18 Burst results for "Scott Carlson"

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So what do you know If you talk to say Moody's or some of the other analysts of the industry, they would say Look for colleges there that have small endowments that Aurora Leigh situated that don't have names that don't have distinctive programs. I mean, all of those things are are really important. To establishing a sort of a position in this industry. So the prestige schools are probably okay but some of the smaller or lesser known schools It's possible that they're going to go under well that create a disparity in who actually gets to go to college. Yes, it will create a disparity and who gets to go to college because a lot of those smaller institutions even if they seem expensive, or even if they're not really not all that selective. They do have A really great history of attracting students, bringing them in giving them a degree, particularly students from first generation or low income backgrounds. And they do private. Small private colleges tend to do a better job of that, then on some public institutions, and even some community colleges, so yeah, there will be a disparity there educational achievement that will come out of this. You know the the elite colleges. They're always going to be okay not only because they have the endowment, but because they're able to pull students up when they're when they're lacking and demand. They can always pull students up from colleges that are at lower tears so they can meet the demand for themselves because They just have that prestige. You know, what I worry about is the loss of biodiversity. A number of these smaller institutions can be really special places that are in a way experimental, You know, I think about a place like the college of the Atlantic, and I don't know how the college of the Atlantic is doing in the covert crisis. But you know, this is a small college in Bar Harbor, Maine, where there's on ly one major. It's human ecology, which can mean anything. You want it to mean. It's built around the idea of environmentalism at that college. It really ends up being an interesting educational experience. Because the college has less resources than other schools. They really rely on the students to go out and seek their own grants to do their own work to find their own equipment to pull off these sort of very hands on kinds of college lessons. You know that place was founded. In the late 19 sixties early 19 seventies around really innovative ideas and higher education and these small institutions of the kinds of places that can make those kinds of shifts. You know, you think about a place like Goddard College in Vermont, another college that has had financial trouble in recent years. Got her college was the place that started the low residency program that is the kind of programme where you turn up at the college for maybe a week or two, and then you go and do the rest of it in distance form, And they started that in the 19 forties, and it's turned out to be a really interesting way a really different ways. Something you don't see Ah lot in higher education. For offering Education to people at a distance, but that is still very much connected to a local community and connected to a cohort. These small schools are able to shift in ways that you know larger institutions have trouble shifting, and they are the innovative edge of higher education. If we end up losing them simply because they don't have the economies of scale to be able to offer cheaper education or they're just remote, and students don't feel like they want to go there. They don't feel like they have. The resource is or the entertainment there that they would have. If they went to an urban institution. I think that would be really tragic. We lost these places. Scott Carlson. Thanks so much for being on fresh air. Thank you for having me. Scott Carlson is senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education. He spoke with fresh air producer Sam Bricker coming up. David Bianculli reviews the New Netflix drama series Ratchet, by Ryan Murphy. It's about a younger version of the character nurse Ratchet from the film. One flew over the Cuckoo's.

Goddard College Chronicle of Higher Education Scott Carlson Bar Harbor Moody Aurora Leigh Atlantic Ratchet Netflix David Bianculli Maine Sam Bricker Vermont Ryan Murphy writer producer
"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And it's fast and it's connected to this. So that I think will start to move the ball little bit as some of these Faster and cheaper testing programs come online, more colleges will be able to pull them off. But still that's pretty expensive to do. Two tests a week a 10 to 15 Bucks a pop. It seems like one of the really big challenges that school's faces. You know what to do with students who test positive like are they put into quarantine is their dorm room. Quarantine is their whole dormitory quarantine. What? What approaches? Have you seen? Mostly. What What I've seen is a CZ colleges sort of setting up Storms that are separate from the rest of the dorms and putting the students and they're delivering meals to them and sort of keeping them isolated. Now, In some cases, I've read that that's been moralizing for these students to sit in these dorms all alone and they really sort of been ignored to some extent by the colleges. Again. In other cases, you know, the colleges have relied on the students to self quarantine to stay isolated and keep away from other students. That's with that comes with mixed success, of course. Has the pandemic strange, the relationship between towns and universities. Those relationships are often strained anyway. But it's this symbiotic relationship between the town in a college. You know what's interesting is that A lot of these small institutions are located in these tiny towns in rural areas, and that is sort of an accident of history. And where that comes from is that When these small colleges were established, they were established usually in connection to some sort of religious order a church and they were largely established for the education of men. And so the idea that time was To say, Hey, we want the men out of the cities where there's lots of temptation, bring them to bring them to the rural areas and will educate them here, both morally and intellectually in terms of Traditional studies. The thing is now is that you have these small colleges dotted across the country in these little communities and given the kind of evaporation of wealth around agriculture, agriculture has been consolidated and mechanized. And started going away in the 20th century and a lot of these small towns, and then after that manufacturing manufacturing was automated or it was sent overseas. And so these small colleges end up being through the last economic pillars. In these small towns. So many people who live in these small towns realize that the college is a vital driver of businesses and activity there, and at the same time, you know, traditionally, students have been troublemakers. There's tension between The college and the administration of the college and the power of their college. And then there tends to be tension between the college and the local community in terms of the decision, making their mainly because The University of College tends to wield a lot of power and tends to push the city around so There's already that attention then you bring in these students who bring Corona virus with them. What I heard in places like Ames, Iowa, was that the local residents weren't eager to see the students back the local residents even when they were skeptical that the Corona virus was a thing. They still worried that the students would bring a lot of infection and disease with them. But at the same time, some of those same people told me Look, we need to have them back because our restaurants or dying are retail is dying. Some people were landlords they rented to students. And they needed the money to come back. We need to take another break here. We're talking about how colleges and universities are being affected by the Corona virus with Scott Carlson, a senior writer if the Chronicle of higher education More after break. This is fresh air..

University of College Chronicle of higher education Scott Carlson Ames Iowa writer
"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Where you know coronavirus can move through the air and infect everyone in them in the place if someone has the infection, so that was one thing that I saw Thea other thing was that I went around to some of the businesses downtown and talk to the business owners and You know they're seeing declines of 20 to 30% in their businesses. Sometimes 50% you talkto landlords and they're saying we can't We have unfilled beds here in town. We can't fill them because people are coming. So it ends up being a really difficult situation for the locals. People who you know, may not be aligned with the kinds of attitudes that are on the campus politically. But they still rely on the economic muscle that the college or university can bring in some ways that must create an interesting discourse between people who have different political beliefs. Absolutely. I mean, in a place like Ames. You know you have people who absolutely didn't believe that the current virus wass riel, and yet they still wanted the students to come back, and they were still nervous about how the students would spread that virus through the community. Essentially, they didn't believe it was real. And yet they're worried about it's spreading. Yeah. I mean, they raise skepticism about whether it was real or not. So But they did. I mean, it's kind of one of these situations where I think the population is a bit schizophrenic about this. I mean, They're not sure whether it's real. They're not seeing direction from the federal government on DH there not seeing direction from public figures and so on. But at the same time numbers are climbing. It's clear that people are getting sick. His size and issue here. I mean, like some of these universities are like small cities unto themselves. With tens of thousands of students. You've got faculty administration staff maintenance people working in food service. You are smaller schools just in a better position to handle the pandemic because of numbers. If you look at the Corona virus tracker that the New York Times has put up for college is you can see that it's the big state institutions that have really seen a spike in numbers. And I think that has to do with the anonymity off living on a big state University. You know, it's a It's a tens of thousands of people and You know the notion that you can sort of escape into the crowd and not have AH kind of responsibility toward the rest of the student population is a little more possible possible when you're more anonymous on those campuses. In the case of smaller colleges, which he noticed from that trackers. They really haven't seen a spike in cases that these larger state universities have, and I think that has to do something with the kind of community that's in these smaller schools. Also, the smaller schools tend to be really situated. So they're outside the cities and outside of contact points, where the where the students might be able to pick up Cove it more easily. So you're saying that in larger university's students can adopt like airport behavior, and just not really think about their co students as much as that? That's a problem. Well, I mean what you're finding in cases like the University of Illinois. Is that they have a vast testing program set up, but It only takes a handful of students to really ruin that if you get a small group of students that hold a party or go to a frat party or socializing in an irresponsible way. Those students end up spreading out across the campus or leading to a rise in numbers. Significant rising numbers. What you find out at small colleges is it's a little bit more of a community feel there's mohr contact between students, administrators and professors, and that kind of smaller community at that sort of smaller environment tends to lead to more self policing. I will say this that even on these big state university campuses, a lot of the students I talked to had say UNC were really disappointed in the students that were ruining the fall semester for them, so it's not like every student is out there being irresponsible. This is a handful of students who are You know, not engaging in the kind of social distancing that they should. Why don't we take a short break here Speaking with Scott Carlson, senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education about how colleges and universities are being impacted by the Corona virus will be back shortly. This is fresh air. This is fresh air. I'm Sam Burger sitting in for Terry Gross. If you're just joining us, I'm speaking with Scott Carlson, senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education about how colleges and universities have addressed the spread of Corona virus on their campuses. So what are some of the financial consideration? Schools had to weigh in making the decision to either go online or have some in person education. Well, there were several. So one is residents and the auxiliary income that comes for colleges and universities. One small product college president Ohio told me we make money on the dorms. We about break even on dining and we lose money on everything else, including the education intuition, right? So for a number of these colleges having students living there, paying for the dorms is a is a big financial boost for those colleges. Add to that athletics. There are a number of schools That have prominent athletic programs. Very few schools actually make money off of the athletics. But even when they don't make money off of the athletics, the athletics ends up being Something that attracts students both to go to school there to play athletics, but also washed the athletics. So if sports is not going on, that ends up being a hit, I think of a place like Mama. College. For example, in Illinois. They told me that 50% of the students there are athletes to three athletes. So going there and playing their sport is a huge Is a huge incentive for the students to enroll in Monaco. And then finally, there's the tuition considerations paying for the classes themselves. So many of these colleges are highly highly tuition dependent. And if students aren't there, even if they have a loss of a small number of students that ends up being ah, huge hit for the college financially, so we're going to see big budget cuts coming up because of that. So schools have decided to go online this year are going to be losing money. Not necessarily. I mean, there have been situations where Colleges are going online. They're charging sort of a similar amount that they would charge for an in person course. So on the tuition, they might be making money. They just might not be making money on the room and board and that'll end up being a head. This might be a cynical question. But do you think that some of these schools may have opened at first, really knowing that they were going to shut down and go online, but acted as if they were going to have a really robust in person teaching experience? Because they wanted students to come and they wanted them to pay their tuition. Well, that is the cynical perspective on this, You know, I mean, I can't assign motives to these administrators. I think everybody involved really wanted to try to make this work. I mean, Again. These colleges are under intense financial pressure, given the trends in higher education. I mean, there were a lot of other factors that they had to put in place. A lot of money spent on bringing students there. I mean, you have to think about all the contracts that they set up with food service with dorms with landscaping, and so on. It. It just seemed like it seemed like it would be a short sighted decision, even if it were operated only cynically. Let's talk a little bit about how colleges and universities air handling, testing and quarantine people. On their campuses who have the virus. You know, I've read about some schools that we're planning to test their students like twice a week. And, you know test can cost around $100 a pop that's going to get expensive really quickly. Yes. At Cal State in particular, you know, Cal State has said that they're going to do an online semester in the spring. They're doing online semester this semester now, and I think Tim White, who's the chancellor of Cal State's Testing would cost the university the university system overall, something like $25 million a week is just not possible to do. Yeah, Some of these tests run anywhere from 102 $150 a piece That's very expensive. Now. The University of Illinois has developed this rapid saliva test, which is has become pretty cheap. It's it's cost about 10 to $15 for them to do it. And it's fast and it's connected to this. So that I think will start to move the ball little bit as.

University of Illinois Chronicle of Higher Education Scott Carlson writer state University Ames New York Times mohr Monaco Tim White Illinois Sam Burger president Terry Gross chancellor Ohio
"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Facing unprecedented challenges. We asked fresh air producer Sam Rigor to explore the dilemma with the following interview. Here, Sam, a student's returned to colleges and universities. Over the last few weeks, campuses have become the new hot spots for Corona virus outbreaks. The New York Times is reporting that there are over 88,000 cases of Corona virus on college and university campuses across the country. While some schools decided to offer all their courses online, many had ambitious plans to open in person with various levels of protocols in place to protect students and staff. These included testing practices in dorm rooms set aside for quarantine. But as cases rose among their students, schools like UNC Chapel Hill have had to reverse course and go completely online. Other schools like Iowa State University remain open. Despite having over 1000 cases of Corona virus. Student parties are being blamed by campus administrators for the spread of the disease. But should these schools have opened in the first place? We wanted to talk to someone about what's going on in colleges and universities across the country are guest. Scott Carlson is a senior writer for the Chronicle of Higher Education. He's been covering how schools of approach teaching during the pandemic and also about the financial health of colleges and universities. I spoke to him on Monday from his home in Baltimore. Well. Scott Carson, Welcome to fresh air. Thanks for having me on. So you know, As I just said The New York Times is reporting that they're over 88,000 cases of virus across colleges, universities you spent last spring and summer reporting on like how schools were planning to open. Do those numbers surprise you? Did you anticipate there'd be that many cases? I think a lot of people thought that there would be an explosion of cases on campus. So you know the colleges. Were debating internally whether whether to come back after the spring semester, and you had administration and board of governors really pushing for reopening plans in a number of cases. UNC being one in particular Georgia being another one. And then internally you had a number of faculty members and students and others course saying, Really, there's no way for colleges. Tio keep students from sort of gathering in the kinds of social situations off campus on campus that would lead to a Corona virus spread. So this isn't really surprising to a lot of people that there would be these kinds of, you know, acceleration of cases around Corona virus, Given that these colleges are under a lot of financial pressure right now, so the pressure to open The the The movement Open was really driven by financial decisions in a lot of cases and you know, pressure politically and pressure to from parents and students strings in particular who really wanted to have a fall semester of some kind. In some cases, but most of the students that I talked to, for example at UNC They all knew that the colleges couldn't keep this under control. They just wanted to turn up for a few weeks to see if they could have something of a fall semester experience. We'll, We'll get to some of those pressures in the second. But before that, can you give us a sense of how many schools across the country decided to go online the semester and how many plan to have leased some amount of in person learning? Yes, So it's interesting. The colleges that have chosen to go in person or primarily or fully amounts to about 20%. That's an interesting Number two me Because if you looked at this earlier in the summer, the number of colleges that were saying we're gonna have an in person semester was well over half. You have to wonder if that was just projecting confidence about what the fall would be. Since so much money was tied up and having an in person semester soon right now it's 20% of college is having some kind of in person courses. It's 16% doing kind of a hybrid, of course, which is part online part in person. A quarter of them are doing education primarily on line. 6% are doing it fully online and some quarter are still trying to figure out what they're going to do. Do you know if they're any schools that have had big outbreaks, but they're still trying to keep a semblance of normalcy. You look, a University of Illinois, for example, So University of Illinois has adopted this testing system that's really one of the most celebrated in the country because it's really vast. They're testing the students twice a week on that campus, in fact, one of the first weeks that they came back to school in the fall. They had done on the University of Illinois campus. Something like 2 to 3% of the tests that were done across the country on that campus, So it's a tremendous number. They also have that looked up to a nap. That connects to the test results and then acts like a kind of boarding pass that allows students to get in and out of dorms. And if the test comes back, a negative student gets a kind of Screen shot or sort of the screen display that says, Hey, you're all clear that screen displacing all clear, allows that student to get into all of the dorm buildings on campus. All of the Academic buildings on campus and other buildings on campus. But it's also being adopted by some of the businesses that are in the urban a champagne area so you can't get into this restaurant. You can't get into this bar unless you flash your past your covert past, so to speak. The issue is, are people going to stick to the rules? You know, you've read about situations where the students are hacking these these notifications Rams on and getting them to show that it's It's a clear test when it actually isn't well and there they had a spread of the virus. Because students were not distancing. Maybe this is a result of the widespread testing. Maybe students thought, Hey, you know, with all this testing on campus, we can do what we want, but it did into spreading the virus, so they did lock things down for a while, and they're trying to maintain The school year as it is thinking that with the kind of testing they had on campus, they'll be able to control this in the future if they're able to reprimand the students who have been not engaging in social distancing or going to parties and song. You visited Ames, Iowa, which is the home of Iowa State University, a school that's had one of the larger outbreaks on this campus. Tell us what you saw there. So I went around the town for the most part and talk to people there. What you see first is that no one is wearing a mask right off campus. We walk into the bars, you walk into the restaurant's Everyone is unmasked and sitting in small rooms together. Sure, they're separated. They're supposed to be separated at the tables. There's supposed to be separated at the bars, but you know this is really sort of enclosed environment..

Iowa State University University of Illinois Sam Rigor Corona The New York Times UNC Chapel Hill Scott Carson producer Chronicle of Higher Education Ames Scott Carlson Iowa Baltimore Georgia writer
"scott carlson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So what You know, if you talk to say Moody's or some of the other analysts of the industry, they would say, Look for colleges that are that have small endowments that Aurora Leigh situated that don't have names. That don't have distinctive programs. I mean, all of those things are are really important to establishing a sort of a position in this industry. So the prestige schools are probably okay but some of the smaller or lesser known schools, it's possible that they're going to go under well that create a disparity in who actually gets to go to college. Yes, it will create a disparity and who gets to go to college because a lot of those smaller institutions Even if they seem expensive, or even if they're not really not all that selective. They do have a really great history of attracting students, bringing them in. Giving them a degree, particularly students from first generation or low income backgrounds. Um, and they do private small private colleges tend to do a better job of that, then some public institutions and even some community colleges So, Yeah, There will be a disparity there an educational achievement that will come out of this. You know the the elite colleges. They're always going to be okay, not only because they have the endowment. But because they're able to pull students up when they're when they're lacking and demand they can always pull students up from colleges that are at lower tiers. So they can meet the demand for themselves because they just had that prestige. You know, what I worry about is the loss of biodiversity. A number of these smaller institutions can be really special places that are in a way experimental. You know, I think about a place like the college of the Atlantic, and I don't know how the college of the Atlantic is doing in the covert crisis, but You know, this is a small college in Bar Harbor, Maine, where there's on ly one major. It's human ecology, which can mean anything You want it to mean It's built around the idea of environmentalism at that college. It really ends up being an interesting educational experience. Because the college has less resources than other schools. They really rely on the students to go out and seek their own grants to do their own work to find their own equipment to pull off these sort of very hands on kinds of College lessons. You know that place was founded. In the late 19 sixties early 19 seventies around really innovative ideas and higher education. And these small institutions are the kinds of places that can make those kinds of shifts. You know, you think about a place like Goddard College in Vermont, another college that has had financial trouble in recent years. Got her college was the place that started the low residency program that is the kind of programme where you turn up at the college for maybe a week or two, and then you go and do the rest of it in distance form, And they started that in the 19 forties, and it's turned out to be a really interesting way a really different ways. Something you don't see Ah lot in higher education. For offering Education to people at a distance, but that is still very much connected to a local community and connected to a cohort. These small schools are able to shift in ways that you know larger institutions have trouble shifting, and they are the innovative edge of higher education. If we end up losing them simply because they don't have the economies of scale to be able to offer cheaper education or they're just remote, and students don't feel like they want to go there. They don't feel like they have. The resource is or the entertainment there that they would have. If they went to an urban institution. I think that would be really tragic if we lost these places. Scott Carlson. Thanks so much for being on fresh air. Thank you for having me. Scott Carlson is senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education. He spoke with fresh air producer Sam Bricker. Coming up. David Bianculli reviews the new Netflix drama series Ratchet by Ryan Murphy. It's about a younger version of the character nurse Ratchet from the film One flew over the Cuckoo's Nest. This is fresh air. W. N. Y. C is supported by HarperPerennial, publisher of more Than a Woman, The older Wiser Follow up to how to be a woman by Caitlin Moran, a new take on modern day middle aged women that tackles heavy topics with a light touch wherever books are sold. W. N. Y. C is a media partner of the City.

Goddard College Scott Carlson Chronicle of Higher Education Moody Aurora Leigh Atlantic Ratchet Caitlin Moran Bar Harbor David Bianculli Netflix Maine Vermont W. N. Y. C partner HarperPerennial Sam Bricker publisher Ryan Murphy writer
"scott carlson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sometimes 50% you talkto landlords and they're saying we can't We have unfilled beds here in town. We can't fill them because people are coming. So it ends up being a really difficult situation for the locals. People who you know, may not be aligned with the kinds of attitudes that are on the campus politically. But they still rely on the economic muscle that the college or university can bring. So in some ways, I must create an interesting discourse between people who have different political beliefs. Absolutely. I mean, in a place like Ames. You know you have people who absolutely didn't believe that the current virus Wass riel, and yet they still wanted the students to come back, and they were still nervous about How the students would spread that virus through the community. Essentially, they didn't believe it was real. And yet they're worried about it's spreading. Yeah. I mean, they raise skepticism about whether it was real or not. So But they did. I mean, it's kind of one of these situations where I think the population is a bit schizophrenic about this. I mean, They're not sure whether it's real. They're not seeing direction from the federal government on DH there not seen direction from public figures and so on. But at the same time the numbers are climbing. It's clear that people are getting sick. His size and issue here. I mean, like some of these universities are like small cities unto themselves. With tens of thousands of students. You've got faculty administration staff maintenance people working in food service. You are smaller schools just in a better position to handle the pandemic because of numbers. If you look at the Corona virus tracker that the New York Times has put up for college is you can see that it's the big state institutions that have really seen a spike in numbers. And I think that has to do with the anonymity off living on a big state University. You know, it's a It's a tens of thousands of people and You know the notion that you can sort of escape into the crowd and not have AH kind of responsibility toward the rest of the student population is a little more pop possible when you're more anonymous on those campuses. In the case of smaller colleges, which he noticed from that trackers. They really haven't seen a spike in cases that these larger state universities have, and I think that has to do something with the kind of community that's in these smaller schools. Also, the smaller schools tend to be really situated. So they're outside the cities and outside of contact points, where the where the students might be able to pick up Cove it more easily. So you're saying that in larger university's students can adopt like airport behavior, and just not really think about their their co students as much as that? That's a problem. Well, I mean what you're finding in cases like the University of Illinois. Is that they have a vast testing program set up, but It only takes a handful of students to really ruin that if you get a small group of students that hold a party or go to a frat party or socializing and an irresponsible way. Those students end up spreading out across the campus or leading to a rise in numbers. Significant rising numbers. What you find out at small colleges is it's a little bit more of a community feel There's mohr contact between students, administrators and professors, and that kind of smaller community at that sort of smaller environment tends to lead to more self policing. I will say this that Even on these big state university campuses. A lot of the students I talked to had, say, UNC. We were really disappointed in the students that were ruining the fall semester for them, so it's not like every student is out there being irresponsible. This is a handful of students who are You know, not engaging in the kind of social distancing that they should. Why don't we take a short break here speaking with Scott Carlson, senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education about how colleges and universities are being impacted by the Corona virus. We'll be back shortly. This is fresh air. On.

Wass riel state University University of Illinois Ames Chronicle of Higher Education New York Times Scott Carlson mohr writer
"scott carlson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies in for Terry. Gross College campuses have become the pandemics. Newest hot spots. The New York Times reports There are more than 88,000 cases of Corona virus at the nation's colleges and universities. What went into the planning of schools that decided to open and how are they testing students and quarantining the sick students are being blamed for the outbreaks for breaking rules and going to parties. But should schools have opened in the first place? And what are the financial challenges that Cove it poses to colleges and universities? Today we speak with Scott Carlson, senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education about the tough decisions colleges are facing. And David Bianculli reviews the New Netflix series, Ratchet. First the news. Live from NPR News. I'm Janine Herbst. Michael Caputo, The Trump Administration appointee to the Health and Human Services Department, is taking a 60 Day leave of absence. He came under fire for a Facebook live event over the weekend on his personal page. Talking about non existing conspiracies within the CDC, saying there was a resistance unit in the agency and accusing public health leaders there of sedition against the Trump administration. Also, Paul Alexander, whom Caputo brought on as a scientific advisor. Is leaving the department altogether. Residents of the Gulf coast of Florida and Alabama.

Michael Caputo Trump Administration Janine Herbst Health and Human Services Depa Dave Davies Chronicle of Higher Education David Bianculli NPR News Scott Carlson Facebook CDC scientific advisor Paul Alexander Terry Gulf Netflix The New York Times writer Florida
"scott carlson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KCRW

"Has been devastating college finances and some of them are even on the brink of closing. What does that mean for college towns? Frank Morris of member Station has this look. Att one rural college community. Lots of towns across rule. America are in steep decline, but tiny Sterling Kansas is an island of vitality. Ah, pleasant Tuesday evening, a local gospel quintet entertains folks spread out on lawn chairs in a large tidal park. This town is anchored by Sterling College, a private evangelical Christian school, founded in 18 87. College senior Cuyler calmly calls it one big partnership. There's just so much overlap in community supports the college to college supports the community. You know, you just see how everything's intertwined. This remote town of 2200 boasts good schools, white collar jobs and a healthy downtown. College students, faculty and staff breathed life into the place, same as they do for hundreds of other little college towns across the country. But students left here in March and they haven't come back. Criminal justice Professor Mark Tremain is worried. I think the bottom line is we've got to get students back to campus. If we're going to survive. I think we have to accept whatever the risks are and do it. Starting college depends on about 500 students paying up to $26,000 a year tuition and another eight or nine grand for room and board. Sterling College President Scott Rich says the school like many others, scrapes by from year to year. We're always dependent upon enrollment always depended upon that next year, always dependent upon persistence or retention. We have to get students to come back. And we're dealing with a lot of challenges. Most schools now face daunting decisions. Scott Carlson follows the rolling crisis for the Chronicle of Higher Education. I think some of the people I know are looking at hundreds of college is going out of business within the next several years if this pandemic continues, and if the economic devastation associated with it continues, small liberal arts colleges have been shaky. For years, Enrollments have slumped down mints have been tapped. Many schools have piled on debt in a building fueled by competition for students. Most offer classes online, but online classes don't pay the bills. Most small schools survived by providing an expensive high touch in person College experience, and Carlson says the pandemic is shredding that business model. These colleges are Unique little entities all on their own, and each one of them provides a unique spin on higher education At Sterling College. The foundation is Christianity, but football is came. Workers here putting the final touches on a big Jim classroom in office complex. Many students enroll here for the chance to play college sports. It's a major selling point. About 1/4 of the students attending in person are on the football team. That's right 1/4 but sporting events could be major vectors for disease. And Jed Miller, who's finishing his degree it's early online next year, says That's another vulnerability. If Cove it defeats the athletics season this year. It will probably defeat a lot of small colleges and as a result heard a lot of small towns. Badly. While small college towns tend to be some of the healthiest communities in remote rural areas, the colleges those towns depend on now pose a physical danger to residence. Christina Darn hours a family practice doctor in sterling, the college probably is the most dangerous. Element for us in terms of covert. Shit. Potentially brings back students from all over the US who have variable levels of exposure across the country. Small colleges and college towns faced the same dilemma over opening, but not everyone thinks that's all bad. Richard Price at the Clayton Christians and Institute argues that the pandemic will lead to better online classes and more equitable schools. The traditional model. It was originally for the landed elite. And it wasn't sure all genders. It wasn't for all races, and that is slowly getting phased out. Along with some older business models that aren't fitting well, and price thinks many small colleges will adapt. Lots of them have cheated death before. There's no question the pandemic will close a number of American colleges and unravel small college towns along the way for NPR news. I'm Frank Morris.

Sterling College evangelical Christian school Cuyler Professor Mark Tremain Chronicle of Higher Education Scott Carlson Scott Rich President
"scott carlson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KCRW

"This town is anchored by Sterling College, a private evangelical Christian school, founded in 18 87. College senior Cuyler calmly calls it one big partnership. There's just so much overlap in community supports the college to college supports the community. You know, you just see how everything's intertwined. This remote town of 2200 boasts good schools, white collar jobs and a healthy downtown. College students, faculty and staff breathed life into the place, same as they do for hundreds of other little college towns across the country. But students left here in March and they haven't come back. Criminal justice Professor Mark Tremain is worried. I think the bottom line is we've got to get students back to campus. If we're going to survive. I think we have to accept whatever the risks are and do it. Starting college depends on about 500 students paying up to $26,000 a year tuition and another eight or nine grand for room and board. Sterling College President Scott Rich says the school like many others, scrapes by from year to year. We're always dependent upon enrollment always depended upon that next year, always dependent upon persistence or retention. We have to get students to come back. And we're dealing with a lot of challenges. Most schools now face daunting decisions. Scott Carlson follows the rolling crisis for the Chronicle of Higher Education. I think some of the people I know are looking at hundreds of college is going out of business within the next several years if this pandemic continues, and if the economic devastation associated with it continues, small liberal arts colleges have been shaky. For years, Enrollments have slumped down mints have been tapped..

Sterling College evangelical Christian school Cuyler Professor Mark Tremain Chronicle of Higher Education Scott Carlson Scott Rich President
As Pandemic Hits Colleges' Finances, Small Town May Be Affected Too

Morning Edition

04:28 min | 1 year ago

As Pandemic Hits Colleges' Finances, Small Town May Be Affected Too

"Has been devastating college finances and some of them are even on the brink of closing. What does that mean for college towns? Frank Morris of member Station has this look. Att one rural college community. Lots of towns across rule. America are in steep decline, but tiny Sterling Kansas is an island of vitality. Ah, pleasant Tuesday evening, a local gospel quintet entertains folks spread out on lawn chairs in a large tidal park. This town is anchored by Sterling College, a private evangelical Christian school, founded in 18 87. College senior Cuyler calmly calls it one big partnership. There's just so much overlap in community supports the college to college supports the community. You know, you just see how everything's intertwined. This remote town of 2200 boasts good schools, white collar jobs and a healthy downtown. College students, faculty and staff breathed life into the place, same as they do for hundreds of other little college towns across the country. But students left here in March and they haven't come back. Criminal justice Professor Mark Tremain is worried. I think the bottom line is we've got to get students back to campus. If we're going to survive. I think we have to accept whatever the risks are and do it. Starting college depends on about 500 students paying up to $26,000 a year tuition and another eight or nine grand for room and board. Sterling College President Scott Rich says the school like many others, scrapes by from year to year. We're always dependent upon enrollment always depended upon that next year, always dependent upon persistence or retention. We have to get students to come back. And we're dealing with a lot of challenges. Most schools now face daunting decisions. Scott Carlson follows the rolling crisis for the Chronicle of Higher Education. I think some of the people I know are looking at hundreds of college is going out of business within the next several years if this pandemic continues, and if the economic devastation associated with it continues, small liberal arts colleges have been shaky. For years, Enrollments have slumped down mints have been tapped. Many schools have piled on debt in a building fueled by competition for students. Most offer classes online, but online classes don't pay the bills. Most small schools survived by providing an expensive high touch in person College experience, and Carlson says the pandemic is shredding that business model. These colleges are Unique little entities all on their own, and each one of them provides a unique spin on higher education At Sterling College. The foundation is Christianity, but football is came. Workers here putting the final touches on a big Jim classroom in office complex. Many students enroll here for the chance to play college sports. It's a major selling point. About 1/4 of the students attending in person are on the football team. That's right 1/4 but sporting events could be major vectors for disease. And Jed Miller, who's finishing his degree it's early online next year, says That's another vulnerability. If Cove it defeats the athletics season this year. It will probably defeat a lot of small colleges and as a result heard a lot of small towns. Badly. While small college towns tend to be some of the healthiest communities in remote rural areas, the colleges those towns depend on now pose a physical danger to residence. Christina Darn hours a family practice doctor in sterling, the college probably is the most dangerous. Element for us in terms of covert. Shit. Potentially brings back students from all over the US who have variable levels of exposure across the country. Small colleges and college towns faced the same dilemma over opening, but not everyone thinks that's all bad. Richard Price at the Clayton Christians and Institute argues that the pandemic will lead to better online classes and more equitable schools. The traditional model. It was originally for the landed elite. And it wasn't sure all genders. It wasn't for all races, and that is slowly getting phased out. Along with some older business models that aren't fitting well, and price thinks many small colleges will adapt. Lots of them have cheated death before. There's no question the pandemic will close a number of American colleges and unravel small college towns along the way for NPR news. I'm Frank Morris.

Sterling College Frank Morris Scott Carlson Evangelical Christian School Chronicle Of Higher Education Richard Price Member Station America NPR Professor Mark Tremain Cuyler Kansas United States Athletics Clayton Christians And Institu Jed Miller Christina Darn Scott Rich JIM Football
"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pleasant Tuesday evening, a local gospel quintet entertains folks spread out on lawn chairs in a large, tidy park. Is down is anchored by Sterling College, a private evangelical Christian school. Founded in 18 87 college senior Cuyler calmly calls it one big partnership. There's just so much overlap the community supports the College college supports the community. You know, you just see how everything's intertwined. This remote town of 2200 boasts good schools, white collar jobs and a healthy downtown college students, faculty and staff breathe life into the place, same as they do for hundreds of other little college towns across the country. The students left here in March, and they haven't come back. Criminal justice Professor Mark Tremain is worried. I think the bottom line is we've got to get students back to campus. If we're going to survive. I think we have to accept whatever the risks are and do it. Student college depends on about 500 students paying up to $26,000 a year tuition and another eight or nine grand for room and board. During college President Scott Rich says the school like many others, scrapes by from year to year. We're always dependent upon enrollment always dependent upon that next year, always dependent upon persistence or retention. We have to get students to come back. And we're dealing with a lot of challenges. Most schools now face daunting decision. Scott Carlson follows the rolling crisis for the Chronicle of Higher Education. I think some of the people I know are looking at hundreds of college is going out of business within the next several years if this pandemic continues, and if the economic devastation associated with it continues, small liberal arts colleges have been shaky. For years, enrollments of slumped down mons have intact..

Sterling College Christian school Professor Mark Tremain Chronicle of Higher Education Scott Carlson Cuyler Scott Rich President
"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We've seen a spate of announcements from colleges that will hold classes online, though all virtual, from Johns Hopkins to Howard University. But for campuses that are opening their doors and their dormitories. Some are attempting a closed campus approach. Their restricting visitors and students comings and going saying, You know, once you've arrived on campus, you're not supposed to leave. I spoke to David Paul Teel, a professor of public health at Yale University about this now His research suggests that without frequent testing, it's going to be tougher to limit the spread of this virus. And he says, this walled garden approach of trying to create kind of a bubble over school. Just isn't very realistic. There are just too many reasons. Students may need to come and go. There are inevitably going to be exceptions that are going to need to be made for these special circumstances. And every one of those exceptions is going to poke a little hole in the wall that you think you're erecting around your campus. It's akin to creating a no peace zone in a swimming pool. It hasn't worked, Allison, Thanks for bringing us that Amid all this disastrous, disastrous news. We got to get our laughs where we can. You did say at the beginning Amid all these somber numbers, you said Plateau, you said decline. Are we doing any better as a country? You know when it comes to doing better about social distancing and masking. I think it's a really mixed bag. I mean, New York has brought the rate down to 1% which is very impressive. But yesterday, the mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, Quentin Lucas said on CBS that you know people to start paying attention to public health recommendations. House parties of up to hundreds of people. Ah, lot of backyard parties and a lot of folks in families and other in formal settings that aren't following social Distancing rules aren't wearing masks and that has helped fuel the spread both here and in the states around us. And he says that this type of behavior that could feel new outbreaks. So as we've said many times, Steve, we all need to do our part. NPR's Alison Aubrey reporting from home as she has been doing for months. Allison, thanks so much for your work. Thank you, Steve. The pandemic has been devastating college finances and some of them are even on the brink of closing. What does that mean for college towns? Frank Morris of member Station has this look. Att one rural college community. Lots of towns across rule. America are in steep decline, but tiny Sterling Kansas is an island of vitality Pleasant Tuesday evening, a local gospel quintet entertains folks spread out on lawn chairs in a large tidal park. Is down is anchored by Sterling College, a private evangelical Christian school. Founded in 18 87 college senior Cuyler calmly calls it one big partnership. There's just so much overlap the community supports the college to college supports the community. You know, you just see how everything's intertwined. This remote town of 2200 boasts good schools, white collar jobs and a healthy downtown college students, faculty and staff breathe life into the place, same as they do for hundreds of other little college towns across the country. The students left here in March, and they haven't come back. Criminal justice Professor Mark Tremain is worried. I think the bottom line is we've got to get students back to campus. If we're going to survive. I think we have to accept whatever the risks are and do it. Student college depends on about 500 students paying up to $26,000 a year tuition and another eight or nine grand for room and board. Sterling College President Scott Rich says the school like many others, scrapes by from year to year. We're always dependent upon enrollment always dependent upon that next year, always dependent upon persistence or retention. We have to get students to come back. And we're dealing with a lot of challenges. Most schools now face daunting decision. Scott Carlson follows the rolling crisis for the Chronicle of Higher Education. I think some of the people I know are looking at hundreds of college is going out of business within the next several years if this pandemic continues, and if the economic devastation associated with it continues, small liberal arts colleges have been shaky. For years, enrollments of slumped down mons have intact..

Sterling College Christian school David Paul Teel Allison Quentin Lucas Steve Johns Hopkins Yale University professor of public health Chronicle of Higher Education Howard University Alison Aubrey New York Professor Mark Tremain Kansas City Scott Carlson NPR Cuyler Frank Morris
"scott carlson" Discussed on X96

X96

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on X96

"There is also an option for parents to have their Children stay. Online at home if they prefer. It's really important that we allow parents to make that choice. It's board member Scott Carlson there back to school plan in this canyon school district. They want to reopen. And returned to in person learning in the Canyon district's proposed plans to reopen It includes three different options that would be available to families to choose from for the fall school semester. The first option would provide a completely in person learning experience. That would be a similar as possible. So what students are you used to? The second provides I 100% online platform where students will be taught remotely through their school within the district, And finally, 1/3 option would allow parents to homeschool their Children using a curriculum provided by the parents. I mean, this is the way to do it is is give people a choice and what they're comfortable with, But the thing that scared me was, the people in the Alpine district said. Well, that's fine. But I'm sending my kid to school without a mask. Anyway, I don't care what you say. I'm sending him with that. Yeah. Then if you feel that way about it, then keep your kids home. After witnessing an alarming spike in Corona virus cases Top leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints here in Utah amped up their support for masks Friday by asking all members of the beehive state to be good citizens by wearing facemasks coverings while in public. This message came from the Utah area presidency. The three member presidency, led by General Authority 70 Craig see, Christy Anson said. A growing chorus of medical experts has repeatedly reaffirmed that wearing a mask in public ones. And when social distancing is not possible will significantly reduce the spread of covert 19. This is true both indoors and outdoors, said the church leaders. They also thank those latter day Saints who have dawned masks when returning to worship service. But the letter that they put out didn't call for government officials to require that Utahns put on Face coverings, a plea that many health care authorities have. Invoked. I'm glad that the's church presidents said this that's terrific. But we need the actual church presidency. To step up and be leaders. And tell their followers. You need to be wearing a mask. Well, they need tell the Governor governor you need to tell everybody. The governor will get the letter in the ward newsletter. And then he'll go heaven. Oh, I didn't realize I guess we need to do this. Well, press. I'm the governor of the state, but but President Nelson says we should wear masks, so okay, everybody put him on. Come on. I recognize that somebody tell somebody to do something. Elaine Maxwell. Was made an appearance remotely. Ah, hearing a bail hearing yesterday. Ah and ah So her attorney, Mark Cohen, began by describing the inhuman conditions that his multi millionaire client friend of princes and presidents has suffered in jail. Just she's she is suffering so lot of your own ear, You know acknowledgement of multiple survivors of childhood sexual abuse of her decades long involvement with the late pedophile and sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein. Just just the lawyer Cohen, riding a bullet trained to the really important stuff like she's all alone in her room lights on all the time. She wasn't allowed a shower for 72 hours. I mean, really, What good is jail time without fancy pajamas in a shower, you know, and a mask that you can wear. But she is doesn't look like she's going to get bail. Um They talked about. The government lawyers talked about how what a flight risk she would be. They talked about how she was hiding out in New Hampshire, and they said when when we raided the place she was staying. We found a cell phone wrapped up in tin foil because she thought that would protect her from being people be able to have a hat to hat. No, that's great. Thie. Internet Never disappoints. Finally, this story. Physically speaking. Researchers conclude. That it would be unlikely that anyone could ever top the amount. Off 80. What is it? 83 hot dogs eaten by a single person in one sitting Current world record is 74. It's a bar set by parental, perennial competitive eating champion Joey Chestnut, but this theoretical 84 hot dog limit Is inviting many many questions. What are the limitations? Just how much food on a human stomach Possibly hold or is it a chewing and swallowing thing? I mean, if we could just unhinge our jaws like pythons with the number of hot dogs you could swallow go up. But there is a study that has answers that says We think that the limit is 80 for hot dogs. It's not good for you, they say. 74 hot dogs is roughly equivalent to 21,000 calories. How much sodium to know, but But they say, we think that maybe Joey Chestnut could eat 80 for hot dogs. He hasn't done it yet. It may someday it's something to shoot for. Well, there's your sports. Gina. Sorry. That's okay. It's always time for so weather traffic. Yeah, we're creeping back up there yesterday. Actually kind of felt cool, which is weird, even though in the upper Today will be 91 we do still have that bad air we've been dealing with because it's hot and nothing's moving it around. So for some tips on helping out with our ozone layer in your Involvement in making the air worse. Go to x 96 dot com. We've got that you care program going on. You get some tips there on what you can do to help traffic..

Joey Chestnut Utah Mark Cohen canyon school district Saints Scott Carlson Jeffrey Epstein Church of Jesus Christ New Hampshire Elaine Maxwell Christy Anson Gina President Nelson General Authority attorney
"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A lot of people think that contact tracing and it is. It's about measurement in determining things, but it's also an intervention. If it's done, right. It's also a chance to get ahead and say Hey, is there something? How do we know who to prioritize tests for? How do we know who to prioritize Karen beds for As opposed to just trying to identify every chain of transmission in an area of Florida. I'm not sure that numbers wins again. I think strategy is going to win over numbers in those places. That's Eric Perak, Solicit faculty member at Duke University. Erik. Thank you. Well. Some colleges have already said they're not holding in person classes this fall because of covert. 19 other schools have put off the decision. And that has some college students wrestling with whether or not to enroll for the fall or defer until they can be sure to have a full college experience. Remember station KOW in Seattle. I leash O'Neill reports this spring, Abby. Oh, Young was a junior Pomona College near Los Angeles. When the school announced it was closing, and everyone had to leave. I was helping my friend pack up her room. And she turned to me and she said Abby. What if we don't even come back in the fall? It's a question college administrators themselves are asking. The Chronicle of Higher education is tracking what colleges are planning for the fall. Most schools they're planning on in person classes. But others, including Harvard, all the campuses of California State University, and many community colleges planned to hold classes online. Other schools are waiting to make a decision. Ramona's in that camp administrators, saying they'll make an announcement in July just two months before classes. Air supposed to start. And Oh, Young says she was not impressed to this spring when she was living back at her mom's house in Seattle, taking online classes. Everyone I know it was just like Texting during class or like scrolling through Facebook, or like We would have group chats. With like our classmates about how boring the cross was. And oh, yang ads. What about all the learning that happens outside the classroom meeting with classmates in the library or having dinner at professors houses? Or for a student athlete like Oh, young on the golf course, If it's online like What are you paying for? It's a waste of my time and a waste of my mom's money thinking like that is a big problem for a lot of schools. How many students will actually show up in the fall? That's the huge, huge question. Scott Carlson covers college finance for the Chronicle of Higher Education. The deposits look good. That means that the students have plunked down a few $100 to secure a spy. That's not a guarantee of anything, Carlson says. The whole situation is putting college is in a precarious financial position. Endowments have taken huge hits. Declining enrollment could be a death now. Some colleges have already closed their doors permanently. Because of the pandemic. I think once we get into August You'll see a lot more Summ school's air trying to deal with the question of uncertain enrollment by taking a tough line against affirm it. University of Washington president Annamarie Kosei says If an admitted student decides not to enroll this fall, they'll have to reapply. You know, it's not that we're doing anything differently because of Kobe that we've instituted any new rules, but rather this has always been the way that we do things, but it's not just schools that are worried about money. Angie Aguirre. So bad, just graduated from Kennedy Catholic High School in Beery in a suburb south of Seattle. She's headed to BRANDEIS University in the fall. She's been dreaming of college since she was an elementary school. She'll be the first in her family to get an undergraduate degree. So encoded 19 started to change what college might look like It's earth shattering. When you have Set blitz list. It's kind of like that. Think that you wrote down is completely blotched over someone's filled water all over it. One of the big things direct about is worried about his money, a big part of her financial aid packages, work study and on campus job. BRANDEIS would give her Of school isn't in person. She's not sure the college will have a position for her. My family is not financially. Strong enough to really pay a lot about it says If BRANDEIS can't give her remote work, she'll keep her current job in a warehouse. She says. She's starting college this fall. No matter what I would continue to power through. I want to graduate. In four years in 2024. That is my goal. That's even though she won't know what BRANDEIS plans for the fall till early July for here, and now I'm a leash O'Neill in Seattle. This pandemic has totally changed how we shop. If we decide it's worth shopping at all. You know, I'm not about to buy patio furniture that I can't sit in to see how comfortable it is. So you had to put that on hold Hollywood a mid pandemic check in with consumers..

Kennedy Catholic High School BRANDEIS University Seattle Young Chronicle of Higher education Pomona College Angie Aguirre Florida Scott Carlson Facebook Abby Duke University golf Harvard O'Neill Eric Perak University of Washington Erik Los Angeles Ramona
"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:50 min | 3 years ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Mary. And welcome. How are you? Great. And we're so thrilled that you're with us today. We want to hear all about your film. Thank you. I'm excited to talk about it. How tell us. How did you? About search and rescue dogs. Well, I was really interested in understanding more sort of history of humans than dogs, and how we evolve together. And then I came upon a story of Matthew's rela and Matthews rela was Rhode Island state police sergeant and he has surfer noun for rescuing dogs from dot pounds and train them into search and rescue dogs. I came across this article about how his team had won a national award, and I reached out to the realistic Rhode Island state police and asked if I could observe the team, and it sort of unfolded for their Landau. Well, I'm sure Matthew was really excited that you are calling to tell him. You wanted to do is show a movie autumn. You know, I honestly, I'm not sure that he was. He was a really busy person actually with his dogs had been called to searches all over the country and Vietnam and train dogs all over the country as well. And so I think it was sort of a he felt a little bit like a mixed blessing because at first it was just I was observing. He and his colleague Scott Carlson as they were training. I didn't know right away that it would be a, you know, a documentary. Just just wanted to understand could this be just be a film. And if so what was the story, and I have to tell you the first day that I observed them training was innocent, abandoned amusement park, and I had never really been exposed to working dogs before. And I have to tell you MARCY. It was the most incredible thing to watch these men work with these animals in this incredibly patient methodical way. And basically, I followed Matt the first day he was sort of setting. Up a crime scene, and these are both search rescue live person search dogs and cadaver dogs have various means and ways by which they find missing people, and that particular day, they were setting up basically a crime scene or seen to train the dogs. And I had never seen anything like it. It was quite extraordinary and very sobering. But at the same time, you know, her working dog they have to stay up and focused. And so it was very interesting dynamic between us, very serious matter. But also this really fun dynamic with the dog. I had never expected such an incredible thing to unfold, and I really knew that day berry I day that I wanted to continue to watch and see what would happen. The question was how do you tell the story, and it turned out that required? A lot of patients to understand how to best film it and show it so that people could really feel immersed and walk alongside the canine handlers Lale, we'll end it is. Mean when you see working dogs do their job and interact with their human partners. I always say it's like it's like being in the presence of magic. I mean, really getting to see that. But like you said, how do you capture that on film? Yeah. Must've been a really interesting challenge at how did you talk Matt into doing the film? Well, it's interesting he'll say, well, he would say, well, I was ordered to do it. Trooper he kind of west because I asked permission, and it's not like he hit necessarily have the option to say. No. Although, of course, he had to agree because it was far more than fed just him on the job. Because as you know, these dogs are not just working dogs. They're also companions and family members. And so I really wanted to understand his story his backstory, how did he come upon this for his lifelong quest at how he dedicated himself to find missing persons? It takes so much more than just a nine to five job where you punch time clock. So it did turn out that I ended up getting to know him and his family really, well, and it really required all of that for me to understand how he came to understand his sort of calling you life, and as you see in the fell Waco in a little bit into his backstory, and you understand sort of you know, his childhood calling with dogs, and it's quite quite moving. Can you share some of that with us? Mary sore. Sure. So Matthew, he's a really interesting person when I began filming he was training multiple teams for the Rhode Island state police. He was trading. Search canine team he was also trading the urban search and rescue canine team and then other teams around the country. I don't had no absolutely no idea to me. He was just really smart guy who you know, is super UPI and intense and super athletic all those things you'd think with a first responder slash canine. Handler supreme rescue person. And I never expected that he would have been someone who had suffered from Xia. And as it turns out what he was a young child. He had a really hard time in school, and he didn't know Linus surly, and we started discover this in the movie, and he was kind enough to allow me to ask about that. And for him to share about it, and he tax very frankly about how you know when everybody else is coming. Down on you as a child, and you kept getting in trouble in school and your parents gala gate, you and your teachers are yelling at you. When you go home and your lock yourself in your room. You've got your dog, and how many of us kind of feel that way. Even now. A. Yeah. That's sort of where he allowed me to go in that story. And I think it's such an inspiring part of the story because I'm a professor at the university of Rhode Island, and I teach and I am a lifelong learner as well. And I can tell you that. Of course, I have my shortcomings, and I have my strengths. But at every point and every turn I absolutely learn from watching my dog and for watching these dogs. They have so much to teach us about loyalty compassion, Haitians than intelligence and leadership. You know, I think that there's a lot to be said for how dogs understand leadership. And certainly how people like Mazzarella have taught me and show people in the film about the I cannot agree with you more Mary. I mean, I've been partner with a dog now for going on thirty years, and I'm still amazed at that every day that genuine I mean, they're so present there so authentic. You know, there's. There's no other agendas for the dog. It's it is really so powerful. And that's so beautiful that Matt really opened up about that and share that because that can be so helpful to other parents of kids that they may be frustrated with and to look at it in a different way. That's just a beautiful at NAT has done some tremendous work in the criminal Justice field with the cases that he's worked on. And that he talks about that in the film quite a bit, right? Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. So, you know, a lot of the searches and cases that you see in the film, obviously, there are hundreds that Matt worked on and, you know, there are so many unsolved. Because so many of these searches are speculative, meaning you only have a certain amount of information to go on. But clearly that dog's ability within the criminal Justice realm to help find missing persons, whether that's live persons who have recently been. Lost or kidnapped or people that have been found and lost a coal cases that are unsolved after five ten twenty thirty years as you'll see in search dog Matt was called by the US military to help locate missing persons, it Vietnam missing soldiers in Vietnam, and he at Maximus were able to locate the remains of a missing American soldier who had been shot down in nineteen sixty six and that was a two thousand three so they're all these dots role in terms of finding missing persons, and helping to solve unsolved cases is an incredibly untapped resource and very exciting to watch. How I know you think about like you said the immediate case of something that just happened. But you don't think about something that the decades ago, and especially in another country like Vietnam. Wow. That's amazing. What an experience. That must have been for them. And like you said it's untapped. We really need to think about that. And how we could use these incredible resources to find these people that have been lost for so long Backley. Yeah. Well, so how did you when you were? I do want to ask you this about getting started for the film because I know so many people want to they want to create documentary film. Yes. How did you raise the money Mary as a university? Professor, how did you do that? I worked on. Well, this took a little bit of time. So I began the film with some small grants seed funds and for the entire duration of the fell my own sweat, which is really fine completely enjoyable, but I also did a Kickstarter campaign where in about thirty two days, we raised about seventy three thousand dollars, and that was really helpful in terms of getting us to the next level too narrowly, completing the film, and then along the way I've just been able to continue to raise money with grants, and that's been wonderful, what kind of grants did you get mostly a lot of Rhode Island's custody artists fans manatees grant at the beginning for development, which was incredibly helpful. And let's see the university of Rhode Island also has competitive grants that I was able to to get aboard it, and that's about sums it up in personal funds as well. Yeah. Yeah. And am I right to understand that it was filmed it for over four and a half. Half years status threat. Yes. So I have to say the first six months was mostly observing and filming trainings. What was really interesting is. You know, the way that I needed to film. It was what is called sorta fair taste style. Meaning you're sort of fly on the wall, you're really trying to be unobtrusive. And you're not interfering at all with the canine work that was really important to it that way because obviously you're working in an environment. That's very different. You can't tell people what you can't tell people. Oh, excuse me. But while you're trying to train this dog or imprint this dog, can you please do XYZ. No, we couldn't do that. So I had to share certain learn how to film unobtrusively gain all of these teams, trusted had them get sort of get to know me, and I just sort of absurd for a long time and filmed a lot of trainings, and in a way unbeknownst to me, I was being trained as well. So I knew exactly. On that. I search I knew exactly what was going to happen. And I really understood sort of how to fill that. I search at it in the way or and also also get what we need it to try to tell the story. But as you know, a search that's unfolding is very complicated. Yeah. And I and I was going to say we're going to talk about that. I want to hear more about that. Mary exactly how you were doing that. In those real time missing person searches so hang on to that thought is.

Rhode Island Matt Matthew Mary sore Vietnam professor university of Rhode Island Landau Mary. Scott Carlson Matthews rela Waco Linus Mazzarella US partner Maximus seventy three thousand dollars
"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:50 min | 3 years ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hello mary. And welcome. See how are you also work raised? And we're so thrilled that you're with us today. We want to hear all about your film. Thank you. I'm excited to talk about it. How tell us. How did you see the film about search and rescue dogs? Well, I was really interested in understanding more sort of history of humans and dogs, and how we evolved together. And then I came upon the story of Matthew's Rila and Matthews rela was a Rhode Island state police sergeant and he has sort of renowned for rescuing dogs from pounds and train them into search and rescue dogs. I came across this article about how his team had won national award, and I reached out to the realistic Rhode Island state police and asked if I could observe the team, and it sort of unfolded for their. Wow. Well, I'm sure Matthew was really excited that you are calling to tell him you wanted to do a show a movie on him. You know? I honestly, I'm not sure that he was. He was a really busy person actually with his dogs and had been called to searches all over the country and Vietnam and train dogs all over the country as well. And so I think it was sort of a he felt a little bit like a mixed blessing because at first it was just I was observing. He and his colleague Scott Carlson as they were training. I didn't know right away that it would be a, you know, a documentary. I just sort of wanted to understand could this be just be a film. And if so what was the story, and I have to tell you the first day that I observed them training was in his abandoned amusement park, and I had never really been exposed to working dogs before. And I have to tell you MARCY. It was the most incredible to watch these men work with these animals in this incredibly patient methodical way. And basically, I followed Matt the first day he was sort of setting. Up a crime scene, and these are both search and rescue live person search dogs and cadaver dogs, and they have various means and ways by which they find missing people, and that particular day, they were setting up basically a crime scene or a murder scene to train the dogs. And I had never seen anything like it. It was quite extraordinary and very sobering. But at the same time, you know for working dogs, they have to stay up and focused. And so it was very interesting dynamic between this very serious matter. But also this really fun dynamic with the dog. I had never expected such an incredible thing to unfold, and I really knew that day that very first day that I wanted to continue to watch and see what would happen. The question was how do you tell the story, and it turned out that required? Sort of a lot of patients to understand how to best film it and show it so that people could really feel immersed and walk alongside these canine handlers Landau, and it is. I mean when you see working dogs do their job and interact with their human partners. I always say it's like it's like being in the presence of magic. I mean, really getting to see that. But like you said, how do you capture that on film? Yeah. Must've been a really interesting challenge at how did you talk Matt into doing the film? Well, it's interesting he'll say, well, he would say, well, I was ordered to do it. Trooper he kind of was because I asked permission, and it's not like he necessarily have the option to say, no. Although, of course, he had to agree because it was far more than than just him on the job. Because as you know, these dogs are not just working dogs. They're also companions and family members. And so I really wanted to understand his story his backstory, how did he come upon this for his lifelong quest at how he dedicated himself to find missing persons? It takes so much more than just a nine to five job where you punch the time clock. So it did turn out that I ended up getting to know him and his family really, well, and it really required all of that for me to understand how he came to understand his sort of calling you life, and as you see in Waco in a little bit into his backstory, and you understand sort of his childhood calling with dogs, and it's quite quite moving. Can you share some of that with us? Mary sore. Sure. So Matthew, he's a really interesting person when I began filming he was training multiple teams for the Rhode Island state police. He was trading. Search Meskini team. He was also trading the urban search and rescue canine team, and then other teams around the country had no absolutely no idea to me. He was just as really smart guy who you know, is super upbeat and intense, and, you know, super athletes all those things you'd think with a first responder slash canine handler can rescue person, and I never expected that he would have been someone who had suffered from dyslexia. And as it turns out when he was a young child. He had a really hard time in school, and he didn't know Linus early, and we serve discover this in the movie, and he was kind enough to allow me to ask about that. And for him to share about it. And he talks very frankly about how you know when everybody else is coming. Down on you as a child, and you kept getting in trouble in school and your parents gala gate, you and your teachers are yelling at you. When you go home and your lock yourself in your room. You've got your dog, and how many of us kind of feel that way. Even now. Yeah. That's sort of where he allowed me to go in that story. And I think it's such an inspiring part of the story because I'm a professor at the university of Rhode Island, and I teach and I am a lifelong learner as well. And I can tell you that. Of course, I have my shortcomings, and I have my strikes, but at every point and every turn I absolutely learn from watching my dog and for watching these dogs. They have so much to teach us about loyalty, compassion, Haitians in intelligence and leadership. You know, I think that there's a lot to be said for how dogs understand leadership. And certainly how people like Mazzarella have taught me and show people in the film about leadership. I could not agree with you, more Mary. I mean, I've been partner with a dog now for going on thirty years. And and I'm still amazed at that every day that genuine I mean, they're so present there so authentic. You know, there's no other agendas for the dog. It's it is really so powerful. And that's so beautiful that Matt really opened up about that and share that because that can be so helpful to other parents of kids that they may be frustrated with and to look at it and a different way that's just so beautiful and NAT has done some tremendous work in the criminal Justice field with the cases that he's worked on. And that he talks about that in the film quite a bit, right? Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. So, you know, a lot of the the searches and cases that you see in the film, obviously there are hundreds at met worked on. And you know, there are so many unsolved. Because so many of these searches are speculative, meaning you. Only have a certain amount of information to go on. But clearly the dog's ability within the criminal Justice realm to help find missing persons, whether that's live persons who have recently been lost or kidnapped or people that have been found and lost a coal cases that are unsolved after five ten twenty thirty years as you'll see in search dog Matt was called by the US military to help locate missing persons in Vietnam missing soldiers in Vietnam, and he at Maximus were able to locate the remains of a missing American soldier who had been shot down in nineteen sixty six and that was a two thousand three so they're all these dots role in terms of finding missing persons, and helping to solve unsolved cases is an incredibly untapped resource and very exciting to watch. Wow. I know you think about like you said. The immediate case something that just happened. But you don't think about something that the decades ago, and especially in another country like Vietnam. Wow. That's amazing. What an experience that must have been for them. And like you said it's untapped. We really need to think about that. And how we could use these incredible resources to find these people that have been lost for so long. Yeah. Well, and so how did you when you were? I do want to ask you this about getting started for the film because I know so many people want to they want to create documentary film. Yes. How did you raise the money Mary as a university? Professor, how did you do that? I worked on. Well, this took a little bit of time. So I began the film with some small grants seed funds and for the entire duration of the fell my own sweat, which has really fine and completely enjoyable, but I also did a Kickstarter campaign where in about thirty two days, we raised about seventy three thousand dollars, and that was really helpful in terms of getting us to the next level to nearly completing the film, and then along the way I've just been able to continue to raise money with grants, and that's been wonderful, what kind of grants did you get mostly a lot of Rhode Island's custody artists grants manatees grant at the beginning for development, which was incredibly helpful. And let's see the university of Rhode Island also has competitive grants that I was able to to get awarded and that's about sums it up. Alangelo personal fund says while. Yeah. Yeah. And em. I right to understand that it was you filmed it for over four and a half years satisfy threat. Yes. So I have to say the first six months was mostly observing and filming trainings. What was really interesting is the way that I needed to film. It was what is called sort of fair taste style. Meaning you're sort of on the wall, you're really trying to be unobtrusive. And you're not interfering at all with the canine work that was really important. Do it that way because obviously you're working in an environment. That's very different. You can't tell people what you can't tell people. Oh, excuse me. But while you're trying to train this dog or imprint this dog, can you please do XYZ. No, we couldn't do that. So I had to serve learn how to film unobtrusively gain all of these teams, trusted, captain get sort of get to know me. And sure I just sort of. Observed for a long time and filmed a lot of trainings, and in a way unbeknownst to me, I was being trained as well. So I knew exactly on that. I search I knew exactly what was going to happen. And I really understood sort of how to fill that I search at Nabi in a way or and also also get what we need it to try to tell the story. But as you know, a search that's unfolding is very complicated. Yeah. And I and I was gonna say we're gonna talk about that. I want to hear more about that. Mary exactly how you doing that in those real time missing person searches. So hang on to that thought. And.

Rhode Island Mary sore Matt Matthew Vietnam university of Rhode Island professor murder Scott Carlson Waco Landau Matthews rela Linus Mazzarella partner US Maximus seventy three thousand dollars five ten twenty thirty years
"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:53 min | 3 years ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"To hear all about your film. Thank you. I'm excited to talk about it. How will tell us? How did you film about search and rescue dogs? Well, I was really interested in understanding more sort of history of humans and dogs and how we evolve together. And then I came upon the story of Matthew's rela and Matthews rela was a Rhode Island state police sergeant and he has surfer noun for rescuing dogs from pounds and turning them into search and rescue dogs. I came across article about how his team had won a national award, and I reached out to the realistic Rhode Island state police and asked if I could observe the team, and it sort of unfolded for their. Wow. Well, I'm sure Matthew was really excited that you are calling to tell him you wanted. To do a show a movie on him. You know? I honestly, I'm not sure that he was. He was a really busy person actually with his dogs and had been called to searches all over the country and Vietnam and train dogs all over the country as well. And so I think it was sort of he felt a little bit like a mixed blessing because at first it was just observing. He and his colleague Scott Carlson as they were training. I didn't know right away that it would be a, you know, a documentary. I just of wanted to understand could this be just be a film. And if so what was the story, and I have to tell you the first day that I observed them training was in his abandoned amusement park, and I had never really been exposed to working dogs before. And I have to tell you MARCY. It was the most incredible thing to watch these men work with these animals in this incredibly patient methodical way. And basically, I followed Matt the first day he was sort of setting. Up a crime scene, and these are both search rescue live person search dogs and cadaver dogs have various means and ways by which they find missing people, and that particular day, they were setting up basically a crime scene or murder scene to train the dogs. And I had never seen anything like it. It was quite extraordinary and very sobering. But at the same time, you know for working dogs, they have to stay up and focused. And so it was very interesting dynamic between this very serious matter. But also this really fun dynamic with the dog. I had never expected such an incredible thing to unfold, and I really knew that day that very first day that I wanted to continue to watch and see what would happen. The question was how do you tell the story, and it turned out that required? Sort of a lot of patients to understand how to best film it and show it so that people could really feel immersed and walk alongside these canine handlers Landau, well, and it is I mean when. Do you see working dogs do their job and interact with their human partners? I always say it's like it's like being in the presence of magic. I mean, really getting to see that. But like you said, how do you capture that on film? Yeah. Must have been a really interesting challenge. And how did you talk Matt into doing the film? Well, it's so he'll say, well, he will say, well, I was ordered to do it. Trooper he kind of was because I asked permission, and it's not necessarily the option to say, no. Although, of course, he had to agree because it was far more than than just him on the job. Because as you know, these dogs are not just working dogs. They're also companions and family members. And so I really wanted to understand his story and his back story. How did he come upon this for his lifelong quest at how he dedicated himself to find missing persons? It takes so much more than just a nine to five job where you punch the time clock. So it did turn out that I ended up getting to know him and his family really, well, and it really required all of that for me to understand how he came to understand his sort of calling you life, and as you see in the film Waco in a little bit into his backstory, and you understand sort of you know, his childhood calling with dogs, and it's quite quite moving. Can you share some of that with us? Mary sore. Sure. So Matthew, he's a really interesting person when I began filming he was training multiple teams for the Rhode Island state police. He was trading. Search canine team, he was also trading the urban search and rescue canine team and then other teams around the country, and I had no absolutely no idea to me. He was just as really smart guy who you know, is super upbeat and intense and super athletic all those things you'd think with a first responder slash canine handler circum rescue person, and I never expected that he would have been someone who had suffered from dyslexia. And as it turns out what he was a young child. He had a really hard time in school, and he didn't know Linus surly, and we started discover this in the movie, and he was kind enough to allow me to ask about that. And for him to share about it. And he talks very frankly about how you know when everybody else is coming. Down on you as a child, and you kept getting in trouble in school, and your parents Gallagher at you and your teachers yelling at you. When you go home and your lock yourself in your room. You've got your dog, and how many of us kind of feel that way. Even now. Yeah. That's sort of where he allowed me to go in that story. And I think it's such an inspiring part of the story because I'm a professor I university of Rhode Island, and I teach and I am a lifelong learner as well. And I can tell you that. Of course, I have my shortcomings, and I have smile strikes. But at every point and every turn I absolutely learn from watching my dog and for watching these dogs, they have so much to teach us about loyalty, compassion, Haitians in intelligence and leadership. You know, I think that there's a lot to be said for how dogs understand leadership. And certainly how people like Mazzarella have taught me and show people in the film about leadership. I could not agree with you, more Mary. I mean, I've been partner with a dog now for going on thirty years. And and I'm still amazed at that every day that genuine I mean, they're so present there, so often take you. There's no other agendas for the dog is really so powerful. And that's so beautiful that Matt really opened up about that and share that because that can be so helpful to other parents of kids that they may be frustrated with and really look at it and a different way. That's just so beautiful and Matt has done some tremendous work in the criminal Justice field with the cases that he's worked on. And that he talks about that in the film quite a bit. Right. Exactly. Yeah. So, you know, a lot of the the searches and cases that you see in the film, obviously there hundreds that Matt worked on and, you know, there are still many unsolved. Because so many of these searches are speculative, meaning you only have a certain amount of information to go on, but clearly the dogs affiliate within the criminal Justice realm to help find missing persons, whether that's live persons who have recently. Have been lost or kidnapped or people that have been found and lost coal cases that are unsolved after five ten twenty thirty years as you'll see in search dog Matt was called by the US military to help locate missing persons in Vietnam missing soldiers in Vietnam, and he at Maximus were able to locate the remains of missing American soldier who had been shot down in nineteen sixty six and that was a two thousand three so they're all these dogs role in terms of finding missing persons, and helping to solve unsolved cases is an incredibly untapped resource and very exciting to watch. How I know you think about like you said the immediate cases something that just happened. But you don't think about something that the decades ago, and especially in another country like Vietnam. Wow. That's amazing. What? An experience that must have been for them. And like you said it's untapped. We really need to think about that. And how we could use these incredible resources to find these people that have been lost for so long. Yeah. Well, and so how did you when you were? I do want to ask you this about getting started for the film because I know so many people want to they want to create documentary film. Yes. How did you raise the money Mary as a university? Professor, how did you do that? I worked on. Well, this took a little bit of time. So I began the film with some small grants seed funds, and for the entire duration of the film, my own sweat, which is really fine and completely enjoyable, but I also did a Kickstarter campaign where in about thirty two days, we raised about seventy three thousand dollars, and that was really helpful in terms of getting us to the next level too narrowly, completing the film, and that along the way I've just been able to continue to raise money with grants, and that's been wonderful, what kind of grants, did you get mostly a lot of Rhode Island state custody artists grants manatees grant at the beginning for development, which was incredibly helpful. And let's see the university of Rhode Island also has competitive grants that I was able to to get aboard it, and that's about sums it up personal fund says, well, yeah. And my right to understand that it was you filmed it for over four and a half. Half years status threat. Yes. So I have to say the first six months was mostly observing and filming trainings. What was really interesting is the way that I needed to film. It was what is called sort of fair taste style. Meaning you're sort of a fly on the wall. You're really trying to be unobtrusive. And you're not interfering at all with the canine work that was really important. Do it that way because obviously you're working in an environment. That's very different. You can't tell people what to do. You can't tell people. Oh, excuse me. But while you're trying to train this dog or imprint this dog, can you please do XYZ. No, we couldn't do that. So I had to serve learn how to film unobtrusively gain all of these teams trusted had them. Get sort of get to know me. And sure I just sort of observed for a long time and filmed a lot of trainings, and in a way unbeknownst to me, I was being trained as well. So I knew. Exactly on that. I search. I knew exactly what was going to happen. And I really understood sort of how to fill that I search at nappy in the way or and also also get what we needed to try to tell the story. But as you know, a search that's unfolding is very complicated. Yeah. I and I was going to say we're gonna talk about that. I want to hear more about that. Mary exactly how you were doing that. In those real time missing person searches so hang on to that thought and is our listeners Youth Day and come right back after these important messages from our sponsors. Does.

Rhode Island Matt Mary sore Matthew Vietnam professor murder Scott Carlson Waco Landau Matthews rela Linus Gallagher Mazzarella partner US Maximus seventy three thousand dollars five ten twenty thirty years
"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:55 min | 3 years ago

"scott carlson" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Was a really busy person actually with his dogs and had been called to searches all over the country and Vietnam and train dogs all over the country as well. And so I think it was sort of he felt a little bit like a mixed blessing because at first it was just I was observing. He and his colleague Scott Carlson as they were training. I didn't know right away that it would be a, you know, a documentary. I just sort of wanted to understand could this be just be a film. And if so what was the story, and I have to tell you the first day that I observed them training was in this abandoned amusement park, and I had never really been exposed to working dogs before. And I have to tell you MARCY. It was the most incredible thing to watch these men work with these animals in this incredibly patient methodical way. And basically, I followed Matt the first day he was sort of setting up a crime scene. And these are both search and rescue live person search dogs and cadaver dogs, and they have various means of ways by which they find missing people, and that particular day, they were setting up basically a crime scene or a murder scene to train the dogs. And I had never seen anything like it. It was quite extraordinary and very sobering. But at the same time, you know for working dogs, they have to stay up and focused. And so it was very interesting dynamic between this very serious matter. But also this really fun dynamic with the dog. I had never expected such an incredible thing to unfold, and I really knew that day that very first day that I wanted to continue to watch and see what would happen. The question was how do you tell the story, and it turned out that required of a lot of patients to understand how to best film it and show it so that people could really feel immersed and walk alongside these canine handlers, Landau, we'll end it is. I mean when you see working? Dogs do their job and interact with their human partners. I always say it's like it's like being in the presence of magic. I mean, really getting to see that. But like you said, how do you capture that on film? Yeah. Must have been a really interesting challenge at how did you talk Matt into doing the film? Well, it's interesting. So he'll say, well, he would say, well, I was ordered to do it. Trooper he kind of was because I asked permission, and it's not like he hit necessarily have the option to say. No. Although, of course, he had to agree because it was far more than fed just him on the job. Because as you know, these dogs are not just working dogs. They're also companions and family members. And so I really wanted to understand his story and his backstory how did he come upon this for his lifelong quest at how he dedicated himself to find missing persons? It takes so much more than just a nine to five job where you punch the time clock. So it did turn out that I ended up getting to know him and his family really, well, and it really required all of that for me to understand how he came to understand his sort of calling you life, and as you see in the film Waco in a little bit into his backstory, and you understand sort of you know, his childhood calling with dogs, and it's quite quite moving. Can you share some of that with us Mary? Sure. Sure. So Matthew, he's a really interesting person when I began filming he was training multiple teams for the Rhode Island state police. He was trading. Search canine team, he was also trading the urban search and rescue canine team and then other teams around the country, and I had no absolutely no idea to me. He was just as really smart guy who you know, is super upbeat and intense, and, you know, super athletic all those things you'd think with a first responder slash canine handlers who can rescue person, and I never expected that he would have been someone who had suffered from disaster. And as it turns out what he was a young child. He had a really hard time in school, and he didn't know Linus surly, and we serve discover this in the movie, and he was kind enough to allow me to ask about that. And for him to share about it. And he talks very frankly about how you know when everybody else is coming. Down on you as a child, and you kept getting in trouble in school, and your parents yelling at you and your teachers unveiling at you when you go home and your lock yourself in your room. You've got your dog, and how many of us kind of feel that way. Even now. Yeah. That's sort of where he allowed me to go in that story. And I think it's such an inspiring part of the story because I'm a professor at the university of Rhode Island, and I teach and I am a lifelong learner as well. And I can tell you that. Of course, I have my shortcomings, and I have my strengths. But at every point and every turn I absolutely learn from watching my dog and for watching these dogs. They have so much to teach us about loyalty, compassion, Haitians in intelligence and leadership. You know, I think that there's a lot to be said for how dogs understand leadership. And certainly how people like Mazzarella have taught me and show people in the film about leadership. I could not agree with you, more Mary. I mean, I've been partner with a dog now for going on thirty years. And and I'm still amazed at that every day that genuine I mean, they're so present there so often take you know, there's. No other agendas for the dog every it's it is really so powerful. And that's so beautiful that Matt really opened up about that and share that because that can be so helpful to other parents of kids that they may be frustrated with and to really look at it in a different way. That's just so beautiful. And Matt has done some tremendous work in the criminal Justice field with the cases that he's worked on. And that he talks about that in the film quite a bit, right? Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. So, you know, a lot of the the searches and cases that you see in the film. Obviously there hundreds that Matt worked on and there are still many unsolved. Because so many of these searches are speculative, meaning you only have a certain amount of information to go on. But clearly the dog's ability within the criminal Justice realm to help find missing persons, whether that's live persons who have recently been. Lost or kidnapped or people that have been found and lost a coal cases that are unsolved after five ten twenty thirty years as you'll see in search dog Matt was called by the US military to help locate missing persons in Vietnam missing soldiers in Vietnam, and he at Maximus were able to locate the remains of a missing American soldier who had been shot down in one thousand nine hundred sixty six and that was two thousand and three. So they're all these dogs role in terms of finding missing persons, and helping to solve unsolved cases is an incredibly untapped resource and very exciting to watch. How I know you think about like you said the immediate cases of something that just happened. But you don't think about something that the decades ago an especially in another country like Vietnam. Wow. That's amazing. What an experience. That must have been for them. And like you said it's untapped. We really need to think about that. And how we could use these incredible resources to find these people that have been lost for so long. Yeah. Well, it so how did you when you were? I do want to ask you this about getting started for the film, because I know many people wanna they wanna create documentary film. Yes. How did you raise the money Mary as a university? Professor, how did you do that? I worked on. Well, this took a little bit of time. So I began the film with some small grants seed funds and for the entire duration of the fell my own sweat, which is really fine and completely enjoyable, but I also did a Kickstarter campaign where in about thirty two days, we raised about seventy three thousand dollars, and that was really helpful in terms of getting us to the next level too narrowly, completing the film, and that along the way I've just been able to continue to raise money with grants, and that's been wonderful, what kind of grants did you get mostly a lot of Rhode Island's custody artists grants manatees grant at the beginning for development, which was incredibly helpful. And let's see the university of Rhode Island also has competitive grants that I was able to to get awarded. And that's about sums it up personal funds says, well, yeah. Yeah. And at my right to understand that it was filmed it for over four and a half. Half years status threat. Yes. So I have to say the first six months was mostly observing and filming trainings. What was really interesting is the way that I needed to film. It was what is called sort of fair taste style. Meaning you're sort of fly on the wall, you're really trying to be unobtrusive. And you're not interfering at all with the canine work that was really important to it that way because obviously you're working in an environment. That's very different. You can't tell people which you can't tell people. Oh, excuse me. But while you're trying to train this dog or imprint this dog, can you please do XYZ. No, we couldn't do that. So I had to serve learn how to film unobtrusively gain all of these teams trusted have them. Get sort of get to know me. And sure I just sort of observed for a long time and filmed a lot of trainings, and in a way unbeknownst to me, I was being trained as well. So I knew exactly. On that. I search I knew exactly what was going to happen. And I really understood sort of how to fill that I search at Nabi in the way or and also also get what we needed to try to tell the story. But as you know, a search that's unfolding is very complicated. Yeah. And I was going to say we're gonna talk about that. I want to hear more about that. Mary exactly how you were doing that. In those real time missing person searches so hang on to that thought. And of you guys are listeners youth, stay put and come right back after these important messages from our sponsors. Does.

Matt Mary Rhode Island Vietnam professor university of Rhode Island murder Scott Carlson Waco Landau Linus Mazzarella Matthew partner US Maximus seventy three thousand dollars five ten twenty thirty years thirty two days