18 Burst results for "Scott Cooper"

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And be like i trust the sky until they start questioning who trusting and why and that was sort of instrumental. So there's only a couple of actors in the world that have that sort of weight and authority in a sense. So matt was the guy we went to i and he read it and got right back to me. It was literally like over a weekend. We were kind of making the movie. Wow a member. Because steve goal who passed away. I talked to steve. On friday and matt said yes. And steve said great. Let's get going monday. We're making the movie. And i said great and steve passed away on sunday. It was just horrible. It was the worst the worst such a good guy. I'm this amazing guy. And like you know what i loved about. Steve golan was he was the kind of. I met stephen a hotel new york and he said what are you got i go. I haven't written. But i liked this story about this roughneck ghost. Oklahoma had an old draft. I don't want you to see me. Start from scratch. And he said okay. Let's make it. And that was it. And i knew he was one of those guys that we were gonna make it and he said what do you need. I said you don't have to pay me. Just pay these french writers and we're good to go and he said okay and you know he had great taste but he also knew how to get movies made and and didn't necessarily wasn't thinking ahead of had market just wanted to tell original stories. i will. I couldn't see anybody else in the part which is always a testament to someone's performance certainly your direction and i generally have Ever since my first film accountable stupidly written with certain actors in mind and sometimes you get lucky. Sometimes you don't but it seemed like Matt saying yes really was the impetus for you to really push the film forward. And i just couldn't imagine about ills in the park. Yeah i mean look at that happens but looks right movies for other people and they say no. I've done it and then you're like oh but you realize you've written something so specific it starts to apply right and starts to play with matt. What made it so great was knowledge. You'd say yeah but like two weeks later. We're in oklahoma together like it's amazing for a guy that's done that many movies how passionate he is about every bit of the work like the details like he really wanted to dig in and like that's inspiring and you feel that all the way down like it's very generous and collaborative and creative spirit that sort of starts to inspire everyone you know question and you look at the actors that he's shared the screen with that he they. Everybody has such a different approach. Me and my world jeff. Bridges has a very different approach than robert divall. Yup and you have to understand how to direct just worked with bail on ford verse ferrari and i don't think i'm blowing matt out here. But he was just kept talking. About how great bail is now deep. Bail goes now. It's like you know you can do that right like you do it to your pretty good and like if you need to go that deep and just do it stop thinking about it and let yourself go there and and we literally you could just see his sort of you know..

steve matt Steve golan stephen Oklahoma new york Matt robert divall oklahoma jeff ford
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

07:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"In the show and in the film right up to the Day players who just kind of come in and we used a lot of local casting in this because marseille who are excellent. What's yeah they were just great faces and great people and so game and so where he and every one of them because you know in marseille the dialects different so it wouldn't matter as much this audience but if you're from paris french people in here you know we needed that sound. I needed them to sound like they're from that region so the detective at the end. Yeah everybody there's just so many great roles that were just really enjoyable to cast. But i think with each actor it was like you know. We're talking about dissipated dinner but like with matt. It was just really felt like you know look. We went to oklahoma together matinee. We drove a row. I sat with roughnecks. We just kept talking talking talking really ultimately giving him permission to just not be matt damon. I think that was the biggest thing just like just everyday letting him know. You can totally get lost in this. No one here knows you. You're going to look different. You're gonna walk different. You're gonna move different. Your your rhythm is going to be different and your integrity will be different. What what you are is going to be different so it was really neat. Just giving him the sort of. I think not that he needs it but that little extra boost to kind of dive in come to that in a moment but in terms of having made all of your films here and then you go and you make a film in france. How difficult was it to communicate with the crew. Did you have a translator speaking french apart from. You're not that hard man. Those guys are just they're ballers there. They know how to make movies. They've been doing it for a long time. They make a lot of film community. They really embrace their own movies. They're movie is incredibly vibrant and they found a way and i spoke just enough to get by and it was really exciting. What happened really was interesting. This movie and steve goal and moan was my wonderful producer. Who passed away before we made. It sorta did back napkin and what it would cost and he just underestimated it because the cost of going to marseille was huge and so we had to shrink in a way. Our cost was going up and my crews were shrinking. And i remember film messina. My wonderful production designer called me. He's like so it was just like an independent movie now and i was like no. It's not an independent movie. Because we're spending way too much money and i would never get you and masa and wall all these other wonderful people in carin if it was an independent movie. I just couldn't afford you so we're european movie now so now. There's a lot of talented people working with less and being more hands on. So that means phil you're going to be on set with me. You're not going to be three days ahead of me. And it made a difference and you know masa always operates anyway so just like suddenly. My team was sort of more together all the time in terms of my keys and you could feel it in how we were and like deeply supported by our majority. French grew what i loved about the film as you have very direct and kind of unselfconsciously aesthetic Which is i mentioned to you. Last time i was on the stage before the pandemic i interviewed a clint eastwood for the film that he had. That was just coming out On richard jewel and it reminds me of his aesthetic. I mean if you look closely you think oh. This is a film that could have dreamt that it's it isn't showy but it's so powerful in so clear and what it wants to say Did you in. Mazda did whether films that you looked at. This is the third film and tom mentioned he. And i share cinematographer. Was this the third the third time you've worked with him. Not specifically. We do talk a lot on movies. There's none that like we kind of you know earmarked is like that's our aesthetic. I think we were just building on what we've done. Quite frankly and i think we both feel like you know we believe in stepping back and really letting the world and the actors play right in sort of giving them that space to do it and in this case we're very static in in oklahoma. We're using a slightly different and more thickly changed. And we're anamour. If it can oklahoma kind of wide frame with short depth of field just so we could just be really isolate matt really feel his isolation and his grounded nece and then then. When we got to marseilles we we went spherical went very hand-held went just moved the camera more. We wanted to feel the energy and it was a little dirtier. The frame was just thirty. Or which is marseille In a great way. So i think that's those are the kind of choices when trying to grab this. But they're still a classical storytelling approach to what i do. Even though this structure is very unclassical right the structure of the movie and is very unclassical. And its approach. So it's combining those those elements. And i think that is a bit of a nod european so making too right like what they do. So you know i think for all of us. It was really just trying to find a tone. I think tone is everything we knew we were going to be moving through genre and different story points and different moments that we're going to sort of be unexpected for an audience but the tone had to remain really i think that's always the directors greatest task right. Hold the tone. If you hold the tone and the performances of solid the audience will have a path the locations that you and your production designer really spectacular really grounded film in in a in a non terrific marseille which i really appreciate it. What were you. What were you looking for when you were scouting. Just that right. Not the postcard. We didn't want the postcard of the city or france. And we we knew. We were in american team primarily setting up there and we needed to feel authentic. This wasn't a backdrop right. It wasn't the born movies where drop in all these great european cities to great effect. I love those movies. This we need to feel inside we needed to live with it and it's incredibly subtle but it's incredibly specific right so we needed to kind of like we didn't shoot on a stage and in all of marseille every location was live and it was just like we were lucky as you said. We were fortunate to be able to do this to go find that and live in it and it certainly provides the actors which is so crucial to just this reality that they can live in and then finally you know matt's character. By the time it gets the marseille he was so formed. it was just fun watching him move through. The city was like sandwich bag. Even what's hat subway saying. Yeah but that was the thing we're like all right. Where was the subway okay. There's one three blocks down there. He would go there every single night because he has no no intent on sort of investing in the culture in any way until he's sort of finds himself there with version. I think it's one of the most immersive performances. I've seen from that in some time. Which is testament to your direction and script and both of you really doing the research to for him to be believable as someone who's roughnecks i. I bought every every moment of it in matt isn't a torey. Ously selective actor. What was the process of getting him. Attached had you send him scripts in the past. Have he has said we never worked out. Isn't it just know some of was timing. Is it always and everything. But this was really quick and he was sort of top on my list. I think we felt like we needed an actor of that stature. Not just to get the movie made. But i needed someone to audiences both in america and globally to be like. Oh he's a hero. He has integrity. He's going to do the right thing. Because we knew we're at a moment in time where we had to start subverting expectations not just cinematic but in terms of humanity you know we had to like weird where two different everything was sort of upside down so i want an audience to come in.

marseille steve goal oklahoma richard jewel matt matt damon nece carin messina france moan paris clint eastwood phil Mazda tom america
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:53 min | 8 months ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And i literally thought we were going to die and was like you were standing on your deck at home. Just maybe having a glass of tequila and myself. I can see the headline george. Clooney parishes in in plane crash other on board also guild. I remember that i remember. Everybody was kind of pale white. And i thought well it's time to calm everybody down because you know in general the thing is it was it was the Might have been sony plane. We were on. And i remember talking that pilot and he goes. It's like a boat on the water is bouncing around every once in a while. So i say to joel. Because he's like a boat on the. I just repeated the boat on the way. Always look with when i'm flying. We're going through some serious turbulence at the flight attendants because they're completely calm and they're still going through work. Then you think all right. This is okay. We had that on a flight to with thurman and this is wwe eighteen ninety four four ninety five. And ed chris. O'donnell was on the weird to fit into the bad suits and we had that same thing like power failure on the warner jet dropping. Like crazy and the flight attendant goes. Everybody did in the back of the plane. Facing backwards like whoa. This is how i kept thinking so this is how it works. you know. I finally get a studio film and now the plane crashes little. Did i know that the batman robin was a thing that was actually going to crash. Oh my god georgia's probably not nearly as bad as you think in rest in peace joel schumacher. What a lovely man usage. A also ted died yesterday. I know no. He was I guess i don't know if you not know what happened. But what a great great guy. And what a wonderful man and won a loss for our union and for this group of of this this this fraternity and sorority of of of directors to lose michael apted in just was a tremendous artist. So you know his some. Jim was the first day. See on three of my films at a guy. And i got to know michael and Really said to to save his passing. Yeah it was. It was really man. Yeah it's been. It was a tough year. We're going to get through a though. Look we got a vaccine coming guys. Were all going to everybody. Just be smart. We're going to you know for those of us. Not really older. Essential workers probably going to be may but we got a vaccine. Come in and we're going to be able to film that's gonna come out and wanted to be in front of in front of an actual audience. That's going to happen. It'll probably be into the summer but it's going to ask you one last question. Do you feel as i do that. People are going to race back to cinemas win. It's safe people the people you know. I remember eddie murphy. Used to this routine about the day that they found a cure for aids and he goes on everybody's gonna be. You can't get laid that day. You can't get light right. He did a whole bit about that. It's really all clear with the vaccines and everybody's going to get out of that. I mean are you kidding. People are gonna like run out of the house. It's like when the sun comes out in london and every brit runs outside. It's going to be exactly like that. And you wanna be in a collective. You wanna see a comedy with other people you want to see a scary movie with other people you wanna be. You want to go out. You can't keep saying your wife would stay home. Geez aw i want to live again. We're going to get there you know. It's the fact that we have this vaccine as quick as we do. And you know. I have great faith that the biden is gonna federalize the distribution. And that'll be a big difference in how quickly we get it out and then you don't have great hope that that you know by certainly by the end of the summer i think that people will be able to go see films again which i would really wish it. Amen george. thank you so much for your time. I loved the film. Good luck on tender bar wonderful piece and hope to see soon man. Thank you good to see it at george. Thanks for listening to another. Dj qa. if you'd like to hear more the director's cut is available. Wherever you listen to podcasts. And be sure to subscribe rate and review..

london michael joel schumacher Jim O'donnell yesterday ed chris eddie murphy thurman joel Clooney ted first day george three of my films michael apted one last question brit eighteen ninety four four nine summer
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

07:45 min | 8 months ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"In the position where you don't get to choose you take what you can get and as an actor certainly and then it's just hey take your job but if you're in the position where you get to choose this one felt like i was willing to spend that time working on the film for almost two years and that's a. That's you know that that doesn't happen that often you you have to read it. It's and you know it's like you you suddenly it's your you go. I know exactly how this story should be told so were you. Were you a quarter of the way through the script halfway through the script or as soon as you read the final page. Will i got direct directness. Will you know what's funny is a general. You can assure a lot of people have done this. You start reading scripted about ten pages in. You can tell whether or not this script. His you know anywhere near the kind of story that you'd like to be involved in a usually it's about Just just about the point of view and the and the you know the the direction that the film wants to go and then oftentimes about dialogue but So when i started reading. I thought well this is interesting and then by the time i got to the end with the you know with the because i kept thinking how. You're going to get to any that you know otherwise it's kind of on the beach right otherwise is on the beat which is which is in the end. And there's no hope. And its and i thought you have to have s to be something to take away from this and they had it. Which was that he got. you know. he's yeah he's saving mankind but he saving his daughter and so i. I always thought that that in some ways You know that gave you the redemption. The midnight finished that i thought. Oh i know how to tell the story well so if your your your children are three I suspect you read this win. After they were born right looming took on even more relevance the right. Well it everything before it changes once you have kids in a way. You're also you feel the pressure to do a sesame street but that's the but you know because you know you're going to be leaving. I'm an old guy having kids and so leaving the house and being away from the kids is hard. you know. it's a hard thing to do so it has to be something that really drives you and says okay. Now this is one. Let's let's all pack up and go to london and shoot iceland and shoot that kind of thing. Well look it's it's been what four almost five years since you were last on screen allah hail. Caesar was at. It was at your last. Maybe i don't know. Maybe i think it's been a while i sort of funny. I couldn't find project. Things have changed for me. Obviously i i'll be sixty this year and so the parts change right in the kind of parts you get changed and you have to accept that you can't fight it and so let's get softer and try to do you. Not somebody asked me the other day. Is this kind of thing you're headed towards or you trying to aim towards this instead of like out of sight and i was like not that i wanted to your age has forced me amber leading. Man yeah i love that so yeah. That's a good look. I i have to say i mean four years five years as soon as you came on screen i mean for me. It was like slipping into a pair of favorite shoes when i could literally feel myself relaxing. Jesus how much of. I missed george alan screen and you and you seemed thinner which i assume maybe whilst wait for the part where you always gonna start in the film. It was interesting thing you know you look at it and you go okay. This is a you know. It's almost like a ninety five million dollars. It's not cheap you know. It's own and in general for film that you gotta have a name you know and you look at the names. I'm about that. You know about the right age and there aren't there. Weren't that many people that were the right person that could do this. You know there only a few and so in way. I felt like well. This is an and it's a fairly. It's sort of in my wheelhouse of the kind of thing to play. And so i thought well i know how to do this. And i'm probably the right guide to play it. I have to say you know. It's not fun directing yourself right. It's not a fun thing to do but but you know adult. Like if i could if i could and we designed it so that shoot all my stuff first and then go on do the space stuff afterwards it would give me the ability to really is a space stuff you gotta focus on. There's no there's no screwing around it into that yet. I mean look. It's it's it's what you're seven film and and very different dome for you. I mean it. It's one thing to be in a good night and good luck. Which is which is largely performance. But here we have space travel with zero gravity. you have very complex visual effects three viz. I mean remarkable scope. And you know directing and starring on like that is about as difficult as it gets was. Did you find yourself ever in the improper midway through what you were saying. Jesus guy myself into every day i mean i remember the old days acting in a play. My cousin miguel and i would do. Theater and great actor loved to use a good actor and we were backstage. We'd be standing there and we both are gonna start hitting ourselves chest like why the did we say yes. Say yes. what are we thinking. Why do we put ourselves in this situation. And i think every director at some point has that moment where like. Oh i didn't. Why did i do this. But i have to say because we had such great professionals around us people. I trusted in new we. You know there wasn't any major hiccups. We had surprises felicity being pregnant. We're in the middle of shooting was a surprise. You know and and so you had to be able to bounce with the with that information. You had to be able to doing improv. You know it's like yes. And so yes she's pregnant. So what are you going to do about it. And so there were those those kind of things but overall it was. You know we didn't have a lot of hiccups which was lucky. We've finished ahead of schedule. This has to be so meticulously planned yet. Which i know you've told me before your urine vetere the methodic. The coen brothers were sort of an sodeberg but the coen brothers would do you know they will do a story boards for every single shot. Every scene in the actors would get them and use their same story board artist. J todd anderson and we would Redraw out every single scene and every every single shot in every single scene so the crew and the you get it with the sides in the morning so everybody knows where the camera is going to be shooting. We're we're we're gonna shoot these these this this and this now of the ice some of that change because weather would come and go and we'd have to mix it up but you know we knew. Okay this is the shot. We're gonna use these on tuned lenses on. This is so everything was very specifically designed the before we started. Jesus one of the many things that i loved was was your decision to keep the catastrophe at its heart. A mystery was that scripted. Was that a choice at you and stephen marioni. By the way. I love personally and also there has been under. It wasn't in the script there. We.

london miguel stephen marioni ninety five million dollars sixty four years george alan three both J todd anderson seven film one thing every single scene Caesar coen this year about ten pages five years every single shot almost two years
With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:53 min | 2 years ago

With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

"In our climate tech series how we survive. We're in the heart of the tech industry this week. Silicon Valley which which is also the home of the venture capital funds that back a lot of the innovation here and those are concentrated in a quiet office park on one little street called Sandhill road. So what are they doing to invest in climb attack. It's not an area that we've spent a Lotta time in Scott Cooper as a managing partner at andriessen Horowitz it is is a big name firm it helped kick start skype twitter facebook and AIRBNB and Cooper says the VC community is a little shy about climate tek lots lots of them invested heavily in solar and other renewable energy ten or fifteen years ago and lost a lot of money when a bunch of those companies went under I think a lot of the old models unfortunately fortunately assumed or dependent on government subsidies to make the businesses work and given how fickle those are with political climates. There was a lot of heartache when some of those things went way and then fast forward to today. Even if you want to put money into cleantech the scientific innovations you might need for a cool new climate tech solution might not even exist public-address is with S. K. ventures. It's kind of heartbreaking as an investor because it's an area where we'd all like to be much more active but it's not obvious what a large check do that would generate a return within time horizon of a venture fund which is less than ten years basically. It's a lot easier to fund products that are purely digital like APPs or social networks than it is to get into super tricky real world tech like batteries are storage or heaven forbid infrastructure the physical world atoms are a pain in the ass us having to actually work with the physical world slows everything down dramatically these days sandhill road does have some venture capital funds that are investing in sustainability. We we look for mission oriented entrepreneurs that are going after really big problems in big markets reporter is with G to VP cleantech venture fund. That is a spin off from the legendary. VC firm Kleiner Perkins Kleiner decided not to keep green investment in the core fund after all those failures a decade or so ago and Porter says G. Tube EP has a broad definition of sustainability so we're not just investing in clean renewable energy we're investing in Three D. printing wanting and new ways of approaching manufacturing and logistics and collapsing supply chains and food to bring producers and consumers closer together. GDP invest in everything anything from electric buses to buying and selling used cars so long plays toward a greener world but nothing that's obviously going to save us and and then there are a handful of investors who wanna make much bigger faster moves. I think the opportunity is incredibly massive. This is Seth Bannon founding partner at the small venture capital. Oh firm fifty years based in San Francisco. We want people to realize that the technologies to mitigate adapt to the climate crisis can create trillions of dollars worth of wealth fifty years is is investing about fifty million dollars compared to about three hundred and fifty million dollars at G. TO VP. Now the biggest name of the game is breakthrough energy ventures it was launched by Bill Gates and other investors in two thousand sixteen to invest over a billion dollars specifically in clean energy but Bannon says the entire tech industry it needs to step up its super frustrating to me when I see people that control hundreds of millions of dollars and determine what companies ISG funded companies don't tweeting about the next e Gaming Unicorn that they're chasing when you have millions of people people who are being forced to migrate all because of a crisis that technology can solve so when it comes to funding tack to help us adapt to climate change the venture capital. It'll industry that gave us the semiconductor and personal computers and smartphones and social media is still mostly in the shallow end of the

Seth Bannon VP Silicon Valley Scott Cooper Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Bill Gates S. K. Ventures San Francisco Andriessen Horowitz Managing Partner Facebook ISG VC Reporter Founding Partner
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"We'll we'll talk about that in the second i just want to talk about the finale first how did you realize that it was going to be a series of montana ranchers that would give them a final faceoff because the the movie could have easily ended with bringing him to his resting ground and and not having any conflict there in dc but i wanted to things one um the film really for me as western only in locale an era minutes it's probably a little closer to joseph conrad the clinton portis desert the ryder true grit um but there are a couple of moments that i tip the hat to john ford's the searchers couple of shots that that i specifically wanted to pay all march to the master ford and then of course it's the shootout but i didn't want to have a shootout just for a shootout sake what i wanted to do is if if you're aware of who clive and bundy and his family are unfortunately yes and it's all about uh grazing rights and whose land is who's and private property and no respect for the federal government indeed or or the indigenous people who were there well before we so it it it also serve as an opportunity for two things one to show that joe or would certainly put his life on the line but would also show that rosalie that whom we meet at the very beginning of the film is a um uh very learn it in an area diet mother whose teaching her children about adverbs and the very spirited woman um.

dc ford bundy joe rosalie montana joseph conrad clinton portis john ford clive
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Physically violate the women the way they did and and and you know so you never want to have to come back to actors and say we have to shoot that again it from midnight until six a m i've just thinking like we never see any that in the in the finished film so was at all ordinaries i never actually shot this stuff i'm talking when he's beating them right um but all that stuff you know that or if you have a crack in the lens and you don't realize is not showing up awhile yeah i mean sort of and we would so we understood him an annual bath for the film now just just uh i say this human error yeah all right gandhi just kicking out for second 'cause they will then have lose a couple of times so film insurance kick in it did it absolutely did but again it's your capturing something i mean i guess the only positive way to look at that is okay well how we make this better right um so that happened a couple of days and that can be very expensive it's crazy timeconsuming and and you know some of these things that don't happen if you're shooting digitally but um let's see are made to period films black masks in this increase the are now the furnace a wanted to feel like period even though they were contemporary and and i just find that you can't really reproduce film and in a certain texture that i'm looking for certainly digitally and and um uh yeah i will shoots um i will shoot film until japhet i i hope you do and how they already no longer count is a video videotapped for you lake how often are you looking at playback when you're doing something only five or six takes yeah not that important um it's more important for um.

gandhi
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Ras if it is um if it doesn't compromise the shot but in that particular instance that was handheld are the only used handheld a couple of occasions when blocker was also expressing his grief and anger and rage in the desert rate before the journey yeah and when she does the roof and the majority of it is is more or less locked off what kind of camera to use in this a used shot on film for the um uh i guess yeah all for the fourth time now shoot film jeff until they tell me i can't is is getting more difficult to find it well and develop it with that for sure i mean i will say that we had some issues um because people don't develop it as frequently as they used to so sometimes they make mistakes and then you get a text from your cinematographer that says we have a problem but he doesn't finish the whole taxed and then you see those thought bob also thought bubble thought anthony out what is it we have to reach shoot and uh how much you'll lose we lost a couple of days we lost some very difficult uh material that you hate after come back to an actor and say tell us like what well for instance all of the when the women were abducted because i shot that very very low light and i asked for it to be process a certain way quite wasn't and it was very cold and you know the women had to is not easy for the actors to have to.

jeff bob anthony
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Video this laptop desktop experiences as a totally new user interface and if you watch that short video rather than just rushing in you'll be smooth sailing watching that video shows you the easiest way to navigate and read the magazine so i truly hope you'll check the video out first and look i can't wait to hear what you think of the magazine experience issue one the free issue it's a double issue filled with lots of great content and it even has fullscreen plays to read so i've got my fingers crossed that after you test drive us you'll become a subscriber at this moment all you could do on the site his subscribe you cannot by a single issue but it's worth the money because you'll gain access to every single issue we've published of backstory so you'll have plenty to catch up on we of course still work on ipads but if you're planning on subscribing do it through backstory dot net as that leaves more of your subscription dollars with us that we could then use toward great content so it's a winwin for both of us as you should well know by now backstory focuses on the art and business of storytelling in not only are we launching backstory dot net it wouldn't you know it this is all timed around the release of our newest issue issued thirty which is packed with tons of great star was the last djeddai stories that will feature the film cinematographer producer editor and of course the poured man himself writer director ryan johnson we also have a huge feature on the post with core riders liz hannah and josh singer is really cool quentin tarantino piece the gets into his twentyfifth anniversary sundance film festival chat for reservoir dogs we also have screenwriter david scarpa for all the money in the world and of course we also did a story was steven rogers and you can read is full screenplay for i tania along with thirty other awards season scripts and we interviewed i tanya director craig leprosy as well and yes folks don't worry we have a feature on the disaster artists with core riders scott new standard and mike leeds wherever you could also read the entire blacklist screenplay breaking news in uber county plessey full interview with its writer amanda doco writer director scott frank tells his tale of what it took to bring his net flicks western godless to life and then.

user interface ipads editor ryan johnson scott frank producer writer director liz hannah josh singer quentin tarantino david scarpa steven rogers craig leprosy mike leeds twentyfifth
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Um it was important to me to to really make this distinction that again christian bell plc has his essentially devoted what he says is when he says i stopped counting when rory cochran says i'm gonna use yukio and he says stop county where he clearly hasn't he knows exactly how many but let's say twenty to twenty five years to essentially fighting native americans and when you're indoctrinated are the united states government to do that that kind of deep seated hatred that he uh that he has developed over the course of that it's clear that he's also hostile it's clear that been foster is a hostile it's clear that the commanches that we made to the opening of the film are hostile um so it was uh it was important for me to say that for one reason other we all have this type of hostility and how the characters in this film are bound by not only that but are bound by tragedy loss grief and violence i mean i don't have to tell her every one in here that that we live in one of the most violent nations on earth and it touches everybody in the film unfortunately and i abhor violence even though i've had violence in my last three films um i feel an obligation to show in in in a very unflinching way the consequences of violence whether it be now the furnace um uh certainly in black mass in no more so than than in hostile but that title i think meant something differently to donald stewart strath two than it does to my result film interestingly native american term cut of describes what is going on in the movie between the characters at least the the two leads in which there is the concept of burying the hatchet which is is a phrase that the english observed in massachusetts when when they saw the tribes go to peace for the first time and here you have you have joe and you have the cheek.

christian bell plc rory cochran yukio massachusetts joe native americans united states donald stewart twenty five years
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Joe is an educator chief philip whiteman who is the chief of the northern china montana those three were onset every day making certain that the more raised that the customs that the mannerisms and then most importantly the language and the translation was correct because i would reitred in english than i would have them speak it in all of the actors would learn it even the actors who didn't have to speak at so that they would understand just as they would english even though we here early on that captain blocker uh speaks fluent yes fluent and and and christian became fluid um as you quite as you can see in the in the film and and uh which was remarkable but having those native american advisers on set every day was critical because i wanted to to honor them and and make certain that everything they were saying everything were doing everything they were wearing was was was authentic is is everything else in the film we're going to get to our spoiler sex now so if you haven't seen the film press pause of europol gaz listener go see the film and come back you know you you touched on earlier the title hostels it's what so interesting here's the magically everybody in the movie by the end of the movie save for i guess the the child has blood on their hands because rowsley by the end of the movie she fires the first shot not seen for her character arc so i'm i'm curious just how you even arrived at that title or was that donald's tied noda's out was already donald's tight okay but bri certainly added a lot of debra through it for donald's title it simply referred to what native american prisoners were known as which are hostile but i wanted it to represent everybody in the film apart from little bear who loses his uh his connection to his culture is identity the little native americans the only cheyenne left in film.

Joe philip whiteman china donald noda debra native americans montana
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Different that geography is and how difficult that would be walking horse literally walking because they're they're rarely even loping and galloping up the continental divide of the rocky mountains and so that really helped so my production designer i donald graham burt who generally works only with david venture david wasn't workings free and and i've always admired don's work so together we scouted and tried to find locations that would really that would really inform character and narrative so that was a big part of the research that i would just to research about wounded knee the indian wars research about the cavalry um it was extremely researchintensive one of the things that amy which oh yeah with the language that's what i was gonna get suit because one of the things i really admire is that you uh for some research you did some work with filmmaker chryss ear and dr julie proud fed they're organization native net workers yes and it it took a lot to get you know eighteenth century cheyenne's spoken correctly and i'm curious with that fees was like an also what it was like for you as a director to be directing in technically a foreign language to you yeah look i i'd never as of uh white anglosaxon protestants never could have made this film if not for the work of my native american advisers chris air who's a wonderful uh cheyennearapaho filmmaker whose film smoke signals is quite an excellent film.

david venture david don director donald graham burt amy dr julie chris air
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And that all that always helps running helps or taking long walks um i haven't yet experience that it i think because i i probably was a little bit of a late bloomer as a screenwriter and as a director and there's so many stories that i wanna tell that i'd just that um i can't get them out fast enough i'm curious about your research face because this felt like a very historically accurate news zeev for an event that didn't exactly take place this is a fictional event this this journey from new mexico to montana what what did you learn in research were how did it inform your writing well uh there's topographical geographical research there's historical accuracy research photographic evidence that i would use um so it all kind of started with the photograph of work of edward curtis who was a great chronicle of early native american life in the early 20th century um look at a great deal of his images because that's what film is films about images and and i don't tend to have a lot of dialogue and in my in my films more about capturing a mood or an atmosphere or um certainly performances images um so i would look at a lot of photographic evidence from from the era in thin i would study maps both cartographical maps as well as three d which you can use google earth and i knew that each location in the film excuse me would really inform movie because we start the film in the deserts of bless you we start the film in the desert's of new mexico and then we ended in the high grasslands of montana and having having driven from new mexico montana i know that that in and looking at maps the just how.

director mexico edward curtis google earth montana
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"But interestingly i was just having this conversation with someone outside our relationship to film was very different now than than it was when the films were made that most inspired me and it's because this constant news cycle it's uh our addiction to our smartphones and in in an always um being inundated with stimuli because there used to be time we didn't have that where people could be much more patient with film um uh i thought it was tarkovsky torcaza could be wrong who said that the in america films can't be fast enough and in europe they can't be slow enough as it yeah so you know he didn't say it he probably would have right exactly so as i as i'm writing you know you you realize cowardice this is now twenty five page london 27 pages you know the film generally won't be that long doesn't need to be that long but my films of generally all been around two hours um some what languidly paste what do you do if you get writer's block howdy how do you handle it eddie breakthrough well h um fortunately i haven't yet experienced it um uh you know i i tend to if if i get overly tired uh and i when i was first writing crazy heart i also play qatar so i would have an acoustic guitar my office or wherever i was writing and would play and it will just allow me to not think about the story but still stay very creative.

torcaza europe writer qatar tarkovsky america eddie two hours
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"An incredible japanese photographer he and i work such long hours in prep and then while we're shooting over the weekend for the next week's work that we know how we're going to capture um the narrative on film that it really freeze us up to for me to work with the actors and work on the uh blocking the ms on saying in in angled ready always ready to to call an inaudible or or move the camera if it isn't working for an act which i never won actors to fill stilted were phil like i'm jamming them in to um uh a certain way of playing a scene because time you do that you're never going to get their best work so do you even block it before shooting her did you just say here's where the camera is and we're just gonna roll now i generally have already blocked everything in my head in offs suggest a christian so i think maybe perhaps um you'll be here and you'll enter through this door roar cochran them will enter through here and let's try that and and if it doesn't work for camera and then if it doesn't work for the actors than i will uh change it but but generally i've i've worked it out in ways that as an actor i think as i walk through it myself well before them that um that it it probably should work for some times it doesn't just to be tedious do you even do a table read cereal yo never because then really want now you're going to have purdue producers even though i produced my movies but people who produce with with you or financiers or god forbid the studio who who then will you know don't one notes now and nine notes but they think that's a little uncompromising or while you really want to do that you really want to have you know all in one take have johnny depp strangle a 16yearold on camera and without cutting away you know that sort of stuff it i just think it's always better to see at one on once a finished this project started when you came across donald stewart's manuscript.

phil johnny depp donald stewart purdue
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"We asked and i know jeff bridges likes to rehearse but i told him sihleli is my first time beverage rating ever nearer never directed even a high school play that i i feel like we shouldn't uh rehearsed jeff and he looked at me like really and i said yes it let's try this and i've he's a bull your shooting on film you weren't shooting digitally because you know with with shooting digitally you can just continue to well me shooting shooting xu rates as explore exactly and and it really worked beautifully with jeff in maggie jilin all an and from that point on it really seem to me because i would always feel like when i was preparing my auditions as an actor in my in my apartment that i was always better when i wasn't in with a casting director right and as i was just starting to work on the material my god is just it feel so fresh and it feels like i'm not searching uh in the wrong way in feels like i'm really alive and it just has seemed to two four movies in his seemed to really work for me there's no one way to do it and which is what so interesting though is that you know some of the classically trained actors i mean they're they're body is their tool they're they're used to exercising the muscle in rehearsing it and you know everything even basics logistically like blocking i'm curious smell like rosamund pike harassed escort guy who trained or benedict cumberbatch who was in my last film uh black mass he couldn't johnny depp has not trained uh but all all countrymen stinking credible credibly talented guy whereas benedict comes from instinct certainly but a great deal with intellect and rehearsal when and same with our roseman but but actors really liked beyond that highwire and take that leap because even with blocking i i my cinematographer and i work uh massive nobu talking argie who shot my last three films.

jeff bridges maggie jilin director rosamund pike roseman benedict cumberbatch johnny depp
"scott cooper" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"G to name one novi the one who dragons ran a fire now i do like that one no i i guess i we go with our might them i mean incorrect okay what's the correct out we were gonna there's only one correct and so go have the prestige i love the prestige i love the prestige and that is the our favorite who medical there's a there's a christian bill movie for every mood there's americans psycho how there's there's the darkness trilogy there's no there's the machinist to watching all hardcore christian belen he had a lot he's so hot again wrong answer very much the wrong answer so his new movie i should mention is called hostile as it is a western redeeming him with filmmaker scott cooper they made a movie that was they didn't like a a huge response it was well reviewed but it was we called out of the furnace a few years back on they clearly get along very well scott cooper also did black mass and crazy heart really actors love working with him and he he's somebody that that really draws out very great performances in this one this this western is a pretty brutal one its search for some bail one side west duty rosamund pike senate and it's it's basically about a an officer who has to kind of transport a cheyenne chief perry west duty to a burial ground and it kind of brings up conflicting emotions he opts he doesn't have a lot of love for the cheyenne people considering the things they've done to his comradesinarms.

scott cooper senate officer novi cheyenne
"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"scott cooper" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Egner face and if you watch that short video rather than just rushing in you'll be smooth sailing watching that video shows you the easiest way to navigate and read the magazine so i truly hope you'll check out the video first at backstory dot net and hey if you dig the free issue i hope you'll support us by subscribing and hey not only is backstory dot net launching so is issued thirty which features tons of star wars the last jedi coverage including producer ram bergman cinematographer steve yet glenn editor bob duck say and of course writer director ryan johnson we also did a huge story an issue thirty on the post was screenwriter's liz hannah and josh singer you would also meet the 2017 nichols fellowship winners and read excerpts of their work in our huge yearly nickel competition article we also do the story was steven rogers and you could read his full screenplay for i tania along with thirty other awards season scripts and we interviewed i tanya director craig leprosy as well and look it truly means a lot to me to have you check out our website so thanks again for visiting www debt backstory dot net but now without any further dula jump right onto the stage at the los angeles film school right after introduced writer director scott cooper to chat about his latest film hostels two i thank you for coming evening staying this so late will enable coming down old course we're gonna job right into it since we're sitting here the los angeles film school did you go to foam school i did not go to film school.

steve bob duck ryan johnson scott cooper producer ram bergman editor writer director liz hannah josh steven rogers craig leprosy los angeles