35 Burst results for "Scott Gottlieb"

Gottlieb says health officials "failed" White House in early COVID response

America's First News

01:27 min | Last week

Gottlieb says health officials "failed" White House in early COVID response

"Meanwhile, President Trump's former FDA commissioner, Dr Scott Gottlieb, told CBS's face the nation Sunday that the White House leadership was failed by health officials early on during the current virus during the pandemic. Look, I think in this respect the White House leadership was failed by health officials. We did not have a diagnostic in the field so we couldn't screen for it. We should have. We should have started working on that in January, and we over relied on a surveillance system that was built for flu and not for Corona virus without recognizing that it wasn't gonna be a sensitive in detecting Corona virus spread. As it was for Blue because the two virus has spread very differently. Those were two critical failings. Now you could say, Well, the president put those people in place. He's responsible. You could make the second order arguments around that, but I think ultimately the White House did not have the information they need to make decisions. Key function of agencies in the government to provide policymakers with accurate, actionable information. The White House didn't have it, and I had a lot of conversations with White House of this time period because I was concerned it was spreading here and I was pushing them on and they were. They were telling me over and over that they were hearing from top officials. From the agencies that they were pretty confident that it wasn't spreading here. I think when history looks back, that's going to be a key moment. That's what was going on over February. So godly, preparing to put the blame on health officials on Sunday late last week, though, when pressed on the president's words and actions in March, golly but spread the blame

White House Dr Scott Gottlieb President Trump CBS FDA FLU Commissioner
Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Squawk Pod

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

"Breaking news out of the former suitable sector. Let's get to make. Good Morning. Good Morning Joe Nine. CEO's of some of the largest drug companies in the world announcing they've signed onto what they're calling a historic pledge to uphold the scientific integrity and put safety first as they are developing covid nineteen vaccines. These are basically the front runners in the vaccine race for covid nineteen, all of the companies involved in operation warp speed in addition to Merck Pfizer and its partner biotech Astra Zeneca Madonna GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi Johnson and Johnson and Nova VACs all signing onto this pledge to do essentially four things. They say always make safety and wellbeing of vaccinated people a top priority continue to adhere to high scientific and Ethical Standards Regarding. The conduct of clinical trials and the rigor of their manufacturing process they pledged to submit for approval or emergency use authorization after demonstrating safety and efficacy through phase three clinical studies designed to design and conducted to meet regulatory guidelines through a regulatory authorities like the FDA, and they say to work to ensure sufficient supply and range of vaccine options including those suitable for global access. They say quote we believe this pledge will help ensure public confidence in the rigorous scientific and regulatory process by which covid nineteen vaccines are evaluated and may ultimately approved and guys. This comes as vaccine development is moving at unprecedented speeds and we are hearing about some hesitancy. From folks to believe in the process and to be comfortable taking these vaccines especially as the FDA's leadership has come under question about political influence regarding convalescent plasma and hydroxy chloroquine in a recent change research and CB poll about thirty percent of people said that they either definitely not or probably not take covid nineteen vaccine, and so guys the company is trying to step in here to tell the public, they will keep safety I. Yeah. It's in response to rumors that we'd get an emergency youth authorization for for one of these vaccines before completing. The process there's always pressure on the FDA. obviously in especially with you know we're talking about life and death situations with with some of these drugs to to cut corners and I think they're just you know they're just putting it out there that especially with so many people when. Vaccines are such A. Controversial even before this people, you know what? The Anti Vaccine and everything else and we do remember back with with polio before we knew everything luckily nothing happened but you need to be sure. His longtime ago we know so much more and we know what's in vaccines. We know the scientific basis for how they worked meg. So I, I would be comfortable with. with one of these, the ad no mediated. Vaccine or you know if there's a small stretch of Messenger Aurigny I'll give it a shot I. I'm not overly concerned with with like contamination by some horrific virus that we don't see or something like that. You know make so. A wary public needs to be. Absolutely certain that that. We've. Crossed all the cross the is and cross. The is in dotted the teeth I just wanted to know we are coming up on that and that final stretch and the vaccine development process sort of inconceivably because this only begin in January really. But when we get to the end of October that's when Pfizer is indicating that they may see results about whether they're vaccine works and the FDA has scheduled advisory committee meeting of outside advisers, October twenty second, and so a lot of people are gonNA be looking at that date and saying, are we going to see data and how transparent will this process be So these are nine major drugmakers saying that their first priority is safety and I think this is hugely important not only for building public confidence in. A covert vaccine, but for protecting the sanctity of vaccines in general broader, we've had discussions with Scott gottlieb about this. The reason you don't want to rush through and push something out there that hasn't been thoroughly vetted with a phase three trial is that if there were problems with it, not only would it convince people not to take a Kovin vaccine, but it could undo a lot of the work that's been done with other vaccination programs around the globe I mean Joe. Brought up polio. Well, Jonas salk actually. Vaccinated his children. As some of the very first people testing this out so you know that was something he felt one hundred percent confident with we don't do things that way anymore. But there has been so much that that we have done with vaccinations diseases that we don't even think about anymore because over the last fifty years or so you know they've they've they've kind of gone away up very common This is just important not only for covert vaccination, but for faith in the vaccination system at large. Yeah it's so fragile. Public Health experts are incredibly concerned that a misstep here when vaccines are so important could shake the the fragile confidence in the vaccine system in general, and as you pointed out, it's this terrible irony of vaccines that they have rendered all these terrible diseases sort of non existent, and so we don't appreciate that vaccines did that for us. So there's a lot on the line here.

FDA Polio Joe Nine Sanofi Johnson Merck Pfizer Pfizer Jonas Salk Astra Zeneca Madonna Scott Gottlieb CEO Chloroquine Partner
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Scott Gottlieb, at least as far as this year's concerned 2020 the fall in the winter. I think that if there is a vaccine made available, it's likely to be a very staged introduction of the vaccine under an emergency use authorization where there's going to be a lot of data collection around the use of that vaccine is just gonna be for a very select groups of people. You are either a very high risk of contracting a Corona virus because of what they do, for example, healthcare workers, Dr Gottlieb on CBS's face the Nation Britain, Meantime, recording its highest daily number of new Corona virus cases since May, would just under 3000. Some of the increase reported on Sunday can be accounted for my wider testing. There's been no corresponding jump in the number of hospital admissions and deaths to new desk, though, were reported on Sunday. The nation's flight attendants pushing Congress from or airline industry Corona virus relief revenue is down 75%, and that's really where we are and where we're expected to be actually through the end of the year, and that is why we are asking for continued relief from Congress to keep us in our jobs so that we can lift off again once the virus is under control, and people do feel safe to fly. Sarah Nelson heads the Association of Flight Attendants. She appeared on Fox and Friends Topsy Novak Djokovic booted Sunday from the U. S Open tennis tournament in New York after he accidentally hit a line judge with a tennis ball, Brokovich angrily smacking a ball behind him while walking to the sideline. During the changeover, the ball hit the line judge in her throat, causing her to drop to her knees at the back of the court. Choco. Vich was not looking in that direction when his racket made contact with the ball. America's listening to Fox News. From the news Podcasts Network download and listen to the one with Craig Gutfeld Cat. I know that you are not particularly pleased with his decision. Take Kamala Harris. Everyone keeps pointing Teo the fact that she was so mean to him in the debates. To me. It's not weird because he got the guy that wrote the 1994 crime bill. You have a drink Coney and prosecutor. I think they're really a match made.

Scott Gottlieb Sarah Nelson Fox News Association of Flight Attendan Congress Fox Teo Kamala Harris Brokovich tennis CBS Vich Coney prosecutor New York Craig Gutfeld Britain America
Gottlieb says U.S. likely "a long way" from herd immunity to virus

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

02:03 min | Last month

Gottlieb says U.S. likely "a long way" from herd immunity to virus

"That you're going to have a period of immunity that collapsed anywhere from 6 to 12 months. It's going to be highly variable. Some people will have less immunity. Some people have slightly more, but it's good news that they're able to document that people have really sterile immunity. They're not going to get reinfected. For at least three months, probably longer than that, after infection. Interesting. Scott Gottlieb there, the oft quoted Dr used to run the FDA. I hope that's true. I think a lot of us were hoping you get lifetime immunity. But I guess we'll take 6 to 12 months because at some point there's a tipping point in the virus just can't spread because there aren't enough ready hosts and then it just kind of You know, Withers away and goes away. Let's go ahead and follow up with a 45 Probably a long way from herd immunity. If you look at the Serra prevalence studies overall, maybe 8% of the population as a whole has been exposed to an outbreak. States like Arizona might be higher closer to 25% based on some modelling, maybe as high as 20% in Florida based on certain modeling. And 15% in Texas. We know this Sarah prevalence in New York City's 20% so that's getting closer to a level of immunity, The rate of transmission will start to decline. It's not quite herd immunity. But you're going to see declines in the rate of transmission because of that, that level of infection that also goes a long way to explaining how New York or parts of California or wherever it I mean, I could cite a dozen examples. They're doing great because X Then they have this huge surge in cases and hospitalizations and deaths and all. Then it gets better And then the media says, Well, they're doing better because of acts. But once you get to and we had a a scientist send us is several weeks ago. But he said Herd immunity is great. But once you pass a tipping point, I think, he said it's somewhere in the low twenty's percent. The virus. Just it runs into too many dead ends and it starts to go away. And so I just think various parts of the country we're getting to that tipping point. And there's so much that's still not known about this damn thing so

Scott Gottlieb Herd Withers New York City FDA Texas New York Scientist Sarah Arizona Florida California
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:52 min | Last month

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Commissioner, Dr Scott Gottlieb, giving his assessment of the latest numbers surrounding the Corona virus pandemic. There's been a fairly persistent level of infection, hospitalizations and deaths. Over the last couple of weeks, we've had over 1000 deaths a day for at least two weeks now over 50,000 infections a day. On average. We hit 55,000 in the last day. Hospitalizations have come down a little bit, but they haven't really started to decline very rapidly and on the pandemics movement. What's happening is as the cases start to decline in the Southern states, Arizona, Texas, Florida. We're starting to see infections pick up in other parts of the country. California's still increasing, really the only state that seems to have come down quite a bit of the epidemic. Sunbelt states is Arizona, Dr Gottlieb on CBS has face the nation. I was Governor Kim rentals asking the federal government for nearly $4 billion to recover from an unusual wind storm that hit the state last Monday, killing at least three, leaving thousands without power and extensively damaging crops. The United Arab Emirates now just the third country in the Middle East, to officially established diplomatic ties with Israel, a new agreement brokered by the Trump White House. Receiving praise around the world, and it will put a pause on Israeli plans for the annexation of the West Bank. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, this piece unites moderate two of the most advanced economies in the world is well in the United Arab Emirates and two of the most moderate. We're fighting Iran and the radical Radicals who are trying to overthrow the entire order in the Middle East. The prime minister on Fox's America's news headquarters. Texas Army National Guard Soldier has died during a training exercise at Fort Hood, 36 year old Bradley more died Thursday during land navigation training. Foul play is not suspected, and the death remains on her investigation. I'm Paul Stevens..

Dr Scott Gottlieb United Arab Emirates Arizona Middle East Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Texas Army National Guard Sold prime minister Commissioner Governor Kim Paul Stevens federal government CBS California Trump White House Iran Fort Hood West Bank Israel Bradley Texas
Moderna pitches virus vaccine at about $50-$60 per course

Squawk Pod

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Moderna pitches virus vaccine at about $50-$60 per course

"Making headlines. Madonna. Is, reportedly, planning to price its corona virus vaccine at fifty to sixty dollars per course. That's at least eleven dollars more than another vaccine proposed vaccine from Pfizer and buying tech. The Financial Times reports price would apply to the US and other high income countries, but that the final price has yet to be determined.

Pfizer Financial Times United States
Coronavirus cases continue to rise across US

KYW 24 Hour News

01:05 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus cases continue to rise across US

"70,000 plus cases a day of the Corona virus across America. Documents leaked out of the White House show that 18 states in the red Zone. The CDC, which wrote that report recommends a face mask man. The number of coronavirus cases continues to rise with Florida at the helm. Congresswoman Donna Shall Layla On this week, we have community spread, which means the virus is out of control, the lack of leadership in the White House and in our governor's office. They simply have not hit this with a hammer, which is what we needed to do and star of the virus. They opened too soon. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer advises to ignore pressure from the White House when reopening schools have to open the school safely. We know that both the president puts pressure on CDC and FDA not to do what the scientists say is safest. But we have to listen to the scientists. Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb were seeing other epicenters of epidemic spreads start to emerge. So you have to be very worried right now about Georgia about Tennessee about Missouri about Kentucky. And that was on CBS

White House CDC FDA Donna Shall Layla Chuck Schumer Scott Gottlieb CBS America Florida Commissioner President Trump Georgia Kentucky Tennessee Missouri
States struggle as coronavirus cases spike

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

States struggle as coronavirus cases spike

"Are worsening pandemic at the height of the summer. Bottom line is cases and deaths spike across the nation southern tier from California to Florida and most of the states in between Arizona a grim milestone state hitting its highest daily death toll Saturday. There, the federal government stepping in to increase testing in hot zones, touches to minimise the risk California also struggling to meet its testing targets. Seen deaths nearly tripled since the state's economy re opened in May. CBS's Lilia Luciano, more than 140,000 people have died of covert 19 in this country. Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb warns. You have epidemics in Texas and California and Florida and the testing companies a big commercial labs like lab corn Quest. Try to prioritize testing those regions. Not only do they fall behind in those regions, but now they're pulling testing out of other regions in seeing delays. There.

California Florida Lilia Luciano Food And Drug Administration Scott Gottlieb Arizona CBS Commissioner Texas
Gottlieb says U.S. "right back where we were" at earlier virus peak

WBZ Morning News

00:17 sec | 2 months ago

Gottlieb says U.S. "right back where we were" at earlier virus peak

"Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb says. The US is back where it was at the pandemics earlier peak in the spring. The difference now is that we really had one epicenter of spread when New York was going through its hardship. Now we really have four major happy centers of spread, and that is CBS's Tom

Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner New York United States CBS TOM
Gottlieb says U.S. "right back where we were" at earlier virus peak

WBZ Morning News

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Gottlieb says U.S. "right back where we were" at earlier virus peak

"Meantime, as Massachusetts is proving to be one of the states as an example of how to safely contain the spread of the virus. Most parts of the country is a struggle to say the least. Florida, Houston, Texas, Arizona and Los Angeles County. Are the nation's covert hot spots, with cases soaring by the thousands every day. We're not going to really be able to crush this virus at this point, because there's just so much infection around way really don't seem to have the political will to do it. Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb says. The US is back where it was at the pandemics earlier peak in the spring. The difference now. Is that we really had one epicenter of spread when New York was going through its hardship. Now we really have four major happy centers of

Scott Gottlieb Los Angeles County Massachusetts FDA Commissioner United States New York Houston Florida Texas Arizona
Gottlieb says U.S. "right back where we were" at earlier virus peak

Trading and Investing

02:20 min | 2 months ago

Gottlieb says U.S. "right back where we were" at earlier virus peak

"Scott Gottlieb, former FDA commissioner. He's on regularly. On CNBC during the weekdays and usually on CBS's phase, the Nation. On the weekends. They asked him about the overall status of where we are right now. Around the United States. Here's doctor got leave on CBS earlier today. Well, I think right now we're where we were when New York City was having its peak epidemic. If you look back in New York City Peak, we had about 34,000 cases a day. At the time. We were probably diagnosing one in 20 infections, so that meant we were having 700,000 new infections a day. Right now, We're gonna have about 60,000 infections a day this week. Maybe we'll reach 75,000 or get close to it. We're probably diagnosing one in 12 infection, CDC said one in 10 a few weeks ago. It's probably one in 12 now because we're falling behind. That means we have about 700,000 infections and day nationally. So we're right back where we were at the peak of the epidemic during the New York outbreak, the difference now Is that we really have one epicenter of spread when New York was going through its hardship. Now we really have four major happy centers have spread Los Angeles cities in Texas cities in Florida, Arizona and Florida looks to be in the worst shape and George is heating up a CZ well, and that's concerning And as I mentioned at the top of the show this remark by President Trump This weekend, about 99% of the corona virus cases. Are harmless. Everybody on the talk show circuit this morning was getting asked about that, including Dr Gottlieb. Here's what he had to say. About President Trump's remarks. Well, I'm not really sure what he's referring to. He might be referring to the number of people who get hospitalized based on a number of people who get infected, which is probably less than 5% when you count all the asymptomatic infection and infection, young people that might not be getting diagnosed. But certainly more than 1% of people get serious illness from this. About 60% of people who get infected become symptomatic. About 10 to 15% of them will develop some form of covert pneumonia and somewhere around 2 to 5% might get hospitalized, depending on what age mixes of of the people who are getting infected, so this is still a pretty bad virus.

Scott Gottlieb New York City President Trump CBS New York Cnbc FDA United States Commissioner Asymptomatic Pneumonia CDC Los Angeles Florida Texas George Arizona
7,000 children test positive for Coronavirus in Florida

Squawk Pod

04:16 min | 3 months ago

7,000 children test positive for Coronavirus in Florida

"Eight thousand number of cases confirmed in the United States a new record and seven thousand, the amount of children who have now tested positive in the state of Florida alone since March Dr Scott. GOTTLIEB is the former FDA commissioner now a CNBC contributor he joins us once again Dr Gottlieb's good to see you. Let's begin with these cases of children in the state of Florida. How alarming is this? What does it tell us about? The age groups now that are susceptible to getting this virus. Well we always knew children were susceptible. The belief is that they're less susceptible than adults, so they're less likely to contract the virus than adults and that when they do get the virus, they're less likely to have a bad outcome. Data seems to support that, but they're not impervious to the virus. They do get sick. They get infected and we have seen some bad outcomes in. In children, we also don't know what it looks like. When this virus becomes epidemic in children, we don't know how many kids have actually had corona virus. There aren't any good seroprevalence studies to look for antibodies and kids to see what the exposure has been in children, and it might be the case that a smaller percentage of kids in the United States have had this infection. Infection at this point in adults on a relative basis, because the very first thing we did when we had these epidemics was closed the schools, and so that that closed off an avenue of spread, and I would venture to guess that parents with school age children were probably more here into the at home, mortars, wearing masks good hygiene because they were doing those things to protect. Protect kids, so might be the case that a smaller percentage of kids have actually been exposed, and so we don't know what it looks like. When this becomes epidemic and children in the same way for example, flu becomes epidemic and children every year, if the virus outbreak stays at the current pace. Are we going to be able to send our kids to school in the fall? I don't think so in the south. I mean if they don't if they don't correct the situation and they don't have a lot of time to do it in states like Texas. Georgia Alabama California Florida Arizona. It's going to be very hard for local school. Districts parents on boards of local school boards to make decisions to open those schools I think in the northeast we will be able to open schools in the north I. Think Parts of Northern California San Francisco be able to open a schools. We should really try do that. There should be an emphasis on doing that because we might be in a situation where we have to close the schools again later on. On in the school year, getting kids back to school socializing them, get him started on classroom learning. If we have to go to distance learning on a selective basis as outbreaks occur, it's going to be really important to get them back into the classroom. At least for a period of time, I think a lot of states in the south really have lost the opportunity do that because they have to make those decisions and July those schools open in August in many in many cases, and so they're probably going to start the year with schools closed in a lot of parts to those states. Do we know anymore Dr Leave about that syndrome that had been affecting. Growing numbers of children and we haven't talked about frankly in six weeks to two months. So there was a really good analysis studying published in the New England Journal of Medicine about two days ago that I would encourage people to take a look at that gives sort of a qualitative assessment of ninety nine cases in New York City, it appears to be opposed by real syndrome that occurs about a month after the virus. What we still don't know is what is the total number of kids who had the virus? We know how many kids had. This syndrome appears to be sort of a post. Viral Inflammatory Syndrome could be quite severe sort of like a Kawasaki Type Syndrome. When you get inflammation of arterial vessels it could. It could have disturbances heart. It's treatable, but we don't know how. Many kids are in effect with corona virus, so we're seeing one hundred cases, and there's been one hundred thousand kids infected, or we seeing one hundred cases there. There's only been five thousand ten thousand kids. In fact, it's probably the case that a lot of kids have had this new. New York City and it's a low incidence event and you do see these similar post viral types of syndromes with other viruses including corona virus, where you also see it on rare occasions, a Kawasaki Type Syndrome, with other forms of Corona virus, and so when you see these epidemics, viruses enter a virus echo virus sort of move through population. You will see a month later three weeks later. A preponderance of these post viral kinds of syndromes, so this isn't that unusual in many respects. We just don't know what the incidences of

United States Dr Gottlieb New York City Florida Kawasaki Type Syndrome Cnbc Dr Scott Commissioner New England Journal Of Medicin FDA Northern California Texas San Francisco Arizona Georgia Alabama
More states halt reopenings as COVID-19 cases surge

The Daily 202's Big Idea

10:24 min | 3 months ago

More states halt reopenings as COVID-19 cases surge

"When the first corona virus cases appeared in Chicago back in January they bore the same genetic signatures as a germ that emerged in China weeks before. But HIS EGON Oser an infectious disease specialist at northwestern examined the genetic structure of virus samples from local patients. He noticed something different. A change in the virus was appearing again and again this mutation associated with the outbreaks in Europe and new. York City eventually took over Chicago by May. It was found ninety five percent of all the genomes that he sequenced. At a glance, the mutation seem trivial about thirteen hundred amino acids, service building blocks for a protein on the surface of the virus in the mutant virus, the genetic instructions for just one of those amino acids number six fourteen switched in the new variant from a D. which is shorthand for. Asset to a G, which is short for Lycene. But the location of that mutation was significant because the switch occurred in the part of the genome that codes for the all important spike protein. The spike protein is the protruding structure that gives the corona virus. It's crown like profile, which also gives its name the crown virus, and allows it to enter human cells the way a burglar picks lock. And Its ubiquity at this point is undeniable of the approximately fifty thousand genomes of the virus that researchers worldwide have uploaded into a shared database about seventy percent carry the new mutation, which is officially designated as D, Six fourteen g, but known more familiarly to the scientists on the front lines of this fight by one letter. G. G. Hasn't just dominated the outbreak in Chicago. It has taken over the world and now scientists are racing to figure out what it means. And how to stop it to of Our Star Science Writers Sarah Kaplan Join. Reported at least four lab experiments suggest that this mutation makes the virus significantly more infectious, although none of that work has yet been pure reviewed, another unpublished study led by federal scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory asserts that patients with the g variant actually have more virus in their bodies, making them more likely to spread it to others. The mutation does not. Does Not appear to make people sicker, but a growing number of scientists worry that it is making the virus more contagious. The scramble to unravel this mutation mystery embodies the challenges of science during the coronavirus pandemic with millions of people infected in thousands dying every day around the world, researchers strike a high stakes balance between getting information out quickly. And making sure that is right. The burglary analogy is when I found very helpful, because it really helps conceptualize what this virus is doing to our bodies, Joel likes to say that the coronavirus can be thought of as an extremely destructive burglar, unable to live or reproduce on its own. It breaks into human cells in coops, biological machinery to make thousands of copies of itself that leaves a trail of damaged tissue and triggers an immune system response that for some people for many people can be fatal, the so-called side kind store. This replication process is messy, even though it has a proofreading mechanism for copying its own genome, the coronavirus frequently makes mistakes. Those are the mutations. The vast majority of mutations have no effect at all on the behavior of the virus. But? Few genetic mutations could be more significant than the ones that affect the spike protein. That is the viruses lock pick the most powerful tool against us. The protein attached to a receptor on respiratory cells, called as to which opens the cell and let's the virus slip inside. The more effective despite protein, the more easily the virus can break into the bodies of its hosts, even when the original variant of the virus emerged in Wuhan China. It was obvious that the spike protein was already quite effective. But, it could have been even better. The spike protein for the coronavirus has two parts that don't always hold together well when you look at it under a microscope in the version of the virus that rose in China the outer part, which the virus needs to attach to a human receptor, frequently broke off equipped with this faulty lock pick. The virus had a harder time invading Ho cells. Studying both variations of the gene, using a proxy virus, in a Petri dish of human cells heireann show a virologist at scripts. Research found that viruses with the g variant had more spike proteins in the outer parts of those proteins were less likely to break off. In that research. The virus was ten times more infectious with that mutation. The good news is this. The mutation does not seem to lead to worse outcomes for patients, nor does it alter the viruses response to antibodies from patients who had the D variant? Suggesting again? This is great news that vaccines being developed based on the original version of the virus will be effective against the war infectious European strain. Identifying, emerging mutations allows researchers to track their spread, knowing what genes affect how the virus transmits enables public health officials to tailor their efforts to contain it wants therapeutics vaccines are distributed on a large scale. Having a baseline understanding of the genome will help pinpoint when drug-resistance inevitably starts to evolve. None of this unfortunately is a magic bullet, but experts say that understanding how the virus works will help respond better. Still, it's a race against time. And Right now. The virus is winning. And, that's the big idea. Here are three other headlines that should be on your radar. This Tuesday number one. US deaths are approaching one, hundred, twenty, five thousand. We expect to pass that number today and the total number of confirmed cases, here's top two and a half million amid worsening outbreaks in Florida, Texas and Arizona that are straining hospital capacity to the Limit Jacksonville, the largest city in Florida and the host to the Republican National Convention in late. August announced that masks will now be mandatory in public and indoor locations. Vice President Pence plans to go ahead with plan travel this week to Florida and Arizona, even though cases are spiking, but Arizona Saul another record, high and hospitalizations days after trump visited the state for a raucous indoor rally where almost no one more mask. Florida's Rolling Seven Day. Average has risen by one hundred percent since week ago. Trump's former FDA commissioner Scott gottlieb warned last night. Night that the surging number of cases could result in nearly half our country infected with the virus by the end of the year and overall deaths are likely to return to more than one thousand per day. He predicts in fact, the number two at the CDC, told the Journal of the American Medical Association yesterday that the US. has quote way too much virus to be. Be Able to contain it anymore and shoe cat said that we're no longer in a position like New Zealand or Singapore. South Korea, where new case can be rapidly identified, and all the context traced and people are isolated or sick and people who are exposed or quarantined, and that's how you keep things under control. She said instead. We have way too much virus across the country. Country for that right now. She described herself as very discouraged and added. This is really the beginning I think there was a lot of wishful thinking around the country that hey, it's summer. Everything's GonNa be fine, but she added that she seemed quote a lot of worrisome factors over the last week or so and added quote. We are not even beginning to be over this. And, we're seeing that on the front lines. Los Angeles County health officials have issued a dire warning in the last twelve hours that conditions are rapidly deteriorating in the nation's most populous county as the virus spreads quickly, officials are warning that both public and private hospitals in the city of angels may soon be overwhelmed leading to triage. One factor that's alarming leaders in southern California. Is that corona virus patients are crossing the US Mexico border to seek medical care. Now, a lot of Americans seeking treatment. But the head of California's Emergency Medical Services Authority describes the stream of patients crossing the border back and forth as quote pouring gasoline on the fire. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey pushed back his plans to reopen public schools and has banned gatherings of more than fifty people. He also has closed down bars, nightclubs, movie, theaters and water parks. All of which he recently reopened as we discussed last week warning residents that we can no longer be under any illusion that the viruses going away on its own other hard hit states, including Tennessee and Georgia have put in place new stay at home. Orders extended them. There are so many unsettling stories just popping up across the country that it's hard to keep up more than two hundred people in West. Virginia were advised yesterday to quarantine after possibly being exposed to the virus will working out at a gym. New Jersey. Governor Phil Murphy says plans to allow indoor dining or are going to be postponed indefinitely while New York Governor Andrew, Cuomo says his administration is reconsidering whether indoor dining can restart safely. New York City next week, which was going to happen as part of its phase three now this is a big blow for restaurant owners in the tristate region who've been preparing to reopen by hiring staff that they'd laid off and restocking their inventory as they teeter on the precipice of bankruptcy, a lot of that food may now need to be thrown away and Broadway's main theaters all said yesterday that they're going to remain shuttered until at least January and probably longer.

Arizona Chicago Florida China United States California Europe Egon Oser Lycene New York City York City New Jersey Los Alamos National Laboratory Virginia Burglary Sarah Kaplan Doug Ducey Wuhan China New Zealand Los Angeles County
Gottlieb expects COVID deaths to rise again amid "major epidemics"

ABC News Perspective

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Gottlieb expects COVID deaths to rise again amid "major epidemics"

"After a hard six months ahead the group prediction from the former FDA commissioner Dr Scott Gottlieb and what the U. S. faces in the corona virus battle telling CBS's face the nation infections will continue to rise in states with soaring infection numbers we're gonna have many weeks ahead of us have continued growth in these cases at least two or three weeks even if we take aggressive actions right now which across the board we're not doing that leaves as many states have been re opening too quickly without waiting two weeks between phases he recommends universal

Dr Scott Gottlieb CBS FDA Commissioner
New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy on concerns of a rise in coronavirus cases

Squawk Pod

04:18 min | 3 months ago

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy on concerns of a rise in coronavirus cases

"Earlier this week, the governors of the tri-state Area New York New Jersey, and Connecticut announced that visitors arriving from states with surging coronavirus numbers will be asked to self quarantine for fourteen days or face fines. Here's Becky. We welcome Governor Phil Murphy from New Jersey. He's. He's been watching his state open up after four long months and and governor. Thanks for being with us this morning. When you get out there, you really start to see people who were back out in restaurants again going out shopping out of beaches and parks and a just wonder as you watch this. If you worry that, we're going to see a rise in cases, and what numbers you're watching how you're measuring this to decide if we're doing this the right way first of all, it's good to be back with you and we do worry. Which is why we've been taking this in very specific. Phases in terms of reopening. Outdoors is a lot less concerning than indoors. That's not to say there aren't concerns outside, but the the concerns pale in comparison to say inside lacking ventilation sedentary close proximity. That's a bad. Those are bad characteristics for this virus. The things we look at most closely in terms of our guides are rate of transmission. If it's under one that means less than one other person is getting infected if they're in contact with someone who has got the virus. The spot positivity rate, meaning what percentage of folks getting tested are actually positive for covid nineteen, and thirdly as new hospitalizations, those are the three here and now data points. We look at a lot of data, but those are the three that matter the most we have seen things. Get a little out of control in states like Texas. Florida Arizona, even California you're starting to see some real pickups in these things and we spoke with Dr Scott. GOTTLIEB I know you're familiar with Scott and I'm well. He said that contact tracing is not being done very effectively in a state like Texas. They don't know why young people are getting it. These states are really doing. Very good contact tracing where to isolate the source of the spread. They think it's congregate settings where young people gathering because young people are the ones who are getting infected at a higher percentage, and so they've. They've identified the bars. And most of the people, apparently most of the people who are presenting sick, the young people preserving sick have identified that they've been in barbies. Lay or a lot of them when I talked to the physicians, but they don't know for sure qepared. Are you in New Jersey in terms of contact tracing? Try and figure out if there's a spike in cases where it's coming from and what? I can't. I can't speak to the specifics of Texas Scott is a great guy and has been a great adviser Jersey Guy by the way. We have we have since day? One remember none of us at any of this at the beginning, so what if you're looking for a source of comfort, folks or silver lining its testing tracing plans? Ties isolate folks who have the virus. We had none of that as a country or state three or four months ago. We now test him the top couple per capita states in the nation. With the great help of Rutgers, our flagship State University. We're adding meaningfully till the already nine hundred contractors we have. We hope to get up over two thousand within the next couple of weeks. I hope and believe that our approach will be effective. Again our numbers have gotten notwithstanding the loss of over thirteen thousand people. It's hard to believe we've lost that many in New Jersey alone. Our numbers have gotten dramatically better, so we've been able to do the contact tracing up until now at least with local and county tracers. We have nine hundred of them on the field so far so good, but we WANNA. Make sure we've got a capacity that looks like our testing capacity. Just in case and I think we all have to be prepared for this. We hope for the best, but prepare for the worst that this is going to flare up. And we need that tracing infrastructure in place. anecdotally again, it's far more concerning inside than outside. At least a New Jersey I can't speak for Texas. That's where our biggest concerns are

Tri-State Area New York New Je Texas Dr Scott Phil Murphy Gottlieb Connecticut Rutgers Florida Arizona State University California
City Of Miami Implementing Mask In Public Rule

Overnight America with Ryan Wrecker

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

City Of Miami Implementing Mask In Public Rule

"New York City is entering a new phase of its re opening with restaurants serving people outside an office workers back on the job but many states that have moved quickly to reopen are seeing big surges in corona virus cases CBS is Manuel Bojorquez says Florida and Texas are seeing a record number of infections this afternoon Miami became the latest city to weigh in on the issue we are going to be implementing a mask in public rule everyone will have to be wearing masks in public in Texas the number reached a record for an eleventh consecutive day but governor Greg Abbott does not anticipate a return to lockdown closing down Texas again will always be the last option former FDA commissioner Dr Scott Gottlieb and I think this week's going to really be a pivotal week for us to get a picture of where things are heading in states like Florida and Arizona and

New York City CBS Manuel Bojorquez Florida Miami Texas Greg Abbott Commissioner Dr Scott Gottlieb FDA Arizona
Former FDA head says some parts of U.S. could see 'exponential' rise in COVID-19

Squawk Pod

04:49 min | 3 months ago

Former FDA head says some parts of U.S. could see 'exponential' rise in COVID-19

"We begin with those new fears about the fall, and what the growing number of outbreaks could mean for the school year, Dr Scott Gottlieb the former head of the FDA now, a CNBC contributor raising those concerns tonight, and he is with us once again Dr. Gottlieb's good to be back with you tonight. These concerns come because of the rising number of cases. We're seeing in places like Florida and Texas. Right, I think we absolutely should make an attempt to open public schools in the fall, and we were headed in that direction I've been talking to a lot of school. District says starting to make plans for how to safely do that had a D. densify classrooms how to protect teachers had to keep students grouped into cohort CEO have large groups of students intermingling so that you can isolate students. In case, there is an introduction into the classroom of infection. Infection, but when you look at the southern states in the southeast right now you see these large outbreaks underway, and really some stay, sir, tipping into what we would fashion as epidemic. It's going to be very hard to open public schools against this backdrop so i. think a lot of the focus right now of our discussion is on maintaining the economy keeping businesses open, and we seem to have come to the resolution that we can maintain business and. And keep businesses open even against the backdrop of a lot of infection right now the infection that we have but the decision open schools is a much different decision, and the threshold is much lower and I fear that if we continue to have this persistent level infection that we're seeing in the south and the southeast right now it's going to be very hard for local school. Districts make decisions to open, and if we can't open schools in the. The fall that's going to encumber our ability to really get back to robust economic activity, because payers don't go back to work until their kids go back to school. This is coming as we're seeing infections in places like Florida effect, younger people, and the fact of the matter is Dr Gottlieb. We don't really know the effects of the corona virus on the youngest. Do we because they were pulled out of school and they were kept largely at home. That's right and hospitalization rates are going up across the board, but more twenty and thirty and forty year olds are now finding their way into the hospital. Because infection rates are rising in that community, and that suggest two things number one to suggest that there's probably a lot of twenty and thirty year olds who have grown ivars 'cause we know a much smaller percentage of them are likely to get sick enough to require hospitalization, but would also starts to tell us that they are getting sick enough to require hospitalization I think that there was previously a. A belief that you know if you were twenty or thirty somewhat impervious to this now we see rising hospitalization rates among that age quarter cohort, as far as younger kids are concerned with in every country. This became epidemic. The first thing that those nations did was close the schools and we don't have good data on this, but it's probably the case that parents with school age children here more strictly to the stay at home, mortars in the social distancing so young kids were largely kept in isolation away from situations where they would have contracted the virus. If only because schools were closed very early in the setting of these epidemic, so we really haven't seen the infection. Have the opportunity to infect that community to infect young children, because they were protected from the virus in same way that older people now are protecting some virus in a much lower rate of infection is occurring among older individuals in the country, and so we don't really know how this virus is going to behave. Once it gets into different cohorts that have been largely unaffected to date. If, you were advising the governors of Texas and Florida tonight. Dr Gottlieb what would your advice be about dealing with this epidemic right now? Well they're really at a critical point right now because you don't know where they are in the scope of their community spreading their epidemic baker very easily tip over into what we call exponential growth where the cases start going up very rapidly, and this becomes much more deep seated into community. There are signs that that may be happening already and so what they need to do right now. First of all universal masking is the simplest thing we can do. It's effective. Effective it's not wildly effective, but it's really the simplest thing we can do. That's not intrusive. Shorter closing businesses. The other thing you need to do is very good testing and tracing to find out what are the sources of spread. There seems to be some indictment right now of the bars in Texas and Florida, but we don't have really good evidence at the bars of the sources spread. We think they are because we know they're indoor. Congress settings are high risk. Risk Settings and they're not adhering to social distancing rules that are in place in those states right now, so there's a belief that those are the sources spread, but we don't know that there might be other things causing the spread at the community level that we need to identify, and that's what good tracing comes into play Texas and Florida, having invested in the tracking and tracing if you look at an early of the fifty states, and who's doing a really good. Good Job Texas and Florida aren't the worst, but they're certainly not the best, and there's certainly below fifty. The median level in terms of the number of tracers number public health workers. They have doing this tracking and

Florida Dr Scott Gottlieb Dr. Gottlieb Texas Cnbc FDA CEO Congress
Gottlieb warns of "exponential growth" in COVID cases in some states

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

Gottlieb warns of "exponential growth" in COVID cases in some states

"New concerns tonight as more states brake coronavirus daily case records as the country reopens former FDA commissioner Dr Scott Gottlieb is sounding the alarm the worry is that they're going to tip over into exponential growth coming this week and the challenge with exponential growth is everything looks okay until suddenly it doesn't infections in twenty one states are trending up with at least ten states this past week breaking seven day averages of new

Dr Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner
Trump Rally Called 'Dangerous Move' in Age of Coronavirus

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Trump Rally Called 'Dangerous Move' in Age of Coronavirus

"And president trump is expected to hold his first rally since the outbreak on CBS's face the nation former FDA commissioner Dr Scott Gottlieb says protests and rallies will definitely cause more cases we know these large gatherings gonna lead to more spread on the spontaneous protests around the country then leads to additional spread certainly holding a large political rally will as well that's an indoor space it's a confined space and so we need to be mindful of this I mean there's things you can do to reduce the rescue car choir people to wear masks trump supporters who attend his first rally must sign waivers agreeing not to sue and the contract over nineteen the president is set to hold its first rally next week at the bok center in Tulsa Oklahoma the arena seats about nineteen thousand

Donald Trump CBS Commissioner Dr Scott Gottlieb President Trump Bok Center Oklahoma FDA Tulsa
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:55 min | 3 months ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Infection in these gatherings Scott Gottlieb on CBS's face the nation there are more than four hundred thousand corona virus related deaths worldwide and almost seven billion confirmed cases tropical storm Cristobal making landfall today on Louisiana's coast storm packing high winds and spinning dangerous weather as far east as northern Florida the storm center moving to shore Sunday afternoon between the Mississippi River and grand dial America is listening to fox news are the two nine six three six two seven six six and I needed to hear for intelligent design plumbing in there we believe the universe declares the glory of an intelligent designer did you know the amount of information in the human body's DNA is equal to eight billion letters in just one cell and we have a hundred trillion cells but those are just random letters that's equal to eight thousand books of code organized in just the right way for the world's most powerful supercomputer every person's coating is unique just like fingerprints manifold air conditioners were designed that well yeah I wish the study showed that ninety percent of Arizona systems are put in with some type of energy wasting cover robin problem that's not some intelligent design right there exactly hot and cold pockets lots of dust and high electric bills are usually the result of improper installation but intelligent design we can fix those problems yes we can summer is around the corner we're running a spring tune up special C. can have cool crisp clean air all summer long published now and make your home feel like heaven eight eight eight eight seven eight seven and online at I. design AC dot com president trump being criticized lately by some well known Republicans including former president George W. bush and two former secretaries of state Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice I would ask the president to first and foremost speak in the language of unity the language.

Scott Gottlieb CBS Louisiana Florida America trump president Colin Powell Mississippi River Arizona robin George W. bush Condoleezza Rice
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

16:34 min | 4 months ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"To reflect on what our world will look like after covid nineteen this week former. Fda Commissioner Scott Gottlieb on the future of pandemics public health and their effects on the economy. Let's go to another audience question. I'll read it out for you. And we can go from there. And president trump is threatened to withdraw the United States from the WHO the World Health Organization is your position so Scott. What's your view on the? Who there's been a pretty strong debate about whether they were as neutral as they should have been vis-a-vis China and whether they were a slow off the bat here to declare global pandemic and touring the five alarm bell. That states around the world needed to get a headstart on preparations to try to reduce the effects of covid nineteen. I think the WHO here was far less effective than it could have been and should have been. I think it was less effective in the setting of the Ebola outbreak in western Africa than it could have been should have been and demonstrated the shortcomings of the W. H. O. I think they were too late to really speak with a clear voice about what was going on. In China this the scope the risks to press China to make more information available. So I I think it's an organization where we have to do a lot of evaluation on how to make sure this doesn't happen again and make sure we have more functional World Health Body but I don't agree with you be defunding it and this is a wrong time to weaken you. Organization still further especially with the risk that covert is going to become now in the Southern Hemisphere. Allow those nations lack access to public health infrastructure? Neighbor rely more on the. Who you'd think about parts of Africa? Parts of South America and so weakening the WHO setting when this could become epidemic in southern hemisphere. This isn't the time to do it. I think we need to reexamine. Who after this public health emergency passes and do the best? We can right now to press them to do a better job in a setting of the current epidemic. But I think a lot of this should be done after this epidemics past try to really reform that organization. Thanks got a great questions from the audience. So let's let's keep going here on this monk dialogue with Scott Gottlieb the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration a board member of Pfizer the drug maker and someone who's really distinguished himself as one of the most astute and thoughtful commentators and analysts on the covid nineteen pandemic so this question. Scott is from Sheldon this week to companies announced results with respect to preliminary testing Vaccine do these milestones mean. The chances of developing a vaccine have gone up or just that testing can continue and Scott. It's interesting maybe we can talk a little bit about one of your other hats the aware which is an analyst on CNBC. We've seen some very big market reactions to the Gilead Therapeutic. And now the Madonna vaccine a very preliminary study. I guess or test that they conducted in both instances very small samples. You could say that these are not even the first inning. It's maybe the first batter at bat in the first inning yet. This huge reaction response that. Do you think the two things are commensurate? Should we be as optimistic about talk about Madonna result past week? Well look I think it's encouraging I. I wouldn't necessarily say that we should be tremendously optimistic about any one of these vaccines but I think that what we see now is a number of early sets released about different vaccines that demonstrates that it should be possible to develop a vaccine against coronavirus. I think that's the real takeaway here we've now seen a number of different vaccine constructs some very novel constructs in case in return in. Marta contract which we haven't used before develop a licensed vaccine visors taking the same approach. We've seen a number of these constructs be able to in both animal models as well as now people induce the production of antibodies that should provide some level of protective immunity. And so that is statement. We couldn't make six weeks ago or two months ago. And so that's why. I think we should be more encouraged with respect to the Madeira data in particular. It's early. It was only forty five patients in all forty five. The data shows that the different vaccines that they use have three different doses of two hundred and fifty gram doses hundred microgram dose and twenty five granddaughters but in all three doses they able to generate the production of antibodies and people were what we call binding antibodies me. They bound the virus. What we don't know is where they neutralizing antibodies. Did they bind the virus and destroy the virus testing for neutralizing? Antibodies takes longer. Because you have to expose the antibodies to the virus in a special lab. It'd be a cell three lab a secure lab because this is now a special pathogen needs to be dealt with carefully. They only looked for the first eight patients on whether or not the vaccine was generating neutralizing antibodies. In fact it was in those eight patients and so I think a lot of people assumed well if it worked in the first eight patients. It's probably likely to work. In some proportion of the next thirty seven we don't know all neutralizing antibodies same. We don't know what level of protection is going to afford but we infer that. Oh probably afford some level of protection these these vaccines any of them probably aren't going to provide protection like we think of smallpox vaccine or measles vaccine where you're vaccinated and you can't get infected. Would this is probably GonNa be more like the flu vaccine? You can get infected. But it's going to reduce the severity of the infection and limit your ability to get Cova the disease. What about Scott. Are you concerned that the DNA sequences that were using now for a lot of this vaccine research is going on right now or primarily those that came out of the initial clusters on in Europe and viruses do mutate? Is there a risk here that we create a a series of vaccines that are based on kind of Kovin? One point zero and we move onto Cova two point zero and three point zero and four point. It's unlikely in a short period of time. So all mutate this virus mutating just because it's mutating doesn't mean that it's getting more dangerous or less dangerous more contagious less than pages. Or that's going to obviate technology. So we've looked at a lot of sequencing data now with this vaccine eylau this work comes lavish Trevor Bedford in the Hutch in Washington State. And what we see is the viruses undergoing drift but the part of the viruses genetic material that codes for the protein on its surface. That is the target of our vaccines particularly this spike protein. Which is the protein. The virus uses to invade ourselves the genetic material that codes that spike protein isn't undergoing as much change and it changes at. Its undergoing aren't changing that spike protein in a way that it should evade our antibodies to it and so it's undergoing drift and so we have a vaccine we might want to reformulate the vaccine every two or three years to get it more precise to what the current composition of spike protein is. But it's unlikely to be the case that we see such rapid mutations in the engines the things on the surface of the coat of the vaccine we target without antibodies that we do with the flu vaccine or with influenza. Where in a single season influenza? Sometimes we've seen undergoes so so many significant mutation so many significant changes obviates the vaccine for that season that that vaccines no longer effective. We're unlikely to see interest seasonal mutations happened so rapidly that this would operate a vaccine. But I think it's probably the case that when we do hopefully get a safe and effective vaccine. We're GONNA WANNA reformulate it on some semi regular basis to get it more precisely aligned with what the current predominance sequences for the parts that code for the region. The vaccines is targeting fascinating stuff. Scott do we know one hundred percent that this virus was not genetically engineered in a lab. I think we feel pretty confident that this virus wasn't manipulated and certainly wasn't like a bio weapon that was deliberately released and engineered and released to Epidemic causing an outbreak. I think there are still some question is we know there was a lab will Han. That was a high security lab. We know they were doing. Experiments with Corona viruses have been isolated from bats other species. We also know that lab didn't have good procedures and well before this well before this episode. You can go back two years ago. There was articles in science magazine. Some of the leading academic journals calling into question the safety procedures in that lab saying that they didn't have good controls in place the special pathogens and calling into question whether they should have been allowed to handle the pathogens. They were handling so I think there's some doubt in people's minds is. Could this have been an accident? Could it have been a lab accident? Where patient zero if you will wasn't someone who came into contact with an animal in sort of inadvertent way but someone who was doing an experiment and accidentally infected themselves maybe became as symptomatic didn't know they had the infection went out and became patient zero and spread it. We might never have an answer to that question. We're going to have to look at the store strain to some of the original infections to really get a sense of that and have much more information about what was going on in that lab and look at some of the strange that they were working with and we might never get that information. I mean it doesn't seem like China's making a lot of that available so I think liveliest theories in doubts gonNA persist maybe perpetuity. But when you sort of hear about people saying well Clinton's have been elaborate could have been something deliver. I think most reasonable people are saying. It's not something that was deliberate net someone releases deliberately by could have been a lab accident and I don't know that we can fully discharge that possibility. It's less likely I mean I think we think it's the less likely scenario may be far less likely scenario. But I don't think we can fully discharge it. Then I guess. Part of this dialogue is thinking about the future. How do we get controls internationally? In place to ensure that countries that maybe are not at the standard of candidates the United States in terms of lab infrastructure lab technology. Don't advertently or inadvertently release another virus. I mean are you optimistic that we have the international consensus to do that? Well no I'm not. I mean this isn't the only lab where has been questions raised in the scientific community out procedures in certain labs. There's been questions about labs in the United States where there were concerns that they didn't have proper procedures in place so we need strong international bodies to overseeing this we have them the World Health Organization. I think that they're not functioning as stringently or aggressively. They could be or should be and we allow certain countries to hold certain special pathogens. Who probably need to reexamine that and make sure that there is a better set of universal procedures in place for ensuring lab safety for the labs that are going to handle. The most dangerous pathogens now is going to be a lot of people who don't want to use this episode as he sort of rallying cry for that. Because there's a lot of people still pushing back on the notion that this could ever have been lab mistake. Miss had to have just been sort of a natural occurrence that this virus jump species went from a bad or another animal into humans. Probably that's the case. But you know. I think we're never going to fully discharge that doubt and I think we should reexamine Lab Safety more generally. It's an important call to be making. Okay let's get some more questions. This has been a great discussion digging in a lot of issues. That were certainly top of mind for me and for you. The Viewing Audience Mark. Warren is asking. How important is a national testing strategy for the United States? And why is it so hard for us to mobilize strategy and Scott can ask the same thing here in Canada? The scaling up of testing has been a persistent challenge. And I would say baby doubly so the scaling up of any large scale contact tracing system whereas Scott you know this better than most you look at countries like Taiwan South Korea China. Frankly they seem light years ahead on on both fronts. I think the reality is that allow these tasks gut are going to be largely. Left to states is certain things. The federal government can do to support these activities. But they're going to be largely left to states. Some states are doing a better job than others at getting in places infrastructure. I think getting into the fall least in the United States. The challenge isn't necessarily going to be on the back end the platforms running tests. Which was a challenge. This go around. We just didn't have enough labs in PC are based machines to run the tests. Scale that up. We've gotten a scaled up dramatically now running about four hundred thousand tests a day but initially running about ten thousand test a week and so has been scaled up dramatically in a very short period of time..

Commissioner Scott Gottlieb United States flu vaccine China Food and Drug Administration Southern Hemisphere Epidemic World Health Organization Africa Ebola South America president federal government Europe trump W. H. O.
Dow Falls 400 Points As Questions Are Raised Over Moderna’s Coronavirus Vaccine

Squawk Pod

04:03 min | 4 months ago

Dow Falls 400 Points As Questions Are Raised Over Moderna’s Coronavirus Vaccine

"Questions tonight about Madonna's vaccine sent stocks lower. But there are new signs tonight. The country is getting back to business BALDO session for Stocks Today. Stocks lose ground early to research how this as yesterday star becomes today's goat shares of Maduna tanking. Why is it that the federal government should be the source of this money? Plus IS AMERICA TURNING AGAINST OUR CITIES AS MORE COMPANIES? Allow working from home. What's the downside this? Cnbc special report markets in turmoil starts right now. Here's Scott Wapner. Welcome good to have you with us on this Tuesday night. After a late day SELLOFF. Let's get your first look at futures tonight. It was a sudden sell-off late in the day right now though. We are green across the board quite early as you know. Stock closing at their lowest following report by our partners at got news raising questions about trial results. From dern his vaccine candidate the Dow and S&P five hundred both falling more than one percent the headline from Staten News. That shook the markets today vaccine experts say modern. It didn't produce data critical to assessing Kobe. Nineteen vaccine for more on that report from Stat News. It did move the stock market. We are joined once again tonight by Dr Scott Gottlieb a CNBC contributor of course the former head of the FDA. Dr Gottlieb's good to see you again. What is your reaction to this news in this late day? Report from Stat. Well look I think. The report raised the reasonable questions. But I think the news is what it was which is the data from earners encouraging. There's now data. From multiple different vaccine development programs both preclinical and some clinical data suggesting that it's possible to develop vaccine constructs that produce genetically mean produce antibodies that could potentially be neutralizing against the virus and could afford some level of protection. But the data's very early we don't know what the title levels were for this vaccine for the antibodies produce so we don't know the magnitude the antibody production. We don't know whether or not all the antibodies were neutralizing. So that means whether or not they would actually target the virus and eliminate the virus. So there's a lot we don't know but the data was encouraging but it was early dated. I'm there's still a lot of work to be done including finding the right dose of that vaccine that could be taken into later stage trials and so you know I think the stat article raised all the reasonable questions. That was still out there yesterday as well but I think the totality of the data that we have around different vaccine contracts should give us increasing confidence that at some point in the future and perhaps in the near future going into the fall we should be able to develop experimental vaccines that will deliver some level of immunity against this virus. Some are asking the question tonight. Dr Gotlib whether this data should have been released at all by Madonna. And how would you answer that? Well look I'm not sure why they released. The data set the way they did and I suspect they felt compelled to release after there was some discussion of the data on Friday. Or perhaps of this data there was some discussion about data from an early trial on Friday. At a press conference that was held and if that was representing them returning data they may have felt compelled to release Monday morning but perhaps if they You know we had the opportunity to. They would have waited a little longer until they had data on all of the forty five patients. Whether or not they were producing neutralizing antibodies as well as quantitative data on the level of antibody production so they qualified the data to describe the level of antibody production that they saw the trial but they didn't quantify it and you would have wanted to see the quantity of the antibodies that were being produced really to have an accurate picture of just how robust the immune response was to this virus. I suspect that they didn't have a complete data set. They said at the time they disclosed that they only had data on the neutralizing antibodies. I eight patients so only had data on whether or not the antibodies are actually targeting limiting the virus on eight of the forty five patients for the patients. We know that they developed what we call binding antibodies. Anybody's abound the virus. But we don't know they eliminate the virus

Stat News Dr Scott Gottlieb Cnbc Federal Government Madonna Scott Wapner Kobe America Dr Gotlib Staten News FDA
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

12:03 min | 5 months ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Editors

"And it doesn't seem like an enormous difference. I think you know the the lockdown California's started a couple of days earlier than that in New York. Wh- what accounts for the disparity between this those two places in your view. Well they were late. They'll probably about a week behind California in terms of the actions that they took and a certain things that they didn't do that. Enclose subway system to blase was very reluctant to close the school system. I think relative to the country though they took pretty aggressive action When they did Sampson's go really lead on on the stay at home order anything when they did that. People were shocked by that people. Who weren't really cognizant of what was coming and in. New York did a number of days later not I think about four five days later. Maybe they announced Day or two later. I think what happened in New York. Probably if you look at Seattle Seattle's probably a better example. Seattle had a a large outbreak very clearly early. The first city really to be identified as having a large outbreak. They they were Very resistant to take any kind of medication steps. And we're getting a lot of criticism Fort They didn't close businesses. They didn't shut their transit. Date didn't require state homeowners And that was well before when we knew that there was even a community spreads. Cisco but what happened in Seattle probably and we know this now from Asia looking at the sequences of the strains in different people is Seattle. Probably had a single introduction sometime before the The travel restrictions will put in place from a traveler from China. 'cause you can sequence strain in now see where it's from any sequence strange of the other people and see where it's from. It's it seems to be the same strain. One large cluster eighty five percent of the infection. Seattle seems to be from one large cluster in the rest. Are you know travelers from Europe and elsewhere? So when that cluster hit? Let's say a thousand cases or fifteen hundred cases and it was expanding a star to throw off sparks. Sparks lit fires became visible the nursing. Home the young man who had the flu flu like symptoms and ended up being cost-wise all those early cases where sparks thrown off from that initial fire would probably happen in New York. Is New York? Some point in February didn't have a single introduction that ended up being a spark that litter flame it ended up it had probably dozens and dozens of simultaneous introductions. All the same time that all became sparks that lit separate fires and when all those fires hit five hundred cases six hundred cases then it became self evident across the entire city. By that time it was so heavily seated there was so many clusters expanding that it was too late. We don't know this for sure. But we're GONNA know this eventually by looking sequencing data that these probably our separate clusters. Seattle probably caught a break. In a way in that there they had one expanding cluster of managed to see that one expanding cluster they took interventions too late but they interventions early enough to deal with one large cluster versus other cities in the mid multiple clusters. Right so last thing on on this portion of our conversation you mentioned China. So what is your view? Obviously China's coming in with the for Getting beaten around the head and shoulders by a lot of folks especially folks on the right If China had been more honest and more transparent at the outset how much of a difference would have made In the spread of this disease or is just the nature of this disease That that was bounded to get out. Get loose around the world. One way or the other Look very critical of China's behavior in this before it became fashionable to criticize China's behavior analysis was over a period of time when everyone was bending over backwards to laud China seem to forget. That actually happened both. Us and international officials were saying congratulatory things about China's behavior. You think waking the president even president trump what was going on In the HELL secretary others. I think what was going on in the beginning was China is not being forthcoming with information. That could have helped us prepare so just a the most visible example is. They didn't make the virus available to anyone so in order to develop a diagnostic test. You need what's called a positive control you need. You need the virus itself. You could try to synthesize it. But that's never as good you want to live virus. China would give it to anyone they held onto it. They pub sure they publish the sequenced strain. But they didn't make the live virus available. The United States eventually got the live virus but they got two weeks later than they otherwise could have that delayed development of diagnostics I think the bigger the bigger infraction here and the one that's going to be judged against their their role in humanity and what they did to the world because his viruses changed the course of history. This has altered the world. This is not going away. This is GonNa permanently change how we live until we get to a vaccine. I mean the the gravity of what does virus is going to mean. Society for the next two years cannot be overstated. My view and this is a consequence of something that came out of China. And it's not just an accident. I mean they set up the conditions to create this risk. They knew they. They knew they had the conditions to create this kind of risk with these markets in the way they handled live animals. But but even more worrisome than that is you could make now a reasonable argument looking at just the little that we know that had China been more aggressive sometime in November and certainly in December in terms of trying to contain the spread of this Taking the kinds of aggressive steps that ultimately took in January in December and been more forthcoming with what was going on because they would have had to be forthcoming. 'cause it would've been very visible that they had a An issue of concern then they might have been able to fully contain this this this potentially if they would have locked down that city or or quarantine people when they knew they had a very unusual flu. Circular pneumonia circulating. I couldn't figure out what it was. And that was in December. That wasn't in January when they when they revealed to the World January twentieth at Fourteen Health. Care workers were infected and in fact the spread human-to-human. Now you look at the studies at the Chinese are putting out there. Putting out their own studies of clusters that they were monitoring that go all the way back into December. So they were. They were concerned about this monitoring clusters in December. They would have instituted steps then had been more forthcoming about what was happening then. this might have been an an entirely avoidable world event. I think people are going to be looking at that closely for years and years to come. And the and the basic impetus there likely was just the inclination of any government especially a dictatorship of that nature to not admit it has a problem. It's kind of the Noble Syndrome while it could be. It could be many things but I think in in this sort of broad buckets of how these things usually in fall one of two things either. They didn't recognize what was going on. They didn't know what they didn't know or they knew it and they thought that they could contain it with you know secret stance and this wasn't gonNA become problem. That's the best. That's the best of all worlds. You contained no one knows you had that hard to believe it i. I don't accept the the idea that they knew it was going to get this bad. And they Let spread I mean I think I think they either were very worried about it. A weren't worried enough but they certainly weren't forthcoming about it. They certainly weren't sharing information about it. If we had known all along what was happening and been alerted to it earlier we probably would have implemented some measures that we did. I mean the Travel restrictions at the president implemented. Did help keep this virus out? The Europeans unfortunately didn't do that in Europe became heavily seated. We actually became seated from Europe from China. Right right I had. They had been more forthcoming. The Europeans might have made some different decisions to. But if you think about the the sequence of this really wasn't until January twentieth I remember the date I remember the document. The China put out information at fourteen health. Care workers were infected. That was the first hard evidence that there was human-to-human transmission By that point China had no net for at least three weeks maybe for their own studies now and probably earlier than that. Because I don't know what their intelligence says I'm just looking at the clinical data. They're putting out and they put out. Clinical Data Studies in literature. That show that they. They had research in late December early January where they were following families to look at whether or not one person would infect the other family members and in fact. They had proven that they do so. That's evidence that the human human transmission in an agent make that available and they made that available early and made the full scope of the infections are underway available early. We might have taken different steps. Every country might have taken different steps so everything was delayed because of the China obvious Gatien so less than China. we'll get to some of the criticisms from the right of what we've been doing. So do you have any Rough guests of of how many people really died there did At all believe that three thousand is close to the real number tar detail. I mean I. I doubt that the China's The China's statistics are off by some order of magnitude You know it says. Seemed like they undercounted. Deaths early in the course of their epidemic but It does I do believe that China got control of the epidemic rule with measures that they took the reality is gonNA end up. The reality is we'RE GONNA end up under counting cases and probably unto counting deaths here as well. I think what's happening around the world in the setting of these epidemics is the systems of becoming overwhelmed. And it's hard to keep up with data. Okay so let. Let's talk about some other Chris of what we've done. I think very implicit late answered this one. But I'll put it to you anyway there One critique is look these public health experts. They're going to want to squeeze every last a case of this disease without considering the cost of the measures necessary to do that and president trump has made a mistake. He's he's fallen in with these white lab coat types who have Convinced him to undertake these lockdowns. That are as as trump is occasionally set himself Worse than the disease the The cost of what we're doing. This population base mitigation is enormous. We're going to be measuring these costs for many many years. Is Things happening? Now that we're not even aware of women not going for Prenatal Care. People not presenting with With strokes and heart attacks and scientists symptoms of cancer. We're GONNA get diagnosed late. Nasa come to just the direct public health costs it. Drinking increased. People are having issues staying at home and fighting with spouses So the implications of this just the direct public health implications are enormous. And it probably measurable. And we're GONNA be seeing seeing that for many many years to come the alternative. Is You have a pathogen ends. Probably you know this pathogen. At this point I think it's not debatable. I think people who try to debate the sort of violence and features of this pathogen. Just it's not credible disappoint. The pathogen is highly contagious. It infects eighty percent of the people get mild and moderate disease..

China Seattle New York president Sparks Europe California blase Sampson trump United States Fourteen Health Nasa Cisco pneumonia Asia Prenatal Care secretary
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

13:06 min | 5 months ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Editors

"What have South Korea and Germany gotten right on the krona virus? Have we overreacted? And what will normality or semi-normality? Look like we'll discuss all this and more on a special edition of the editors with Scott Gottlieb the former FDA commissioner now with the American Enterprise Institute. You're listening to a national view podcasts. You listen to this. Podcast VIEW DOT com. Or what have you? But it'd be easier for you and better for us if you made us part of your feet at any of the streaming services out there from spot fight. I tunes feel like what you hear. Please give us a glowing five star review on I tunes. If you don't like what you hear here forget. I said anything so Scott. Thanks so much for making time. And congratulations on all your really valuable work on this. I thought we do this. Conversation and three buckets. I I'd ask about some things. I'm just curious about mostly involving the various Responses from countries around the world and how China handled this second. Go into some of the critiques. From the right about how we've handled this and especially The argument that we've overreacted and three get into your work with your colleagues about how we responsibly. Open up again. So let's just dive right in and let me ask you this. If this virus had merged in one thousand nine hundred seventeen and nineteen eighteen and let's subtract world one pretend world war one didn't happen all the crowding and things of that nature But just have the same medical and scientific knowledge and conditions of that era. Would this virus have looked like I think given the profile? This virus is likely it would have been far more deadly than the Spanish flu. If you look at Look in comparison to Spanish flu viruses have bears some similarities in that the people who seem to be hardest hit by virus are people who are middle aged relative to normal seasonal fluid Spanish flu was that the young people will by and large spared. Old people were spared to But there were a lot of older people around nineteen eighteen and they would disperse differently demographically but the people who are hardest hit by the spent the middle aged people and it was often stories talking. About how the Spanish flu left kids orphan to be raised by their grandparents and what was happening with the Spanish flu was people were dying of. We think was an overwhelming inflammatory response. Immune reaction to the fluid south the fluids so novel that revved up people's immune systems and that that immune response actually destroyed people's lung tissue this seems to be very similar this is a lower airway disease affecting lower areas of lung and the people who are getting into trouble and getting what we call acute respiratory distress syndrome in the air type picture in the ICU. Ending up with prolonged innovations. What's happening? They're having an overwhelming immune response. They're developing what squad sidelined storm. It's basically a release of immune cells and those immune cells are attacking their own tissue and damaging their lungs. That's very Spanish flu like and if you look at the sort of overlay of deaths from Spanish flu verses intimations in ICU admissions from covert nineteen. There's unmistakable trend in terms of how the ages trend with the exception at for covert nineteen. There's a very large spike. When you get over the age of seventy five eighty and that we don't we can't full explain that other than to say that nineteen the warrant a lot of eighty euros now. There are is possible that the small number eight year olds who lived in nineteen eighteen. Maybe we're dispersed in the countryside outside the cities with Spanish flu hit and so they just didn't come into proximity with the Spanish flu. Maybe they would selected for because a you know were were had more ability to the pathogens unclear that's never been explained. But what is clear is that there's unmistakable trend as you move through the age bands of people died from the Spanish flu versus people who are admitted to the ICU. For Covert nineteen reason. Why that's I think relevant observation is at. I think it's reasonable to surmise. That anyone who soup who gets admitted to belonged Icu stay with covert nineteen ends up getting into bait ends up getting prolonged critical care. That's probably someone who would have died from the Spanish flu. And if you do accept that assumption or at least some amount of that suction if you say well. Some large proportion of people who are surviving covert nineteen or even surviving but ending up with prolonged Into Beijing in critical stays in critical care would have died from Spanish flu than Spanish Nineteen not only looks like Spanish flu in terms of distribution across the age range but looks far more fearsome. So let's talk about some of the responses around the world and the different outcomes so I remember one of your Bank tweets at the beginning of this. What four or five weeks ago is that? We've missed the opportunity to be on a South Korean curve because of the the initial testing debacle. But I just wonder that that South Korean example just how applicable it would have been in this country Involved such robust contact tracing in tracking people on their phones and things that even if we've been stronger out of the gate on testing would seem hard to do in this country. What would you think of that operation while the tracking on the phones? Were sort of a sideshow thing. I think a lot of people clinging to that to find reason to be skeptical of sort of traditional public health case Baynes tracking. We would never do that in this country Track people and see where they go and see if they come into contact with coke now is sort of a sideshow thing that South Korea did They did do contact tracing overall though they identified their cases efficiently. They had very broad diagnostic capabilities so they tested a lot of people identified those cases and they did do traditional contact tracing where they interview people who are positive found at all. The people were in touch with you. Know ask those people if they were sick required some selfies late. Who may be had signs of symptoms coca until they got back? Positive tests may be for people who are in closer contact they were were also requiring people self isolate until tests came back proving that they were negative so they did. They did that. Those are the traditional tools of public health. We do that here all the time. There's a measles outbreak outbreak of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis. We do those cards it tools. We also did that at the outset of covert nineteen in fact. We did more than that. We forcibly required people to quarantine on military bases when they're identified as having covered nineteen or or exposed to nineteen. We're even more aggressive in some ways. The challenge was that there ended up being so many cases in the. Us quickly overwhelmed our capacity to do that to do contact tracing and what we call case based interventions if we want to prevent another outbreak in the future or large epidemic. We're GONNA have to rely on these tools. We really don't have a choice. I mean you can either let this circulate. You could do three things they just let it circulate and then you're GonNa have an extreme amount of morbidity death and disease hostels be overwhelming to build more hospitals people probably as large subset of people are going to be afraid to go out. You can do what we're doing now. population-based base mitigation. But it's it's untenable to do this again to me we. We can't go through this again as a country or you can do those case based interventions very aggressively and try to find people who have the disease test very aggressively and when you find people ask them to self isolate for a period of time that they're infectious in five people. They might have been in contact with either treat them. Hopefully we'll have a drug that will be a prophylaxis you'll be all treat them or s themself isolate for the duration that they may have the disease. We're those are the only three options I mean. Is that really a good middle option with any of those strategies so we'll circle back on on. Xm obviously hits on your on your thinking about how we open back up the German example in Europe. It it does seem to be the the genuine exception in Europe. Lots of confirmed cases. Probably write a product of of lots of testing But then many fewer deaths than in places like Italy Spain the UK which lease at the outset. I haven't checked down in on a slightly ahead to do with apparently young people being disproportionately in fact infected but what accounts for Germany looking different than the rest of Europe. We don't know exactly. There's a number of things about Germany. That are a lot different first of all as you said. They case fatality relative cases. They turned over as far lower than us. Certainly but lower than other parts of the world is well. It's probably a function of a number of things. One day are diagnosing more than mild and moderate nascent cases in the community so there Denominator Looks Different Than Ours. Relative to the numerator. Many people are hospitalized. How many people Ultimately come to the infection they have many more mild and mater cases underneath that here in the US were by and large just diagnosing. People were presenting to the hospital. I would say on the whole. Were probably doing a worse. Job Than China did At diagnosing all our cases in several other criticism of China date not being believable. Our data's probably off by me even further because we have less community-based testing in Chinese at this point you can you can sort of surmise. Just by the fact that we don't have community based testing sites that up And certainly less than South Korean Singapore Hong Kong where they had a lot of community based testing site. Set up the other thing. Is that when you look? At a comparison of the percent of deaths blessed in sixty five years old versus percents deaths over the age of eighty At your in Germany. It's it's four point. Nine percent of all their deaths from covert are less than the age of sixty five Sixty one percent or by the age of eighty give you some other examples in elite nine percent of all their deaths. Covert deaths are less than the age of sixty five Netherlands is five point one percent in Portugal. Four point five percent in Spain is four point. Six percent in Sweden four point eight percent switch learns three percent so pretty consistently around five percent. Say of all those countries of the deaths overall about five percent or less than the age of sixty five of all their debts in the US by comparison Louisiana. It's twenty three percent Michigan Detroit's twenty one percent In New York City. It's twenty nine point nine percent so startling as that's under underlying health conditions we don't know Is the short answer. The long answer is there seems to be a correlation With a poverty and death if if you overlay the map of where the death star in those cities in the United States there Areas of extreme poverty. And so you can surmise that. It's socioeconomic factors like crowding in in housing with people can't socially distance probably co Morbid illness because his higher incidences of Diabetes Smoking related illness in those communities so is probably multifactorial but like a lot of other infectious diseases. Mrs True Infectious they often become diseases of poverty in disproportionally affect people of lower socioeconomic groups for a whole variety of reasons. Another reason is that in a lot of people lower income people who can't can't miss work but there were also they work in jobs where they come into contact people think about someone on checkout line. Grocery store That person's coming into contact with a lot of people on a daily basis increasing debt. Paternity that they get sick so moving here to the US. what your view has been the the difference or parent difference now comes in. California in New York. San Francisco is initial hotspot and the New York Times Article Day or two ago along piece on. Why New York was was late and both Cuomo's got. I've gotten a lot of praise and de Blasio not so much Both both were late to this compared to California. But you look at the timeline. And it doesn't seem like an enormous difference. I think you know the the lockdown California's started a couple of days earlier than that in New York. Wh- what accounts.

Germany United States South Korea New York City China Europe California Scott Gottlieb FDA American Enterprise Institute Icu commissioner multi-drug-resistant tuberculo Beijing New York Times Diabetes respiratory distress
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

09:03 min | 6 months ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Is exciting. And I think you'll see that over the next days. Money getting into the hands of the small businesses Robert. We're out of time so I need a quick answer. But what is the biggest concern from the banks? They are the ones fronting the money. They just want to make sure that they're going to get paid back and not get blamed for. Thanks God no well certainly. There is a liability provisions. We WanNa make sure they are not blame for doing exactly. What the government's doing we're also around there. Kyc issues were working on that as well. But I will say the. Sba Treasury throughout the entire weekend did a very good job answering all of these questions many of these questions so we can get this money quickly into the marketplace. That is the goal of the banks. They're doing everything they can to help their customers and clients right now and so again. Lots of progress is being made. We have more to do. But this program is ramping up considerably Becky Literally as we speak. Hi Right Rob. Thank you for your time. Rob Nichols next. Scott Grub hubs CEO Matt Maloney on supporting businesses through this crisis. If we can help restaurants get through the next few weeks or months depending on how bad this is they will come back. We'll be right back. This is quite apart. Here's Andrew Ross. Sorkin with news about takeout during the corona virus shutdown talk about squawk box grub her but announcing it will donate thirty million dollars of its own capital two hundred thousand restaurants to help them during this time of crisis. That's about two hundred fifty dollars to each restaurant joining us right now. Talk about his Matt Maloney. Ceo of GRUB. Good morning to you matt. How much of a difference is this very moment? Two hundred fifty dollars to restaurant. GonNa make doesn't sound like a lot but it's GonNa be it's GonNa be a huge different. We're looking at different sort of looking at it. Like a a stimulus. Almost because the way we're rolling it out is a consumer gets ten dollars that they spend thirty dollars so are thirty. Million dollars is going to transform into over one hundred million dollars of food sales to restaurants across the country so that that's a big slug when everyone's working really hard to try to put money in the hands of small businesses. What what percentage of restaurants are still online and on board right now and what percent are often even shift that or change that or do you think once you're off your off We're trying really hard so it depends on the market what we saw as an early. Kovic West Coast markets you. You'd see a dramatic dip in restaurants. Went off the platform and they're now starting to come back on. You have New York a Detroit that are in the throes of the crisis right now inside your there there. Peaking at about thirty percent of the restaurants are off but remember you're having thousands and thousands of restaurants coming on the platform for the first time. So we're we're seen about the same number in terms net but it's just a transition and what's the experience trying to on board or even keep a keep your delivery people working right now it's incredible You hear everyone. Has these crisis stories. Our teams are working around the clock. we tripled our most on boarding a month. Ever of restaurants had fifteen thousand restaurants. Go live in March. We're probably going to do more in April. It's just an incredible intensity of need right now for restaurants and so we're we're doing everything we can to help them and with drivers we lost contact a contact free pickup up or drop off and we just launched last week con curbside pickup for the drivers to make sure those two layers of protection and no contact to make sure we help a mad. I gotTa tell a bit of a tough question because I was looking online and people talk to you about it. There were some some drivers and is not just true of Grub but across the board who were saying. You know what? I actually don't make enough money doing this full time. I'm actually better on unemployment insurance right now. Given what's taking place you know. There's plenty of work on GRUB. I know there's lots of work on other delivery platforms as well. We have our own our own stimulus for drivers if they get impacted directly by Kobe were were paying them. I know other platforms are and of course the cares. Actress came through with a lot of relief of forgive workers also so I think that everyone right now is all hands on deck trying to help the restaurants that drivers everyone impacted do this Economic and health care crisis and I just think a little longer term out for for all of us. Because I think we're all trying to understand what the expectations are. I'm curious inside the meetings that you're having when you look at the other side of this and the other side may be a month or two if depending on where you think about how you think about this. There's other people who think that this is going to be a terrible restructuring bankruptcy situation that goes on for months and months if not a year where are you on that in terms of what happens to the restaurant industry. While that's been I am hoping for the best I think at the fundamental economics of our of our society are still intact at the. There is a lot of demand right now to restaurants if we can help restaurants get through the next few weeks or months depending on how bad as they will come back. They will be there for our communities if they can't Than than that. It's going to be a real problem But as what? We're seeing right now. It wants the crisis bottoms out in the market. It does Growth does start to come back in that local area but we're seeing is is crises around the country in different markets at different times. And so we're trying to dynamically manage that situation on the ground. Okay Matt. We wish you lots of luck Stay healthy and safe out. There appreciate you joining us as always talk against him. More squad pod after this faith during a pandemic you're listening to squawk hot from CNBC. Here's Becky quick. Credit virus pandemic obviously causing economic and humanitarian crisis. That's being felt on an emotional level across our families and workplaces. So we're going to do something a little bit different right now and talk about the mental and spiritual impact of what? We're all going through right now. Joining us right that right now for that is Father Jim. Martin he's Jesuit priests the author and editor at large of America magazine and Father Jim thanks for being with us. Today it's good talking. You're my pleasure. We talk all the time about. How THE CORONA VIRUS? How this is a war against the krona virus in you also hear that. There are no atheists in foxholes. Do you think that people are seeing? A real resurgence in spirituality as a result while I think people are looking to spirituality for answers But by the same token I think it's really challenging a lot of people's religious beliefs. You know people are asking. How can God let this happen? So I think it's it's kind of both ends situation. Spiritually what do you hear from people? Are there more and more people who are seeking counsel from you There are. It's it's mainly a sadness at this point in the in the disease. There's also a lot of panic too and so what I try to remind people as that panic is not coming from God. You know feelings of hope and calm and peace are. It's okay to be concerned of course but I think panic and terror are counterproductive in holy week right now for for Catholics and Christians and Passover for for Jews is coming up and in this time when people probably need it most she find that places of worship are closed. Because of all of the social distancing rules that we've gone through you've got some pretty interesting ideas and advice that you're giving people for lent you say instead of giving up something this year that there's something else they can do. What is that? Well I think right. Now it's being kind and Frankly one of the ways being kind addition to doing a good things for your neighbors as to you know practice social distancing and and stay home and and not give other people the disease I mean. I think that's one of the most generous things you can do. Which is to take those precautions to prevent infecting other people? What's What other advice would you give people right now? Who are struggling whether that just be with the fear of what's going on out there if they've lost their job if they have a loved one who's sick or a loved one that they've lost because of this. What are you telling people? Well it depends if they're religious or not religious. It's looking for deeper meaning and remembering that God is with you You know through small. Love that people Show you I think that you know one of the things I'm telling people holy week is that you know. We can see God's love and the way that Jesus offered himself for people on Good Friday in the way that doctors and nurses and healthcare workers are kinda putting their bodies on the line for people. It's very defeat that generosity is one way of God loving us. Jim Want to thank you for your time today. We realize this is a little bit different but we also realize people have all sorts of different questions because of what's been happening with all of this again our time today. Thank you thank you. It's good talking to you and that Squawk pod for today. Thank you for listening. Squawk boxes hosted by Joe Kernan Becky. Quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin tune in weekday mornings on CNBC at six am eastern to get the smartest takes and analysis from our TV. Show right into your ears. Subscribe to squad. Wherever you get your podcasts. We'll meet back here tomorrow..

Matt Maloney Andrew Ross Sorkin Joe Kernan Becky Ceo Father Jim Scott Grub Rob Nichols Robert CNBC Sba Treasury Andrew Ross Jesus Jim Want West Coast New York
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Just search for politico Halse check, he should also check the show notes where we linked to stories previous episodes with Commissioner God lead and other items that we reference. During the conversation. And now, let's get to that conversation with Commissioner. Scott Gottlieb Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. Welcome back to politico. Pulse. Check. Thanks for having me. We weren't expecting you back. So soon the secret to cut the line is just to announce it your resigning it worked here. You are one of your colleagues. I was asking around trying to figure out what what to ask you today. One of your colleagues said I should ask if you don't love America anymore. If that's why you're leaving the FDA feel free to weigh in on that sometimes, you know, sometimes a pipe just a pipe. And you know, the reason I'm leaving the reason I gave this got really difficult commuting from Connecticut and being away from my family, basically for two straight years. So my kids on Saturday, but you know, it'd be home late Friday night. And I'd be back in Washington Sunday and mostly working all day Sunday. So two years of that with with three young kids got hard reporters. Like me, my colleague, Sara Carl Smith's are over m-. All others have been. Trying to figure out the reasons behind your departure. Do you understand why that has been such a source of curiosity? I don't understand why has been source of curiosity. You know, obviously, I love this job. And I'm very unhappy leave it I would have liked to have done for longer. And it was a difficult decision in the week after I resigned motionless. It was very difficult. I was thinking whole week. What did I do was this right decision? But you know, I've been in two years, and I worked this job one hundred and fifty percent, I think that that was largely apparent to people on the outside. This was really a twenty four seven job. I I didn't work from home Fridays. I was home late Friday night again, which spent part of Saturday with my kids. Go out my wife, Saturday night and Sunday be back at work two straight years that difficult. I think in retrospect had had I do it over again. I would have moved my family down here at the outset. But I didn't speaking on behalf of journalists. I think one reason it is such a source of curiosity is there. It could be a reason that you're leaving that could be of interest to the American people, for instance, if you push too hard on tobacco, and that was an issue or if the White House had a different vision for the FDA that would seem to be of interest to well on the tobacco. I understand the proximity of when I announced on that Tuesday versus there was reports that I had been at the White House that Friday a briefing on tobacco meeting. But the reality is, you know, there was always going to be something immediately before I resigned and something coming up immediately after I resigned as always things happening here every week. I think with respect to the tobacco issue in particular. I would hope we put that to rest with the announcement made last week where not only did weed Vance a policy that we intended to. But you know, we got strong support the secretary put out a statement. I had a White House fact sheet issued the White House press secretary re tweeted some of the statements Kellyanne Conway over the weekend re tweeted some of these statements with respect to that that announcement you had to chief-of-staff, Mick Mulvaney and had. Domestic policy council. Joe Rogan both affirming that there was going to be steps taken to address a youth the youth addiction to to nicotine in e cigarettes and additional tobacco relation coming. So I think the strong statements and the administration which we would have had regardless. But I would think that's strong. That's strong statement from the administration, in fact that we got that policy out in time for him that we that we intended to would would put those rumors to rest vaping has been a major subject of of your tenure. It has been something you've weighed in on quite a bit. I don't want to spend too much time on it. But the Washington Times a conservative paper has an editorial today Wednesday morning saying that your resignation quote comes at just the right time..

Commissioner Scott Gottlieb White House Commissioner FDA Joe Rogan Washington Washington Times Sara Carl Smith Connecticut America Mick Mulvaney secretary nicotine Kellyanne Conway Vance press secretary two years fifty percent
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Our EMS to via should only be administered by healthcare provider in a certified medically supervised healthcare setting that really encompasses this this conversation. There was a big press release from the FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb that came out on November second when to via was officially approved. You can read it in full. It's very long statement trying to answer a lot of the concerns that people have voiced since this drug became marketable. And since people started to realize that this was probably going to potentially become approved by the FDA. So. So so here are the big concerns. We already have su- fennel on the market is of course, though, already available only through intravenous administration. So the argument here is that there are situations in with in which a patient might need immediate reduction of acute pain through something very very strong. And when I say, strong, how are they usually wording. These articles Sufen channel is ten times more powerful than Fenton hill. And it is I think what is it a thousand times? Or is it one hundred times? Steve do you remember more thousand thousand times? Yeah. More potent is the best better. That's a little more accurate at times more potent than morphine ten times more potent than fentanyl. No that doesn't mean necessarily that. If you take the same amount, you'll be a thousand times more like eft up. What it really means is that it takes much much less of the drug to have the same effect. So obviously, the potential for abuse of something like this is potentially enormous if it's not well, regulated so popular sites gives a little bit of background on the opioid quote unquote epidemic from one thousand nine hundred nine to twenty sixteen over six hundred thirty thousand people in the US have died from drug overdose and over half of those so more than three hundred fifteen thousand of those within that time span directly involved opioid medication. That's according to the CDC on average when calculated about one hundred fifteen Americans die every day for an opioid over. Us. So keep that in mind now, many of these people have prescription opioid drugs available to them many of these people are using opiates that they've purchased on the street. Bentonville can be abused on the street. And it is actively like there are many cases of people overdosing onto feno. This new drug again called the Suva, which is sub lingual form of Sufen fennel is a single tablet and the way that that tablet is administered is through a single use package. So it looks like it almost looks like a little needle. But instead of a needle a push administrating piece of classic that pops the little tablet underneath a person's tongue and the entire package is only loaded with one tablet, and so the idea here is that that should reduce the ability for abuse because you're not buying a bottle of pills at a time. You get a single dose in your administration, and we're not talking prescription that you.

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb drug overdose acute pain US Suva Fenton hill Sufen morphine fentanyl Bentonville Steve CDC
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"I've heard asked of your female colleagues how do you balance being a working dad with the job of being FDA Commissioner, it's very hard. I'm away from my family during the weekend. It's very hard so hard as part of the job is is the fact that I'm away from my family, and even when I'm home on weekends. You know, I spent one whole day working. So I don't think I'm balancing very, well, did you balance it better in some way? Given the demands of this job. It's hard these twenty four seven jobs, and I think I think, unfortunately, that's the only way to do these jobs. Well, there's going to be a new planned community next door to FDA. I saw you with the groundbreaking. I watch video of you with Maryland governor, Larry HOGAN, could you buy a home in that next community that community will be fully erected? I think in sometime like twenty twenty five. So I'm not making long-term plans out that far. Last question when I sat down with CMS administrator Andy Slavic at the time in two thousand sixteen I think it was the first episode of this podcast. He made a comment like I need to do something on drug pricing. If I don't the next guy who comes in the next person who comes in. We'll say what the heck was slab thinking, what is the thing that you need to accomplish that if the next FDA Commissioner comes in and it hasn't been done. You will feel like the work was unfinished. Well, look, I feel good about what we're doing our job in the pro drug pricing debate is to try to bring more product competition to the market. I feel like we're doing that successfully. In terms of the reforms will make making the generic drug side. I think there is there is not as much recognition as the obstacles that branded companies face bringing follow on innovation to the market and some of these these drugs targeting on medical needs. We you see companies maintaining monopolies for longer periods of time and sometimes in perpetuity for drugs targeting unmet, medical needs, and that lack of competition against branded drugs is maintaining higher prices for long appear. As of time we have data demonstrating this. Now, I'm gonna be publishing a study that we did our own analysis showing that when we look at a cohort or drugs from the early two thousands to the current cohort of drugs over five or ten year period is taking much longer to get the second and third to market drug to the market now than it did ten years ago, and there's reasons for that. And I think there's things we can do to address it. But if that if that trend continues, and if you see venture capitalists and companies pulling out of the market, if they don't think that they can be first to market we're going to have significant challenges going forward, keeping these drugs affordable. The other thing that I'm going to be focused on in two thousand nineteen is looking at ways to try to improve the overall economics of generic drug development. I think that that industry is facing some pressures a lot of more commercial pressures that we can't affect. But I think some of them are regulatory. I think the multiple cycles of review are very costly to the industry. I think there's things we can do to make it less expensive and more efficient to file generic applications and get more generic companies into the space. See more competition, and we're going to be very focused on some of those reforms also making high value opportunities available to share companies that means you know, what we can do in biosimilars what we can do on drugs that have Rhames associated with them. What we can do in hard to formulate drugs to make it easier to genera size those drugs. Well, that's a lot of stuff to finish. No wonder you're working sixty's a week. Really could be working seven. But we will let you get back to your work. Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. Thank you for joining politico. Bolster thanks for having me. That's it for pulse. Check this week. My thanks to Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb and his team for making time and space for this interview. And my colleagues are over mall for making her long way to debut on politico. Pulse. Check as always

Commissioner FDA politico Scott Gottlieb Andy Slavic Maryland Larry HOGAN administrator biosimilars ten years ten year
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"The bottom line is that if we are creating a whole pool of kids addicted to nicotine through e cigarettes some proportion than we're gonna become long-term uses of combustible tobacco that otherwise might never have initiate tobacco and all the great gains that we've made in his country, reducing smoking rates. And you saw the data that came out today showing smoking rates continue to come down and also stigmatizing smoking among young people. So that we're reducing the pool of future smokers all of that will be reversed or lost. If we can address the youth use of cigarettes. I'm Dan diamond this pulse. Check and that was FDA. Commissioner Scott Gottlieb vowing to crack down on e cigarette. Sales to young Americans. I just sat down with the FDA Commissioner, right? As news was breaking about the FDA's plan to widely banned sales a flavored e cigarettes in an effort to curb teen. Use now Commissioner Gottlieb couldn't comment on news reports, but he did detail with the agency is thinking what he's called an epidemic ahead of a formal announcement next week, but someone who can break down the latest news and t- up white. You're about to hear from Commissioner Gottlieb is my colleague, sir overhaul who's been covering the e cigarette beat get to both of those conversations in a moment. But first reminder, if you like pulse check, if you like being able to hear us put questions directly to Commissioner leave and other top officials. You can help us by keeping the podcast going every rating review on itunes. It's help. And please send suggestions to you. Can find me a D diamond politico dot com by Email and.

Commissioner Scott Gottlieb Commissioner FDA Dan diamond nicotine
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"FDA. Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced a crackdown on these cigarettes after unpublished federal data showed teen uses reached epidemic levels. The FDA has told five major brands. They have sixty days to submit plans detailing Hello prevent kids from using their products. John Jeffreys NBC News Radio a former Trump campaign spokesman is being accused of slipping and abortion pill to his pregnant girlfriend. According to court documents, Jason Miller is accused of putting the pill and a smoothie, and then giving it to the unnamed woman the documents are attached to a custody battle between Miller and another Trump campaign staffer AJ. Delgado. She Miller had an extramarital affair while on the campaign trail and conceived a son the documents reveal Miller and the unnamed woman met at an Orlando strip club prior to the campaign affair after the woman drank the smoothie she had to be taken to a hospital where she was said to have been bleeding heavily and went into a coma documents reveal the abortion pill possibly reacted that way. Due to potential street drugs already in her system. Miller quit his job as a political commentator on CNN following the allegations saying he wants to focus on clearing. His name the Allman brothers band guitarist Dickey Betts recovering from surgery to relieve brain swelling. After a fall at his home. In Florida statement on the rockers website says his surgery was a success bats was hospitalized last week after he slipped and fell hitting his head. Just last month. Betts was forced to cancel tour dates when he suffered a mild, stroke de mutual NBC, News Radio. Checking.

Jason Miller Dickey Betts Commissioner Scott Gottlieb NBC FDA Trump John Jeffreys Delgado FDA. CNN Allman Florida sixty days
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Check in kiosks, baggage drop counters and security checkpoints the goal is to replace passports and tickets it's going to be optional for now. But to use it you would enter your passport information when you checked in online. Then apparently at each transition point you approach the kiosk with the cameras. They scan your face and you wait for a green check, Mark. And then you can move on. I don't know. I think it's fast. I just a beep pass to be honest to Stanford until it recognizes. I don't know. We'll say they say, it doesn't have an impact. But of the guy grows a beard. It's got to. I would think it was longer beard. To the face. I would think about hard time. But they say it does not suppose somebody has a face. It's a lot like yours. Yeah. Identical twins. What about that something like that? All right. Yeah. We'll see how that works. Elsewhere the smartwatch. At least in this country is going to come with an EKG an electrocardiogram feature. Yep. Apple's latest smartwatch. But it's only here in the US because the US FDA is the only one that's cleared the function and other countries their regulatory agencies haven't done it yet. Apple so they're not even promoting the feature on their international websites here. If you buy the watch now, you will see it enabled later this year and FDA Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb has said in an interview that he really wants to make it easier for other companies to follow Apple's lead and integrate products like the heart monitor into new consumer gadgets, very friendly to this. Yeah. All right somewhere in the world. The price of gold is attached to the price of beer. It is equated with the price of beer. Yes. The October fest German October fest starts tomorrow in Munich. I think you've got something going we start tonight here in October, veterans and anatomy, right? Well. Well this year after an almost ten percent slump in the price of gold and an increase in beer prices. This Liechtenstein based asset management firm has been doing this relationship since nineteen fifty they say an ounce of gold at the October fest will only get you about ninety three leakers or twenty four and a half gallons of beer nut is the lowest since two thousand nine my Lord. What's the world coming to don't know? But gold prices are down prices are up as our gold prices down. Also compared to traditionally too like silver. Yes, see, they're they're onto something. They are futures. Look like what please. Just a little flat here on the SNP up less than a point NASDAQ up about seven points from the Bloomberg newsroom. I'm Patrice Sikora on NewsRadio seven hundred wwl W..

Apple FDA Scott Gottlieb US Patrice Sikora Mark Munich Bloomberg Commissioner ten percent
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Optimus prime day All right here is, your last. Quote doesn't lack that was the head of the FDA Scott Gottlieb announcing a new rule that you can no longer. Sell products called what Is that. Okay Well if an, almond did lactate. It, would give no they have decided. Government at work All those nut Cash anything that doesn't come from an actual animal can no longer be called milk according, to the FDA not milks have become more, and more popular and apparently the FDA got mad at nuts for lying about their cleavage Get Cow eat the. Almonds, I that could work This week FDA head Scott Gottlieb announced that he will ban the use of the. Word milk, and, products that aren't actual dairy milk farmer Joe at least you don't have to wake up at the. Crack of dawn to. Milk, the pistachios anymore What people are saying that this is due. To political, pressure, from the dairy industry or as I guess we now need to call it the mammal milk industry They don't want people fooled into by hazelnut milk when they, could, have the natural goodness of and this is how the FDA will define what you can now call milk quote the lack deal secretions of a bovine mammal unquote Yami still secretion Good What day does this take affect that you can no longer titled rule they're going to impose in the next few. Weeks and then presumably by by next, year I just wonder what day it's going to be because that's the day that every coffee shop in California will close Now you can still sell, them but you get called them look and we don't know what they're going to call them juice nut squeeze squeeze I don't think juices a big, seller Out Tender too long All right Thank you so. Much regulation Guys panel that it's time for you to answer some questions about, this week's news this week a woman in California made national news which he scared away a bear by using only what..

FDA Scott Gottlieb milk Optimus California Milk
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I want Optimus prime day All right. Here is your last quote And That was the head of the FDA Scott Gottlieb announcing a new rule that you can no longer sell products called what Is that. Okay Well if an, almond did lactate it. Would give no Exactly they, have decided that work All those nut Cash anything that doesn't come from an actual animal can no longer be called milk according, to the FDA not milks have become more, and more popular and apparently the FDA got mad at nuts for lying about their cleavage What if you get the cow eat the almonds I that could work this week FDA head. Scott Gottlieb announced he will ban the use of the word milk and products that aren't actual dairy milk, well former Joe at least you don't have, to wake, up, at the crack of dawn to milk the pistachios anymore what people are saying that this is due, to political pressure from the dairy industry or, as I guess we now need to call it the mammal milk industry They don't want people to buy like hazelnut milk when they. Could have the natural goodness of and this is how the FDA will define what you can now call milk quote the lack deal secretions of a bovine mammal On me Good What what day does this take effect that you can no longer titled rule they're going to impose in the next few. Weeks and then presumably by by next, year I just wonder what day it's going to be because that's the day that every coffee shop in California will close There's. Nothing left but you can still sell, them but you can call them up and we don't know what they're going to call them.

FDA Scott Gottlieb milk Optimus California Joe
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I consider this an incredibly positive thing so get into more detail president trump signed a bill on wednesday that will let terminally terminally ill people use experimental drugs citing the meds ability to save tremendous number of lives as i proudly sign this bill thousands of terminally ill americans will finally have the help the hope in the fighting chance that they will be cured and that they will be helped that they'll be able to be with their families for a long time or maybe just for a longer time he said at a white house ceremony he signed a bill called right to try joined by vice president mike pence health and human services secretary alex czar in fda commissioner scott gottlieb pronounced cuddly embrace americans fighting lifethreatening couldn't additions the measure gives terminally ill patients the ability to seek drug treatments that haven't been fully approved by the fda so that's pretty pretty big deal i think it's great yeah it's long overdue it's a it's an air the government should have never been involved in regulating in the first place so is there more to the article there.

trump vice president alex czar scott gottlieb fda president mike pence secretary commissioner
"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"scott gottlieb" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"And now here's my conversation with my colleagues lean about a miller and sarah karlin smith i'm now joined by two of my colleagues first helene about a miller you bitch our senior agricultural reporter hello helene ah high has gone and sir karlin smith our east pharma reporter back on the podcast i dan so i am a tourist i go around to all these agencies in exchange us and and take a look you to or basically residents of fda you live this agency every day how we scott gottlieb doing after his first year in seat well i think for the most part he's keeping people on their toes especially on the food side there's been a lot of kind of surprise with how he has approached especially nutrition policy coming off an obama administration that was so active on everything from added sugar is to menu labeling and so far it seems like the commissioner uh has really stuck to keeping most of those policies there have been some delays but so far no major reversals and i think that is surprised a fair amount of people in town would run in the form of sorts her i think that m a lot of people probably are more satisfied went scott gottlieb than we might have thought one his name was first floated for a nominee um particularly because people sort of made this comment that trump flooded some more extreme candidates to make people happy they got gottlieb but if you think about it got leap was still seen as someone pretty far on the right end of the spectrum ray free enterprise.

miller sir karlin smith reporter scott gottlieb sarah karlin smith helene obama commissioner