40 Burst results for "Scotland"

Treasure-hunter finds 3,000-year-old hoard in Scotland

AP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 4 hrs ago

Treasure-hunter finds 3,000-year-old hoard in Scotland

"Amateur treasure hunter in Scotland has found a treasure trove of 3000 year old items. Jewelry. Ah, horse harness and a sword still in its scabbard. They're calling at one of the most significant bronze age discoveries ever found in Scotland, discovered about 22 miles south of Edinburgh. A man who found it said he was shaking with happiness.

Scotland Edinburgh
Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:24 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For a lot more analysis like this subscribe to the Economist to find the best introductory offer wherever you are just go to economist dot, com slash intelligence offer. WanNa gets safely back to business during covert nineteen. There's an APP for that I offer by safety culture will help keep your co workers and customers safe. It's as simple safety checklist and inspection at that anyone can learn within minutes. It allows you to do things like follow CDC guidelines complete covert Nineteen Safety Inspections, maintenance audit trail, and stay safe. There are hundreds of preloaded checklists available to download for free eye auditor is the world's largest safety checklist APP with more than six hundred, million checks completed per year visit safety culture, dot com download your free checklist today. covid nineteen is making the four nations of the United Kingdom look rather less united. The virus is still circulating in. Scotland. We elaborate to is capable of an woes blade rapidly in Scotland Nicholas Sturgeon who leads the Scottish National Party and the country's semi-autonomous parliament has impressed voters with her call management and refusal to understate the problem. We have been recommending the use of face coverings for some time. No, and it is already mandatory on public transport. But while many scots were not impressed with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's handling of the crisis, he insisted the central government had supported Scotland. What we've seen throughout this crisis is the importance of the strength of the Union in in dealing with certain crucial crucial things support people through the the fellow scheme the worker as I say the Armenian and the services. In testing moving around many scots though are unconfirmed inst- and that has many talking again about seceding from the United Kingdom about a referendum like the one in two thousand fourteen that failed only narrowly. For the first time since the question has been asked, that is a clear trend among Scottish people in support of Independence Mafia will house. It's British politics correspondent. One factor is brexit which has pushed remains in Scotland's towards independence because the Scottish national, party, which wants a post brexit. The other factors seems to be corona virus, which seems to have damaged the reputation of the British government as a competent manager and has enhanced the reputation of the Scottish government as a potential stating waiting, and so why the disparity than in the way Scotland has handled the coronavirus versus the rest of Britain this is being very marked in. England has had a band pandemic by international standards. If you look at the rate of excess deaths, which is one of the most reliable ways of measuring the impact in a country, Scotland has been slightly less spot, but it still quite high up that similar mistakes have been made in England as in Scotland in terms of misjudging the pandemic early on allowing the disease to spread in cabs and yet Scott seem to think that the Scottish government has done much much better job of handling it. Then the British government has an particularly, Nichols. Sturgeons Management, Nicholas Cage and has done daily press conferences with some very clear messaging whereas the pitcher south of the border has often seemed much more erratic, much much less clear strategic direction. The other issue which which troubles unionists is this support for independence comes despite the fact that the UK wind power as have been used to support Scotland support from the Treasury, for the fuller scheme things like testing capacity cooperation between scientists, unionists say this is a time when the union is working as it never has done before it has been visibly. In supporting Scotland and Scottish voters don't seem to be rewarding not in any way. So is the increased appetite for a referendum going to actually make a referendum more likely? Do you think the important date to look at is main next year when there are elections to the Scottish parliament devolved parliament now on the moment based on these polling the Scottish National Party. Is Set to win an outright majority based on what we see on the moment which would give Nicholas sturgeon a mandate she would say to ask for another referendum a second referendum on Scholarship Ben had the last one in twenty fourteen. However the British government is not obliged to grant that request constitutionally this is a question for the UK government and Boris Johnson has said he will do so under no circumstances does the Scottish National Party have have an option if if the government Westminster simply says, no, if they say, no, then discouraged griffin is putting a very difficult position and lots of supportive independence worried that heading for a long stalemate. Now, Nicholas Surgeons plan is what she goes a plan. A is a legal recognized referendum one, which the British government has agreed to go down thoughts is the only way she says to get international recognition for any positive result for her and. Negotiations members getting really impatient, and so they want to find a plan B. in case Johnson continues to say so that talking about getting a Scottish court to recognize a learn referendum, which doesn't need British permission that talking about maybe getting the E to recognize referendum to Nico students really enlightening to go down that route because she thinks just leads to a dead end, and so you are looking potentially quite long stalemate between these two comes and for his part. Then why won't Boris Johnson GIVE GIVE ANY WAY HERE Boris. Johnson. How absolutely leads reasons to say? No. Good is conserved. Body is pretty they. They got rid of the leader, the other week and replaced him with a new leader Douglas Ross Richard Response really to how the poser going however restaurants in really again, one reason is because if you allows referendum in the UK breaks up thoughts pretty fatal for that's his career suicide. You cannot be the prime minister who lost Scotland because of those reasons, there are no pressure inside the Conservative Party from MP's for ministers from anybody in the cabinet to tell him to give away. So he he won't be forced from inside the party. Plus there's the fact that actually this stalemate has been quite profitable for the Scottish Concept Party they do like the fact that you can start to see divisions emerged in the Scottish National Party and their revival in Scotland there. Now, the second party in Scotland Has Been Ju- largely to the fact that they have taken this issue of the Constitution and they have said to unionist voters we don't want a second referendum you said no we. Honor Your decision to say no, and so they really as you have this polarization in politics along constitutional question, they've taken the no camp really extract to a lot of reward from it. The incentives to make this issue, go away against allowing it to run on run on not that great an as it runs and runs. What does this growing political debate mean for for the people of Scotland you're heading for a very long campaign, of attrition. The national side saying look, the British government is saying no to as they are refusing to respect Scottish democracy that for join our cause the unionist sign saying this thing is becoming a drag on our politics. The SNP really need to take no for an answer. The downside of all this polarization say academic look at public policy and is it really discourages thinking about big reforms because reforms unpopular and if you're in a continual referendum campaign. It discourages you from looking at things like how does your local government system would? How does your social custom work thinking really hard about reforms to the health service and so you you see the risk of this becoming slightly paralyzing for Scottish public administration. The other issue is that it's roads the support for the evolution created in Nineteen, ninety eight, which said, the Scotland would have the same parliaments and the degree of powers we didn't the UK. The SNP. Clearly don't support that in the long run they want to build from division towards independence and they say the division is a poor substitute for independence on the other hand. Is a growing number of people in in the Conservative Party who don't think devolution has worked as a strategy to stop independence. They think that actually grunting more powers to Edinburgh has mealy fed this this tiger and so they want to really reassert the power of the central.

Scotland Scottish National Party British Government United Kingdom Boris Johnson Scottish Government Conservative Party Scottish Parliament Scottish Concept Party Nicholas Sturgeon Union Prime Minister Independence Mafia CDC Wanna Auditor Nicholas Cage Nicholas Surgeons England
Detectorist 'shaking with happiness' after Bronze Age find

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 d ago

Detectorist 'shaking with happiness' after Bronze Age find

"British archaeologists are hailing the discovery of a bridle that was last put on a horse. 3000 years of bronze age bridle was found by an amateur with a metal detector near England's border with Scotland. It's quite astonishing. I've never seen anything quite like it, Jerry dear Matthew Knight is because the bronze and leather bridal hadn't been disturbed. We can see Our horse harness was assembled by tracing 3000 year old remains of leather straps, very ornately decorated on DH Inter quickly made and the man who found it. He camped at the site for three weeks to protect it and then to watch the archaeologists at work. Vicki Barker. CBS NEWS

Vicki Barker Matthew Knight CBS Scotland England Jerry
Fresh "Scotland" from AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

02:39 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Scotland" from AP 24 Hour News

"Is AP News. I'm Rita Fall away. The Corona virus hits another ugly milestone, AP correspondent Soccer Madani tells us about this Johns Hopkins University's tally shows there are now 20 million confirmed cases worldwide. Health officials believe the actual number is much higher. Given testing limitations and the fact that as many as 40% of those with the virus show no symptoms. It took fewer than three weeks for the tally to rise from 15 million. The U. S now has about 1/4 of the global cases at five million and counting, though President Trump is again shocking that upto attesting boost soccer Megane Washington The Secret Service Hustle the president out of the White House briefing room late yesterday as he began his Corona virus briefing. Listen, it looks like they just about gonna be topping records, hopefully soon. President return minutes later, telling reporters there'd been a shooting just blocks from the White House. The Secret Service is an officers shot and wounded a man who'd been acting aggressively. Seattle's police chief, the city's first black police chief, is retiring. Carmen Best announced her decision. The same day, the City Council decided to lay off police officers, a move supported by protesters. A storm with 100 mile per hour winds swept across the Midwest, blowing over trees, flipping vehicles, causing widespread property damage and leaving hundreds of thousands without power is a move through Chicago and into Indiana and Michigan. Several people said have been injured. Will there be any college football this season? The Mountain West is now the second FBS conference to postpone its football season. We're told the Mountain West will not play in the fall. It joins the Mid American conference as leagues from the highest tier of NC double Division one football bail on the fall season. This is AP News. Air Traffic is down, but the number of guns T Essa is seizing is up with air traffic nearing a five month high airport security is finding guns in passenger carry on bags at three times the rate recorded before the pandemic, and 80% of them are loaded. PSAs public appeal to follow gun rolls comes the same day that it reported screening of almost 832,000 people on Sunday. That's still down 69% from a comparable Sunday a year ago. I'm surely Adler, an amateur treasure hunter in Scotland has found a treasure trove of 3000 year old items. Jewelry. Ah, horse harness and a sword still in its scabbard. They're calling at one of the most significant bronze age discoveries ever found in Scotland, discovered about 22 miles south of Edinburgh. A man who found it said he was shaking with happiness. I'm Rita Foley. AP News Thank you for listening to the AP Radio Network for News on the go Try the AP Mobile APP get breaking US International news from the world's most trusted news source,.

AP Secret Service White House Ap Radio Network President Trump Soccer Madani Mountain West Johns Hopkins University Rita Foley Scotland Carmen Best T Essa Seattle United States City Council Midwest NC Chicago
Homophonix Artist Interviews: Rainbow Riots

HOMOGROUND

05:39 min | Last week

Homophonix Artist Interviews: Rainbow Riots

"We begin in Stockholm. It is true that Sweden produces an astonishing amount of legendary music small country. Third and world music exports after the US and the UK. No surprise that within the queer communities are Sweden there exists a bevy of talent. Rainbow Reports is a nonprofit organization using arts and coach as tools to advocate for human rights, LGBT Iq, plus people globally. Now. More than ever. Our focuses humane humans should be equality and acceptance for all. It is clear that social justice is not yet where it should be, which is why arts and coach organizations like Rainbow, riots exist if you're lucky enough to live in a country where there oiled ubt brides, a lot of times people get complacent and they think, oh, this is the norm. This is the standard while it ain't Jinnai they're like seventy plus countries in the world grades illegal with same sex relations and where people get killed where where. A death penalty sometimes. Free. Sometimes I think we have freedom, but the struggle still continues. The filed the torture still continues. The fight for freedom still continues. Let's put our hands together for freedom for freedom. Through Rainbow Riots Hitter Lemberg brings to light the ongoing injustices faced by LGBT plus family worldwide. With a background in music production visuals, events publication in community projects combined with an amazingly generous creative spirit. Is Well to use music and media to inform and educate. Rainbow riots invited artists from several countries to take part in a concert as part of the Stockholm pride two, thousand and seventeen. They also made their presence known within the pride parade from the back of a truck proudly blasting out there incredible musical achievements. I asked Peta which countries were represented. On the rainbow riots flow we had a representatives from Sweden what and we had Uganda Kenya. We had Malawi and we had Jamaica. One of the standout tracks from that for me was a song called freedom. See the crowd. Jumping into. Heard? Freedom. To it in such a way can you tell me up freedom came about when I started making freedom which I co? Bro With? Lesbian rapid called you'll be she's A. Legendary rap group in this in the states called. And when we wrote it, it was kind of like part of my old project housing Wallenberg and kind of thought. It was going to be part of that. But then as I started gravitating towards doing something with Queer activism around the world I, started turning my movement Rainbow Rides into a creative project and I thought well, freedom should be part of that. Really. So that's when I went down to Uganda and started working in Uganda 'cause I thought if I'm going to make this album with queer voices from the world's most dangerous places I've gotta go to the belly of the beast which is Uganda. So I thought okay. Well, I've got to go there ain't going to be nice in preschool ad. And before I went like my passport was running out, so yeah, they add to reissue a possible at the Swedish apple before my flight and they gave me a pink. And I thought. How appropriate with driving along well, exactly Scotland I'm going into Uganda practically waving rainbow flags. This is not going to end well because I was not sure what to expect the anything I'd seen and heard was that nobody nobody in Uganda who was queer was safe and everybody was you know hiding whenever you saw an interview with somebody they will always hiding behind a blood pixellated sort of thing and and not just come to know people going to want to be part of this project. Is it going to be really difficult? What am I going to expect? So therefore came prepared with a song that I'd already written which with freedom I thought at the best maybe I can get some people to dogs in the video at least will have something. But when I arrived, I found a thriving queer community with love creativity and that's how the project started. When I arrived in Uganda realized wow I could really make a whole out I could turn this into something much bigger or they're already artists to establish themselves within the community who were making music. N You lots of quiz singers and performers an artist, and I ended up right in the middle of it. So you know I arrived armed with one song and you know it turned into an album of freedom was starting song, and of course, a features my my old correcting partner you'll be of your majesty but also features a Ugandan singer cold deep lack on bicycle and also on the spoken word intro and the thing about freedom was the I always knew that it was really instant kind of be happy pride song and I just wanted to dot context to put it in. Something else. So it's not just the body, song? To. Put it into context of something really really important life and death and I kinda thought what what better way to to get the message out to make people ons. That was to make them listen.

Uganda Sweden Stockholm Peta United States Lemberg Partner UK Malawi Kenya Scotland Jamaica
Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:28 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Consumers I. Think really can help restaurant by placing takeout orders. That's another thing like there was so much like incorrect information Disinformation skewed information that's just been like disseminated since Since American media founded. Safer at home shelter in place. Yet, 'cause you know restaurants would never all like order to just shut down. You know they were told, we were told him to start in a Eric, our city, he even. It that way he's ordering restrooms restaurants who shut down, but they can make him do takeout order. Or pick. Up Orders Right But then so many people got it into their heads customers like, Oh, you're close now you've already shut down, it just didn't help. So that, effectively shut us down incorrectly phrased, you know. Yeah mandate. So. So that's another thing. It. Just it just hurt us. You know Stop, and then I'm a restaurant owner dealing with regular stresses of operating a restaurant and then the stresses of crisis and then I'm also explaining to my customers what's going on in Minnesota? It's too tiring. It's too timing. Then I become the information corrector to on top of border. Homeless I. I'm exhausted just hearing, you describe that. Yeah Yeah. Yeah and. What's it been like you? You had to let staff go. It sounds like I. Mean. These are people. I mean, you're Restaurant opened in twenty fifteen, I mean, I'm sure some of these people have been loyal reliable. Wonderful. Partners and making this a reality. I'm a talk us through that to what, what was that like to to actually have to, and then how are they doing? Now, we only had one part time person. Okay. All right. So our restaurant model. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So my husband and I we used to do traditional. Sit Down like full service dining. And then about five years ago, I could see that that just like was a money losing endeavor, really don't go anywhere without. Whatever you make up during your busy shifts, you're GONNA lose on payroll when it's slow. You know it's so just it just wasn't worth it. So our North African Taco restaurant is quick service and most of our TACO and Taco toppings Burrito fillings they come out of steam trays. So we heat up all the food, we take an order on and then it's really easy to put together the order. So we never really need more than one person, one additional person besides my husband husband in myself on shift. So. Now wasn't that it really wasn't that bad. It wasn't that bad and so kid named Canario used to work with us but. We still keep in touch. He says his family's fine and He believes our food bank and what we're doing, and he understands that like we'll ask him to come back soon. It's. Those. Rapid period, just resetting redoing everything that it is just like. The. But yet, he's okay. Well that's that's good to hear, and he lives with his family, he lives with his family. Okay. Lives with his parents and. Last time I. Yeah. Yeah. So. So let's talk about. That the restaurant and how it came together. Your husband. He is he said Berber, African French Algerian? Yes. Yes. So how did you guys? Yeah, you're both shafts, how did you meet and then because it seems like? This is a unique even for Los Angeles, a unique fusion of of different cultures foods. So. Almost. Exactly. Twenty two years ago. Twenty three years ago. Almost exactly twenty three years ago, we met a May. So I. Grew up in Los Angeles. Yeah. He He. He grew up in France who was born and raised in fans, but he'd like to travel. So he he wants to. He wants to eat in London and Aberdeen Scotland for a while before coming to America, and he was working at a French restaurant shit. It was pretty well known back then. In Sentry on century in century, city a little Santa Monica Boulevard. And they had a private party. Friends and family and the staff, and we had mutual friends, and I went to the party. And you know he was at the party, he was working as a staff number who was invited to friends and family. Party. And, that's where we met and he just kept calling me around. Susan Suzanne, where are you going? I like you Suzanne Oh. Like. French. Thing. Yeah Get to the point. Yeah. Well, what's the problem like you? I'm just going to tell you. and. We're you that encouraging in the beginning or did it take well? Yeah, and then we started going out. Okay. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah we got married and had two children. So yes, we went ou-. Then we got married pretty quickly and we went. On Honeymoon to Seoul where I was born and he really liked it and he said he wanted to. Work in Seoul. So I, went to the took him to the French Chamber of Commerce and then he founded jaw like within a few days like goodness. Then he worked in Salt like three years. I not like find people to connect people. So, then hit my husband's. Chaining from his his training in in in the coronary world is actually classic French. So he worked at a French fine dining restaurants and attended culinary school in France. and his mother cooked Algerian Berber food at home. And then my parents were like. Really big on food. I realize more and more that I've just eaten incredibly, well, my entire life, so they used to take me on. On trips to back to. Seoul a lot, and they would include like you know regional culinary trips. So they would take me to. Visit my dad's brother and poussant that support city at the southern tip of South Korea, and they'd rent a car and we'd stop by.

Seoul Los Angeles French Chamber Of Commerce Eric Canario South Korea Minnesota France Santa Monica Boulevard Suzanne Oh Susan Suzanne France. Aberdeen Scotland London America
Travel to Comoros

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Travel to Comoros

"I'd like to welcome to the show. Fiona Jones from Scotland who's come to talk to us about Comoros? Fewer welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me and I say welcome back to the show. Some of you may realize I. Don't Remember Hearing Theater on the show before. Yes. We had one of those that we have. Every three to four years lost episode whether according didn't work, and so Fiona is coming back to talk. Komo's again so for you. This is new those of you who are listening but for Fiona tonight. This is very familiar, so if you're old hat at this, can you put commerce on a map for us? Says I didn't know where it was. This is one of those things. There's episodes that Fiona pitch me rose that I had to go googling. What are we talking about? Is this country which it is? Yeah it's a country. It's well three or four depending on how you look at it for Collins. It's in the Indian Ocean northwest of Madagascar. The northern part of Mozambique And you say three or four, because there are four islands, but only three of them are Komo's. Yeah the whole country used to be French when they voted for independence, then three of the islands voted to become independent and the fourth island, which is not decided it wanted to stay with France but I. Think the rest of the Comoros is terribly happy. But May stays resolutely French. Excellent, and why should someone go to Komo's? The reason we won was because our daughter. Who's GONNA traveling. We wanted a family holiday and it was over the tail end of the Christmas holidays, so we wanted somewhere hot. We wanted somewhere that would be good diving and we wanted somewhere that maybe a little bit different that that might be a bit of. Of An adventure so for those reasons we, we looked around, and now at actually seen an article by unknown or unexplored islands I think it was on tripadvisor and seen the Comoro and and I was quite entrusted I'd also rashly sets the family that I as a bit of a surprise for them, so I thought well. That will give them a surprise if we to the Comoros. As I'm surprised you don't know who you are. Being hot, so we're right off the coast of Mozambique and Madagascar and not that far from Tanzania another from Zanzibar. Which people have probably heard of and it seems like it's kind of like Zanzibar except with a French flair. Yeah, we bar. Oh, Gosh, by well. It must be about twenty five years ago. There are some similarities birthday. Islands are obviously much smaller probably per than Zanzibar wealth. Wise I know. Zanzibar isn't exactly a rich country, but Comoros is quite far down to kind of GDP league, but in other senses it's Israel serve Indian ocean stuff so white sand beaches very green interiors very heavily forested interiors, so in that sense, I guess top graphically, probably quite similar. Excellent will what kind of area or are you going to recommend for us well well, what we did was to land in Grand Comoro switch. I guess everybody will. Think he can probably catch a from the mainland. I. Think just made way for everybody to come. In is going to be defined to Grande Comoros. We landed there. We had a couple of days there. It to be honest is not an awful lot. See and the island. I think we did what everybody did. which was to get yourself a taxi? Going to run the island is laconic island. An active volcano in the middle so much you can do is drive around the outside of the island i. think was one ruined. That goes across the middle, but otherwise he just sits the perimeter. you see the beaches and such like. So. That's pretty much it and he kind walk-ups civil. No, that wasn't something that we did. The seems to be mixed reports about how you do I know. We talked to a couple of guys who were there and holiday who were going to do that and they've got themselves. Guideline think they were gonNA count and some accounts say that you've gotta take a couple of days in walkout, but I've seen something else, so you can get a car or jeep close to the top, and then just walk up the rest of the day so I'm not quite sure which was correct, but between a to the islands. A chip up the volcano, a suspect that's probably about it for a Grande Comoros so after we'd spend our couple of days of them went to Miley which the island that we were going to be based for the rest of the time

Comoros Fiona Jones Komo Zanzibar Grande Comoros Madagascar Mozambique Indian Ocean Scotland Collins Tanzania France Miley Israel
Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on 10 Things To Tell You

10 Things To Tell You

00:47 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on 10 Things To Tell You

"And so when I got to a place in teenager dumb where I was envisioning future I think for a little bit I got less dreamy and more practical about what that might look like. Then I had been as a kid he then. I went to college in Oklahoma I went to the University of Oklahoma and at this stage of my life, I was following a really traditional sort of path for my social circle for my parents type of social circle like there was a very traditional way to do things that included going to college and then getting a degree and then getting a job and getting married in these things that were felt very comfortable to me and I. Say that with complete normalcy that felt like exactly what I wanted to do and so i. Did that without a ton of energy around it other than like Oh, this is the next step and then you go to college and so when I was in college was when I started to think that you know maybe I didn't want to get married right out of college I didn't WanNa, start a family right away and Oh, how I wish I could go back. And do certain aspects of college again because I think that those years your late teens early twenties are so formative. No matter where you are. If you're still in education if you're starting a family young, if you know whatever it is that you're doing those are just really formative times in life they can be and I was definitely not paying enough attention to sort of how amazing it was. I had a great time in college and I had good friends and I had great classes. But I I was not appreciating maybe just how awesome that time is when I look. Back, and think, wow, like how lucky I was to be in a situation where was learning and studying literature and philosophy. The things that I wanted to be studying than I have you know the choice to do that I had absolutely no idea how incredible that opportunity was how special it was. Now I, look back and just like it was really really great for years but the summer between my junior and senior year I studied abroad I studied abroad in England got into a literature program at Oxford. University and that summer is actually the thing before the thing if you will. That is such. A huge part of my big story because you know being in the UK is not exactly like an immersive cultural experience. You know there's no language barrier. It is about as similar to the US as one could get I assume but I had never been out of the country since then except for like going to Mexico for spring break, I had not really explored another country and in my time in England, we would take the train to Scotland we took the train to France, and then of course, our home base was Oxford, which is just rich history especially. Literary history which was my passion's still is my passion. So seeing the world for the first time seeing another part of the world for the first time when I barely traveled even within the US at that time I had never been to major cities here and it was very eye-opening to me to be in the middle of London to be in the middle of Paris as a broke college student like I felt like the world's just opened up so wide and I saw so things that I just had no idea I needed to even be thinking about you know in my..

Oxford United States England Oklahoma University Of Oklahoma Paris UK Mexico Scotland France London
Brexit talks: Michel Barnier believes trade deal 'unlikely' at current stage

The Briefing

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Brexit talks: Michel Barnier believes trade deal 'unlikely' at current stage

"And a brexit trade deals being called unlikely. The EU cannot accept and will not accept the bill for the UK's political choices. Those were the words of Michel Barnier as he gave a press conference in London today, and the e US chief negotiator blamed the UK for making brexit trade deal unlikely he wants his opposite numbers to give up some ground Brussels demands on fishing. The two sides are also divided on the so-called level playing field guarantees that the e U, says a needed to prevent fair competition. You can read what Mr Barnier said. When asked if the U, K trying to run down the clock to get a better deal. Of course Johnson was elected in December on mandating. Get brexit done. Tomorrow marks a year since he became. Prime Minister Patrick I. thinks Mister Johnson's first twelve months since Downing Street's has been an epic motion picture, and he ponders whether the prime minister's done a good job. One person doesn't think so. Is Nicholas Sturgeon? And she accused Mister Johnson of using covid nineteen as a campaigning to during his visit to Scotland today, the prime minister champion, the might of the Union, and ruled out a second referendum as support for independence grows. You can see how the first minister used a press conference to call him out.

Mister Johnson Michel Barnier Prime Minister Prime Minister Patrick I. UK Union Nicholas Sturgeon Brussels United States London Scotland
Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on KCBS Radio Afternoon News

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:38 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scotland" discussed on KCBS Radio Afternoon News

"KCBS case, CBS News time to 20 Dish. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has another problem on his hands. Now that the Brexit builders behind him, it seems that nationalism is growing quickly in Scotland, and some see the nation looking to remove itself from the United Kingdom. For more, we turn to the KCBS Ring Central news line and checking with end of Brady Sky News reporter in London. And I have read that the corona virus pandemic is strengthening Scottish efforts to break away from the UK Connect those dots for us with if you would Yes. So this is really interesting. You've got on the one hand you've got the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and he's leading the fight against cold. But on the other hand, you've got a very determined leader in Scotland in Nicholas Star Jin. She's the first minister of Scotland. She holds the Daily news conference. And she is leading the cold would fight in Scotland. Scotland has been far stricter in the lock down. It has been a lot of people feel more ahead of the game in terms of where the virus was going into care homes. And people in Scotland seem to be taking farm or faith on confidence in their leader up there. Nicholas Sergeant on DH. Yeah, you can join up the dots. A lot of people in Scotland fielding Leadership she has shown The decision making the decisiveness how well she comes across, speaking to the media news conferences, people are starting to warm to are. She's always had a core base of support. I mean, she wouldn't be leader if she hadn't And put a lot of Doubters have come on board and generally feel that she has made a far better fist off fighting culvert than the London government has for the whole of the UK. Is there more to this than Cove? It were some of the seed's already planted before it struck. Look. There was a referendum on this in 2015 on people. The majority off Scott's in Scotland decided to stay with the United Kingdom and that Scotland would remain part off the United Kingdom. With Wales, England and Northern Ireland. Four countries who make up the U. K. There's been so much discussion. I mean way. Have the referendum in 2015 people call it never end. Um, because there seems to be a story every other week. People same or Scots are now pro independence. Ultimately, Boris Johnson is the prime minister of the United Kingdom, and he has said that this decision was taken in 2015. It was once in a generation on Scotland made its decision, so he's pretty much said over his dead political body with Scotland gets a second vote. However, yes, you're right. The percentages are growing on DH certainly rhetorically on an adult likely that the feeling is that Maura people in Scotland are now in favour of independence than they were five years ago. Of course, all this is playing out what? Just six months after Britain broke away from the U. Yes, So there's obviously a deal that needs to be done before the end of December. Britain leave the European Union completely without any deal. We're in a transition situation. At the moment. The transition phase Britain is out of the European Union, but it would be concrete as of midnight on December 31st so it's a tale of two unions. And one that wants Britain on the prime minister certainly want to stay together the Union of the United Kingdom on then Britain and its relationship with the European Union, where the people have voted narrowly 52% to 48. For Brexit Britain leaving the European Union, so I mean, I think the Scottish situation is fascinating. It really, really is. It's a country with A completely different culture, a different dynamic its own distinct history and heritage. It even has a Scots Gaelic its own language up there in places, So a lot of people argue that Scotland should be its own independent country. Another's say You're looking at 200 plus years of Connections and trolleys and unions and Freedom and everything that comes with being in the UK, So it's It's an extraordinary dynamic. It really is. Well, thanks as always, we appreciate it. That's end of Brady Sky News reporter in London. On.

Scotland Prime Minister Boris Johnson United Kingdom Prime Minister Brady Sky News Britain London European Union Cbs News Reporter UK Brexit Britain London Government Nicholas Sergeant Nicholas Star Jin Wales Maura Northern Ireland Scott England
Woody Johnson: US ambassador to UK denies making racist comments

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:16 sec | 2 weeks ago

Woody Johnson: US ambassador to UK denies making racist comments

"JETSOWNER Woody Johnson has denied a report that he has made racist and sexist comments while serving as the ambassador to the United Kingdom. Johnson is also accused of trying to get the open championship played it a president Trump own golf course in Scotland. Jets day to day operations are currently run. By Christopher Johnson, Woody's younger brother

Woody Johnson Christopher Johnson Jets Donald Trump United Kingdom President Trump Golf Scotland
Trump’s Request of an Ambassador: Get the British Open for Me

All Things Considered

00:21 sec | 2 weeks ago

Trump’s Request of an Ambassador: Get the British Open for Me

"His friend the U. S ambassador in London to help land the British Open at one of Trump's golf courses in Scotland. The State Department's inspector general is looking into that claim as part of a routine review of the embassy. The investigation is also looking into claims that the U. S. Ambassador Woody Johnson made racist and sexist comments to embassy staff. NPR London

U. S. Ambassador Woody Johnson Npr London London Donald Trump State Department Scotland U. S
Trump’s Request of an Ambassador: Get the British Open for Me

Midday News

00:26 sec | 2 weeks ago

Trump’s Request of an Ambassador: Get the British Open for Me

"In the State Department reportedly investigated the owner of the Jets, Woody Johnson for making sexist and racist remarks to embassy staffers in London. Johnson is currently serving as the U. S ambassador to the UK. The embassy had no comment. While Johnson did not deny the allegations when contacted by CNN. He's also accused of suggesting to British officials that the president of the British Open, beheld a Donald Trump's golf course in Scotland that according to reporting in The New York Times at the request of the

Woody Johnson Donald Trump Jets State Department CNN London UK President Trump Golf The New York Times Scotland U. S
Trump Asked US Ambassador to the UK to Request the British Open Be Held at a Trump Resort in Scotland

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Trump Asked US Ambassador to the UK to Request the British Open Be Held at a Trump Resort in Scotland

"Claims President Trump Tie tried to use his influence to get the British Open moved to his golf course in Scotland. Correspondent Tom River says the claim also involves Johnson. The New York Times reports. The president asked his ambassador to London help steer the tournament to his Turnberry golf resort papers as ambassador Woody Johnson raised the idea of Scotland secretary of State despite some reservations expressed by his embassy staff, But in the end the Gulf request Was turned down. The White House declined to comment, as did the ambassador and the State Department.

Woody Johnson President Trump Scotland Trump Tie Tom River State Department Turnberry White House London The New York Times
U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 2 weeks ago

U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

"Parliamentary report on Russian influence in the United Kingdom is out this morning. And it's bad, among other things that says the UK government actively avoided trying to figure out of Russia tried to influence the Brexit referendum for more. We've got NPR's London correspondent with US Frank Langfitt, who's looking at this high, Frank. Hey, Rachel. I mean, I said, it's bad. It's that that the British government would be intentionally trying to avoid figuring out the extent of Russian interference. I mean, what can you tell us? It's well, it's It's completely damning people here. Actually, we've been waiting for this report for months. And we thought we were going to find out if the Russians tried to influence the Brexit vote. The answer, in fact, was different and definitely it was more unsettling. Stuart Hosey is with the Scottish National Party is also in the parliament, and this is what he said today at a press conference. No one in government knew if Russia interfered in or sought to influence the referendum because they didn't know want to know the UK government of actively avoided looking for evidence that Russia interfered. Why, Frank? Why wouldn't anyone in the British government want to know this? That's actually really easy answer, and I think the answer is this. It would have undermined the Brexit referendum. Remember the biggest decision of the British people in decades? It's already changed the course of British history and the person who was front and center and that was a guy named Boris Johnson, who is now the prime minister. So if you say Russia interfered, then it could undermine this thing that has changed the course of British history. You can see why nobody certainly in the government wanted to mess with that. Ah Stewart, Hosey said No one would touch with a 10 foot pole and he went on and said this. This is in stark contrast. To the U. S response to reports of interference in the 2016 presidential elections, No matter how politically all quarter, potentially embarrassing there should have been an assessment of Russian interference in the referendum. They must now be one. Okay, So did this report find Russian influence anywhere in the British government? Yes, it absolutely did. One is the Scottish referendum. This was 2015 when Scotland was voting for independence. And the reason this is important is from the perspective of Russia. Vladimir Putin would want Scotland to leave the United Kingdom to weaken it. It's the same reason why we know that he wanted the Brexit vote to pass so that it would weaken the European Union. But another part and everybody kind of knows everybody knows this, Rachel, But another thing that that's mentioned here is that London is such a Place for money laundering, and this is a really good quote that I liked, frankly from the text. Russian influence in the UK is the new normal. Successive governments have welcomed the oligarchs and their money with open arms, providing them with the means of recycling illicit finance through the London laundromat. So how's the British government responding? Not much of anything, considering what this report says. You might expect something more robust. Dominic Robby's the Foreign secretary, he has has a boiler plate response so far, saying Russia must desist from these attacks. And that the UK has defend its country and democracy and values from such a hostile state. NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Thanks, Frank. We appreciate it always breaks it

British Government Russia United Kingdom Frank Langfitt London Stuart Hosey NPR Rachel Vladimir Putin Boris Johnson Scottish National Party Dominic Robby Scotland Ah Stewart Prime Minister European Union Secretary Brexit
Pubs and hairdressers reopen as England's lockdown eases

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:44 sec | Last month

Pubs and hairdressers reopen as England's lockdown eases

"And hair salons. Among the business is re opening in England today as Covad restrictions there. Start Tio ese. CBS News correspondent Vicki Barker reports from London. Some hair salons opened it midnight The minute the lock down rules eased, but English pubs were asked to hold off till six AM today talk about royal privilege. That's Prince William getting to break his thirst in his local pub Yesterday, Pub customers still have to stay three feet apart, but Different rules in different regions. Grandparent's in Scotland, hugging their grandchildren for the first time since March, is locked down restrictions their ease further. Vicki Barker, CBS NEWS, London Fourth

Vicki Barker CBS London Fourth Covad Prince William London Scotland England
The Self-Sufficient Herbalist

The Plant Path

05:29 min | Last month

The Self-Sufficient Herbalist

"Hi Lucy welcome to the plant path. Thank you so much. Hi. Thank you for being here with us? Today I'm really really delighted, and this still excited to talk to you, and you're all the wisdom you have to share. Will really excited to talk to you and count. Wait to share about what's going on my end. Great but. I would love to open it up faded. Just introduce yourself. Interview could share a bit about your story of how you became an herbalist, or how the plants pass ended up calling you be lovely to hear. Wow How long have we go? To. Okay so I'm Lucie Jones. I'm a medical habilis based in the UK, and I have a full-time practice in in Somerset which is actually quite near to Glastonbury, the the town why I'm if anybody's head of that. So I, initially before I came, a medical hobbyist is studied. SA- Baton Medicine. And I've always been. Really drawn to SA- baton. Buddhism and I've been a battery on a practitioner for. Gosh I think it's getting on the thirty years and so. When I had the opportunity to study to baton medicine I felt really codes to do that I'd already started. autohrity actually studied as a spiritual healer years the force I think I've always had kind of. pull to woods. The healing modality sees, and I've also say. Grown up, I'd like to say. I've grown up with my hands in the soil, but I've always grown hobbs, I've always been out in the countryside connecting with plants, so I had really strong. Connection with plants as well as the connection with the tha baton side of things so I, had the opportunity to be one of. Only a few people studying Tibetan medicine in Scotland. Between Nineteen, ninety, four and nineteen, ninety eight, and it was a really unique opportunity because this incredible. Amazing Master of Tibetan medicine called Campo. Truro Sanam was going to travel to Scotland four two months a year for four years in order to teach these western students, and literally I'm talking about. Maybe there were twelve of US something like And I just. knew the I needed to be part of that and. I requested the I could join the course. And I was told No. And have to say. I was just so devastated. Because somehow in my heart I just absolutely felt this incredible pool of destiny, bringing me to that place and I thought. Hey, this is how this story supposed to go. So I was re at first I was really upset and disappointed, and then I reflected I thought. No I'm going to ask again. So a couple of months later I requested again I said I really feel this Poe to do the coals and I would really ask the idea it again. I'd ask you again and. My spiritual teacher occurrence I said no, because the cool is going to be for people who aw already medical practitioners, it's not for people who are just interested in becoming a practitioner It's such a row, but she anisi we want to that medicine to be integrated into existing modalities, so some of the people for example on the coast where. general medical practitioners are different, were a couple of her less than different modalities and I was somebody that will always very interested in it I wasn't yet qualified, so I was declined again and the third time. I, I kind of I wouldn't say I begged. I left another few weeks and then I retired, I said. Please, let me join this coast I will study to be a medical harvest at the same time afterwards, but I just feel so strongly that I would really need to do it. And, he and he said to me a K.. If you commit to studying Western hobble medicine after the course you can do it, but also what I would really like you to do is stop clinic which combines western herbal medicine and Tibetan medicine, so that is how. I ended up. Having studied western herbal medicine after the course for five or six years. That is how I ended up with my clinic, because it's a combination of using a combination of Tibetan, medicine and western Hubbell but.

Sa- Baton Medicine Truro Sanam Sa- Baton Scotland POE Lucy United States Lucie Jones UK Somerset Hubbell Campo
The Self-Sufficient Herbalist

The Plant Path

05:29 min | Last month

The Self-Sufficient Herbalist

"Hi Lucy welcome to the plant path. Thank you so much. Hi. Thank you for being here with us? Today I'm really really delighted, and this still excited to talk to you, and you're all the wisdom you have to share. Will really excited to talk to you and count. Wait to share about what's going on my end. Great but. I would love to open it up faded. Just introduce yourself. Interview could share a bit about your story of how you became an herbalist, or how the plants pass ended up calling you be lovely to hear. Wow How long have we go? To. Okay so I'm Lucie Jones. I'm a medical habilis based in the UK, and I have a full-time practice in in Somerset which is actually quite near to Glastonbury, the the town why I'm if anybody's head of that. So I, initially before I came, a medical hobbyist is studied. SA- Baton Medicine. And I've always been. Really drawn to SA- baton. Buddhism and I've been a battery on a practitioner for. Gosh I think it's getting on the thirty years and so. When I had the opportunity to study to baton medicine I felt really codes to do that I'd already started. autohrity actually studied as a spiritual healer years the force I think I've always had kind of. pull to woods. The healing modality sees, and I've also say. Grown up, I'd like to say. I've grown up with my hands in the soil, but I've always grown hobbs, I've always been out in the countryside connecting with plants, so I had really strong. Connection with plants as well as the connection with the tha baton side of things so I, had the opportunity to be one of. Only a few people studying Tibetan medicine in Scotland. Between Nineteen, ninety, four and nineteen, ninety eight, and it was a really unique opportunity because this incredible. Amazing Master of Tibetan medicine called Campo. Truro Sanam was going to travel to Scotland four two months a year for four years in order to teach these western students, and literally I'm talking about. Maybe there were twelve of US something like And I just. knew the I needed to be part of that and. I requested the I could join the course. And I was told No. And have to say. I was just so devastated. Because somehow in my heart I just absolutely felt this incredible pool of destiny, bringing me to that place and I thought. Hey, this is how this story supposed to go. So I was re at first I was really upset and disappointed, and then I reflected I thought. No I'm going to ask again. So a couple of months later I requested again I said I really feel this Poe to do the coals and I would really ask the idea it again. I'd ask you again and. My spiritual teacher occurrence I said no, because the cool is going to be for people who aw already medical practitioners, it's not for people who are just interested in becoming a practitioner It's such a row, but she anisi we want to that medicine to be integrated into existing modalities, so some of the people for example on the coast where. general medical practitioners are different, were a couple of her less than different modalities and I was somebody that will always very interested in it I wasn't yet qualified, so I was declined again and the third time. I, I kind of I wouldn't say I begged. I left another few weeks and then I retired, I said. Please, let me join this coast I will study to be a medical harvest at the same time afterwards, but I just feel so strongly that I would really need to do it. And, he and he said to me a K.. If you commit to studying Western hobble medicine after the course you can do it, but also what I would really like you to do is stop clinic which combines western herbal medicine and Tibetan medicine, so that is how. I ended up. Having studied western herbal medicine after the course for five or six years. That is how I ended up with my clinic, because it's a combination of using a combination of Tibetan, medicine and western Hubbell but.

Sa- Baton Medicine Truro Sanam Sa- Baton Scotland POE Lucy United States Lucie Jones UK Somerset Hubbell Campo
Jacks left hand

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:34 min | Last month

Jacks left hand

"I'm your host. Kit, crumb. Today. Jack The ripper left hand. There are certain mysteries. Stand out and remain known answer. What happened to Amelia Earhart? How did Panamerican huge flying? Boat Hawaii Clipper disappeared without a trace and who was jack the ripper. Between August and November eighteen, eighty eight, at least six women were murdered in London's White Chapel district. But it was the gruesome nature, the murders that brought about panic and fear in the area for months finally spreading like the plague across London where the press picked up on the cereal, aspects of the deaths and dubbed the killer Jack The ripper. There are currently dozens of organizations that debate evidence surrounding the eighteen eighty eight white chapel murders attributed to Jack. The, ripper. There is speculation that there were two killers. Some experts attribute six victims to Jack The ripper. Others say eleven. The list of suspects exceeds five hundred ranging from royalty to doctors and one jill the ripper. As of this writing the number of nonfiction books on Jack, The ripper is closing in on two hundred and that's nonfiction. Without a doubt, the most highly publicized rip book to Come Out in recent years was written by Patricia Cornwell portrait of a killer Jack The ripper case closed. Cornwell claims to have found DNA evidence linking Walter Skirt to a small number of ripper letters. Her book rapidly climbed the Bestseller List and was the subject of numerous radio and television programs around the World Cornwell may have found evidence to suggest that Walter Skirt hoechst one more ripple letters, but the fact remains said skirt was in France on the night of at least four of the five ripper murders was not jack the ripper cornwell use twenty-first-century technology, including DNA to come up with skirt as Jack. Jack The ripper even though as mentioned. He was in France during a number of the murders on the other hand. James Tully author of the Book Prisoner Eleven Sixty, seven, the mad man who was Jack The ripper spent over thirty years, investigating the white chapel murders totally poses many questions about criminally insane inmate James Kelly who escaped from Broadmoor criminal lunatic asylum and evaded capture for over forty years. Specifically question why prisoner eleven sixty seven's government files are still classified and will remain sealed until twenty thirty. That's an interesting secret. Finally no collection of books on the why chapel murders would be complete without the nineteen hundred ninety volume Jack The ripper, first American serial killer. This highly research books speculation Jack The ripper may have been an American doctor Francis Tumblety who had a criminal record, and both sides of the Atlantic, and in fact was arrested eighteen, eighty, eight as a suspect in the white chapel murders. Their, theory is based on a recent discovery of a letter written by a Scotland Yard inspector. Authors Stuart Evans Paul. Gainey claim that Jack The ripper died in nineteen three, when tumble tease heart stopped shortly after I finish the research for the story, I received a letter with a fingerprint at the top that the author Ledge was taken off one of the letters received by Scotland Yard and determined to be from the thumb of the left hand of Jack the, ripper, he claimed the original was among the files of Broadmoor, criminal lunatic asylum prisoner eleven sixty seven, which would remain sealed until twenty thirty. The letter was signed anonymous, and curiously there was no postmark. The letter seemed validate author James. tolleys assertion that James Kelly's files were classified. But if at the time of the murders Scotland Yard had acquired the killer's fingerprint wind up, make an arrest. If however the print is that of James. Kelly was not say so.

Jack The James Kelly Walter Skirt Patricia Cornwell White Chapel District Scotland Yard White Chapel France Broadmoor Amelia Earhart London Francis Tumblety James James Tully Stuart Evans Bestseller List Atlantic Gainey James.
Six Injured, Including Police Officer, and Suspect Is Fatally Shot in Glasgow

Rush Limbaugh

00:31 sec | Last month

Six Injured, Including Police Officer, and Suspect Is Fatally Shot in Glasgow

"A police officer and five other people are hospitalized after an attack in Scotland Scottish police saying six people have been hospitalized including a police officer after incidents in the city of Glasgow a police union saying the officer was stabbed the suspected attacker has been shot dead by police emergency teams racing to a street in the center of the city that's crowded with hotels shops and restaurants there's no word on a motive but police say the threat has been contained Scotland's first minister calling the incident

Officer Glasgow Scotland
Police are treating Glasgow stabbings as terrorism

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:14 sec | Last month

Police are treating Glasgow stabbings as terrorism

"Leeson Scotland say they're treating today stabbing spree at a hotel in Glasgow as terrorism six people are being treated for wounds among them a police officer who is in critical but stable condition the suspect was shot and

Leeson Scotland Glasgow Officer
Glasgow attack: Scotland police respond to stabbing

On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

00:21 sec | Last month

Glasgow attack: Scotland police respond to stabbing

"At least three people are dead after a stabbing attack in Scotland the BBC reports they were killed in the stairwell of a Glasgow hotel police confirm a male suspect was shot by a police officer the Scottish police federation confirms a police officer was stabbed in the attack a witness says he saw at least four people taken away by

Scotland Officer Scottish Police Federation BBC Glasgow
How to Overcome your Fear of Sales Calls with Nina Cooke

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:41 min | 2 months ago

How to Overcome your Fear of Sales Calls with Nina Cooke

"What is holding us back? Nina from having more powerful and authentic sales conversations well, the one thing that I found held me back and has held back all my mind is their mindset. They seemed like is all the scary stuff out there? It's getting on the phone and having to talk about your price in your great product, and having to convince someone that they should be spending money with you and this affair about the prospect, saying no than all interested too expensive, or they need to think about it until we think is all coming from the outside, and that's what's scaring us, but actually are thinking thinking. We're creating moment by moment about. What we believe is going to happen on. That sells coal which fills us with fear. And up. What about biggest enemies that we makeup through our thinking is anticipation. We're anticipating house go. At. Such a big gap between US having been warring. How things actually are. When we buy into this big scary worry about how it's going to pan out. That's what makes us feel so scared is all coming from inside of us? Now I do have a question for you Nina de you have Karaoke and Scotland's I'm not prompt Scotland. I live near London Scottish dancing school, but we do have carried okay here. You Have Karaoke in England as well. Good because for me, this is always two quick things to is people across the board? They're scared to make those initial sales calls because like you said they have this anticipation. About how is GONNA go and They're filled with dread so I always tell people hey. Just do one call. Just do one call this week. That's it and what happens is they make that call? Because it's just one it's not like. Oh do one hundred calls today, which is very daunting. They do one like that was actually kind of easy and like to bring it around to like the actual conversation that have with people around Karaoke with this is. If you've ever been Karaoke Bar, you always see. There's like that one person that gets like pushed on stage by their friends. They don't WanNa, do it. They're terrified. They don't WanNa, do Karaoke and then they sing that song and like by the third bar? They are just like you. You, Know Adele? They're out there and they're singing there. Hardaway, then you literally can't get them off the stage and it's just sometimes breaking that ice. Realizing that is not nearly as scary as you're anticipating that it was so for me. That kind of comes back to mindset. So why is having the right mindset? Absolutely crucial for successful sales calls because we can think our way into being okay about having sales cools and taking away the fair, because everything is you know that we're seeing in the world where making up through thoughts and everyone has a unique perspective on the world, because there are seven billion or more unique thinkers in the world. Because! We are able to create thinking because we're the crates. Is Thinking bothered than the some possible thoughts? We are able to change our thinking and it's it's amazing. We have this. Incredible Gift of free thought that we can use to Crato reality and most located. We don't pay any attention because a busy. Reacting furiously to was on outside of US and eat a big sky, and anxious and overwhelmed, and yet we forget we have this amazing palace superpower. When we can change our thinking about anything. It changes our feelings, and it can just bring up so much. Courage and resilience and you'll. Writer is about taking action. I helped my clients to overcome. They block so they can take action in their business because we don't take action obviousness. No can't get kinds simplisafe. Semi. People scared. They're so scared off having conversation because they pay rejection. They worried about getting because when they get no. Those people are selling the services products, and when they get the take it, Brady Pass, nate and they feel that being passed rejected who they are is being rejected by the prospect, and that could fill a berry berry painful. We'll do anything become to avoid that pain. At. That's why we're muddling up. The the failed to sales compensation will make you all up in ahead, and we think he is waded through with buying into the story, but if we would strip that story away at just say okay. What I'm going to do now is have a conversation with this person for good together. That's all that can happen and what we take away. All the meanings that were attached to this means again. No too terrible, they may think. They may think I'm too expensive. I believe with my value, and they believe my value either won't be stocked crazy with these stories around taking a acton. Than, we can easy took US outfit, but we see justice neutral action, which is a compensation. That's all. That's GONNA happen the. Pus might say yes. They may say nerve it fun and they. We're GONNA have another compensation off that. There are plenty more competition going to have when we strip away and just. Look at the neutrality if you lie. Then it will stop making us feel scared because this the meanings for attaching. To the action, thus causing the fan or the actual

United States Nina Scotland London Scottish Dancing School Hardaway Adele England Writer Acton Brady Pass Nate
"scotland" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

05:13 min | 5 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"One travel had the lamb. I mean we're just said this will be the best lamb chop you've ever had like all right and I had it and I'm like I don't remember the restaurant right now if you listen to our Ireland destination diary so we did an whole episode just on Ireland We talk a lot about Dingell and dive into that and you'll be able to hear that restaurant but dingle yeahs known as like the culinary capital of Ireland. I think it's because it is a bit of a seasonal town we were there in. January stuff was still open but During the summer it gets pretty popular. And so a lot of you know gorgeous in phonic and basically on the edge of Ireland so you know people do WanNa live there. And then they can afford to open up restaurants. They get tourists. Come in in the summer and keep them float and all that but yeah dingle loved it better food than I'll sky. I also could beat on scenery. And that's that's saying something because the west coast of Ireland. His jaw dropping the beautiful. It really is like when you went to the cliffs of more. I just thought wow. This is one of the most beautiful things I've seen however all those tourists really diminish some of it for you whereas the Isle of Skye is more remote and it's just some really cool like the fairy Glen. I've never been somewhere like. I almost believed in fairies going there because it was so beautiful and mysterious. And you're like what? What is this land? I mean it felt like you were in a movie it did. We're coming up half hour. We said we're going to keep these to a half hour. Ireland or Scotland was that was that it. That's your trump card. You pull it out the end aisles sky as my trump card. I mean we we were only Glasco like one or two nights. We didn't do a ton there so I don't really have a lot to say about that. City I mean Edinburgh for me is more beautiful. I love sky. One of the coolest places I've ever been to in my life. Those that's my Trumka last thing that I have and it's not a trump card but it's interesting is with Ireland. You can understand the accent better than you can the Scottish accent so odyssey accent. I mean well cool. If you're actually trying to talk to someone and get directions like the lady who is giving directions to the fairy. Glen legitimately couldn't understand her how we ended up finding the fairy Glen. I will never know. Magic Magical fairies got us going Scott but Ireland awesome accent but you can understand it. Scotland officemax and I can't understand a word you're saying especially when you get out of the cities it's just crazy so there you have Ireland or Scotland to beautiful our country areas that the top of your list. If if you you know if you haven't gone on if you have of course let us know the reason we love doing. The throwdown showdowns. Hey we get to like spar little bit. Heather and I hear arguing is always fun. Pastime of bars. Hopefully it's on the podcast and hot in your life but we also do it because you want to hear from you let us know either tweet. Us or get to us on Instagram at extra pack of peanuts a if given the choice which do you prefer to make a decision. Ireland or Scotland and then be who made the better argument Is it half with her? I mean give them your kind of closing arguments. Your your your main points. Here were the beauty of Edinburgh. Trump's the beauty of Dublin. In my opinion in the Isle of Skye is more remote desolate in in that way. More beautiful to me than road tripping through Ireland even though I really did love Ireland so it was hard. It was hard I mean. I've got the pub culture in Ireland. Chill with the Guinness with the music with the fire. Go and it's very hard to beat. That is exactly what you want. Top that with the fact that on the West Coast you have the dingle peninsula you have the cliffs more. You have the burn and lasts. You've got that that cute little city slash town. Galway which if I was gonna live somewhere in the UK That would be very high on my list. It just what a neat vibe care and Ireland in the excuse me I guess Ireland's now part of all right I'm going I'm going So that you guys have it. Let us know what you think. Who ON THAT ARGUMENT AND Thank you for tuning in it. We have other throwdown showdown. If you like this format let us know. We just put out Nashville Verse Austin. So that came out last week. And then we've got our season one of the throwdown showdown which came out October. Twenty eighteen so you can find those episodes three thirty five through three thirty seven. That's Portland Verse Vancouver. That was very fun so fun and and tough to make a call that tyler inverse Bali I mean again yeah great places and then we kind of wrap that season up with eastern versus Western Europe. Which yeah we? One of our favorite shows that we've ever recorded there. I think just Superfund you can go listen to those as well. Thank you guys For the support as always for making us no more than rated travel. Podcast.

Ireland Scotland fairy Glen Isle of Skye Trump dingle Edinburgh West Coast WanNa officemax Dingell Portland Galway Trumka tyler Heather Dublin Western Europe Scott Nashville
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

14:58 min | 6 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Comfortable so the stage is set. The microphones are switched on. We settled into our comfy chairs under audience is waiting. Could you make a noise oysters to be sure. We know you're there. I'm Ken Gordon. I run the refugee voices Scotland podcast. It's a personal project of Maine. We've been running for two years now and if your subscribers listened to for thanks it's really cool that we meet people who've actually listened to it so this is a co production between refugee. The Voice Scotland University of Glasgow UNESCO chair in refugee integration through language and the arts and refugee for the wonderful facilities. Ah Hijab or are you doing nice to meet you you're looking PhD student at the University of Glasgow. You're also an intern for the Palestinian Estonian Arabic online project. Yeah the higher. The one thing that we always do in these podcasts is just ask people. What's on their mind? What's on your mind today? In one hundred years ref we shop the first thing. That's in my mind that I'm happy. It's sunny today unlike yesterday. And the second thing that's in my mind since we're talking about refugees there's a I tell you a little bit of history. Yeah so I'm Palestinian from Gaza and I'm not sure if people know about the whole Palestinian Israeli conflict but it it started like in one thousand nine hundred forty eight and because Israel started their estate created their states. They had to expel people from their villages. When I say people I mean Palestinians who are living there for a long time and as they explode those people those people started to move to other areas and then eventually they became refugees? So Amirah Fiji Ah in one of the most populated refugee camps in Gaza. My parents are refugees. Migrant parents are piggies so it's like like three generation of refugees and you can tell like how many years we've been refugees and They you were Help those refugees get you know the main basics for the lives I with my grandparents and they give them tens and then people people started to build their own houses. Because sometimes when I say that a refugee and I live in a refugee camp I people will be like all and then I would. I don't understand why they they say that because in my mind it's not a big deal because a normalized and internalize allies in me. But then I started to get to know that even a refugee. It has like Norman normalize idea in people's mind that just that person and who lives in a tent. Well it's true for you know other crisis but for Palestinians. Just we tried to you know to move on on and I don't live in a tent. I live in house to floor house. So yeah this is me as a refugee third-generation third generation refugee. So what I want to talk about as well I said that everything internalized in me and then because I loved my I hope my whole life there. My parents live their whole life there so I didn't see anything different. That would make me compare between what I live. And then how other people live so I got a scholarship to get my masters in the USA and then spend their two years and then it was really really like the first two years of my life. So when when I when I started to have I was full of energy. Discover the World Meet New People and all these things and it's worked and then by the end of the second year I had like my own community. You know my friends and then I had to leave back to Gaza so I knew it is going to be hard because I will not see my friends But it turned out. It's not only because I will not see. My friends is because I will have something to compare to like. What's going on in Gaza and what what happened to like all these experiences I had in the USA so going back to Gaza? There's no no insecurity. There is no stability. There's no electricity. There is no access to clean water. Sometimes we wouldn't have have water at home like even all these things I wouldn't I wouldn't imagine that they're that bad but because I was exposed to new new environment that showed me what what are the basic rights that people from other countries have and we don't have so and and some of these things like for example access to water like I didn't I didn't I didn't say I didn't get it until until one of my friends pointed that out to me because in Gaza We get water for three or four hours a day and and during these hours we have we have like engine that will push water in big tank and sometimes would feel a lot of Like would fail the bathtub as well so that would have water to clean or do all these things add. It was normal to me. You know I didn't know this. This is bad but when when my pointed that out to me I was like. Oh yeah this is not right. You know so Besides there there were there would be a lot of collisions in Gaza. Like Bombini. And you know really horrible not not like war were just like is collisions. So sometimes I would go to work and then I would just freak out because there will not VC's fire so there would be skeletons and you know. Sometimes they would boom car and then just just in my mind that maybe AH car. I'm in maybe this guy in this tax is targeted. Maybe I'll die. And then you know just I go to the work and I go back mccomb and just the same thing until ceasefire is announced or whatever it is so yeah it was pretty hard like going going back after the. US spending two years in Gaza because it made me feel like how unfair the world is and help people. Just don't appreciate she it all these things in their lives you know and then After spending two years in Gaza enduring all these things like I was with my family and would live the same things but it affected me differently because I started to think that this is not right. This is not supposed was to happen so now I got another scholarship from the British Council to get my PhD. And let me tell you one thing. I think I started to recover cover from my reverse culture shock going back together up. Maybe like I started to feel that going back to myself. Maybe like a month ago because I think in my first year I wouldn't be like I don't know it say. I felt that I wasn't right because it was recovering. But now I feel I'm almost there. I started to recover. Well that's great news. Yeah we'll come back thank you and so. How long have you been? This started in Glasgow. Yeah so long beating Glasgow and three months so you spent quite a lot of time here. Still recovering yeah okay. How did that manifest itself in you? When you're you're still feeling like you're having reverse culture shock? How does that feel what? What does it make you do here? So for example. We don't have electricity in Gaza. We only have like four hours so at the beginning. Freak out if my phone is one percent because it's like if it's back home you know that you leave maybe wake up and your phones I it but here is just is not the same. I hate fireworks. I really hate fireworks because it just sometimes I'm with my friends is and their fireworks and unlike only there's Kelly there's something wrong sometimes. I feel like I'm stupid. Because or maybe I'm a very much sensitive person which I don't know yet but there was. This is this to this thing that I've ever felt once I was sleeping and then the curtain were open and then the street light was like the street lights here there and the yellow so that yellow light sometimes whenever there's bomb there's a flash similar look yellow flesh before the bomb so that lies just freaks me out like I if you best pass by my house. My curtains is always close ause because that lies freaks me out is just reminds me of that light before the bomb goodness me. Yeah I mean I don't know I'm I'm not sure how I feel all these things because my friends. I'm not sure if they feel the same. I don't know just happens. I e all these Adia just come to me reverse culture shock is something. I'd not hair dove until now I mean it's different from one country to another so if view have reverse culture shock if you were in California and then came to Glasgow there verse culture would be The weather is bad. I'm not used to the weather in. We know what reverse goes. Yeah but it depends on the place you know. Thank you for sharing interesting. Have you met many other Palestinian refugees around Glasgow. Well not really. I knew three Palestinians who got scholarships here and two of them and they're from the West Bank they're not refugees and the other one. She's originally from Gaza so she's not refugee but you know all those experiences dances. The don't differ that much from a refugee a non refugee Palestinian because of just the same. There's is Kelly we all in the same and you know we're on the same situation so it doesn't vary that much when we were having at the beginning. You were talking about refugee anger. Yeah yeah elaborate on that well. I can't elaborate in there. But sometimes I feel the media especially like the Western media. They like to portray refugees in specific picture so that other people would sympathize with them and I totally understand that but at the same time when. There's a picture of a refugee that I don't remember remember that I've I've seen it but because I'm so angry. Okay I just makes me more angry. When when they don't show that anger that the refugees Jeez they endure because of all these injustices and I wish that they would once they would show that refugees? They're humans yes. They feel sad the feel pain. They feel happiness whenever they get any kind of aids the feel Arnaud. They've all these feelings beside they feel angry as well. It's not only that. Oh look at them. They're I'm sad because because of their suffering offering a look at them I said because they feel happy because the we give them floor or give them a bit bit of money now but they're really angry like no one would like to be suffering that much or to be be living in a situation where he or she doesn't have the basic needs like most of those people who sympathize with them have so yeah I just want to say that refugees get angry but I'm not sure if they show it because maybe they don't have enough energy energy because I think anger needs so much energy maybe all their energy is wasted in sadness and suffering. What would your advice be to any refugees? Jeez that are listening to this in Glasgow right who feel angry. I mean I would tell them. Take your time feel sad. Tried writer adapts. And once you feel that you're angry don't don't be scared to show because you're just human. Don't be scared because you have different passport. That says that you're Fiji. You cannot get angry. Don't don't be scared to show in your anger if you're at the airport and you people people deal with you in a different way because your passport says that you're you're human. You're British Scottish Tisch. But you now you have different password. Heard the term. New Scott's yeah what do you think about well. I like it because because I read about the program so I think it's mainly for the Syrian refugees. Who came right okay? So I only read the part about Syria winds coming and the calling them new scots. I read it because because of education wise not like political wise and all these things but I really like it. I think here people in Scotland they care much about refugees even like normal people. Sometimes I would walk doc and people would have like a post I say I welcome refugees or you know just if feels good that they're they're people just normal people who care and you know they want you to feel home and I think the program is well organized because they focused on the language I I that you need to learn the language and they give those people the chance to represent their culture alive..

Gaza Glasgow USA Scotland Voice Scotland University of G University of Glasgow Ken Gordon Palestinian Estonian Arabic Kelly Maine intern British Council Israel Norman Fiji Syria Scott Arnaud West Bank
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

06:18 min | 8 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"To to get in touch Axes new funding. Were Open for new ideas. Yes we're all doing. A lot of things now always open for new ideas. So yeah just support us. You know by becoming friends of the welcoming by visiting us here if you need them to come with this buying dealt with more about what we do and aw thank you very much. Get thank you. We make podcast. The capture refugee stories I'm here with Sarah Nando Fernando from Venezuela yes I am Venezuelan by my parents Portuguese. I am to to I stay here from one year. I love stay more time. Many many years. Why why do you come to the welcoming center Sir because one friend is big with me about this this association? He's very good about this. I decided to come one one girl attend me speak with me. She showed me only activities during the week. I love that and I a decided to come now. I come into Games night. I enjoy you. Play Ping Pong bijard chest. Learn English to a meet people many countries I had that there's more than sixty countries entries people from more than sixty countries or here. Yes Fernando I heard you playing table tennis with Zoe as you you. So who won. WHO's best at playing table? Tennis other other guy is not what between you two guys to say the same fit you. Sure yes and now you wonder yes. Good Okay yes. What do you like doing here number? Yes and Mississippi. It is a very good and guilt. Inhale vide- Pity Nice Golden Hail. Yes and God God then yes and very very garden three yes and the city nor hot. Yeah the city is not hot although okay okay where are you from Sir. My from Syria and Syria now no good bombard and yes brazen nor now okay. How long have you been in Scotland? It meant a kgo eight months commitment and might to go dumberer and Turkey Oh yes because man Miami and me Nogot me could and So you have lost hunt. Yes Oh no hunt deers. and A me. And go twenty four in college and studied English and my children and to goes near Surrey and my wife and to go study English Speak English and I noticed something that something. Something that people have said before is that children learn the language quicker than adults. Do you agree. Is that true. Yes yes my children and my children to to my son three years and my daughter to two years good at Mas- speak English and colored number. Save an mammary and Bill and children. I want to say something that I did. One course about no sorry childcare for one year hearing in Scotland the consular Salaam. He's become a concealed. Remember how you saw in the newspaper about men men in childcare I applied they accept me. I bust the course I have a certificate and you want to to job about about nursery. I have to agree to to found A. Yeah just about Cheer Dron. I loved that world. Okay so you're looking forward to getting some work work with children. Have you have your certificate. I think good gentlemen. It's been really nice to talk to you. This is a lovely beautiful bright place isn't it. It's nice to be here with you both and thank you very much for telling me about your experiences and the welcoming and I hope we bump into each there again. We'll meet again definitely. Thank you very much thank you. Thank you refugee voices. Scotland refugees in their own words. Let's you can find welcoming on the web at www dot the welcoming mark. You could find it on instagram and on facebook and on twitter account is cold act welcoming. I remember that if you're a refugee or asylum seeker who has something something on your mind if you run a refugee or asylum seeker support project and wanted to tell us about it in our podcast. Contact us on refugee voices. Scotland at gmail.com. We'd also on twitter to Ref Voice Scott and we have a facebook. Don't miss an episode by subscribing to our podcast. I thank you very much for listening.

Scotland Sarah Nando Fernando tennis facebook twitter Syria Venezuela Surrey Mississippi Mas Bill Miami Zoe
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

06:54 min | 8 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"We don't have knowledge in general and Scotland uh-huh so that's such valuable thing to in terms of legacy and what's your what's other projects you're looking forward to to be the next legacy Agassi project. The next product will look into doors. It's an addition to what we are doing to look at transport okay for the CF. Each year or issue round of funding Europe life for need to show additionality something new that you're going to so what we have in mind at the moment still under lease which is to introduce an outcome around transport and as my own opinion at least not uh-huh yet formalized as I said earlier on we have we attract foreigners people coming from abroad. I think that might be these. People fly to Scotland and flying obviously is not good for the environment so what we could do is to you. Obviously do they want to see how the they traveled to to the UK or recruitment And then uh this these people about alternative or epo ways of travelling. I encourage people to buy three an in order by bus. And then you know one of the behavior of these people and then we can. We can see because we have a baseline and we know people use to fly. And this is how much carbon emission they used to to create and now they're going by bus or train and this how much carbon emission the could he hit and then we can compare the two. So that's that's an exciting area and then another area that we're considering torture work with schools. WHO's the local schools here in the teachers? The students independence but we are at the moment. We are exploring. Auden these these these ideas until you've got a fantastic list of things that you do in this relatively small area this beautiful building. What other skills vote talk to you teach? Okay we're on gloss on on the weekend inside so so is computer class begins for Arabic speakers so we actually that you speak in Arabic Midi attended by series Uh so they deter would teach participants busy competitive skills you know how to create your own military's health shop online how formation facebook unsold so for people with no computer knowledge at all this is very useful to confine their own is talking point to increase it. Looks kills so this is really popular. And as I said they take place every Saturday to clauses eleven till one and how foreign policy and how many people are in those classes. I think another ten people not attending each plus mixed when we started we started with. We Miss Class. I and close by then. We decided that I'm experience would be more appropriate every Saturday. That's a Lotta a Lotta people learning digital scale. This is it is at the you. So you mentioned everyone has to be over. Eighteen are already programs that are particularly designed for younger younger people with about a year ago so I was approached by A couple of people from the Indian community who are saying you know the young people they don't have access to any activities outside else I can help them with creating someone gave her. DVD's for them because the welcoming did not work with young people. Do we contacted other organizations. In this example it was the Spartans Community Football Academy in North Edinburgh so pericles bill. Football Academy means lovely facilities ooh We knew for a long time so we got in touch with them and the the the the opportunity so now hosting a weekly session for the CDN people say twelve Every Sunday play football table tennis. They have a a communicable where people come play. the play station for young people on white labeling that from time to time the invited speaker somebody to speak to them about a specific issue. That's important so that partnership allowed us to support the people who don't directly work with them but we have access to park the notice and other organizations. Who can do that? And I'm really pleased that the SPARTANS is leading the out and a very successful product which is often the Ford initiated by coming. What do you see? The future of the welcoming association welcomed project. I think appreciate is getting I think the way coming has future because you know the woodwork. That we do here But again funding is never you can never say you know. I know. They're going to get funding. Our have a good track record I talk for my productivity killing the product. I think we are making really would impact and I'm sure would have an opportunity to due to get more funding by these competitive sector and This will acities. You don't know you know what's going to happen looking at our traffic. Was I think would be would be fine. If someone's listening to this what to do next will send individual then our website you know. Kick out what we do. You can contact if you'd like to volunteer as a as a teacher or the defender our gardening volunteers we have a large number of opportunities for volunteering. You can you can support us by donation If he's the government person listening to this day funding is what we're looking for is to do because it was out funding of yesterday do so if the government started the body or a funder then again.

SPARTANS Scotland Spartans Community Football Ac Europe Agassi UK Miss Class Auden North Edinburgh
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

11:23 min | 8 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The Fisher project because we do home visits so we go to people's home about vice about how to save how to use in the deficiently recycling system in Edinburgh how it works because as you can imagine Meighan. It'll these people come from Brooklyn climate. They're not used to heating systems and the wizard in decline in Scotland. So they need that. Help help from us to Go over he thinks the programmers the bills at the recycling. I'm so it's really useful. Say This I think that we are providing to the comedian. Say Money as well. I think I think Scottish people okay. Even though the Scottish people from Scotland they also don't get used to extremes of weather hot spell and everyone complaining. Yeah Yeah So. It mentioned a great project right at the very beginning. Can you tell me about the incoming clear. Future Project started five years. School is funded by the Climate Kelly Front squats government. I knew administered by keeping Scotland. Beautiful This most recent funding we go two year funding and There are three or four outcomes attached to that The first first one is about home visits where we go out to visit Syrian families in their own home give them advice about home deficiency and recycling and saw saw the other outcomes about climate literacy where we bought the different welcoming classes English language classes and talk about climate related public with recycling glass. Dick or even information. You know what this climate king what Causes Climate Jake game on what are the effects of climate. And what can you do as an individual to help package. Climate Change so climate literacy is a very important outcome for us and And we are doing very well. Actually because of the nature of the whittling that we have a pool of people coming to us so struggling. But I'd like to find people talk to. Here's a question. What is the most difficult thing to to educate people of climate change? Because it's a eddie very big thing is tricky thing to get people to remember or understand. I think do things. Yeah Yeah for some people coming from The global developing countries coming to live in the UK. They might not have the same notion about climate. So there's a lot of work to be done there. There is there so in this. Some people is struggling to find the benefit of tackling climate kink. Unless you say you can also save money you see because we will come to your house. need to put the heating on twenty four hours in your bill. Will it'd be very high. So what advice we give you will help you save money as well as protecting the vitamin so joining the two that to help us to to brexit terminology right name was playmate crisis. How do you feel about as a person I feel through facing the climate crisis I think would be even more in the future I believe that people should stop to think seriously about what they do on day to day. life and what they can do to reduce the dead foot the carbon footprint. There's also interesting subject. I'm actually you can explore is climbing justice or injustice year for me coming from Africa I know for that. There is very little carbon emission in Africa because of very low industry look less travel and sold so in other words the western countries Youtube America they emit of carbon emission African in poorer places in Asia versus the emit very little however the consequences are filled more by the poorer countries Dan the Western countries and we call that climate injustice. You causing trouble. I suffer more for example when Hue Akin Katrina. I think the United States a few years ago when it happened the most people who suffer where the black ethnic minority the homeless and the poor. Because they're not able to evacuate quickly. Don't have things to places to go. Why would not victim ugly because the details of six Similarly on a on a global level in Africa Medicare is are feeling. Aw Poor really because the racism has changed because of climate change People are able to predict there in the beginning of the season so they can start planting their crops on they suffer because of the deforestation addition People Migrate from one place to another because they did here is is is no longer suitable for agriculture because because of climate change it causes less disturbance to the communities who live there to have claimed at refugees. You have calamities. Tiffany is actually people say the problem is Syria stopped because of climate change because on one area I think they were Because of climate change agriculture was down People were unemployed in numbers so people started to fit. I played and started to race against the government. And that's how the thing is committed so yes climate terrific. I think. That's that's the future. I can feel your interest and passion for the subject. Yes on your such great stuff. Here Junior uh-huh people going into actually going into people's homes and show them how to be more efficient and everything you need to do to save money and also reduce the carbon footprint MHM The other. Outcome is is about food growing really exciting project. We started in April two thousand eighteen and we managed to secure an allotment nearby and the food growing project consists of people going to to to Get used to planting again new skills and mixed with other people and also we go go to people's homes and held them to to grow food in their own gardening and we help them. You know building raised beds communal building in compost Mama uh-huh equipment and so on so that's really really useful for the community and Do that we work in in partnership with so many organizations whether they're CCF funded or or or not and we also a lot of number of here's especially for the garden and Part of the CCF product encourage you to create a legacy of your project so when the funding is finished what is going to be there. So I think we've been really successful on Establishing legacies or creating ladies for the project for example in two thousand sixteen We stabbed social enterprise. The legacy of the project now social enterprises about running and they're doing better will Making reusing Dick Style to create new ideas clothing and handbags and things like that And we also have a legacy of resorts bank that we have coming which contains topics selected to climate change. So teachers can come anything. Look about the plan to do with environmental clinique and they can use use that as a teaching material for the class We are also considering working with CDN artists to create the new social in the price where this artist would work with CDN women to create take what record called textile up using recycled materials. And stuff so I think their legacies very important than an an and I think we've been successful in that area and as the defenders would like to see there is something left after the end of the project so as I said that would be the city of community and we're really in a managed to dander terrorist. I'm there would links with them because we offer package once. We offer a full package of of of of service and support to this community. For example could come here to learn English. We go to them talk about climate change and Khomeini we have befriending project so each it can be assigned befriended As I said earlier on we have unemployment worker who helps them writing their. CV's finding jobs hopes and so on and plus it's more products like Scotland for newcomers for this week liberal each. What is the Guam visit with a place where this Akassim or museum or a park so they go in a group from the welcoming? All New People Very very popular because people is really good in a group to hit some somewhere. So you know where you're going you meet people on the way the group members they're going with you can meet friends with them So yeah there's so many things going on though is coming it. It strikes me that you're teaching people and climate change skills and climate change awareness in a way that lots of us don't.

Scotland Africa Edinburgh Brooklyn Meighan UK Kelly Front Dick United States Akassim or museum CCF Asia Guam Khomeini compost Mama Tiffany America Syria
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

05:18 min | 8 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Name. Is Ken Gordon Today. In a magnificent echoey place with with Adele Abraham who is a community development practitioners out the Welcome Association Louisville. Hallo it's a beautiful day. It's been sunny rainy every five ten minutes Scottish. Could you tell me something about the welcoming association. Because it's a very ediborah KNBR centric organization. It is numbers. Injury is a grassroots organization established in the early two thousands Men thing that we do here. The welcoming is to provide English language classes at different levels so we have beginners closys else. He's being immediate intermediate advance In addition to that we run conversation coffee. Every Friday. So people people come to us from different countries over sixty different nationalities. Come to the weight coming and we are threat over fifteen hundred people annually to come. I'm he ended English. So that's our mean operation and has been like that for for a long time so on top of that we on other projects for for example. The project I'm working in it's called the welcoming future project which is funded by. CCF Kolin Fund Scottish government administered listed by keeping Scotland beautiful and we have been received funding for the last five years. And we're very grateful to our funders because doc money is allowing us to work in the community. Today's awareness about climate king and encourage people to take action to tackle Clem. Kick pick okay before we before we talk about that coming back to the English. Many many many people take boxing classes. We don't seventeen in different classes a week on average about twenty people in each plus so annuity say they're about seventeen hundred. People come out classes security countries from over sixty countries I would say mainly Europeans. We did the research or survey recently and Italians audience and Spanish are the minority for participants. However a couple of years ago we started to engage with the Syrian refugees irving is through the Edinburgh Council seat in the program were partners in that program and therefore we we do what was serious as coming here to learn English or enjoying other activities to help them integrate in the community? So we have we've been we've been fortunate position to be partners in that. What is it mixed cripple male and female female over eighteen? We don't work still doing at the moment though the will look into into that but so far we what was eighteen plus. How long did the courses lost English is it? Continuing for years is a drop in Dropping clauses so people can come for a month or two months six months so is very very flexible when no unlike Fixed with a specific course that you need to complete the dropping nature actually attracts people dos. People don't don't feel obliged to you know to stick to a course because as you know people some people come here just for the short holiday or for some work and going back home so this idea for the. There's no commitment in terms of time under you. Can you can stop anytime you can attend as many classes as you want east gloss About two hours and is completely you talked about people finding work. Is there a focus on trying to help the people to get into work with. We actually have a worker. Who dedicated for that? So we have unemployment guidance Colleague who help people writing their CV's applying for qualities finding jobs and so on. So that's yes we do have that. How long do people stay with you and stay connected team? It depends for example the Europeans who come to us there it depends on their own circumstances. You know some people here are here for a short period and then they go back to their country over something. We're here for longer. And they will stay for us that long list. They had full time and they couldn't come in. Wi- with the Syrians is kind of more Glenn commitment because as I said we're partners with the city of council and receive funding from them to do that integration work so is more kind of ongoing commitment with the Syrian community. Okay so you get to know people potato we do. Let me do pretty well either through them coming here. Yeah or visit them at home as part of what.

Scotland Ken Gordon Adele Abraham Welcome Association Louisville CCF Clem Edinburgh Council Kolin Fund Scottish government Wi Glenn
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

09:31 min | 8 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"A distance because you know you've created a different reality in the space and so you're in a character which means you're not you whereas in a in a situation situation like this I can as an artist be myself and present music that way as an opera singer you are yourself in there under the wig and the make up. Ah Your responsibility is to step into another character. Portrayed someone else's life. I'm what I can bring to. This is my life experience. My feelings my emotions as a collective elective with the orchestra. And that's a very unusual thing to be able to do. What are the things that transmitted for me was just pure joy? Yes and that is what for me is so inspiring very often as an opera singer. You're not at home. You're on the road you're alone and that's an incredibly probably a lonely existence in which to make music and so with this group we travel together. We laugh together. We cry together. We sing together. We jammed together and and we make music together and that experience Intergroup is really powerful and it's also powerful for us to be able to connect with people who may not. Have you ever heard classical music before. been up close to it. And that's also bridging a gap because people often classical music is out of touch out of reach is too expensive. Not Accessible. Won't understand the words when in actuality classical music is just music. So that's why I find. The idea of reaching teaching people through this art form is the perfect perfect vehicle. And what's what's the next few. Well I have two sides to my life. I work for BBC radio. Scotland and I do a lot of documentary work on civil rights and so my next project is operatic but Inbetween I try to find ways to tell all stories through radio and the next big project that I'm doing is trimmed which is Scott Joplin. Opera is the first black opera from America. Ever written and Scott Joplin is the slide pianist and so it features. An african-american story told through jazz blues. Slide piano opera and European classical music and the project runs for the next eighteen months in North America so that is my next big GIG if we have listeners in north North America and we probably do we are in north. America are in May and California. This is through the volcano theater and we are in Stanford and we are also at Berkeley at the beginning of May. And if you're in North America keep an eye out TREMOLO volcano theatre in Toronto turn. There are more dates coming throughout America. So keep your eyes peeled and it's easy to find us on social media like you so much for speaking to me. Thank you very much. Thank you for coming Selena. Got Really quiet now it has. It's gone really quiet. I don't like the everything's gone. They've all finished. The Orchestra. Orchestra has left the building so friend of the podcast as ever facility now. This seems like an annual event. We catch up. What's been happening in the last year a year and refugee if time to fit it all in there is never attained to fit? It's also really difficult to talk about time periods when we just go by the by you just sort of play through but yea since last December world. We've got this space we've got a space on buyers rued. Incredibly lucky to have this beautiful event space. I was actually chatting to somebody earlier and I described it as if we were if we were dead port and we had one of those houses that Hadley guest room like the the posh eleven rim the only the only guests are allowed to go and this is our late. It's our portion in the bregger. The donation space is like the whole cupboard that nobody dares open the door and it was only when I was saying that actually captures what this is all about. The buyers route is to give us an office space. That takes us a we from the macy chaotic vibrant fun brilliant space is the donation space. But the just a little bit room to think thank and then it's also a little popo space that we can do events late tonight and that we can have open mics. We can have workshops. We can host amazing organizations. We've had universities. Use the space with private companies uses base. And it means that we you're bringing in income the get to do something for us as a refugee support organization and whilst also needing space in the city to do do whatever they do so it's a lovely little it's just a lovely little hub of community stuff and tonight is a great example over this afternoon where we had people dropping into say hi people dropping into finite how they can help and then a stupendous performance. German spy nervous on symbol and last time we spoke you were talking about shortages and needs of things like buggies and stuff like that dot going in the donations nations site and also you talked to boat you pop up events that you were doing. You're you're giving stuff away. POPs have been transformed. It's amazing are POPs. What was our this exactly what we say for them to be there a bringing together of people from all over Glasgow to pick up things that they need and it's don in a way that structured it's not exclusive? I suppose is the word I mean in that. It's not an exclusionary because it's complicated it. It's a very straightforward. You can be booked on you might be UCONN. There will be volunteers and people there who will know that you've been before four if you've been before and you will be asked to either. Just wait half an hour Wilson. People who've never been before Gwen or or or to just head the street and we know no and I feel much more confident saying that I think last year I was just getting to the point of saying. I think we might have figured out what we're doing now. I feel really confident. In seeing we knew how to run their event successfully and that doesn't doesn't come easy to somebody who still thinks that they're winging their way through life but I think we've got IT I. I really think we've got it. We've doubled the a number of volunteers at as well. So we've got more mines and more folk helping problem solve anything that we come across so the pop ups are going brilliantly. We still see one hundred fifty two hundred people a month at those donations are phenomenal at the moment as well and people poll again we center founder feet in terms of how we get the things we actually need. We don't shy away from seeing if you wouldn't give it to someone you do. Oh please don't give it to someone you don't and people really seemed to have responded to that so we know get winter jackets. We get winter. Footwear we get toiletries. Toiletries and stationery and hats and gloves and scarves that we need. We no longer get some were droops and the stuff. That's the whole cupboard was talking about earlier we get the specifics. And that's really really important. It makes far easier to to welcome people but we've also moods of new partners and that always makes life far easier and whether that partner is Somebody Light Nevis Ensemble from tonight who can deliver the most phenomenal capture of community and of coming together as people through music. Yeah it blows lose my mind whether it's that or whether it's somebody late repair cuffy Glasgow who we work with to recycle up cycle. Repair the prams impeached. Here's that get donated. The have taken sole march of I were so much of the Admin side. Uh of the BUGGY and prime donations of her hands the it just completely changes. We do things. So they're currently running crowd under the. I would encourage anybody that wants to support refugee to support them because if people support them we can get twice the number of buggies out that we can if we are not if don't exist details of that in the notes yeah that would be amazing. They are the they basically take the bit of the bug impromptu donations that we can't handle as an organization so we can't repair them. We can't spend time cleaning them and enter of up cycling them whereas if we can get into neater to repair Kathy they can do all of that stuff and then we can get them out to family so much quicker so they are. Yeah the IT's working with Organiz organizations like that that have made refugee be able to grow the way. It's grown over the last year. And what's in the coming year..

America North America Glasgow Scott Joplin BBC Somebody Light Nevis Ensemble macy Stanford UCONN Toronto Scotland Selena Hadley Organiz Kathy California Gwen Berkeley
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Yeah UH They you mean yeah.

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

13:43 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Fight. It's it's nice to see you. Everyone can come together and make something happen and it was all on the basis of the little boy with those he said there sure no matter how much extra stuff you get. That's still not enough. No had I think a lot of organizations in China who worked without level luke distribution and passing on things. I think we all see my goodness. It really helps helps. I individual helps that family. The time is completely needed and allows people to feel missile luther. Doing some fun can be really hard to to want to help them. Thank you want me to do especially. If you're a peden responsibilities you can't just most people just to say took off again so can be able to donate to be financially whether it be stuff and it can help people feel involved and part going to wait or project but yes you're right. You know it doesn't it doesn't solve the problem. The little boy went away bones on <hes> but that doesn't change them. What do you wish you'd known long before? He started such a good question because I've been thinking about that a lot recently. I wish I don't what about developmental trauma I wish I had known more attachment and I wish I focused more on support and patents rather than children should be the best way to support a child is to support the patience to continue that stable attachment until the capture after them and the best we possibly can and I think it's hard for volunteers going into camps with Nori my youth for I'm a opened appearance to to support their children and sort of provide them with resources allow. They've been the ones to get the children the boots at distribution because quite often the kids would play not for Oregon with the way it was the we would manage. We it would be handled. Are we were top. Biscuits may be you know what story tame enough to kind of choosy. I wished appearance and been doing and I wish we could have empowered them to do that and we did. Certain extent especially with younger children are toddlers Babies Day findlay. I wish that more of that and I wish I could have understood that award at the time and again to do this again. If you were would that be possible nor not just any and between among most young person who's going through this island process <hes> someone I met in flatts on no. I look after head so I'm very committed. It's a it's all my all much open and second. I couldn't leave have indisputable when these through what's going through just to meet some insurance is he's one of the young people and he's he's wonderful and he's incredibly resilient and capably fiercely total phone but he's in a really difficult situation when through so much as I can really be anybody else you mentioned things three things that you wish you'd known more about Developmental Trauma Attachment and parental support when doc developmental trauma. What does that mean for me. It's been a really steep learning curve. I I have one youth work different things for work but didn't really fully understand the impact of trauma and impact when there's been lots said recently about A._C.'s adverse childhood experiences. There's lots of talk about that and newspapers and you know all the different ideas of you can have an e score in this can show tell you what could potentially happen in your life in terms of your health and wellbeing. What can what that traumatic relief can then become Bloomington if you like. I don't think got a full understanding of until I started looking after my young person on for me. It's been a huge huge learning curve to cap the different parts of his behavior and how you paid and look after. I don't Paerson who's going through. You know what their behavior scare what they see or how it seems highly behave in a war war. Is that really like self sabotaging behavior not being able to sort of take positives not being able to complemented all these different things just sometime surely small or sometimes much much bigger so I would have loved afternoon one of Atlanta before I went to France and to understand why the children behave the way they do and how something that may come across as one behavior is really yes. I know something attachment attachments a huge thing for me. There's there's lots of unaccompanied asylum seeking children in Scotland. I think Linda who make Andre one hundred and fifty something like that not Massey's but you know there's some but if you think about your young adult asylum seekers who you're eighteen and going through the asylum says they've perhaps started their journey seniors four years ago in some cases shouldn't will travel traveled through different countries of applied for asylum that failed the feudal gone through all these different things in traffic being exploited. I'm not that strong but they took place and sort of cater or someone to give them that strong secure attachment and everyone needs in their life especially someone who's gone through through so much harm the top knowledge can have their and the attachment that that person will be there no matter whoa no matter who they try and push a week perhaps because they're frightened they'll get wound and can allay again or they're frightened that something happens without deletion ship so much award won't that attachment relationship is totally important a young person regardless of what their backgrounds are two cutlass where they're from but it's the kind of young adults asylum-seekers the ocean who's got their box. WHO's looking after them. Who's has been that can among thicker or not but you know what I mean. So I think actually important something I would love to see more of happenings. What more can I greater understanding of the worst. We talk about about wanting to be the best place best place in what. Oh for children and young people to grow up with. I love that can happen. We need lots to be the source starting point of all these different journeys and the way we look after and care for people we need law at the heart of all the processes that's homesick tactical through under teams from my reading these things the opposite of and and it's a bit of a bitter fine. I think all some people can I think a lot of what's going on. We're talking about immigration stats. We're talking about numbers. We're talking about these. People come back. I wonder how much money should always cannot fundamentals and I get understand thought you can't. There's there's poolside since we have to strip says no matter how much we lake them agree with them or have you. There's there's paperwork. You know what different thing there's interviews and there's all these different things tmz until we can value everyone in society then then Puerto Rican teen until we can look at I don't comparison see them for what they are or not and see them and get them kate and nurture then four Arthur Lee CIANCI's ultimately. We look after unaccompanied asylum-seeking children's clearly a huge issue for you. Yes and hope will the catheter young adult asylum-seekers takers because I think I think we have to remember that when we think of our children we don't necessarily think aqua. They're fully eighteen never darkened her door. Again I think there's an understanding these stone need support eighteen even if they think they do you know even if they're quite happy to fly off into the what they still need the stony something it fall back on and I think between unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and you know those late teen years we know that from school to show people we know that from our children it from education and care we know that young people between the ages of fifteen and twenty one thing might think they're adults. They may look like they're adults on Peter official but the reality is they are they still need support and they still need love and encouragement and someone to fall back on and that's something that particularly particular thing for me. The moment is particularly a big issue for me just because I look at this island processes services that we expect young people go through and buy that unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and also young adults and I think gosh is utterly rallied retraumatize on on hand on Heart Haiku we put her young people in that possession we would never think to a young person going through the criminal justice system in that position. We're talking at the moment in the papers about smart justice and hope we after victims of time and also how we look at dealing with perpetrators as claim as well but these people have done anything wrong. They're claiming asylum which is illegal right so we need to look how we meek. How Hey we look after them better? Now I get the immigration is a devolved matter in Scotland. Goodness knows how many people keep telling me that but health health and social care and education are so why is it the immigration continually trump's those other parts of our the Scottish government and our priorities for Scotland I look at the idea of nutty in being safe and healthy and achieve and all these wonderful positive things look pictographic getting it right for every child. Does the immigration process actually get it right for every child of course it doesn't if there's there's no way it can so for me. It's about right how we look at look after these young people and as between fifteen and twenty twenty one twenty two twenty head to look after them and make them feel cared for and really the and enveloped within Scotland within keer and communities. We're just starting point for that. Do you think that is I had a conversation received something. This morning or this care has to start when the ironic because otherwise we sort of lose we will lose our trust or we physically lose them or the the you just become middle swallowed up by processes. We have to remember that the people come on the young people come in. They're not just stop hydride. You can stop the other reasons for being here and they've all got the right to claim asylum and we need to look at high we can for wouldn't benefit the best and we welcome them into communities help weight based or will the capture them and make them feel safe and nurtured and secure because I think we've got an obligation to to them. Regardless of four parts of policier devolved or not so Lindsey. What's on your mind? Gosh the immigration system uh-huh immigration system is most definitely on my mind because we're going through that moment. I think I'd always seen the allegation system. You know you always read about immigration system. You'll look at the weakest people clean asylum until it spend your house. It's a different so then dictation systems on my main just mental health for young people Scottish on people. I'm sure just as much as unaccompanied young young people Cleveland asylum all those are issues that we need to try and improve on as I said earlier I think love and safety and security and nurture needs to come much closer to the forefront of dealing with our young people and looking after them than it currently does Lindsay. I'm so glad we connected on twitter me to thank you so much for this thank.

Scotland China twitter Oregon Scottish government Cleveland flatts France Paerson Bloomington Lindsey Arthur Lee CIANCI Atlanta Lindsay Massey Peter official Linda Andre four years
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

15:04 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. This episode features Stephen mcklusky, the phone der- of the bikes for refugees charity, which if you follow them on Twitter seems to be growing arms and lakes or should that be pedals Jane's. Bikes refugees started through a meeting that included Stephen a young gentleman from Syria called Yemen. And what Stephen describes as a bike shaped object refugee. Voices. I'm here with Steven McCloskey, the founder of bikes refugees. Hi, stephen. Hi, Stephen standard question, what's on your mind? What's marines? Well, let me tell your story story about, it's Scotland that came about a story, aboots, mind, omit, usual gentleman, from from was a refugee cold Yaman, and they got that I ain't and Canaan, bro much with no more than Clinton's Barack, and I think you have to see to something Lorne afraid about of what the future also made me bring having lefties finally maybe loved ones by Coleman and walked home of those things away. And not won't after lightning Yaman bought himself, be by from from country for ten fifteen just to help himself got owned explains news loans. The only problem was that the beat was more of our paycheck object, the walking walking, basically that was actually capable of, of getting anywhere. So Maceo and my partner base. We took care Yaman Dench of local bike. Shop to see for today. Get it fixed up and get one that would cut logs. The shorts the beach was repealing. But the guy who'd on the bake shop where cabling gifted Obata Yemen, and they. Yeah, I just over the next couple of weeks and a couple of months, I just noticed who simple thing as really made a difference to Yemen to stay help them. Save money to help them to set one TS. She's new woman Indians. He said. And a supposed to to eat. One was could be any other people Bill like the guy in the bait. Shop who is Cain, the generals off to the ache to Gammon and with other refugees who will benefit from, from heaven, I say step. So when they set in host of attest to and a bunch of effigies was once on Facebook and fast forward to half years we've had over six hundred eighty. Nearly five hundred eighty six of in before, pushed and distributed to terrific. These sailing across Scotland Costa central Rebecca's demand for actually in Glasgow. But also also Edme will and people tell the aches for a whole regions. So these are aches for kency's sustain to school to college university to act say, essential wine, which classes, people use to say, volunteering, what corporate entities to access central hill, safeties, and meetings with, with a home office, and lawyers, and people use of eight to, to come together and people in meet you in Glasgow. We have poop in also link, people all over Salem seekers refugees can be quite particularly Glasgow to isolated as well. So thanks. Yeah. I'm gonna. It helps bring people to go, so yeah, but speculative geez, about Xiamen doing new Yemen, so yeah, so young, it was inspiration censored, the Puget he is still living data book. He's, he's new here. He settled a has many friends, I suppose, he's probably happy as could be under the circumstances has prince and his family still bucking Damascus, were too old to, to flee when dominates the left a sudden and the bass Kasese with he's system. He was shape related oblique from southern border and he's been related Bethesda has also. No, listen, Edinburgh. There's no great. He's Yaman know what king take me has started full and tearing he knew speaks fluent English feted, little English, but you knew speaks English with a very strong Scottish accent. You'll see tells me as well and has what's, what's. Mighty a Scottish Lassie buffet with Ray taken and. And there's only only one spoil him in the story that don't always tell everybody less supposed to be going twenty five year old man walking tape. He's only going car. But he's abundant the mic you still can use as you still way you still say, cools. Actually on. Sake, and bake have more news. I believe, and the more novel two and a half years later, from inspiration, behing, refugee Scotland. He has no trustee board. So dominant very much involved in helping and shape the project forward as well. Which, I think as, as, as a great story, that's a beautiful circularity there, then right back to the person that inspired the soul being a core part of what's, what's moving on much, when you started this new sat down and thought rate, I'm going to start this bikes for refugees, and you'd ideas hoped would pan out, has it panned date compared with what you thought at the beginning. I wasn't quite sure how it would, you know, it was one of these things that you what did these things that you come up with, you know, when you don't. Bedroom. And then grows goes arms and legs, I mean, I remember going to put that initial in Facebook. It's been interesting. I so social has been quite quick central to the project has been very central at the style and continues to be, so that's a lot of people, particularly effigies Salem seekers link-up. But yeah. To physical all over widow with goal, but people started to contact with people like the guy and the bait shop give that for speak to Yemen wanted to do something they had seen the stories, let me say refugees asylum seekers, particularly from study, and Secondly, no shortage of people who just wanted to do something. And, and sometimes, you know, just a simple, thankfully, the core if nobody misinter- actually the scrape the jet less, and less as put more of a project that supports peoples inclusion and integration. And, and I think I think importantly as we think that when people at the saints approval, Mesa Joel Sola, down as well and say the people that you're welcome here. So I think that makes that makes a big difference. But, but yeah, two and a half years ago, people started to aids and very quickly. I suppose that started to about a problem as well, because we have no storage, also very quickly, my host start develop bakes. I had bakes chained up all day, and I'm Chris Coppola half the muster Lou this'll be it as real and settling no shortage of people wanting to help, but we had to paint storage, how to reach out and people who could help us to fix up under appeal aches, and we're no have full in tears, and Edinburgh and Glasgow, and who picks up eight so we have some really good partnerships as wheel when an Edinburgh, we have a partnership with a commute for Jay called Coppola, gee up. So we work closely with them and Glasgow. We have a close partnership with an established project associate of the cold coastal wiggles. So we have volunteers. From the fictional aches and disturb them today for jeez. Biggest demand for Nicely. nicely. And. And surprisingly as global. Saying the key population of Salem of posting Glasgow always always always always fifty six people waiting for aids and people here are pretty split to accessibly. If you're say. Say Glasgow some of the lessons make. No. If you say she can legally work and legally get also even claim state benefits, you know, so you're living off an alone today, so even even in public or is prohibitive. But you have some freedom of movement, particularly Glasgow, where you pretend to be hosted wings away from the city centre with a low of essential services, the kind of service that we take granted, you know, so just giving people that feeling of movement goes a long way to helping people just take khanate with central safeties and importantly, a little basically people helps people to connect with other people into people, meet feigns as Bill we have a volunteer, zipping, authors, matey, and Glasgow from star, whose Salem Sika. He's a great champion forsake Leno Hessel interest in one is also he, he also the one of the spikes from the poor jet he then when on volunteer, experts for his peers McAteer Beatty through some training, but he's actually left does not all he's still supports in other ways, but he's life doesn't that rolled and interesting what he's up has Kennedy Kujat, not the specs bakes for other beverage because but not bikes. Anybody and the trinity who become afford to access also, that's a look at that's the moment, but say, what really makes the project has the support begins forget from individuals who didn't bakes. But also also many power ships that the beget Israel and some place in creator partnerships. Which is Liz, what surprised you about where you've come on this journey tease, the Moton craze. Given what you go in the beginning surprise my question really surprised by the middle support. The people have come forward who who faulty about the skills that wasn't too surprising. Yeah. Before bikes refugees might professional by public, health and public health, hills, improvement and. Call coz diff'rent doesn't groups and populations including refugees, and say seekers off over the years, but before bikes when the refugee camp, the jumble, stole an offer, France and Palley myself. And so other people say up project, which shea bikes, but caravans and people would donate caravans or the words or automated, but fundraising the by kind of, on the with two fellow Philo, v- clothes and food in the paint and say to them, and we have a network of drivers who take eight a fruit essential eight refugee company for firms, and including used as shelters. And I think over the space of about. Over the year. I think we must have called the not eat over one hundred caverns. Quite a few kind of scold, Israel. Take the jungle Bobby G temp. Those two most a couple of years ago, and I still have links and some. With Manial grassroots Jay and Scotland UK that stole the closest open in much the in the north of France cave job was on his it was healing secrets. Those children and many of the combines used a mixed shale toes where fated some shelter for of the particularly vulnerable children at the but yeah, I mean is still there, but I suppose was a looking for Kujat, not necessarily. But. And the races. But I suppose I'm never so the realis- apply used by the people. Not one what to help and what to do something, which is, which is great. And that's. I support the project would exist, sensually Esmael expensive projector. But we do we need resources at costs money to two picks up each week when we give real full wheel to a new cycle met looks late says, well, that costs money stood by and the frustration. We've actually global we've for the first time even -ployed somebody for a couple of days a week as wheel mechanic, which is which is not surely helped, and I'm gay, he's also supporting volunteers have Glasgow's will Sipa so yeah, you run event. I should say you want an award this last year was that you want to know what the Saco frame, the committee of cycles yet. So yet, sober to stay just ship, yet, which is, which is, which is first of many. Oh, yeah. I think it's nice to have. It's nice to get those. Mosul for the people who support that a lot of us have, and some very, very committed and dedicated volunteers was able to give up a low of in affects and a fun vision for his as well. And just Hove angel a whole region. So what's next for bikes horrific? Geez. Can you give any? Yeah. And site to your next plans. That's plans yet secrets, I suppose what's, I think Pemberton stage in the development of the? Demand for for cases of the day, as I mentioned, always always operating lusting. Always forty fifty sixty people waiting for eight we trained get H two people as quickly as we can. But some players may take a one to see one sister painting and quickly get the needed quickly. We can get reform repealed and on the road. She said to someone apply as a form, as it online or so we have a, a website, www bikes jeez..

Glasgow Yemen Stephen mcklusky Scotland Salem Yaman Facebook Israel Edinburgh Yaman Dench Kennedy Kujat France Obata Yemen Twitter Steven McCloskey Syria Xiamen
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

15:35 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Yeah. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. I'm all as didn't is a campaign for human rights and social Justice in Scotland. She's a Somali-born Scottish refugee doctors, who co founded the Glasgow girls, a group of seven young women who campaigned against the harsh treatment of Silom seekers in response to the detention of one of their friends. The Glasgow girls story has since been turned into to be documentaries, a stage musical, and television musical drama, the stage musical toured again this year, two thousand nineteen and twenty sixty Amal was named by both the young women's movement. And the Saltire society as one of the standing women of Scotland, and in twenty eighteen she won the university of Glasgow's world changing alumni award. I'm also embassador for the Scottish Refugee Council. Since leaving university Amal has worked for the mental health foundation in Scotland as equality and human rights officer responsible for the development of the foundation's work with Silom seekers, refugees. She leads on the phone Dacians Saudi project. Amal continues to campaign and speak out. And we were delighted to catch up with her in Glasgow a few weeks ago. He is out refugee. Voices. I'm here.

Scotland Amal Glasgow Scottish Refugee Council university Amal university of Glasgow Ken officer Gordon
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Yeah. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast my name is Ken, Gordon. This is our first birthday episode. We are one year old in this episode. We interview Selena from refugee, the subject of our very first podcast to find out what's happened since we last spoke a year ago. He will not be surprised to find out. There's a lot before that as it's breathy. We have a special treatment of you. But the person that more or less came up with the idea for these casts. Jennifer, gordon. I interviewed a Wailer go. And she explains why we started doing the broadcasts and also bits about the work that she does for a grunt provider, based in London. The quality is variable, but it's a long way to London on the internet. Here's Jennifer refugee. Voices. It's refugee voices. Scotland's both the on the lane. I have Jennifer Goten Jennifer go all the way from London. Jennifer, why did we stopped refugee voices Scotland that well, so casting our minds back to this time last year both of us were feeling really first-rate said with the narratives impediments in national media by refugees in particular ones that had arrived in the UK, where integrates in for the papers, would have you believe where I remember this particular story around refugees who were living on Rossi ever leave of really, really annoyed us? And we both felt that we had to do something and kind of thought about what skills we go busted around a couple of ideas than occurred me you are appalled caster. And you have all the gear on your experience in it on. Hey, why don't we use poke casting? As a method of allowing the real stories to get there in a sense of, of amplifying, the voices of people doing amazing work in Scotland's for refugees to tell their own story in their own words being skewed. We thought pay that might be might just work. So I very over excited with myspace. The behalf had already ball. The main goal as g mail address goes to Eric with I was so excited about the idea on here that's where he'll start really remember got bit because I was doing something was in, it'll I went into a show in K motion. But the time you've got the Twitter address on geologist lined up. So. So it was very much. Born of the biased ridiculous news. But news on wanting to do something about it. Absolutely feeling feeling pissed off. I like to say on a pole. And feeling like what can we do with our skill sets and knowledge and experience in networks? What can we what can we do in a meaningful way? And we just thought you know, we're not doing the worker cells. We can amplify the voices of the people that are doing it, and that suicide today. So Jennifer, what's your favorite episode from the last year, and I think my favorite one so fire monthly the one that was by faith United and helped him effigies elevate the kind of churches Scotland project with the coordination piece on refugees, and that is that, like as much as it was an organized by the church Scotland, which is also of the Christian faith. It was multi-faith project. It just felt like a really strong welcoming initiative from the church. Scotland. I really liked the idea episode. Currently is a Corrine through a little Oley of been quite something. In terms of realization also. What people say, but Amy Corinne or throw to spend time with her was quite joyous, despite everything often are positively enter her positive, focus was very inspiring. Everyone of these things being really inspiring. Let's face it, every podcast veiled new information on the humanity of the situation finding these, these parts of humanity that are going to be a, you know, this country in the future, as while it's seeing refugees, not as a refugee in that box, seeing them as a human being. He has had to leave their home and often their family and their livelihood for many different reasons, but they are on their humans with feelings thoughts and opinions and experiences. And they're no less valid than anyone in this country's just 'cause they're not from year. And I think I am quite a believer in hearing that kind of voice of someone who's left experience of something really. Being able to perhaps change the opinion or really provoke something with people that reading an article in paper, that journalists has written about someone else counts. I think there is something very powerful about hearing someone story spoken possible by by themselves, and that, I think that was another key thing when we were setting up, this was, perhaps, someone who has a very negative were refugees, if you sat them dine with the Cup of tea, and that person to speak to someone who had fled Syria or fled the or somewhere in the world and talk with their experience. I've really challenged that Paris in who had the purview of refugees to come out of that have changed their minds that way, because it's very powerful that human to human storytelling. Another thing that really pitched us to, to do this, this podcast is while doing it for you so experience of working with refugees? Yeah, I bet yet back in February at t Gonda to visit project that we fund throughout maker, the I worked for in London. The grants is to organization called give directly who are brilliant, as you might guess, the name their work all around, giving money directly to people living in poverty. So the project has been singing Uganda was in a refugee camp large refugee camp there, which majority refugees there from the Democrats Republic of Congo. But the also have a number of Rwandan refugees have been living there for over twenty years in Uganda. The have some of the most progressive refugee policies in the world. They have basic rights, such as education land, the right to leave the settlements and the right to become a citizen, which is bad. The number of countries. But that's by no means saying that refugees have easy in Uganda all so the project yet we revisiting was giving cash transfers by mobile money to people living in the refugee settlement with no strings attached. They can spend the money on whatever they want the premise of the pilot was to test whether these kind of cash transfers are ineffective way of supporting refugees as opposed to in kind services such as a package or clothing packages etcetera. So really shifting the power balance to giving these people and families cash that they can then budget on spends accordingly according to their needs really fascinating. Really interesting on really again. Hit home. I mentioned earlier round the humanity aspects of these people. There may be assumptions that giving people money you just giving the. They're going to spend on. However, these people they had a life and their form a country where they had jobs. They had family bills to pay on. They had to budget, people know how to manage their needs. And when you give them the cash to do that, that's incredibly empowering that they can say, here's what I need. Not what I'm being given by this agency, this agency has inches e it's by will I can do for my family. It was very inspiring, incredibly powerful on spots of ideas really energizing, visit and great to see project is really disruptive and innovative way of helping refugees in these countries. So, yes, must my limited experience of working refugees, but really inspiring visit on really when I came back made me want to even more unlearn even more by the different challenges, the refugees face around the world's June for could really interesting project other any. Early learning points are interesting fights coming into. Yes. I think it's, it's really interesting as a pilot. So the idea is that next at be scaling up to prove that it is a valid way of supporting as people in hoping that it can perhaps be taken on by some of the large agencies that were presented. But certainly when I was there really positive comes to a number of one on one into us with refugees who had received the cash transfers they have spent on school fees that they've been able to pay, which is excellent a number of medical bills debts that they owed other people when they've had to borrow to pay for medical bills or still 'this never place. There was a lot of meeting the basic immediate needs stockpiling of grain and other foods is great to see the number of livelihoods projects that people were were gauging annual number had boats motorcycles, so that they could be registered Buddha Buddha drivers, which is a form of light motorbike taxi take. Can you gotta so that they had to share light to buy the bike in the first place using the cash transfer? But then the gets making income on its Swiss itself things that he just didn't have the capsule to up to two out there in the first instance to then be able to reap the rewards that, that this passionately Oester for them on the brilliant thing is a few people felt to actually saving the first time they've, you know, in ten years relied of started pitching, some money site. When I get the money back for my livelihood projects for emergencies for a rainy day, you know, she's really brilliant us, I think it was also a appoint around that the slightly, you know, the secondary comes I guess, or in the Senate, less expects his outcomes of cash transfers that we hired by for example, there was a couple. Hey, used the money to fix a wrist make appropriate Reuss prior to that they had some kind of slats let low of rain when it rains, it was the rainy season while we were there. He said that the thing that's really changed is their relationship as parents that they're not arguing all the time. There's so much more family harmony as a result of being able to fix the race on. I think that really powerful linked to the kind of stuff we certainly here in the UK eleborate, toxic stress of living in poverty, just a tool that can take on people in many different forms. Another interesting point, I was quite interested in when they were given the option of whether the male or the female, head of Heissel manage the budget. The women were always taking the budget that men want the responsibility, one mount even. Oh, gosh. I would not I wouldn't spend as well as she went. So I'm happy for her to be managing all our money, which was was great. And really interesting. So on the women said it made them elected had more of a place in, in the high school while they were not for husband wants money. He had to ask her. I think it really that, that was also on the unintended outcome that I thought was fascinating. From a sociological point of view fantastic project fantastic insights at this early stage. Yeah, great. Yeah. Well fuck you so much for explaining the thinking behind the origins of refugee voices. Scotland also telling his about that fantastic project. You're very welcome. Refugee. Voices.

Scotland Jennifer Goten London Uganda UK Selena myspace Twitter Gordon church Scotland t Gonda Amy Corinne Ken Eric geologist Senate Congo Buddha Buddha Syria Paris
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. This episode features Kieran Taylor talking about the forgotten history of Belgian refugees in Glasgow during the great war, a story that has many contemporary parallels. Here's Cuban refugee. Voices. Killing Taylor in your first year. PHD student at the university of Stirling and you're looking into the history of Belgian refugees in Glasgow during the war, what drew you to that subject. Well, I had about current teacher saw talking the first World War, and Scotland Oviously big issue as a history teacher. But definitely I had working species with refugees and science because with the squad shift veto, as tier and within you working as a teacher in issues to do with international education. Google says Vadim portent and saw this project when our plight for to be part of this project to the because weekday did macho definitely experiences the iheart towards an academic APD. Okay. Tell me about your project where my foot as it looks. The history of building Fiji's were being Glasgow, and we're not see this cannot often people are quite surprised and he built jeez. This is something that's because it's really a forgoing as head, not related to the first World War. Two hundred fifty billion refugees came Tippin. Tune the first World War, and the state's nineteen fourteen to nineteen nineteen nineteen and nineteen nineteen sadly most of them were deported by Belgian or repack cheated, but billion, but we can talk about an and a second in twenty thousand diligent effigies came to classical and boys, twenty thousand refugees came who were Adnan care of 'cause corporation, which was caused what city council about team and Glasgow corporation to take the responsibility for these refugees. Because Glasgow subtly was one of the few places where refugees could go because of the war restrictions that team anyone who is foreign anyone who wasn't a nationalist Betsy. Citizen couldn't go to the lakes of Dundee Aberdeen aver because these places, of course, to and there a fear of, you know, having too many foreigners near the coast, and if there was an invasion, even Bill Jim an ally say that, there would be some sort of help. So because they. Who came, and who are dispersed laws will have to stay there. And so there was a special policy. Almost today. Yep. Yep. Absolutely. Because, as you can imagine just like the wall of refugees arriving in coastal areas. Kate folks, we're being stationed in London. However, speaking problem, attics Amboise, the government, and the organization responsible for looking after the war refugees committee, decided to spare refugees to Kane Amedure, Auburn centers Manchester, Birmingham, classical London. We stay in also to Ireland you said and Glasgow twenty in gos-. You said twenty thousand. Yeah. Tweeted in Glasgow so twit so twenty in Glasgow. And where did they go with a good question is will they were spread across the city and some of them that could pair three that further we? In some refugees, being in so kudos coast to the that the, the spate and not being allowed to add to some extent, never some refugees need again. They were really supposed to be there. So we are Cain dispersed. I wrote in the city, however won't happen. Moi's Gaza corporation had a very good system of infrastructure. Not they're very organized city council for the period. So the hard very detailed moves on vegan, hosing, so many refugees were stationed and the can hosing and shared often associate glance coping city Tatum bit impoverished on refugees were late the joy, citizens, staying and whole families and rooms things. However, caused the corporation also annexed and took over some of the parks and institutions are in the city. So, for instance, rookie Glen park was used to Jose Fiji's called over the state ho several difficulties. And also the religious organizations churches to a number of refugees in the institutions, particularly the Catholic church Ruthie refugees received in those days received a new creation and nationally nineteen fourteen what we see as because of the relationship of the refugees Bilden, refugees, arriving, and because the relationship of that to the war, and this is one of the principal reasons but goes to war, the invasion of Belton by Germany was seen as a great humanitarian act. And what we see is an overwhelming support for refugees, particularly in the newspapers. And in this great Jaren that Barbara's actions of the of the gentleman will empire and things a lot and to Belgium, and courageous Bejamin, those really a portrayal Belgian refugees as I can't deserving pays entry is really been treated badly buying Germany. A not is the sum of technical of the reception receive so those babies of good discussions in play many sources of Belgian effigies arriving in God's go at central station. Fromm on, you know, people Wayne in streets, clapping tying things. These release something that we saw refugees received Jeremy nationally. However, over the course of the war, the changes, sadly, and what we see as by nineteen fifteen Beijing, Fiji's are seen as a of a drain on society on account of the fact that, you know, many people are dying in the water that's point many people dying in the water. That's point conscriptions about to be introduced and because of Fiji's are seen as Wyant the fighting why our soldiers over, seas fate, a my aunt, these buildings that we're looking after going over as Bill when spatial inconsideration for some, too. Hundred fifty thousand billion fees. And so this is how the, the narrative rookie changes by nineteen sixty what we see, as the government because of this public pronouncements against building, if because of a growing steady towards the governor actually bonds, any media reporting of negative portrayals refugees by nineteen eighteen when Bilgin effigies the war's over Bilden refugees are very swiftly patchy, too, which as a country, as you can imagine, which has been ravaged by four years of war, coincident, bombardment minute. Setis had been ravaged actually, some photographs, liter flat, and the refugees are shut, but continues in ruins unnecess-, because of fears that they'll be LeBron race between Bilden refugees, and the British public was the perceived need for the refugees as for labor more for employment because again there must have been huge, huge needs in. Partitioned straight loud, telling absolutely the gate war. We associated with mask inscription of made and that was vide- Coleman. We see whole industry tones of coop rage eerie just examples Glasgow. You many walking main are saying overseas to Fe four and so who's gonna fill the jobs. And we associate with women the women's struggle for suffrage as and this as part of the narrative, have Bilgin refugees, but also quite sort of expandable, workforce, thirty percent, reduction and jobs and temperatures the weapons and all the other things at times, the planes, sich Belgian refugees were to some extent drafted than to start building and pervading for the industrial coda me in the saints. So Belgians aren't expand the war

Glasgow Fiji Scotland Kieran Taylor Glasgow corporation Bill Jim Germany university of Stirling Bilden Google Ken Tippin Amboise Adnan Glen park Jose Fiji Dundee Aberdeen Setis Beijing
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. It's not often we get invited to sit in on a meeting for a refugee project until we were invited by the colors of Edinburgh project colors of Edinburgh is a refugee, an art project, and it's happening on June. Twenty first I joined the meeting, and then after the meeting, I spoke to co-founders more and Murio refugee. Voices. I'm an Edinburgh tonight in the university building, and I just sat through a meeting of the colors of Edinburgh project on a guys. I must say that was incredible meeting. Never I wish I went to meetings that as precise action orientated and passionate as that was, thank you so much funders phone, does of, of Edinburgh here with meat more and Murio. Let's start with you more. How did this all start? So it actually all started about four and a half months ago when maryelle and I decided to go to a star meeting stars, a society, and university, and that actually exists in most universities in the UK. And it sounds for student action for refugees. Unrecorded just side along that one of the first meetings, they had I noticed the shirt. It was really exciting really? Nice. They did a few smaller projects fundraising events. But we also wanted to do more than just fundraise bit of money. We really wanted to find a way to really talk to the public in Scotland Morales and are just yourself. I'm not so much in artist. I am more the business mind behind this. But so I still I'm very interested in art, and new kind of wanted to put him her and put his well. So we decided to say, you know, let's, let's try to use art as a medium of conveying. This message of conveying, what it means to be a refugee in Scotland. So that's how he started in not first meeting we, then after I kind of sat down after the to create a pitch a next meeting, I asked for the first ten to fifteen minutes of the star meeting, and I said, I wanted to suggest the project and pitch it to the people in society. So I did that. Recruited our first maybe five to ten people, and we quickly started working on things quickly started talking about potential ideas. How could do things talking about our actual main event, which is art exhibition, which will get you, probably later. That's that was the start of it. Eventually, we noticed we need more help need morons things. Exactly the team got bigger and bigger because we noticed that, you know, everyone came aboard has amazing ideas. So the idea it self was so ever-evolving and so growing naturally by the people came and joined so only thing we, we had to do is really recruit more people ended up with about twenty until plus minus some came on for a short while to help us, and then left and some have been there from the very start. What is the aim of colors of Edinburgh? So the main aim of colors of Edinburgh's really to convey the message and make people understand who are in Scotland, the locals mainly in Scotland understand what it means to be a refugee, especially in this country. We really try to make it a local project to make it more relatable to our audience. So every time every meeting, every time we come up with a new idea. Our main focus is still at the end. Is it going to help reach a wider audience, and make them understand? What it means to be refugee. But having said thought it doesn't only mean that we wanna talk about the negative sides of what it means to be a refugee. We also want to kind of change the perceptions of what our g is what they do. What their emissions are, you know, there's this big misconception of people refugees coming, because they're unmotivated and don't want to work and, you know, just want to kind of chill, which is we've found, so not the case every single refugee that we've been interviewing has been so motivated has been entrepreneurial has been really driven to progress in their career in their education etcetera on that kind of all contributed to our aim is. I think art is was the medium that was maybe enabling the Reggie voices to be heard in a different way to be seen in a different way and not so negative as

Edinburgh Scotland Morales Murio maryelle UK Reggie fifteen minutes
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Do? Do you can study? Steady. Volunteer. Get involved in your community. And. Tryst people, even if you can't trust everybody find someone in contrast. And then with love with this tryst, you can grow if you is relate yourself, it would be. Difficult. So get involve in your community and focus on positive things and forget about every negative things because MRs part of life. And you said reflection is a big issue reflect yes, honestly, if we can be reflective people. Reflect on everything. That happens to us that will be something we will gain a lot at the hand of your day try to what was good. What was bad and take a positive and try to reflect what was it, but, you know, and try to what could I change for, you know, so yes reflection? Thank you. Yes reflection. This is part of my life. Now reflecting. It's been a joy to sit here and can be based on your positively on your joy, and your story is inspiring. The best in your studies and the whatever I mean those. Next. Could it be? Thank you very much. You welcome refugees. Voices. Listen to that interview, so many times, and every time I smile meeting was joy, her infectious, positivity and optimism were so inspiring you can find out more about what Amy is doing on our website, which is you can find out more about Amy is doing visiting our show, spades will be food, details of her university website, and on the same page is our friend who die, who featured an episode three who's also a UNESCO ambassador all the websites mentioned, including network. Scotland over to truth commission and bridges programs are on the show notes page is well, you can find our website at WWW dot refugee voices. Scotland dot com. A huge thanks for all your support via our Facebook Twitter feeds. We've had some fantastic conversations that we have some amazing new episodes lined up. Please remember that. If you're a refuge, e or an asylum seeker who's got something on your mind. If you run a refugee or asylum seeker support project and what tell us about it in our podcast. Contact us on refugee voices. Scotland gmaiLcom. You can get on Twitter at ref voices. Scott, that's art. R E F v I c s SCOTT, and you can find us on Facebook. Huge thanks to Amy for telling us our story for her infectious optimism joy until love. And thank you very much for listening on goodbye.

Amy Scotland Twitter Scott Facebook UNESCO
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Do? You can study. Steady. Volunteer. Get involved in your community. And. Tryst people. Even if you can't trust everybody find someone you contrast. And then with love with this trust, you can grow. If you is relate yourself, it would be. Difficult. So get involve in your community and focus on positive things and forget about every negative things because MRs part of life. And you said reflection is a big issue reflect yes, honestly, if we can be reflective people. Reflect on everything. That happens to us that will be something we will gain a lot at the hand of your day try to what was good. What was bad and take a positive and try to reflect what was it, but, you know, and try to what could I change for, you know, so yes reflection? Thank you. Yes reflection. This is part of my life. Now reflecting. It's been a joy to set here and can be based on your positively on your joy and your story is inspiring. The best in your studies and the shooter. And whatever those. Was next. Could it be? Thank you very much. You welcome refugees voices. Listen to that interview, so many times, and every time I smile meeting, her was joy, her infectious, positivity and optimism were so inspiring you can find out more about Amy is doing visiting our show, spades will be food, details of her university website, and on the same page is our friend who die, who featured an episode three who's also a UNESCO ambassador all the websites mentioned, including network. Scotland over to truth commission and bridges programs are on the show notes page is well, you can find our website at WWW dot refugee voices. Scotland dot com. A huge thanks for all your support via our Facebook and Twitter feeds. We've had some fantastic conversations. We have some amazing new episodes lined up. Please remember that. If you're a refuge, or asylum seeker who's got something on your mind. If you run a refugee or asylum seeker support project and what tell us about it in our podcast. Contact us on refugee voices. Scotland gmaiLcom. You can get us on Twitter at ref voices. Scott, that's not our e f v I c s SEO SCOTT, and you can find us on Facebook. Huge thanks to Amy for telling a story for her infectious optimism joy until love. And thank you very much for listening goodbye.

Scotland Facebook Twitter Amy UNESCO Scott
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. I thought for a long time, but hoped to introduce this podcast that features Amy Corinne auto an asylum seeker from the Ivory Coast, who arrived in the UK in twenty eleven and after being dispersed to Glasgow spent three years, fighting to get refugee status. She has changed an amazing amount, and she's a UNESCO rely ambassador. All I can say to is relax for the next twenty two minutes, and listen to Amy. Tell us her story refugee. Voices. I'm here with Amy choline auto, Holloway, her you. I'm good. Thank you. Very nice to meet you me, too. You have done many things in your life and you're still young. So what's on your mind today? What he wanted okay? I just wanted to start with the fact that is my first language. And I wanted to, you know. Speak of. Identity of people. For example, when my story started I was seeing myself as an asylum seeker, and then as refugee. I forward that I was I am a person. So, you know, I love liberal myself as refugee instead of seeing myself, as a person, we refugees us or a person, seeking asylum, and since I've started to do this Demarcartion, I feel better. When did you decide to make demarcation? I decided when I. Completed my b o NAS in community development. Oh, yes, this is it because we have we've learned how, you know, people with we call people with disability, you know, in order, not to. Us. I don't know how to call it picture Hoti words. So, yes. So I thought. Why not seeing myself as a person we finish fees did this? And I honestly I fit lights with day when I decided it, so yes, I am EMMY from the Ivory Coast and here, I have a status of a refugee. So I am a person with refugee status. And when you when did you refugee story start started in two thousand and eleven? When I ride in London, where claimed I silos, and I has been I have been. How to call it? Here's the French word. Dispersed. So this is yes. Survey just dispersed has so I have been lucky to be sent here in Glasgow. I said lucky because when I I showed my paper to have people because we were on a bus so people were going to live and blah, when I should my paper, someone's told me. You're going to people from last very nice visit. So what did you expect it to be like an hose it? What hotter. So I claim that so I expected to be believed and then I thought it will take at least one or two months, and then I would start my life again. So in London, people have been so nice, you know, because they interviewed me and bay. I don't know if they believed in me, but we seem the I've been putting in an accommodation. And you know, I had to come here. So I was spectating same scenario. And you know. And I came here. I had my interview and I was in believed. So it took me three years to get my refugee status. So. It was I came here with Nestle, so many old and so many Choy and this was my second time to get out of my country. I went to Canada for training and people were amazing. I winced to London people way. So, you know, so I was expecting the same thing. So, yes. It's that it was Annesley very hard for me because I didn't expect it, I was in believed was portrayed as someone who all stealing lies. And you know. So I lost in my in myself through the process. I am someone happy person all with lot of dreams. So being in this position way. I had to, you know, to look for proofs to, to show that I am genuine Besson in, in need of help was something hard. But again. I have learned a lots for this process. So I lost confidence. I today I don't know if I can speak English. Oh, I can speak French. You know, sometimes peop- hard times in your life makes you lose a lot of things in your life. So visit. But I was I am lucky because I was coming from Egypt's where I completed

Amy Corinne Holloway London Ivory Coast Glasgow UNESCO Scotland Ken UK Nestle Besson Annesley Canada Gordon Egypt Choy three years twenty two minutes two months