long after when you first were hurt. Him on lewis two thousand fifteen twenty sixteen in the book came on twenty eighteen men. Fun fact for those. That don't know i was actually at the book launch team for thirst so when thirst finally came out i was so shocked when i got the email that he was going to release the book i jumped at the chance to be on this launch team. I actually personally sold probably three hundred copies of the book. I message like every single person. I knew in my network and i said hey i'll send you the fixture after the fun it fun. Because that's that's what i did. So i'd historic pretty well. Thirst does is. It goes into pretty much every single. Move line by line for the beginning. Here's why i is such an important rid. And i'll tell you who it's for where we hold on you say every single. Is it from him. Starting charity water correct. That's the play by play. Okay god yeah. Every single play is in the book even before that from when he started. The story actually begins when he's eighteen in the book where he first gets into the nightlife new york city. So there's a lot of details in the book. He doesn't actually cover in podcasts. Which is normal right because the audible is like few hours. And you'll never now or something on a podcast. So that's what happened. Let's go from the bottom top. Here's who i think. The book is for the book is a great example of an individual trying to solve a global problem. That is advancing the human race and it's damn successful at it damn successful at it. Who isn't elon musk. Who isn't this big super genius. He's just a guy who had a lot of hustle and he's he's very smart as well but from a different lens but it gives you hope that you can also solve one problem as well and there's a great quote by the book that we can start with and the quote is by scott harrison. The goal is not to live forever but rather create something that will so. When i read that book and i finished it..

scott tesla lewis new york city scott harrison
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

02:39 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"Story not just the founder so at scott did exceptionally well is. He didn't just talk about his personal story. Ray said okay. I was a nightclub need. There's a lot of focus there. But he also celebrates all the other stakeholders around charity water. Here's a quick example of that nora's an eight-year-old girl who gave eight bucks. Charity water basil. The story went is. She wanted to give money to charity. Organization went to her. Mom said bobby. How much money do i have my big. And then her mom looked at it and it said eight bucks and she donated north donated. Sent the envelope with like the change to charity water and said. Hey i'd love for this. To cleveland knows how you're smiling there right telling the stories of other people. That's a true story so dirty water winter house filmed her made a whole commercial. Called the eight dollar campaign raised a million bucks. It was absolutely crazy and amazing right. So there's a lot we can learn from stop. I love that man. Okay so you find him through lewis and then you're fascinated. I wanna get into his book in a minute before we do when you heard him. You mentioned a few things which impress you problem solving that he changed your mind abou how you solve problems world problems or big picture problems you human problems any made you change your mind where you used to think it can only be solved using business capitalism things of that nature but you now actually be can be solved through a nonprofit. What else impressed you if you could go back and you maybe a year into listening to louis and you found that episode. What else stood out from that. I experience listening to him being interviewed. And then we'll get into the book right and let's double click on the problems because i'll give you an insight actually never talked about publicly. What scott convinced of that ended up being wrong on and he was right and what he and ultimately convinced me of is the following billy. There's some problems in the world that you don't need nonprofits for i'll give you the best example the problem. I'm soften public speaking for the world. At the end of the day. I can sell funded pretty much entirely. I'll explain why it's knowledge eighty percent of its knowledge. Democratizing that knowledge. Hey billy this video. Hey john check out this video. So i bear those production costs and then i use coaching revenue from all my exact clients i fund by own dream as become you know as my personal brand increases. I develop free curriculum and just teach tall. Everybody else for free open source. Like with tesla did so..

scott nora Ray bobby cleveland lewis billy louis john tesla
"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

Insight Out with Billy Samoa

03:17 min | 8 months ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Insight Out with Billy Samoa

"We don't know where the money and he's like. Whoa this is crazy. So what he did. And i was one of those people by the way guilty as charged. But what he did is he said. Okay i'm gonna create to bank accounts one bank account where a hundred percent of all the money. Go straight to the programs so if you donate twenty bucks dot twenty bucks goes directly to someone in it but to fund your donation. He has a separate bank account that rich people fund to fund all the overhead costs. This is what he called the well. That was absolutely insane. It's going to high net worth individual. Who's worth five million dollars and say. Hey i don't want you to fund programs or water. Let billy do that. I need you to fund the salaries. The printing costs the credit card transaction fees and the craziest thing of all of it is he pulled all three of those things off flawlessly despite some of the challenges so those were the three reasons that caught my initial okay. So let's good bit deeper on problem solving because you highlighted that as one of the things that stood out how it really impress you and you gave an example of how he solved a problem which is hey people. Don't trust nonprofits. They don't know where the money's gonna go. They don't have confidence that when they donate money that it's actually going to go to the intended purpose or caused that they think it's going to so he solved. What are some other things that stand out from a problem solving perspective either the way in which he thinks or something that you picked up from the book that would be valuable to share right now absolutely so the first piece is definitely that one that you just mentioned around how most people don't trust including me by the way charity water was my first ever thousand dollars donation to a charity before that i'd never donated more than fifty or a hundred bucks to a charity right so i was saying level of skepticism and by the way so just word transferred. I still have that level of skepticism for most on offense. I just make an exception for charity. Water that's worth noting for the pod as the second thing. That really is interesting about scott that we can all learn from him is when we think about nonprofit focus on the hope rather than the despair so of course you know. The water crisis is a tragic thing..

billy scott
"scott harrison" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"You can make up a name or you can be completely anonymous. There's a real tax benefit for giving bitcoin. When i think a lot of people don't know that but we we. We've got some of that on the website as well for people who just want to understand. I guess the last thing i'd say is the great thing about clean. Water is it. Everybody thinks is a good idea not political. It's not religious right. it's the most basic need in life. And you know that strikes me every once in a while when i'm sitting in a panel and like i don't know what the heck some of these people are talking about because it's just beyond me and you're sitting here and all of the opulence in the you know the open bars in the parties but ten percent of the world is drinking dirty water so i really hope and believe that bitcoin can be used as a force for good in the world That coin ken directly provide human beings on this planet. With the most basic you could say useful utility of clean water. A lot of people have been. There's an argument there. He well people don't think it's useful at all. Oh it's just funny money. It's just what is the point. What is the use of bitcoin. Why i'd like to say. I think we can use it. To give twenty million human beings the most basic need in life clean water. So that's a use right. And i would hope that other nonprofits could start looking at this as a vehicle. Maybe not just to grow their incremental core business but to take a big swing and to go out to a donor. And i mean i've heard from so many of these whales. I don't give to these donor advice. Funds are going to turn it. So i'm holding it on holding all well. Is that donor gonna give to you in five years. Maybe maybe not. Maybe they've moved on. Maybe they found another passion. Maybe they found another cause. So i think that's what we're trying to do. Here is both honor. The intent and the long-term appreciating value view while also saying. Please give it to us. Now please make this donation. Now let us custody and will create a really big impact story. I'm in i appreciate it. I know i think this is a no brainer. I think you're not going to get enough credit for how hard this is ben. I also don't think people understand how impactful if it works right. If.

twenty million five years ten percent both honor bitcoin lot of people
"scott harrison" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Sixty fifth seven one sixty fifth. I'm thirty six years old now bro. Like i want to solve more than one point. Six percent of the global problem that i had a vision to solve and half a billion dollars is not that much money. I mean there's probably backstage ran into you know. Fourteen people that you know have a lot more than that. And this is what i worked fourteen years and we're considered one of the fastest growing charities in the country and we're considered a picture of rapid acceleration. So the idea here is that you know. I believe bitcoin could provide an exponential growth story. Where because of this strategy people are willing to give it both big and small. We had someone's giving us fifty bitcoin. Actually tyler and cameron matching the wink. Losses are matching the first fifty bitcoin of this funds. So i think there's there's an opportunity for people to give significant way and then i want people to be able to give fifteen bucks worth of bitcoin sixty worth of bitcoin. One hundred and forty dollars. And we're one of the other things that you and i were talking about and you were helpful with is to. The idea is to keep this. Trust bitcoin native as well so we don't imagine in twenty twenty-five like just thinking about this in dollar terms. We actually want to spend the money in bitcoin as we start unlocking the trust and is the bitcoin starts going out to provide clean water for people hopefully vastly appreciated in for five years. We don't imagine turning it back into dollars to then turn into ethiopian. Birr or the rwandan franc. The whole idea is take bitcoin in hold bitcoin and then five years from now or more when you go to build that well that previously cost ten thousand dollars now you spend a tenth of a bitcoin right or whatever. It is ten wells. Yes and when you do that which are actually able to do. Is you're able to use a global currency to accept hold and spend and do it across all these different countries but what you're really benefiting from his the appreciation of the purchasing power. And you talked about this. Why should we suffer the same soap. My core business is in. us dollars. I'm going to raise one hundred million. Us dollars this year from a million generous individuals around the world. But why should we suffer from the same depreciation with our purchasing power as we're trying to get human beings.

Six percent five years fifteen bucks fourteen years Fourteen people half a billion dollars cameron ten thousand dollars one hundred million tyler Sixty fifth fifty bitcoin sixty twenty twenty-five thirty six years old first fifty bitcoin One hundred and more than one point both seven
"scott harrison" Discussed on Famous Failures

Famous Failures

13:11 min | 2 years ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Famous Failures

"Promoting days probably charging five ten dollars. There's per bottle at nightclubs and then here you've got you know half of the country without access to clean water. Yeah the question about water was is it sparkling or flat and that's right we would charge ten bucks to people. I just by nightclubs so after you got back to New York. He spent two years in Liberia. Got Back to New York. You're back in this environment. Where all of these all temptations were surrounding you? How did you manage to stay clean? I I was so changed when I came back. I mean I had this cold Turkey moments. I never smoked again. I never touch coke or any of that stuff again I never gambled again. I'm and I swore off this life device so when I came back I was really a teetotaler. I mean I wasn't fun for my friends and I was showing them pictures in nightclubs so actually actually went back into the nightclubs. Because those are the people that I knew but this time I would open up a laptop and I would share my experience and I'm showing pictures of leprosy in high end. Fashion shouldn't nightclubs. I think people just responded. They knew me they said. Wow I mean we want something like this in our life we want to have a life of purpose or a life of meaning meaning. There was never really the temptation to go back. There was a responsibility to do something about what I'd seen. What I had seen had changed me and that responsibility liberty to do something lead you to eventually start charity water? So let's talk about that. How did you end up deciding to to start charity water? I had no money when I came back from Africa. Given all the money that I had to mercy ships and the people that I've met along the way and I wasn't a very good saver anyway. as a nightclub promoter but I just started. I filed for a nonprofit status. I got some volunteers around me and and said you know. Let's try to raise awareness. Let's try to raise money. Let's try to find partners. Who could meet these needs in these countries around the world and it was just A real flurry of activity from events exhibitions to Inviting myself to speak different places and share my photos. Does that was. That was one thing that I think really helped you know when I came back I had taken fifty thousand photographs so there was a real authority you know. Imagine inviting the photojournalist journalist in to give an account for what he had seen out there in the world that just ended with me asking people for money for for water and when you started charity watered. You didn't have the the trappings of Institutional Knowledge and the nonprofit world but you spent two years in Africa but you were very much an outsider to a charity organization out those who are listening that might strike most people as this advantage. But do you think being an outsider advantage vantage. You in some ways I do. I was talking to everyday people who worked at a bank or worked at Sephora worked at MTV. At the time and I wasn't talking to institutional philanthropists I started just going on a listening to a really insane. Hey I'm going to try and solve a big problem like water. What would make you give of to something like this or or maybe what would make you knock to this and I realized that there was a a real disenchantment? A lot of people didn't trust big charities. They didn't know where their money when they didn't feel connected to the mission that didn't feel connected to their dollars out there making an impact and I realized that there was a big opportunity there there was a study actually done by my oh mater. NYU On charitable trust. They found seventy percent of the people they asked believed charities. WASTED THEIR MONEY Seventy percent of the people said when I give money to charity. I don't think it's spent well so I wondered what it would look like for. Charity wanted to create a model that spoke to some of those objections. Is that one back some of the disenchanted people who might not beginning and say. Hey we'll take a different look and the the big idea a number one was could we find a way to use a hundred percent of people's money to directly fund clean water projects. Could we raise all of the overhead separately in a separate bank account for a very small group of visionary donors so that I can go out there and say. Hey if you've only got one dollar to give all one dollar will go to build a water project to help someone in need or if you have one hundred dollars or one hundred thousand dollars or one million dollars one hundred percent will go straight to the projects so I opened up these two separate bank account tonight. I resolved at the beginning that I would raise the overhead personally and separately and then the second realization. We stumbled into as well. Well money's not fungible. We're not not just mixing it together in one bank account so we can really track it so I could tell you if you gave thirty dollars. Here's where thirty dollars went. It went to India Orissa India. We are a went to chick Wa wa in Malawi or a went to Cambodia or Bolivia so we build really cool Impact tools. We could track dollars down to their final location and show people the impact of their money. So those two things were really foundational and then the third kind of core belief was was just that our work to be culturally appropriate and sustainable in the long run it had to be led by these local partners. In each of the countries it had to be led by the locals and Ethiopians in Ethiopia. Not Not a guy like me from New York City parachuting in with a hard hat trying to drill a well hydro geology. So our role would be to create a movement to create energy in animation around clean water for the world world raises much capital as possible from as many people as possible but then find identified the local organizations who could turn that capital into clean water are for people in need. I love that and that was all of all three factors. You just explained where the reasons why I. I decided to donate my forthcoming books. preorder royalties to charity water as well when I was looking at potential charitable causes to to give to charity water just stood out for the reasons you mentioned mentioned to to know that one hundred percent of what I'm giving is going to fund water projects and that actually could be tracked how I know exactly Ackley word. Water project is going to be and that it would be led by by local partners. Yeah that that team. I think you supported project in addition India place. Yes I've been to a bunch of times. Let me tell you first of all hard to get there. It's like two flights in country and then a five hour drive and then nine hours drive out to the but the guy that's actually a great example. So one of the first projects you funded. This is led by a man named Joe. Madine who forty five years ago started his charity. He is in and when he was young he saw his grandfather feed some of the local workers from a hole in the ground and he walked over to his grandfather as a as a boy any said grandfather. Why are you feeding the people who work for us like you feed the animals and his grandfather said because those people are dogs their animals and something this little boy snapped and he said I'm GONNA use the rest of my life to fight for equality and I'm gonNA fight for equality using water and sanitation to break down these barriers? And what he does is. He goes into communities N.. Forces one hundred percent participation in the water and the sanitation and hygiene and because of the culture in the area where he works when he first started ninety percent of the villages rejected his help. Uh under those conditions and he would hear things like Oh. I'm not drinking the same water as them. Ninety percent of the people said No. We're good with our dirty water. If it means means that we all have to share and he just started working with a ten percent and the ten percent and the ten percent and you know amazing thing to watch your neighbors around and you get clean water and toilets and showers and be so entrenched in your In your views of exclusivity right and and you know now over forty five years. He's made a an extraordinary impact in employs hundreds of locals. But if you go to Orissa India you're not GonNa see anybody that looks like me or were you know. Maybe some of the the people here on our team in Tribeca New York City. You're GONNA see Amazingly passionate locals that Joe has found trained many of them who have worked for them for for thirty years. I and these water projects and I should mention. There's a really powerful video. I think this is from two thousand thirteen. That charity water put together. That explains how the this is a gram Vikas right. That's the organization how that works in the community. All include that in the show notes. It's like a seven minute video but it's so powerful and well worth watching thing because in addition to bringing clean water and sanitation to these communities these water projects also ended up breaking these barriers that exist between people in terms of cast which is such a powerful barrier in India as you described Include that video and the show I encourage everyone to check it out what. What are the other things I wanted to ask? You is so charity. Water tells a great story and people respond to two stories. What do you think are the the key elements of a a great story when you think about telling a story to people and by by the way I in addition to to that video I highly encourage which people to check out Scott's book thirst as well it's a it's a master class and storytelling very kind? It's an it's an excellent book. I finished it in two days. So what do you think are the key elements of a of a great story or I will be true in our in our case right and I and I think we're we're really a careful to not embellish not to lead people into stories that might you know maybe even be better for our work so it needs to be true. I think in the way yeah I think about. It needs to be visual so I think by seeing I think in pictures in photos and in a video charity water's now made over one thousand videos since since we started the organization and I know how to shoot and edit and final cut and you know. There's there's just this it's in our DNA that we show and tell because it's one thing for me to describe to you a tumor. Maybe of a patient that I saw in Africa or even leprosy right and you might have an idea of what what that would look like. It's another to actually see it. It's one thing for me to describe you know Brown water. That looks like chocolate milk but when you see a child knee deep in in that water it it imprint a little differently. I think it moves you in a different way so I think stories are true. They're visual and and Gosh. It's it's funny because I've seen people kind of read books around the organization on storytelling and I think in some ways it's just innate. I'm not sure I could teach it. Except that intuitively and instinctively. We have built culture. Maybe starting with me where we just see stories everywhere and we see stories in our failure that could be useful. I think maybe I would say that stories can speak to values. I'll give you just one example of a story of failure that I didn't get to tell but I I wish I had led. This probably goes back. Five years we had crowd funded a million dollar drilling rig in Ethiopia and I got about ten thousand people all fired fired up about funding and drilling rig and putting their names on it We were going to be able to go faster. We're GONNA drill more wells. More people will the rig we mount a GPS tracker on it so people could see where it was. We put our rig on twitter so tweet its location. And then I learned for years. Later that are rig has crashed on a narrow road in Ethiopia. So our rig rig that ten thousand people Sakr officially gave their money to pay for Wimp belly-up so just imagine like a beetle with its legs. Flailing in the in the sky right our rigg was on its side. The the wheels are up. And it's not helping anybody. Our local partners were a little sheepish in intelligence right so their plan was just hey. Let's just go fix the Reagan. We'll get it back and running him and we'll keep drilling but it's almost like maybe if you crash your parents car you would fix it. I I say Dad I crush. I crashed your car but I did the right thing. I took it to the body shop. I paid for it on my own. And we're all good right right. Well the minute I I heard about it in this moment that the partners were fixing it. I tried to send photographers out there to actually get me. Pictures of our crashed rig and my plan was to the email it to the ten thousand people with the email headline we crashed your rig. The opium learned what happened was our partner. It was actually taking a risk on that road to reach a highly marginalized community and the easy thing is to drill wells by the.

Africa Ethiopia partner India New York City New York Joe Liberia Turkey NYU India Orissa India Orissa India opium twitter Wa Reagan Sephora Cambodia
"scott harrison" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"For more we go to Scott Harrison in college station well a lot of storms and flooding in this region this week but today a beautiful sunny day in college station what to watch out for the freshmen great bonus it is a starting quarterback Auburn well he was the first true freshman to start a season opener and the FCC since two thousand four meanwhile what about Auburn well we got those good players and protection for a an amp we've got eyes a store and he's a freshman and yes to a one hundred yard rushing games this season so it should be an interesting game maybe I'd store in fact you. thank you very much Scott number six Ohio state Miami of Ohio in Columbus Buckeyes forty eight oh one one against in state opponents since nineteen twenty two elsewhere in the top twenty five U. C. F. travels to Washington and Utah for B. Y. U. later tougher in clubs and can extend it school best eighteen game win streak clashes with conference USA Charlotte seven thirty eastern want to watch it eight in the east number seven Notre Dame and third ranked Georgia and affects both undefeated but the Irish big underdogs college basketball shake up can't is expected phase multiple major violations after the F. B. I.'s corruption and bribery investigation baseball Padres dismissed skipper Andy green after four years Yankees lead the blue jays six two in the seventh home run two RBIs for Giancarlo Stanton for eastern mess for three and a half out of a spot nine to play have won three straight visit the Reds and NASCAR in Richmond at seven thirty eastern Brad Keselowski has the poll I'm self candor follow us anytime on Twitter our handle these at CBS sports radio. this is bill rider we're.

Yankees CBS NASCAR Andy green Padres bribery Twitter Brad Keselowski Richmond Reds Giancarlo Stanton Scott Harrison basketball Georgia Charlotte Y. U. Utah Washington Ohio Miami
"scott harrison" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"scott harrison" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome to experts on expert. I'm Dax Shepard. Who are you young person? Monica Padma n- oh going by the same name. Same name. Monica Pettman thought maybe nineteen you might try out a new moniker moniker. Wait, if you already thought of that course. Oh, no two people say that to you on the playground. Shove you in the back. These intelligent be worth getting burned. Yeah. Well, we have an intelligent guest on today. Scott Harrison with a son at the end. Yeah. Sometimes I just want to say, Scott, Harris. I don't even know why. But it's got Harrison in created an incredibly, effective charity. Called charity water. Yes. That my wife has been involved with for years in. I have been very skeptical of because I have all the skepticism for white people who go into Africa to change things. I've learned about a lot of those ways. L intention things gone awry in anthropology, and so I was not willing to give Scott Harrison fair shake. So he came into the attic. And he got me. He did he gets me. Yeah. Yeah. He got me. I've been got. Well, you'll see just how much I got got. Yeah. Because that fucking checkbook came out what a story incredible story family story grown up riveted was on the edge of my lazy. Boy, Monica get to hear it while Monica manic moniker, Padma n-. Oh, let me just also threw out there. We do have some tickets left in San Antonio. If you go onto my Instagram page in follow the link in my bio, I think it'll take you to some ticket sales. And we have a few left come see us. Some see is we're going to fucking rage down in San Antonio data. Listen, I'm not writing a check my ass can't cash because we're bringing a very funny guest. It's going to be a party. So if you're anywhere.

Scott Harrison Monica Padma Monica Pettman San Antonio Dax Shepard Monica Africa Harris
Bills, Nathan Peterman and Scott Harrison discussed on Chicago GameDay

Chicago GameDay

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

Bills, Nathan Peterman and Scott Harrison discussed on Chicago GameDay

"Bills at Texas. Haven't heard from Scott Harrison, man, it's been too long. It's going on Scott. Well, Josh Allen is out of the game. The bills quarterback he's questionable return with an elbow injury. But Nathan Peterman comes in and during his first offensive series after the bills get the ball when Shawn Watson fumbles away when sac near his own thirty yard line. Peterman eventually finds a receiver open four touchdown. It goes eight Jones sixteen yards for a touchdown. And the bills get their first lead of the game

Bills Nathan Peterman Scott Harrison Josh Allen Shawn Watson Jones Texas SAC Sixteen Yards Thirty Yard