35 Burst results for "Scotland"

Crack open a cold one: Monday is National Drink Beer Day!

Charlie Parker

02:53 min | 2 d ago

Crack open a cold one: Monday is National Drink Beer Day!

"In case you were curious about beer on this drink Beer day, According to the ancient Code of Hammurabi, it was decreed that bartender's Who watered down beer would be executed. I think it's still that way in Texas. Yeah, on once again. I'm don't know who, Mama Robbie wasn't but anyway, may even actually be a place. Of clouds and near the constellation Akila. Contains enough ethyl alcohol. To supply 300,000 pints of beer every day to every single person on Earth for the next billion years. Well, then why aren't we fly into one of the stars in Akila and put Mars further down the list of Thebes builders of the Great Pyramid of Jesu. Were paid with a daily ration of beer. Cause it was supposed to be a square. George Washington insisted that is Continental Army be permitted. A quart of beer is a part of their daily rations was old Millwall sounds good. In a paper bag. A Buddhist temple in Thailand was built with over one million recycled beer bottles. And while Americans love our brew What country do you think drinks more beer than any country in the world? Australia? Nope, Ireland? Nope. Scotland No. Well, where are your China, of course, and if the United States had a drinking competition For most beer consumed per person. Who would it be? The person know the state of the state. Um, Texas Neck North. Dakota held that explains it. There's not a lot to do there. Ham Shire is second And Montana came in third. Uh, once again, not very, really popular places. Do you have a go to beer cold? Other than that. Not really, really. You know, I kind of go all over the place right now. In the Mexican beers, Charlie. Okay, Well, you can have mine. OK, I'm a Miller high life guy myself. And I don't think I have. Ah, if I man if I'm forced to, which is a lot, Yeah. Probably going to go, Bud Light. Maybe. Margo, You have a go to beer? Yeah, I love craft beer. So I drank. Okay goes about that. You don't talk to my son in law. My daughter Charity Charity likes him too of it. My favorite brewer is Guadalupe Brewer in New Braunfels. Great place. Okay, if you say so.

Akila Guadalupe Brewer Mama Robbie Charity Charity Texas Millwall Continental Army Texas Neck North George Washington Thailand Bud Light Ham Shire New Braunfels Scotland China Montana United States Margo Ireland Dakota
Trump's tax revelation, what are the highlights?

The Daily Beans

09:00 min | 2 d ago

Trump's tax revelation, what are the highlights?

"Donald J trump paid seven hundred and fifty dollars in federal income taxes the year he won the presidency in his first year in the White House he paid another seven hundred and fifty dollars. He had paid no income taxes at all in ten of the previous fifteen years largely because he reported losing much more money than he made. So that's the lead. In this is in reporting from New York Times Sunday afternoon by investigative reporters Russ Butner Suzanne Craig, and Mike Macintyre now Russell Suzanne incidentally or two of the three that dropped the huge story on trump's finances in October of two thousand, eighteen ahead of the midterm elections. and that was fueled by the financial documents provided by Mary trump who is now suing the president and his siblings by the way for defrauding her out of millions of dollars. But back to today's story from the New York Times quote. The New York Times has obtained tax return data extending over more than two decades for Mr Trump and the hundreds of companies that make up his business organization including detailed information from his first two years in office. It does not include his personal returns for two, thousand, eighteen or twenty nineteen. This article offers an overview of times findings. Additional articles will be published in the coming weeks. So this one, hundred and ninety two paragraph long story is an overview of the times findings. this is the sparks notes the abridged version the Reader's digest abridged story. And I'm GonNa go over the key highlights with you. Hundred Ninety two paragraphs is the overview of what they found. And they're going to be releasing multiple stories in coming weeks for details about what they've uncovered an important caveat here by their very nature, the filings will leave many questions on answered. These tax returns that they got many questions will be unfulfilled. They comprise information that Mr. Trump has disclosed to the irs not the findings of an independent financial examination they report the trump owns hundreds of millions of dollars in valuable assets, but they do not reveal his true wealth nor do they reveal any previously on reported connection to Russia? This kind of makes sense why Sivan's needs the documents, right These data simply report revenue not profit in two, thousand eighteen for example, trump announced his disclosure in his disclosure that he had made at least four, hundred, thirty, four, point, nine, million dollars. The tax records deliver a very different portrait of his bottom line forty seven point four, million dollars in losses. So he announced his disclosure, he made four hundred and thirty, five million. In here it says he lost forty seven point four million. To that's what he filed his taxes as. All of the information that times obtain was provided by sources with legal access to it. So we can. Try to guess. WHO This to the New York Times prior to the election maybe somebody on the case who knew that the case wouldn't be Sort of we wouldn't see any fruits of that until after the election. I don't know I'd be guessing. These tax data examined. by The Times, provide a roadmap of revelations from write offs for the cost of criminal defense lawyer a mansion used by the family retreat to a full accounting of the millions of dollars that the president received from the twenty thirteen Miss Universe pageant in Moscow. So that's kind of a Russian dealing. The apprentice may trump a total of four, hundred, twenty, seven, point, four, million, which he then invested in a collection of businesses that we're failing mostly golf courses. They steadily devour cash much as the money he secretly received from his father the and how that financed spree of quixotic overspending that led to his collapse in the ninety. the picture that perhaps emerges most starkly from the mountain of figures and tax schedules prepared by Mr Trump's accountants accountants. MAZAAR. Clue. Probably got this from the Manhattan Da Somebody there. This is the picture that emerges starkly is of a businessman president in a tightening financial vice. Most of trump's core enterprises from his constellation of golf courses to conservative magnet. Hotel in Washington I guess it draws conservatives. They all report losing millions if not tens of millions of dollars year after year. His revenue from the apprentice and from licensing deals drying up and several years ago he sold nearly all the stocks that now might have helped him plug holes in his struggling properties and tax looms. And within the next four years more than three, hundred, million in loans and obligations for which he's personally responsible personally will come do. Over the next four years. And these records show the actual and potential conflicts of interest created by trump's refusal to divest himself of his business interest. While in the White House his properties have become havens for collecting money directly from lobbyists, foreign officials, and others seeking facetime access or favors. The record for the first time, put precise dollar figures on these transactions. Here's some examples at the Mar, a Lago Club, a flood of new members starting in two thousand fifteen allowed him to pocket an additional five, million a year from the business people paying for access at his Durrell Golf Course in Miami. The roofing materials manufacturer GIF spent at least one point, five, million in two, thousand, eighteen even has as its industry was lobbying the trump administration to rollback egregious federal regulations conflict. In two thousand Seventeen Billy Graham vandalistic association paid about four hundred thousand dollars to the Washington Hotel where the group held at least one event during its four day World Summit in defense of persecuted Christians. Then when he took office Mr Trump said he would pursue no new foreign deals as president. Even. So in his first two years in the White House is revenue from abroad till seventy three, million dollars. And while much of that money was from his golf properties in Scotland and Ireland some came from licensing deals in countries with authoritarian leaning leaders or thorny geopolitics. For example, three million from Deteriora- from the Philippines two point three, million from India and one million from Turkey. Now the data also contains. Revelations about the one hundred, thirty, thousand dollars payment to Stephanie Clifford Stormy Daniels. The, which is one of the focuses of the Manhattan da Subpoena for trump's tax returns. Another financial information another clue that that might be where they got this. However. They say that it has no new revelations, but there is kind of a revelation because trump has acknowledged reimbursing cohen. Who made the? Payoff. But the materials obtained by The Times did not include any itemize payments to Cohen. The amount however could have been improperly included in legal fees written off as a business expense which are not required to be itemized tax returns that says to me. That trump. Didn't make the payoff where he would have had to have itemize it. Which says to me. It was improperly recorded. As a business transaction. At for legal fees, which is another thing to Manhattan as looking at. Business fraud. Falsifying business documents. Now, no subject has provoked more intense speculation about trump's finances than his connections to Russia while the tax records revealed no previously unknown financial connection and for the most part lack specificity required to do. So they did shed light on the money behind the two thousand thirteen Miss Universe pageant in Moscow at the subject of Enduring Intrigue Because of subsequent investigations into Russia's interference in two thousand sixteen. So basically what the time saying here is that there's nothing itemized here about Russia, but there wouldn't be because it's not required to be in tax returns but boy, did we see something interesting about the? Miss Universe Pageant in twenty thirteen. The records show that the pageant was the most profitable Miss Universe during trump's time is co owner and that generated a personal payday of two point three million dollars made possible by the Aguilara F- family at least in part who would later help set up the infamous twenty sixteen trump tower meeting. For. Officials seeking dirt on Clinton with Veselnitskaya who is now we know connected directly to the Kremlin. The record show that in two thousand thirteen to paget reported thirty one point six, million in gross receipts. That's the highest since at least the nineties allowing trump and his co owner NBC's split the profits of four point seven million by comparison trump and NBC lost two million on the deal the year before. Moscow and made three point eight million from the one the year after. So it appears the Russia one. Made money and made a lot of money a lot more money than it ever has before. So did. Russia overpaid trump for this event. Wonder why? In Two thousand, thirteen?

Mary Trump Donald Trump Donald J Trump President Trump Russia The Times Manhattan Moscow The New York Times White House Cohen Washington NBC Russ Butner Sivan Mike Macintyre Stephanie Clifford Stormy Dani Paget
Activists, Betita Martinez

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:14 min | Last week

Activists, Betita Martinez

"Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez was born on December Twelfth Nineteen twenty. Five in Washington DC. Her father immigrated to the United. States for Mexico in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventeen in some ways historic exemplified the American dream. Here. Arrived with little to his name and ended up becoming a professor of Spanish literature at Georgetown University? In other ways his story serve as a cautionary tale he face racism and prejudice and top Petita to think critically about US policies and structures. The Titas American born mother whose family had come from Scotland and Ireland also helped to shape titas perspective. She was a teacher and activist. Batista. Grew up in Chevy. Chase Maryland a suburb of DC or she later wrote she felt like an outsider and what felt like an all white community after high school she left the D. C. Area to attend swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in history and literature in nineteen forty six. After graduation but thiede decided to go by Liz Sutherland in an attempt to better fit in with elites in the arts and Publishing World of New York City? She worked as a translator at the United Nations before moving into research and administration. PETITA studied European and US colonies in Africa and the Pacific Ocean working to shed light on conditions in places that didn't have self sovereignty. She, then worked at the Museum of modern. Art before becoming an editor at Simon and Schuster. In nineteen sixty four Batista became the books and Arts editor at The Nation magazine. PETITA had successfully broken into the New York, city. Cultural, elite. It was no easy feat. PETITA later said that she was a woman in a world dominated by men. Even. So she was adept at moving between worlds. TITA was equally at ease socializing on Fifth Avenue as at the Johns frequented by beat poets of the day. She was a very busy lady. In addition to her day job, the TITA found time to research and write pieces that landed in publications including the national. Guardian Horizon and the New York. Times. She also volunteered for political causes she believed in. petito wanted more than a successful business career she was driven to seek and push for change in the world. In nineteen, sixty, five petito left the nation to work in the civil. Rights movement. She then became the director of the New York Office of the student nonviolent coordinating. Committee or. And Major Civil Rights Organization. She was one of only two Latino women who worked as a paid employee at snack in her role Tita raised money organized events did research on the racial climate the American south. She wrote a book called Letters. Mississippi. About her experience working in the movement not state. Also continued to write for major national publications in nineteen sixty seven but he left snack and turned her focus to feminism before being drawn to the fledgling Chicano movement. Chicano Connex refers to people of Mexican descent born in the United States. Nineteen Sixty Eight petito left New York City for New Mexico. She went back to going by PETITA Martinez rather than the more Anglican sounding Elizabeth Sutherland. In New Mexico petita joined propelled forward what became a movement to promote the rights and celebrate the culture of connects people in the United States. She continued to maximize the power of her pen. She cofounded Allegri. Toe Del Norte a Chicano movement monthly newspaper in Nineteen seventy-three petita back the Chicano Communication Center and Albuquerque and served as its director until nineteen seventy six. The center used arts and media to educate visitors about the culture and struggles at the Chicano community. During her tenure there Petita also wrote another book. This one called five hundred years of Chicano history. From New Mexico petita moved to San Francisco where she continued to fight for a better future she served as the program director at global options an organization working on issues relating to labour conditions and social justice in. Nineteen. EIGHTY-THREE PETITA ran for governor of California as a peace and Freedom, party candy. In nineteen ninety-seven PETITA founded yet another organization the Institute for Multi Racial Justice the Institute served as the embodiment of her life's work to break down barriers between people fighting for justice especially different peoples of color. Following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight, petito book called Deca Loris means all of us. But. Thiede has written and taught throughout her long and impressive career and activism. She's lectured at odds three hundred higher educational institutions. She's received many many honors accolades including as a nominee for the Nobel peace prize in two, thousand and five. Batista is a living example of what it looks like to keep fighting the fight against injustice in our own communities across the country and around the world.

Director Batista Petita New York City Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez New Mexico United States New York Elizabeth Sutherland Thiede DC Chicano Connex Chicano Communication Center Mexico Liz Sutherland Chevy Georgetown University Chicano Community Institute For Multi Racial Jus
Boris Johnson urges spirit of togetherness in desperate call to combat virus.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:25 min | Last week

Boris Johnson urges spirit of togetherness in desperate call to combat virus.

"Wednesday September twenty three. I'm Anthony Davis. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson appealed for spirit of togetherness through the winter yesterday. Unveiled a series of new restrictions on everyday life to suppress a dramatic spike in new corona virus cases warning the restrictions could lost six months. Johnson voiced his hopes that things will be far better by the spring when a vaccine and mass testing of the population could be in place. Perhaps the most high profile changed centered on pubs, restaurants and other entertainment venues in England, which from Thursday we'll have to close at ten. PM. Johnson also changed course and urged people to work from home where possible. He stiff fines will be imposed on anyone breaking quarantine rules or gathering in groups of more than six while the USA face mosques will be expanded to include passengers in taxis and staff at bars and shops. He added that the government's change of tack was necessary in light of a recent taken cases and warned that further restrictions may have to be taken in coming weeks if people failed to abide by the rules, the other nations of the UK Scotland Wales Northern Ireland also tightened restrictions in some cases going further. The new cabs came as official figures showed the UK recorded four, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, six new cases. The most sincerely may though more testing is taking place. Now, the number of daily cases being reported is more than four times the figure a month ago many scientists say echoes of the palm of the outbreak earlier in the year when the virus spread swiftly through the country and led to Europe's deadliest outbreak. Johnson's government has faced a barrage of criticism in recent weeks. Over its handling of the pandemic notably of the big problems in the testing regime, it has also been criticized over its perceived mixed messaging and suddenly lurches in policy. It was only last month that it was encouraging people to go and help out pubs and restaurants Vira discount hospitality scheme, and just weeks ago. Johnson was

Boris Johnson Anthony Davis Uk Scotland Wales Northern Ire Prime Minister Vira England Europe UK USA Official
U.K. medical experts raise nation’s COVID-19 alert level

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last week

U.K. medical experts raise nation’s COVID-19 alert level

"Britain's chief medical officer's air raising that nation's official covert 19 alert level, meaning the viruses in general circulation and transmission is high. The chief medical officer's of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, say cases air rising rapidly and probably exponentially. So they're raising the alert level from 3 to 4 that is the second highest level. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to announce additional restrictions for Britain tomorrow in an effort to slow the spread of the

Medical Officer Prime Minister Boris Johnson Britain Northern Ireland Wales England Scotland Official
As Second Wave of Virus Builds, U.K. Enters New Testing Crisis

The Leader

04:34 min | Last week

As Second Wave of Virus Builds, U.K. Enters New Testing Crisis

"It's imperative that people who fear they have covered symptoms are able to be checked as quickly as possible. In the absence of a vaccine. That's the only effective way to stop infections spreading the prime minister says that schools shouldn't send whole classes or people bubbles home and said child has had a positive test but tower enough come this work. If there's nowhere for them to be tested, it's a shambles. The principal cause of this mess is, of course, organizational and administrative failure by the government on those tasked with delivering the system. But what's not helping either is the lack of clear consistent messaging from ministers. The prospect of a second national lockdown, which must be avoided if possible was being quashed today by ministers but if London and the country as a whole is to overcome the current spike and infections. Prevent further restrictions the government from the prime minister down must end the testing chaos and get a grip of its message to. A reporter Rachel Buffet spent the last couple of days researching this and she's with me now, Rachel. You tried them all every borough in the city. What happened say yesterday we spent about five hours. Trying to book a test everywhere in London. Using, residential postcard for each. And there was none available anywhere. We went. He'd be redirected yesterday to tests outside of London. It was simply not debatable check back later. Still. Not Test available. At again, this morning as well. Yeah. Again, this morning that was. Sort of eighteen available for a walk in center in Kensington. But again, when we tried to book that that was it the slots for booking she came up and this really is just exposing how difficult this crisis is particularly as we have a situation where you know the prime minister has said. CHILDREN SHOULDN'T! Be! Taken off out school Unless their entire bubble is a task but now parents get a test you spoke to apparent in to what kind of trouble will they heaven? Yes. But I quasi parents A couple of in story know they had to go huge round trip is three hours to EPSOM. Paradise boats you had today at just to get a test and they were you know saying alarms midnight waking up refreshing the government page days. Together, test others we spoke to would actually just. Pay For private tests which cost over one hundred pounds just so they can get their kids but to school and they don't have to sell vice sleep two weeks and I think the thing is as well. You know kids especially young kids they get a little time and you know the constantly got colds and coughs and things like that So love tests you know people have that tested negative, but they can't risk it and they have stated time of work on. which has a huge impact on incomes well, for low people this just it's just a huge disparity across the UK as well. So you know we try to protests in Scotland putting in Scottish codes on his ones available immediately go get one in half an hour until of Aberdeen Dundee. That's all fine. But trying to get one in London is just impossible and is there anything being done about it? I hear them might be a new rationing system in place yes and that`ll Be Announced today that there's going to be rationing system where he workers teaches HSA workers camera because. They will get priority protests which can only be a good thing but. There are so many key wikus, huge amounts, people, h HFS and teaching schools, and there are so many patients covid while Kiwi status the the still going to be a huge number of people needing tests all the time. especially. Love Them. We'll have children who come home be on Ben their whole house openly tests. I mean, hopefully it will help but. Donate. So what was the health saying about? All this Donald tells the saying you know they're adding tests all the time they go team hundred, thousand tests day. But when he speak to actual people. There's no one I spoke to. The said Yep was able to just go and get a test. It was so easy in the last two weeks I mean full children stopped back at school. Yes. It was easy to get test but now the children's died back at school it's just very, very difficult especially in the

London Prime Minister Rachel Buffet Donald Trump Principal Spike HSA Kensington Reporter Aberdeen Dundee UK BEN Scotland
Microsoft pulled its underwater data center out of the sea in Scotland

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:18 sec | 2 weeks ago

Microsoft pulled its underwater data center out of the sea in Scotland

"Has declared its underwater data center test in Scotland a success the tech giant place that data center 117 FT underwater two years ago in a vessel designed with cooling systems and powered by renewable energy. The immediate conclusion, the cylinder packed with servers had a lower failure rate than a conventional data center. That's your

Scotland
Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Monica. Today's activist was a major proponent of prison reform in Britain. She's known as the Angel of prisons. Let's talk about Elizabeth Fry. Elizabeth Gurney was born in Norwich Norfolk in seventeen eighty to a wealthy quaker family. Her Father John was a successful banker and her mother Catherine was a member of the family that founded Barclays Bank which still operates is one of the largest banks in the world. Elizabeth was the odd one out amongst her siblings. She experienced mood swings and had difficulty learning which biographers attribute to her dyslexia. Elizabeth once said I was thought and called very stupid and obstinate I certainly did not like learning nor did I believe attend my lessons when Elizabeth was twelve years old her mother passed away and Elizabeth was left to care for her younger sisters and brothers. Eighteen hundred at the age of twenty. Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry London banker and quaker together. They had many children most sources say eleven, five sons and six daughters though some sources suggest that had even more kids. Elizabeth was an observant quaker and frequently worshipped at the Friends Meeting House. It was there the she heard Williams savory preach about the importance of altruism and philanthropy. His words inspired Elizabeth to help those in need. In eighteen thirteen elizabeth visited newgate prison, which was notorious for its filthy state and its dismal treatment of its prisoners. Elizabeth was appalled to see such harsh conditions. Women and children were tightly packed in small spaces with little room to wash themselves or cleaned their clothes, and while many of the newgate prisoners had committed severe crimes, some of them had not. And others hadn't even received a trial. Elizabeth was determined to act the next day she returned to the prison with fresh loaves of bread and clean clothes, but she had sewn herself. She distributed them to the prisoners and encourage them to keep their cells clean and find ways to be hygienic in the oppressive environment. Elizabeth didn't come back to newgate until eighteen sixteen due to financial difficulties within her family. But upon her return, she dove back into the Work Elizabeth educated the children of Newgate who were imprisoned with their parents teaching them practical skills like reading and selling. In eighteen seventeen, Elizabeth founded the Association for the improvement of female prisoners along with twelve other women she worked to advance prison reform and to provide female prisoners with education and tools for employment Elizabeth fought for the idea that prison should be based round rehabilitation rather than punishment she wrote it must indeed be acknowledged that many of our own penal provisions as they produced no effect appear to have no other end the punishment of the guilty. Eighteen nineteen Elizabeth wrote prisons and Scotland in the north of England and encouraged her society friends to visit newgate themselves. At. That time Britain was in the practice of sending prisoners to penal colonies in. North. America Australia and India. At newgate. Prisoners en route to be transferred to convict ships, rebound by chains and unable to move around and tiny carts people in the streets pelted them with garbage. Elizabeth convinced the governor of new gate to carry the women enclosed carriages rather than open ones and to ensure that all the women and children had enough food to eat on their voyage. Elizabeth also gave the prisoner sewing tools, bibles and other necessities to accompany them on their long journeys. With the help of her efforts, the act of transporting criminals so far away lands was prohibited in eighteen, thirty seven. Prior to that change in policy Elizabeth visited every convict ship bound for Australia for more than twenty five years. Throughout the eighteen twenties, Elizabeth inspected prison conditions and continued to advocate for the rights of prisoners. She presented her findings to the House of Commons committee in doing. So she became the first woman to present evidence to parliament. Elizabeth's ideas influenced the eighteen twenty three jails act which introduced a series of prison

Elizabeth Elizabeth Fry Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry Work Elizabeth Newgate Britain Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network House Of Commons Committee Norwich Norfolk London Friends Meeting House Barclays Bank Australia Scotland England America John Williams Catherine
Brexit: What happens now

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Brexit: What happens now

"At the beginning of two, thousand and twenty it was widely assumed the years news agenda in the UK would be dominated by the rancorous torturous divisive and tedious subject of Brexit. Those were the days happily for those of us who had grown weirdly nostalgic for it. What one thing another brexit is. Self. Evidently back in the headlines as the UK's final departure looms on December thirty first British ministers. Now, apparently plan to try rewriting the EU withdrawal agreement, they agreed last year you may recall this being presented at the time as the ticket to the sunlit our plans and so forth. Well, joining me with more on. This is the political journalist and author Terry Stephanie. Terry, as far as it's possible to boil it down. What is the big idea here? It's Boiling down I suppose the big idea is that a Britain the UK is. Having, more talks with the e this week. At the same time, there's what's called the UK Internal Market Bill, which is going to go before parliament this week. Now that parliament is back and it's due to be published, and we're told that this bill might according to the first reports of this in the Financial Times, eliminate the legal force of parts of the withdrawal agreement I-. Overriding the treaty that has been signed and ratified by everybody a regarding what's going to happen to do with Northern Ireland and its future relationship, and this is being greeted with a fair deal of horror because it seems to suggest that before any deal is donald before no deal happens Britain may actually go back on something that everybody has already signed an agreed to. The difficulty here a difficulty here as I understand it is that you want sowing the treaty you can't really on sign it can you? Know you can't. The reaction to this again, this is this is something that might happen. I suppose. One of the questions is whether this is all part of the UK government talking its own book ahead of future, Negotiations Boris. Johnson saying that we must have definitely have an agreement by the fifteenth of October and being innocent blustering and talking about prospering mightily in the future. But yeah. An international treaty is international law and the European Commission, is being quite calmly so far in a on the surface at least saying. I trust that Britain will continue to abide by this and we trust that they will implement the withdrawal agreement. Michelle Bonnier saying that everything that has been signed must be respected but yes, international law. That was signed into law by this parliament after the election certainly still stands what you're alluding to. There is a statement made in the last hour. So by US Levonne, delay in the president of the EU Commission very thinly veiled faint subtext of irritation. Do you get the sense that the UK's government might be overestimating the degree to which the EU is still terrifically interested in any of this? I think you know they the usual has to be interested in it. I think. It's possibly a there ever estimating the degree to which the EU doesn't see these tactics coming because there has been quite a lot of talk over the last week about the likelihood of their being a no deal agreement and. British negotiators really saying you know we'll be we'll be fine with the no deal. Don't worry about this. You know we we can. We'll. We'll go ahead and do this and I think there's an element of Brussels sitting back and looking at it and saying, okay, you go. Ahead you go. Do what you want to do. It's. It's sort of slightly reminds me of apparent with a recalcitrant trial and we trust the to do the right thing and you know we understand that you really want to do the right thing. Don't you and just letting them in a slightly letting them walking towards towards. Well on the subject of the UK doing the right thing eventually over we are, of course, fast running out of eventually to recap those dates December thirty. First, the UK's transition period is over October. Fifteenth is when Boris Johnson says a deal needs to be done by if you just think about this, not so much as an analyst. e you affairs but just thinking about it as a British political journalist doesn't not strike you that the likelihood is if you judge the career in character of Boris Johnson that he will at the last minute take whatever's the easiest way out and claim a great triumph because that's pretty much what he's always done. Yes I. Mean Boris Johnson has always been as we know particularly even his decisions on which side to support in the referendum he's looked at both the options had a back pocket version of both things, and then done something at the last minute I mean he? No, he's he's a journalist by training. This is how we work. He come come up to do things at the last minute. The difficulty is there are lots of things that can't be done at the last minute not least signing a huge international agreement, not least getting UK borders ready for the for the transition, getting all the customs officials that you need Also the economic impact of this. There have been statements from retailers recently saying that you do realize that if there's no deal agreement, we will have tariffs that will effectively increase the price of food and You know. We don't know what state the economy is going to be in coming out of Cova, but we can imagine that it's not going to be very good and one of the questions is despite Boris Johnson's talk about Britain prospering mightily, how much more of a shock can the UK economy standard? It's those kind of questions not least as well. The relationship with Northern Ireland with the rest of Ireland the relationship with Scotland the keep coming back to bite people and people keep warning about it but on the other hand, the government sort. Of trying to appeal to its own backbenchers I suppose, and also saying look we can. We'll be able to do more in terms of government investment state aid without the telling us what to do, and we will be able to make our own rules as they keep saying and government ministers today suggesting that that could be a price worth paying just on the subject they're finally of the actual practical preparations. This is what strikes me. It'd be interested in in your view on this might actually end up governing what the government ends up deciding because. This was raised last week, and we talked about this on the program by associations of holy is in freight companies just basically making the point that the account be no deal brexit because the infrastructure and the personnel and all the other stuff necessary to deal with it simply does not exist and sure as heck isn't going to be conjured into being in the next two and a half months. No? I mean I was in Kent last week where people were talking about this, there's a site that local people had expected was going to be used for an Amazon Amazon warehouse that they now think is likely to be used for a customs checkpost and there's there's not really anything there the state and yes, you know people saying that training the customs officials let alone the the software, the hardware whatever else you need in place is going to take more time than we have. But you know things have been cobbled together. If you look at how we respond to the coronavirus crisis in the last few months, and perhaps there's an expectation that these kinds of things can somehow be becomes it up but it's not going to be easy and come January. We may see the downside of that terrorist. Asked me. Thanks as

UK Boris Johnson Britain EU Northern Ireland Brexit Terry Stephanie Financial Times Eu Commission Amazon Amazon Brussels Michelle Bonnier European Commission Government President Trump Kent Donald Trump Cova Analyst. Scotland
UK split over Portugal quarantine rules

The Briefing

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

UK split over Portugal quarantine rules

"So it was transports grant shops on the airwaves today defending the government businesses and holiday makers of criticized how travelers in England don't face quarantine rules for holiday in Portugal but travelers in Scotland Wales do travel. Lifelock has the latest on changing rules across Europe Mr Shep submitted it is confusing but said, there's little he could do about the devolved nations approaches it Tom Harris questions why people are feeling confused and says, after twenty one years is just proof of evolution of work.

Mr Shep Scotland Wales Tom Harris Portugal England Europe Lifelock
Nature's Tasty Secrets

National Trust Podcast

05:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Nature's Tasty Secrets

"Turned off the canal towpath now, down, quite a narrow twisty turny path into a wooded area. And I can hear water in front of me. So let's see where it takes us. The so many different planets. Different flowers is really beautiful. And he's a man armed with two beautiful wicker basket. So I believe your call Fred the far eject where does that nickname come from a run business called the wild side of life and I spent most of my time teaching people how to forage for medicinal and edible plants. Now I've already seen some blackberries and they are looking really juicy. Can you take me to place whether even more bountiful to my best but I think we need to get out into maybe a move sunny spot. So why is this a place state you think is good to come and pick up raise this perhaps a mile and a half of country park where anyone's allowed to go and their blackberry bushes all over the place. It's a free market absolutely for that and many other things to. This looks like a black free books to me. But Bruce quite distinctive but there are a number of other lobe fruits that you could mistake it for. So there are things like the debris who's tends to be much smaller and more compact. Let's the RASBERRY and if you're up in the mountainous areas perhaps up in Scotland, you might find the cloud berry another free of a similar shape, the colors completely different. So what your top tips for picking and store blackberries when you pick them, run your hands gently over the cluster of varies and just with your fingertips, roll them slightly around each vary because the ones that are ripe were literally just SORTA popoff. Don't use a carry a bag, it will get quite machine bashed. shelf-life is dramatically reduced. So try to use an open container of some sort if not done wealth about brees I'm afraid and look around here I can see nettles but apart from that, I can't see anything else here that I would not to pick tweet. So today I'm going to introduce you to some of the unsung heroes of the plant world. which he may have pulled out of your gardens, weeds trump would over. Let's go find out. Things, you need to remember. We have this kind of notional idea of what I call the doc we say. And try not to pick things on the edge of footpaths and lesser at least two or three feet above the ground. It's gorgeous out today apple cheese around look at the sun on the kind of the Ashley. Oh Time. Before He in the one that looks like a big Benaroya. This is nothing like that. This is greater planting common-law. Wait you would cook it as a spinach like affects people take a look at these seat heads pulled backwards and the seed comes off your hand I use plantation seeds an ingredient in my mixed seeds mixture I gather every years. Path now is a lot more open than way where before in the fight closed in woodland space, it's much more majer. We feel it feels very sumarine because wall the flowers and all the insects. Let's get down here. Look. This is waterman like plasma breaking out in a plasma boil. When you inhale it's real deeply relaxing and it makes very calming. Hazel not. Having actually got not. Find our teeth can stand up to it. Always little sheep but don't know how much they liked neck. It's a bit of an unsung hero, isn't it? Natalie's aloof a lot you can do with it. It's hard to exhaust the number of uses you can put it to the top of the stinging nettle. Rick Out Vicki bear hangs. How're you doing that without getting Stoughton show you nettle stems are covered in lots of tiny stinging hairs and at the base of every one of those hairs is soft land full of venom if you rub to plant in this direction. All of the. Fold upwards and you don't get stung but if you're up the plant in this direction. They leave jagged edge which digs into your skin. It's almost like pulling a pint of beer. You know you're working the needle backwards it's pumping the venom sac into you. So the nettle does not stink. You Stink Yourself. You must fit firmly in a section with new leaves on. Hand must be already traveling in an upwards direction. As you grip few grip I then travelers, you'll be sons fancy. Okay. I'm. The young ten to tops are very good green vegetable. They're very rich in iron and they're very high in protein that make a wonderful T- and even lightly cooked they no longer stay. One of our local pastimes in the wilds of wheelchair is rolled metal eating competitions. Of course, the trick is they know how to destroy nettles really quickly. So if you roll it up, you stick it on a molar teeth chomped down hard to release the. Final secret is that the juice of the nettle is the antidote to the thing is pretty cool

Fred Country Park Scotland Apple Bruce Hazel Stoughton Natalie Rick Vicki Bear
21-year-old young adult author gets 7-figure book deal

WBZ Afternoon News

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

21-year-old young adult author gets 7-figure book deal

"Has hit the publishing jackpot. CBS's Wendy Gillette has the story. How's this for a first book Deal? A 21 year old author from London just ing to seven figure contract for two young adult novels. Yep. In the millions. Sherida abdicate. Liam today is still in college in Scotland, but he sure has a jump on his career. A division of McMillan Children's publishing bought his debut novel called Ace of Spades, about to black students at a mostly white private school, as well as his second book, Ace of Spades will be released in June. Wendy

Wendy Gillette Mcmillan Children Liam CBS London Scotland
Philadelphia Flyers, Canucks stave off elimination in NHL playoffs

Ben Maller

00:21 sec | Last month

Philadelphia Flyers, Canucks stave off elimination in NHL playoffs

"NHL playoffs. Second round action Flyers Avoid elimination with for three overtime win over the island is Scotland deflecting in the game winner. For Philadelphia, New York, There was a three to Siri's edge. Canucks there live, beating the Golden Knights to one Vancouver goalie Thatcher Denko first career playoff start. He has 42 saves in the wind leaves Patterson the game. When you go in the third period will be a game six. Vega still needs a serious three

Thatcher Denko Golden Knights NHL Siri Vega Scotland Patterson Philadelphia Vancouver New York
Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

TED Talks Daily

05:03 min | Last month

Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

"Hi. I'm Elise Hugh. And you're listening to Ted talks daily today's talk features really fascinating research that cuts us all some slack. What I mean is it turns out you can be a late bloomer in your chosen sport or skill or specialty, and it's actually better for you in a lot of ways. The talk is journalist David Epstein at Ted Ex Manchester in twenty twenty. So I'd like to talk about the development of human potential and I'd like to start with maybe the most impactful modern story of development. Many of you here have probably heard of the ten thousand dollars rule maybe you even model your own life after it. Basically, it's the idea that the become great anything takes ten thousand hours of focused practice. So. You'd better get started as early as possible. The poster child for this story is Tiger Woods. Father Famously, gave him a putter when he was seven months old at ten months, he started imitating his father's swing. At to, you can go on Youtube and see him on national television fast forward to the age of twenty one he's the greatest Golfer in the world's quintessential ten thousand dollars story. Another that features a number of bestselling books is that of the three Polgar sisters whose father decided to teach them chests in a very technical manner from a very early age and really wanted to show that with a head start and focused practice. Any child could become a genius in anything, and in fact, two of his daughters went onto become grandmaster chess players. So, when I became the Science Writer at sports illustrated magazine I got curious if this ten thousand hours rules correct then we should see that elite athletes get a headstart in so-called deliberate practice. This is coached air correction focus practice not just playing around, and in fact, when scientists study lead athletes, they see that they spend more time in deliberate practice not a big surprise. When they actually track athletes over the course of their development, the future leads actually spend less time early on in delivered practice in their eventual sport they to have what scientists call a sampling period where they try a variety of physical activities. They gain broad general skills they learned about their interests and abilities and delays specializing until later than peers who plateau at lower levels. And so when I saw that said, Gosh that doesn't really comport with the ten thousand hours rule does it. So I started to wonder about other domains that we associate with obligatory early specialization like music. Turns out the patterns often similar. Research from a world class, Music Academy, and what I want to draw your attention to is the exceptional musicians didn't start spending more time into practice than the average musicians. Until Third Instrument, they tended to have a sampling period. Even musicians we think of is famously precocious like Yo, Yo Ma he sampling period he just went through it more rapidly than most musicians do. Nonetheless, this research almost entirely ignored and much more impactful is the first page of the Book Battle Hymn of the Tiger mother where the author recounts assigning her daughter Violin. Nobody seems remember the part later in the book where her daughter turns her and says, you picked it not me and largely quits. So having seen this sort of surprising pattern in sports and music. I started to wonder about domains that affect and more people like education and economists found a natural experiment in the Higher Ed Systems of England and Scotland in the period studied, the systems were very similar except in England students had to specialize in their mid teen years to pick a specific course of study to apply tours in Scotland they could keep trying things in university if they wanted to and his question was who wins the trade off the early or the late specializes and he saw that the early specializes jump out to an income. Lead because they have more domain specific skills, the late specializes get to try more different things and when they do pick, they have better fit or what economists call match quality, and so their growth rates are faster by six years out erase that income gap. Meanwhile, the earliest specializes start quitting their career tracks in much higher numbers essentially because they were made to choose. So early that they more often made choices. So the late specializes lose in the short term and win in the long run. I think if we thought about career choice like dating, we might not pressure people to settle down quite so quickly. So this interested seeing this pattern again in exploring a developmental backgrounds of people whose work I had long admired like Duke Ellington who shunned music lessons as a kid to focus on baseball and painting and drawing or Mario Mir's economy who wasn't interested in math is a girl dreamed of becoming a novelist and went on to become the first and so far only woman to win the fields medal the most prestigious prize in the world in Math Vincent Van Gogh had five different careers, each of which he deemed his true calling before flaming out spectacularly, and in his late twenty s picked up a book called the guide to the ABC's of drawing. That worked out. Okay Claude Shannon was an electrical engineer at the University of Michigan who took a philosophy course just to fulfill a requirement and in it, he learned about a near century old system of logic or was true and false statements could be coded as ones and zeroes in solved like math problems. This led to the development of Binary Code, which underlies all of our digital computers today.

Ted Ex Manchester Scotland Elise Hugh Tiger Woods Math Vincent Van Gogh Youtube David Epstein Sports Illustrated Magazine Claude Shannon Duke Ellington Third Instrument Higher Ed Systems Of England Music Academy University Of Michigan ABC Writer Mario Mir Engineer England
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | Last month

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
UK's Johnson says face masks possible in English schools

The Briefing

00:33 sec | Last month

UK's Johnson says face masks possible in English schools

"Boris Johnson signaled potential. You turn on a face masks in schools. If the voice changes, we will change those were the words of the prime minister amid growing pressure on ministers to review the guidance on face masks in schools across England comes off to Holyrood confirmed secondary school people's in Scotland will be required to wear face coverings inbetween lessons from Monday. He can read what the prime minister said when asked why the UK government is ignoring World Health Organization advice, which says children aged twelve should wear masks in corridors and sheds spices.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Holyrood World Health Organization Scotland England UK
Podcasts about Ireland

Feedback with EarBuds

02:39 min | Last month

Podcasts about Ireland

"This week's team comes to us from Kevin Dolan and it's called podcast. It's about Ireland here's why Kevin chose this theme he writes. A host of a podcast on Irish history I've been amazed with the interest around the world with our little island with that in mind I thought I'd share some of my favorite podcast episodes about the island of saints and scholars. Here are the episodes chosen by Kevin, for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first one comes to us from the history of Ireland and the episode is called setting the scene. It's eleven minutes long. In this, the inaugural episode, the Party's players and movements bouncing around Ireland in the early nineteen hundreds are introduced. Next up the episode comes to us from the Irish. Passport podcast and is called who were the celts it's sixty nine minutes long. Celtic. Identity is politically powerful, but historically nebulous a subject of debate among historians and archaeologists while being a source of inspiration to some an irritation to others. In this episode Naomi and Tim Visit Celtic Music Festival in the Netherlands to explore why the concept has such. International. Appeal, Tim Explores the political use and abuse of the idea of the celts in debates about identity and nationalism in Scotland and Ireland. The. Next episode comes to us from Radio Lab and is called tweak the vote sixty six minutes long. In this episode democracy is on the ropes in the United States and abroad citizens of democracies are feeling increasingly alienated, disaffected and powerless. Some are even asking themselves a question that feels almost too dangerous to say out. Loud. Is Democracy fundamentally broken. Next up, the PODCAST is called mother folklore and the episode is called the Blue Blue Grass of Home Irish in Appalachia. It's forty minutes long. In this episode, Rebecca Welles a singer in Nashville tells the lads about her Appalachian Roots and the influence of Irish music on bluegrass and other musical traditions. The last episode of the week comes to us from the blind boy podcasts and is called the Goblin of strange uncertain times it sixty two minutes long. In this episode, a hot take on society's response to Corona virus through the Lens of Grief Psychology, a post Catholic view of Ireland's response. Those are the episodes chosen by Kevin for this week's theme podcasts about Ireland.

Ireland Kevin Dolan Tim Visit Celtic Music Festiva Lens Of Grief Psychology Rebecca Welles Nashville Radio Lab TIM United States Naomi Netherlands Appalachia Scotland
UK health advisers say missing school is greater risk than COVID-19

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:23 min | Last month

UK health advisers say missing school is greater risk than COVID-19

"Were doing everything they could to help Nevada. Chief medical offices in the United Kingdom of Said Children's should return to school after the summer holidays warning that missing out on their education posed much bigger risks to them than catching covid nineteen. The red joint statements from the top health advisors to the governments of England Scotland? Wales. And Northern. Ireland represents a boost for British Prime Minister Boris Johnson who has said getting children back to school is a national priority. Confidence in the government's approach to schooling Jerry the coronavirus pandemic took a hit last week when Education Minister Gavin Williamson was forced into an embarrassing u-turn over examination results. Evidence shows that a lack of schooling increased inequalities, reduced opportunities and could exacerbate physical and mental health issues. The statement said. By contrast, there was clear evidence of a very low rate of severe disease in children. Even if they caught covid nineteen, an exceptionally low risk of dying Johnson said, reopening schools in September is a social economic and moral imperative insisting they would be able to operate safely despite the COVID. Nineteen pandemic. Separately England's chief medical officer was

United Kingdom Of Said Childre Boris Johnson Education Minister Gavin Willi Prime Minister Nevada England Medical Officer Wales Scotland Ireland Jerry
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

14:58 min | 8 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Comfortable so the stage is set. The microphones are switched on. We settled into our comfy chairs under audience is waiting. Could you make a noise oysters to be sure. We know you're there. I'm Ken Gordon. I run the refugee voices Scotland podcast. It's a personal project of Maine. We've been running for two years now and if your subscribers listened to for thanks it's really cool that we meet people who've actually listened to it so this is a co production between refugee. The Voice Scotland University of Glasgow UNESCO chair in refugee integration through language and the arts and refugee for the wonderful facilities. Ah Hijab or are you doing nice to meet you you're looking PhD student at the University of Glasgow. You're also an intern for the Palestinian Estonian Arabic online project. Yeah the higher. The one thing that we always do in these podcasts is just ask people. What's on their mind? What's on your mind today? In one hundred years ref we shop the first thing. That's in my mind that I'm happy. It's sunny today unlike yesterday. And the second thing that's in my mind since we're talking about refugees there's a I tell you a little bit of history. Yeah so I'm Palestinian from Gaza and I'm not sure if people know about the whole Palestinian Israeli conflict but it it started like in one thousand nine hundred forty eight and because Israel started their estate created their states. They had to expel people from their villages. When I say people I mean Palestinians who are living there for a long time and as they explode those people those people started to move to other areas and then eventually they became refugees? So Amirah Fiji Ah in one of the most populated refugee camps in Gaza. My parents are refugees. Migrant parents are piggies so it's like like three generation of refugees and you can tell like how many years we've been refugees and They you were Help those refugees get you know the main basics for the lives I with my grandparents and they give them tens and then people people started to build their own houses. Because sometimes when I say that a refugee and I live in a refugee camp I people will be like all and then I would. I don't understand why they they say that because in my mind it's not a big deal because a normalized and internalize allies in me. But then I started to get to know that even a refugee. It has like Norman normalize idea in people's mind that just that person and who lives in a tent. Well it's true for you know other crisis but for Palestinians. Just we tried to you know to move on on and I don't live in a tent. I live in house to floor house. So yeah this is me as a refugee third-generation third generation refugee. So what I want to talk about as well I said that everything internalized in me and then because I loved my I hope my whole life there. My parents live their whole life there so I didn't see anything different. That would make me compare between what I live. And then how other people live so I got a scholarship to get my masters in the USA and then spend their two years and then it was really really like the first two years of my life. So when when I when I started to have I was full of energy. Discover the World Meet New People and all these things and it's worked and then by the end of the second year I had like my own community. You know my friends and then I had to leave back to Gaza so I knew it is going to be hard because I will not see my friends But it turned out. It's not only because I will not see. My friends is because I will have something to compare to like. What's going on in Gaza and what what happened to like all these experiences I had in the USA so going back to Gaza? There's no no insecurity. There is no stability. There's no electricity. There is no access to clean water. Sometimes we wouldn't have have water at home like even all these things I wouldn't I wouldn't imagine that they're that bad but because I was exposed to new new environment that showed me what what are the basic rights that people from other countries have and we don't have so and and some of these things like for example access to water like I didn't I didn't I didn't say I didn't get it until until one of my friends pointed that out to me because in Gaza We get water for three or four hours a day and and during these hours we have we have like engine that will push water in big tank and sometimes would feel a lot of Like would fail the bathtub as well so that would have water to clean or do all these things add. It was normal to me. You know I didn't know this. This is bad but when when my pointed that out to me I was like. Oh yeah this is not right. You know so Besides there there were there would be a lot of collisions in Gaza. Like Bombini. And you know really horrible not not like war were just like is collisions. So sometimes I would go to work and then I would just freak out because there will not VC's fire so there would be skeletons and you know. Sometimes they would boom car and then just just in my mind that maybe AH car. I'm in maybe this guy in this tax is targeted. Maybe I'll die. And then you know just I go to the work and I go back mccomb and just the same thing until ceasefire is announced or whatever it is so yeah it was pretty hard like going going back after the. US spending two years in Gaza because it made me feel like how unfair the world is and help people. Just don't appreciate she it all these things in their lives you know and then After spending two years in Gaza enduring all these things like I was with my family and would live the same things but it affected me differently because I started to think that this is not right. This is not supposed was to happen so now I got another scholarship from the British Council to get my PhD. And let me tell you one thing. I think I started to recover cover from my reverse culture shock going back together up. Maybe like I started to feel that going back to myself. Maybe like a month ago because I think in my first year I wouldn't be like I don't know it say. I felt that I wasn't right because it was recovering. But now I feel I'm almost there. I started to recover. Well that's great news. Yeah we'll come back thank you and so. How long have you been? This started in Glasgow. Yeah so long beating Glasgow and three months so you spent quite a lot of time here. Still recovering yeah okay. How did that manifest itself in you? When you're you're still feeling like you're having reverse culture shock? How does that feel what? What does it make you do here? So for example. We don't have electricity in Gaza. We only have like four hours so at the beginning. Freak out if my phone is one percent because it's like if it's back home you know that you leave maybe wake up and your phones I it but here is just is not the same. I hate fireworks. I really hate fireworks because it just sometimes I'm with my friends is and their fireworks and unlike only there's Kelly there's something wrong sometimes. I feel like I'm stupid. Because or maybe I'm a very much sensitive person which I don't know yet but there was. This is this to this thing that I've ever felt once I was sleeping and then the curtain were open and then the street light was like the street lights here there and the yellow so that yellow light sometimes whenever there's bomb there's a flash similar look yellow flesh before the bomb so that lies just freaks me out like I if you best pass by my house. My curtains is always close ause because that lies freaks me out is just reminds me of that light before the bomb goodness me. Yeah I mean I don't know I'm I'm not sure how I feel all these things because my friends. I'm not sure if they feel the same. I don't know just happens. I e all these Adia just come to me reverse culture shock is something. I'd not hair dove until now I mean it's different from one country to another so if view have reverse culture shock if you were in California and then came to Glasgow there verse culture would be The weather is bad. I'm not used to the weather in. We know what reverse goes. Yeah but it depends on the place you know. Thank you for sharing interesting. Have you met many other Palestinian refugees around Glasgow. Well not really. I knew three Palestinians who got scholarships here and two of them and they're from the West Bank they're not refugees and the other one. She's originally from Gaza so she's not refugee but you know all those experiences dances. The don't differ that much from a refugee a non refugee Palestinian because of just the same. There's is Kelly we all in the same and you know we're on the same situation so it doesn't vary that much when we were having at the beginning. You were talking about refugee anger. Yeah yeah elaborate on that well. I can't elaborate in there. But sometimes I feel the media especially like the Western media. They like to portray refugees in specific picture so that other people would sympathize with them and I totally understand that but at the same time when. There's a picture of a refugee that I don't remember remember that I've I've seen it but because I'm so angry. Okay I just makes me more angry. When when they don't show that anger that the refugees Jeez they endure because of all these injustices and I wish that they would once they would show that refugees? They're humans yes. They feel sad the feel pain. They feel happiness whenever they get any kind of aids the feel Arnaud. They've all these feelings beside they feel angry as well. It's not only that. Oh look at them. They're I'm sad because because of their suffering offering a look at them I said because they feel happy because the we give them floor or give them a bit bit of money now but they're really angry like no one would like to be suffering that much or to be be living in a situation where he or she doesn't have the basic needs like most of those people who sympathize with them have so yeah I just want to say that refugees get angry but I'm not sure if they show it because maybe they don't have enough energy energy because I think anger needs so much energy maybe all their energy is wasted in sadness and suffering. What would your advice be to any refugees? Jeez that are listening to this in Glasgow right who feel angry. I mean I would tell them. Take your time feel sad. Tried writer adapts. And once you feel that you're angry don't don't be scared to show because you're just human. Don't be scared because you have different passport. That says that you're Fiji. You cannot get angry. Don't don't be scared to show in your anger if you're at the airport and you people people deal with you in a different way because your passport says that you're you're human. You're British Scottish Tisch. But you now you have different password. Heard the term. New Scott's yeah what do you think about well. I like it because because I read about the program so I think it's mainly for the Syrian refugees. Who came right okay? So I only read the part about Syria winds coming and the calling them new scots. I read it because because of education wise not like political wise and all these things but I really like it. I think here people in Scotland they care much about refugees even like normal people. Sometimes I would walk doc and people would have like a post I say I welcome refugees or you know just if feels good that they're they're people just normal people who care and you know they want you to feel home and I think the program is well organized because they focused on the language I I that you need to learn the language and they give those people the chance to represent their culture alive..

Gaza Glasgow USA Scotland Voice Scotland University of G University of Glasgow Ken Gordon Palestinian Estonian Arabic Kelly Maine intern British Council Israel Norman Fiji Syria Scott Arnaud West Bank
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

06:18 min | 9 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"To to get in touch Axes new funding. Were Open for new ideas. Yes we're all doing. A lot of things now always open for new ideas. So yeah just support us. You know by becoming friends of the welcoming by visiting us here if you need them to come with this buying dealt with more about what we do and aw thank you very much. Get thank you. We make podcast. The capture refugee stories I'm here with Sarah Nando Fernando from Venezuela yes I am Venezuelan by my parents Portuguese. I am to to I stay here from one year. I love stay more time. Many many years. Why why do you come to the welcoming center Sir because one friend is big with me about this this association? He's very good about this. I decided to come one one girl attend me speak with me. She showed me only activities during the week. I love that and I a decided to come now. I come into Games night. I enjoy you. Play Ping Pong bijard chest. Learn English to a meet people many countries I had that there's more than sixty countries entries people from more than sixty countries or here. Yes Fernando I heard you playing table tennis with Zoe as you you. So who won. WHO's best at playing table? Tennis other other guy is not what between you two guys to say the same fit you. Sure yes and now you wonder yes. Good Okay yes. What do you like doing here number? Yes and Mississippi. It is a very good and guilt. Inhale vide- Pity Nice Golden Hail. Yes and God God then yes and very very garden three yes and the city nor hot. Yeah the city is not hot although okay okay where are you from Sir. My from Syria and Syria now no good bombard and yes brazen nor now okay. How long have you been in Scotland? It meant a kgo eight months commitment and might to go dumberer and Turkey Oh yes because man Miami and me Nogot me could and So you have lost hunt. Yes Oh no hunt deers. and A me. And go twenty four in college and studied English and my children and to goes near Surrey and my wife and to go study English Speak English and I noticed something that something. Something that people have said before is that children learn the language quicker than adults. Do you agree. Is that true. Yes yes my children and my children to to my son three years and my daughter to two years good at Mas- speak English and colored number. Save an mammary and Bill and children. I want to say something that I did. One course about no sorry childcare for one year hearing in Scotland the consular Salaam. He's become a concealed. Remember how you saw in the newspaper about men men in childcare I applied they accept me. I bust the course I have a certificate and you want to to job about about nursery. I have to agree to to found A. Yeah just about Cheer Dron. I loved that world. Okay so you're looking forward to getting some work work with children. Have you have your certificate. I think good gentlemen. It's been really nice to talk to you. This is a lovely beautiful bright place isn't it. It's nice to be here with you both and thank you very much for telling me about your experiences and the welcoming and I hope we bump into each there again. We'll meet again definitely. Thank you very much thank you. Thank you refugee voices. Scotland refugees in their own words. Let's you can find welcoming on the web at www dot the welcoming mark. You could find it on instagram and on facebook and on twitter account is cold act welcoming. I remember that if you're a refugee or asylum seeker who has something something on your mind if you run a refugee or asylum seeker support project and wanted to tell us about it in our podcast. Contact us on refugee voices. Scotland at gmail.com. We'd also on twitter to Ref Voice Scott and we have a facebook. Don't miss an episode by subscribing to our podcast. I thank you very much for listening.

Scotland Sarah Nando Fernando tennis facebook twitter Syria Venezuela Surrey Mississippi Mas Bill Miami Zoe
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

06:54 min | 9 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"We don't have knowledge in general and Scotland uh-huh so that's such valuable thing to in terms of legacy and what's your what's other projects you're looking forward to to be the next legacy Agassi project. The next product will look into doors. It's an addition to what we are doing to look at transport okay for the CF. Each year or issue round of funding Europe life for need to show additionality something new that you're going to so what we have in mind at the moment still under lease which is to introduce an outcome around transport and as my own opinion at least not uh-huh yet formalized as I said earlier on we have we attract foreigners people coming from abroad. I think that might be these. People fly to Scotland and flying obviously is not good for the environment so what we could do is to you. Obviously do they want to see how the they traveled to to the UK or recruitment And then uh this these people about alternative or epo ways of travelling. I encourage people to buy three an in order by bus. And then you know one of the behavior of these people and then we can. We can see because we have a baseline and we know people use to fly. And this is how much carbon emission they used to to create and now they're going by bus or train and this how much carbon emission the could he hit and then we can compare the two. So that's that's an exciting area and then another area that we're considering torture work with schools. WHO's the local schools here in the teachers? The students independence but we are at the moment. We are exploring. Auden these these these ideas until you've got a fantastic list of things that you do in this relatively small area this beautiful building. What other skills vote talk to you teach? Okay we're on gloss on on the weekend inside so so is computer class begins for Arabic speakers so we actually that you speak in Arabic Midi attended by series Uh so they deter would teach participants busy competitive skills you know how to create your own military's health shop online how formation facebook unsold so for people with no computer knowledge at all this is very useful to confine their own is talking point to increase it. Looks kills so this is really popular. And as I said they take place every Saturday to clauses eleven till one and how foreign policy and how many people are in those classes. I think another ten people not attending each plus mixed when we started we started with. We Miss Class. I and close by then. We decided that I'm experience would be more appropriate every Saturday. That's a Lotta a Lotta people learning digital scale. This is it is at the you. So you mentioned everyone has to be over. Eighteen are already programs that are particularly designed for younger younger people with about a year ago so I was approached by A couple of people from the Indian community who are saying you know the young people they don't have access to any activities outside else I can help them with creating someone gave her. DVD's for them because the welcoming did not work with young people. Do we contacted other organizations. In this example it was the Spartans Community Football Academy in North Edinburgh so pericles bill. Football Academy means lovely facilities ooh We knew for a long time so we got in touch with them and the the the the opportunity so now hosting a weekly session for the CDN people say twelve Every Sunday play football table tennis. They have a a communicable where people come play. the play station for young people on white labeling that from time to time the invited speaker somebody to speak to them about a specific issue. That's important so that partnership allowed us to support the people who don't directly work with them but we have access to park the notice and other organizations. Who can do that? And I'm really pleased that the SPARTANS is leading the out and a very successful product which is often the Ford initiated by coming. What do you see? The future of the welcoming association welcomed project. I think appreciate is getting I think the way coming has future because you know the woodwork. That we do here But again funding is never you can never say you know. I know. They're going to get funding. Our have a good track record I talk for my productivity killing the product. I think we are making really would impact and I'm sure would have an opportunity to due to get more funding by these competitive sector and This will acities. You don't know you know what's going to happen looking at our traffic. Was I think would be would be fine. If someone's listening to this what to do next will send individual then our website you know. Kick out what we do. You can contact if you'd like to volunteer as a as a teacher or the defender our gardening volunteers we have a large number of opportunities for volunteering. You can you can support us by donation If he's the government person listening to this day funding is what we're looking for is to do because it was out funding of yesterday do so if the government started the body or a funder then again.

SPARTANS Scotland Spartans Community Football Ac Europe Agassi UK Miss Class Auden North Edinburgh
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

11:23 min | 9 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The Fisher project because we do home visits so we go to people's home about vice about how to save how to use in the deficiently recycling system in Edinburgh how it works because as you can imagine Meighan. It'll these people come from Brooklyn climate. They're not used to heating systems and the wizard in decline in Scotland. So they need that. Help help from us to Go over he thinks the programmers the bills at the recycling. I'm so it's really useful. Say This I think that we are providing to the comedian. Say Money as well. I think I think Scottish people okay. Even though the Scottish people from Scotland they also don't get used to extremes of weather hot spell and everyone complaining. Yeah Yeah So. It mentioned a great project right at the very beginning. Can you tell me about the incoming clear. Future Project started five years. School is funded by the Climate Kelly Front squats government. I knew administered by keeping Scotland. Beautiful This most recent funding we go two year funding and There are three or four outcomes attached to that The first first one is about home visits where we go out to visit Syrian families in their own home give them advice about home deficiency and recycling and saw saw the other outcomes about climate literacy where we bought the different welcoming classes English language classes and talk about climate related public with recycling glass. Dick or even information. You know what this climate king what Causes Climate Jake game on what are the effects of climate. And what can you do as an individual to help package. Climate Change so climate literacy is a very important outcome for us and And we are doing very well. Actually because of the nature of the whittling that we have a pool of people coming to us so struggling. But I'd like to find people talk to. Here's a question. What is the most difficult thing to to educate people of climate change? Because it's a eddie very big thing is tricky thing to get people to remember or understand. I think do things. Yeah Yeah for some people coming from The global developing countries coming to live in the UK. They might not have the same notion about climate. So there's a lot of work to be done there. There is there so in this. Some people is struggling to find the benefit of tackling climate kink. Unless you say you can also save money you see because we will come to your house. need to put the heating on twenty four hours in your bill. Will it'd be very high. So what advice we give you will help you save money as well as protecting the vitamin so joining the two that to help us to to brexit terminology right name was playmate crisis. How do you feel about as a person I feel through facing the climate crisis I think would be even more in the future I believe that people should stop to think seriously about what they do on day to day. life and what they can do to reduce the dead foot the carbon footprint. There's also interesting subject. I'm actually you can explore is climbing justice or injustice year for me coming from Africa I know for that. There is very little carbon emission in Africa because of very low industry look less travel and sold so in other words the western countries Youtube America they emit of carbon emission African in poorer places in Asia versus the emit very little however the consequences are filled more by the poorer countries Dan the Western countries and we call that climate injustice. You causing trouble. I suffer more for example when Hue Akin Katrina. I think the United States a few years ago when it happened the most people who suffer where the black ethnic minority the homeless and the poor. Because they're not able to evacuate quickly. Don't have things to places to go. Why would not victim ugly because the details of six Similarly on a on a global level in Africa Medicare is are feeling. Aw Poor really because the racism has changed because of climate change People are able to predict there in the beginning of the season so they can start planting their crops on they suffer because of the deforestation addition People Migrate from one place to another because they did here is is is no longer suitable for agriculture because because of climate change it causes less disturbance to the communities who live there to have claimed at refugees. You have calamities. Tiffany is actually people say the problem is Syria stopped because of climate change because on one area I think they were Because of climate change agriculture was down People were unemployed in numbers so people started to fit. I played and started to race against the government. And that's how the thing is committed so yes climate terrific. I think. That's that's the future. I can feel your interest and passion for the subject. Yes on your such great stuff. Here Junior uh-huh people going into actually going into people's homes and show them how to be more efficient and everything you need to do to save money and also reduce the carbon footprint MHM The other. Outcome is is about food growing really exciting project. We started in April two thousand eighteen and we managed to secure an allotment nearby and the food growing project consists of people going to to to Get used to planting again new skills and mixed with other people and also we go go to people's homes and held them to to grow food in their own gardening and we help them. You know building raised beds communal building in compost Mama uh-huh equipment and so on so that's really really useful for the community and Do that we work in in partnership with so many organizations whether they're CCF funded or or or not and we also a lot of number of here's especially for the garden and Part of the CCF product encourage you to create a legacy of your project so when the funding is finished what is going to be there. So I think we've been really successful on Establishing legacies or creating ladies for the project for example in two thousand sixteen We stabbed social enterprise. The legacy of the project now social enterprises about running and they're doing better will Making reusing Dick Style to create new ideas clothing and handbags and things like that And we also have a legacy of resorts bank that we have coming which contains topics selected to climate change. So teachers can come anything. Look about the plan to do with environmental clinique and they can use use that as a teaching material for the class We are also considering working with CDN artists to create the new social in the price where this artist would work with CDN women to create take what record called textile up using recycled materials. And stuff so I think their legacies very important than an an and I think we've been successful in that area and as the defenders would like to see there is something left after the end of the project so as I said that would be the city of community and we're really in a managed to dander terrorist. I'm there would links with them because we offer package once. We offer a full package of of of of service and support to this community. For example could come here to learn English. We go to them talk about climate change and Khomeini we have befriending project so each it can be assigned befriended As I said earlier on we have unemployment worker who helps them writing their. CV's finding jobs hopes and so on and plus it's more products like Scotland for newcomers for this week liberal each. What is the Guam visit with a place where this Akassim or museum or a park so they go in a group from the welcoming? All New People Very very popular because people is really good in a group to hit some somewhere. So you know where you're going you meet people on the way the group members they're going with you can meet friends with them So yeah there's so many things going on though is coming it. It strikes me that you're teaching people and climate change skills and climate change awareness in a way that lots of us don't.

Scotland Africa Edinburgh Brooklyn Meighan UK Kelly Front Dick United States Akassim or museum CCF Asia Guam Khomeini compost Mama Tiffany America Syria
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

05:18 min | 9 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Name. Is Ken Gordon Today. In a magnificent echoey place with with Adele Abraham who is a community development practitioners out the Welcome Association Louisville. Hallo it's a beautiful day. It's been sunny rainy every five ten minutes Scottish. Could you tell me something about the welcoming association. Because it's a very ediborah KNBR centric organization. It is numbers. Injury is a grassroots organization established in the early two thousands Men thing that we do here. The welcoming is to provide English language classes at different levels so we have beginners closys else. He's being immediate intermediate advance In addition to that we run conversation coffee. Every Friday. So people people come to us from different countries over sixty different nationalities. Come to the weight coming and we are threat over fifteen hundred people annually to come. I'm he ended English. So that's our mean operation and has been like that for for a long time so on top of that we on other projects for for example. The project I'm working in it's called the welcoming future project which is funded by. CCF Kolin Fund Scottish government administered listed by keeping Scotland beautiful and we have been received funding for the last five years. And we're very grateful to our funders because doc money is allowing us to work in the community. Today's awareness about climate king and encourage people to take action to tackle Clem. Kick pick okay before we before we talk about that coming back to the English. Many many many people take boxing classes. We don't seventeen in different classes a week on average about twenty people in each plus so annuity say they're about seventeen hundred. People come out classes security countries from over sixty countries I would say mainly Europeans. We did the research or survey recently and Italians audience and Spanish are the minority for participants. However a couple of years ago we started to engage with the Syrian refugees irving is through the Edinburgh Council seat in the program were partners in that program and therefore we we do what was serious as coming here to learn English or enjoying other activities to help them integrate in the community? So we have we've been we've been fortunate position to be partners in that. What is it mixed cripple male and female female over eighteen? We don't work still doing at the moment though the will look into into that but so far we what was eighteen plus. How long did the courses lost English is it? Continuing for years is a drop in Dropping clauses so people can come for a month or two months six months so is very very flexible when no unlike Fixed with a specific course that you need to complete the dropping nature actually attracts people dos. People don't don't feel obliged to you know to stick to a course because as you know people some people come here just for the short holiday or for some work and going back home so this idea for the. There's no commitment in terms of time under you. Can you can stop anytime you can attend as many classes as you want east gloss About two hours and is completely you talked about people finding work. Is there a focus on trying to help the people to get into work with. We actually have a worker. Who dedicated for that? So we have unemployment guidance Colleague who help people writing their CV's applying for qualities finding jobs and so on. So that's yes we do have that. How long do people stay with you and stay connected team? It depends for example the Europeans who come to us there it depends on their own circumstances. You know some people here are here for a short period and then they go back to their country over something. We're here for longer. And they will stay for us that long list. They had full time and they couldn't come in. Wi- with the Syrians is kind of more Glenn commitment because as I said we're partners with the city of council and receive funding from them to do that integration work so is more kind of ongoing commitment with the Syrian community. Okay so you get to know people potato we do. Let me do pretty well either through them coming here. Yeah or visit them at home as part of what.

Scotland Ken Gordon Adele Abraham Welcome Association Louisville CCF Clem Edinburgh Council Kolin Fund Scottish government Wi Glenn
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

04:07 min | 10 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Oh boys in the coming year maintenance. The numbers of arrivals have increased increased massively recently. So it's really hard for us to look at that twelve month plan at the moment and to sort of look at how we grew in in projects and stuff because when we're delivering one hundred and twenty well compacts a month. That's a big push each month. That is hard on top of that. We've got thirty to forty buggies and we've got two big community unity. Proper prevents all the donations. An Open Mike here and there to know all of this stuff that we enjoy leading feeds our soul as well chats with schools schools and workplaces running donation drives. All of that stuff needs to happen. So for one hundred and twenty welcome back. That was difficult. Last month. We delivered two eight hundred seven. Welcome pacts to recently arrived people in Glasgow so numbers are increasing so we need to be able to respond to that and we don't know whether that will continue. Its nobody ever knows but we need to be able to react to that if it is to continue if someone's listening listening to this and wants to get involved in to help. What's the first and foremost check the website? The website is where we're not trying to put as much information in as possible as the surf first point of call. We do also have a refugee volunteers. FACEBOOK group. We also have a WHATSAPP group. There's going to be a link on the website this week to be able to join that WHATSAPP group from the website. And then there's also our mailing list what she can do through the website as well. The events page page on the website is probably the best place to check what we're not too. When the pop ups go on their community events going there and welcome Pat Building Dis Gore upon on their at anytime? We're looking for volunteer to get involved. The picture for the event will be a little placard. Come along to something whether it's a volunteer event or aw come along to something like tonight. The number of people I met tonight that were late. What can I do hotel a hotel connect and come and meet us because we are very responsive mm sieve to your needs rather than to our needs? There's always can. I swear there's always shit that needs done so you can. You can come and get involved in that stuff but it's up to you. It's up to us a person to decide so we're not one of the organizations musicians to ask you to commit ten week every week we ask you to get in touch and we'll find your availability away to fit in with our organization canonisation but also gives you the opportunity to hopefully do the thing that feeds your soul. Because that's why refugee works. It feeds my soul if he's harnessed saw if he jane soul and every volunteer works with those comes away in circles thanks so much for the opportunity unity and the the core team sort of look at that and go thank you so much for giving us all of your energy and shooting that period but it has defeat your soul sold Selena. Thank you very much. Thank you for happily in this podcast you heard in order of appearance lorry Resolven flips. KIEF DAITO Zahn Jamie Mon- John Hargreaves Andrea Baker and the incredible sound energy of the nervous ensemble and finally the founder Ariffin G Cylinder Hills. All their contact. Details are in the show notes. If you're interested in being in our podcast get in touch you can find us on. WWW DOT FIJI voices. Scotland Dot Com and on twitter at REF voices Scott Anger also on on facebook on behalf of the refugee voices. Scotland team we would like to issue a merry Christmas and a very happy new year. We're going to see see you in two thousand twenty with lots of new shows a new show ideas take care stay warm hug your billions and thank you for listening.

facebook WHATSAPP group Jamie Mon- John Hargreaves And Scotland Dot Com Glasgow Selena Scotland Mike Ariffin G Cylinder Hills Scott Anger founder
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

09:31 min | 10 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"A distance because you know you've created a different reality in the space and so you're in a character which means you're not you whereas in a in a situation situation like this I can as an artist be myself and present music that way as an opera singer you are yourself in there under the wig and the make up. Ah Your responsibility is to step into another character. Portrayed someone else's life. I'm what I can bring to. This is my life experience. My feelings my emotions as a collective elective with the orchestra. And that's a very unusual thing to be able to do. What are the things that transmitted for me was just pure joy? Yes and that is what for me is so inspiring very often as an opera singer. You're not at home. You're on the road you're alone and that's an incredibly probably a lonely existence in which to make music and so with this group we travel together. We laugh together. We cry together. We sing together. We jammed together and and we make music together and that experience Intergroup is really powerful and it's also powerful for us to be able to connect with people who may not. Have you ever heard classical music before. been up close to it. And that's also bridging a gap because people often classical music is out of touch out of reach is too expensive. Not Accessible. Won't understand the words when in actuality classical music is just music. So that's why I find. The idea of reaching teaching people through this art form is the perfect perfect vehicle. And what's what's the next few. Well I have two sides to my life. I work for BBC radio. Scotland and I do a lot of documentary work on civil rights and so my next project is operatic but Inbetween I try to find ways to tell all stories through radio and the next big project that I'm doing is trimmed which is Scott Joplin. Opera is the first black opera from America. Ever written and Scott Joplin is the slide pianist and so it features. An african-american story told through jazz blues. Slide piano opera and European classical music and the project runs for the next eighteen months in North America so that is my next big GIG if we have listeners in north North America and we probably do we are in north. America are in May and California. This is through the volcano theater and we are in Stanford and we are also at Berkeley at the beginning of May. And if you're in North America keep an eye out TREMOLO volcano theatre in Toronto turn. There are more dates coming throughout America. So keep your eyes peeled and it's easy to find us on social media like you so much for speaking to me. Thank you very much. Thank you for coming Selena. Got Really quiet now it has. It's gone really quiet. I don't like the everything's gone. They've all finished. The Orchestra. Orchestra has left the building so friend of the podcast as ever facility now. This seems like an annual event. We catch up. What's been happening in the last year a year and refugee if time to fit it all in there is never attained to fit? It's also really difficult to talk about time periods when we just go by the by you just sort of play through but yea since last December world. We've got this space we've got a space on buyers rued. Incredibly lucky to have this beautiful event space. I was actually chatting to somebody earlier and I described it as if we were if we were dead port and we had one of those houses that Hadley guest room like the the posh eleven rim the only the only guests are allowed to go and this is our late. It's our portion in the bregger. The donation space is like the whole cupboard that nobody dares open the door and it was only when I was saying that actually captures what this is all about. The buyers route is to give us an office space. That takes us a we from the macy chaotic vibrant fun brilliant space is the donation space. But the just a little bit room to think thank and then it's also a little popo space that we can do events late tonight and that we can have open mics. We can have workshops. We can host amazing organizations. We've had universities. Use the space with private companies uses base. And it means that we you're bringing in income the get to do something for us as a refugee support organization and whilst also needing space in the city to do do whatever they do so it's a lovely little it's just a lovely little hub of community stuff and tonight is a great example over this afternoon where we had people dropping into say hi people dropping into finite how they can help and then a stupendous performance. German spy nervous on symbol and last time we spoke you were talking about shortages and needs of things like buggies and stuff like that dot going in the donations nations site and also you talked to boat you pop up events that you were doing. You're you're giving stuff away. POPs have been transformed. It's amazing are POPs. What was our this exactly what we say for them to be there a bringing together of people from all over Glasgow to pick up things that they need and it's don in a way that structured it's not exclusive? I suppose is the word I mean in that. It's not an exclusionary because it's complicated it. It's a very straightforward. You can be booked on you might be UCONN. There will be volunteers and people there who will know that you've been before four if you've been before and you will be asked to either. Just wait half an hour Wilson. People who've never been before Gwen or or or to just head the street and we know no and I feel much more confident saying that I think last year I was just getting to the point of saying. I think we might have figured out what we're doing now. I feel really confident. In seeing we knew how to run their event successfully and that doesn't doesn't come easy to somebody who still thinks that they're winging their way through life but I think we've got IT I. I really think we've got it. We've doubled the a number of volunteers at as well. So we've got more mines and more folk helping problem solve anything that we come across so the pop ups are going brilliantly. We still see one hundred fifty two hundred people a month at those donations are phenomenal at the moment as well and people poll again we center founder feet in terms of how we get the things we actually need. We don't shy away from seeing if you wouldn't give it to someone you do. Oh please don't give it to someone you don't and people really seemed to have responded to that so we know get winter jackets. We get winter. Footwear we get toiletries. Toiletries and stationery and hats and gloves and scarves that we need. We no longer get some were droops and the stuff. That's the whole cupboard was talking about earlier we get the specifics. And that's really really important. It makes far easier to to welcome people but we've also moods of new partners and that always makes life far easier and whether that partner is Somebody Light Nevis Ensemble from tonight who can deliver the most phenomenal capture of community and of coming together as people through music. Yeah it blows lose my mind whether it's that or whether it's somebody late repair cuffy Glasgow who we work with to recycle up cycle. Repair the prams impeached. Here's that get donated. The have taken sole march of I were so much of the Admin side. Uh of the BUGGY and prime donations of her hands the it just completely changes. We do things. So they're currently running crowd under the. I would encourage anybody that wants to support refugee to support them because if people support them we can get twice the number of buggies out that we can if we are not if don't exist details of that in the notes yeah that would be amazing. They are the they basically take the bit of the bug impromptu donations that we can't handle as an organization so we can't repair them. We can't spend time cleaning them and enter of up cycling them whereas if we can get into neater to repair Kathy they can do all of that stuff and then we can get them out to family so much quicker so they are. Yeah the IT's working with Organiz organizations like that that have made refugee be able to grow the way. It's grown over the last year. And what's in the coming year..

America North America Glasgow Scott Joplin BBC Somebody Light Nevis Ensemble macy Stanford UCONN Toronto Scotland Selena Hadley Organiz Kathy California Gwen Berkeley
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

01:59 min | 10 months ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Yeah UH They you mean yeah.

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

13:43 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Fight. It's it's nice to see you. Everyone can come together and make something happen and it was all on the basis of the little boy with those he said there sure no matter how much extra stuff you get. That's still not enough. No had I think a lot of organizations in China who worked without level luke distribution and passing on things. I think we all see my goodness. It really helps helps. I individual helps that family. The time is completely needed and allows people to feel missile luther. Doing some fun can be really hard to to want to help them. Thank you want me to do especially. If you're a peden responsibilities you can't just most people just to say took off again so can be able to donate to be financially whether it be stuff and it can help people feel involved and part going to wait or project but yes you're right. You know it doesn't it doesn't solve the problem. The little boy went away bones on <hes> but that doesn't change them. What do you wish you'd known long before? He started such a good question because I've been thinking about that a lot recently. I wish I don't what about developmental trauma I wish I had known more attachment and I wish I focused more on support and patents rather than children should be the best way to support a child is to support the patience to continue that stable attachment until the capture after them and the best we possibly can and I think it's hard for volunteers going into camps with Nori my youth for I'm a opened appearance to to support their children and sort of provide them with resources allow. They've been the ones to get the children the boots at distribution because quite often the kids would play not for Oregon with the way it was the we would manage. We it would be handled. Are we were top. Biscuits may be you know what story tame enough to kind of choosy. I wished appearance and been doing and I wish we could have empowered them to do that and we did. Certain extent especially with younger children are toddlers Babies Day findlay. I wish that more of that and I wish I could have understood that award at the time and again to do this again. If you were would that be possible nor not just any and between among most young person who's going through this island process <hes> someone I met in flatts on no. I look after head so I'm very committed. It's a it's all my all much open and second. I couldn't leave have indisputable when these through what's going through just to meet some insurance is he's one of the young people and he's he's wonderful and he's incredibly resilient and capably fiercely total phone but he's in a really difficult situation when through so much as I can really be anybody else you mentioned things three things that you wish you'd known more about Developmental Trauma Attachment and parental support when doc developmental trauma. What does that mean for me. It's been a really steep learning curve. I I have one youth work different things for work but didn't really fully understand the impact of trauma and impact when there's been lots said recently about A._C.'s adverse childhood experiences. There's lots of talk about that and newspapers and you know all the different ideas of you can have an e score in this can show tell you what could potentially happen in your life in terms of your health and wellbeing. What can what that traumatic relief can then become Bloomington if you like. I don't think got a full understanding of until I started looking after my young person on for me. It's been a huge huge learning curve to cap the different parts of his behavior and how you paid and look after. I don't Paerson who's going through. You know what their behavior scare what they see or how it seems highly behave in a war war. Is that really like self sabotaging behavior not being able to sort of take positives not being able to complemented all these different things just sometime surely small or sometimes much much bigger so I would have loved afternoon one of Atlanta before I went to France and to understand why the children behave the way they do and how something that may come across as one behavior is really yes. I know something attachment attachments a huge thing for me. There's there's lots of unaccompanied asylum seeking children in Scotland. I think Linda who make Andre one hundred and fifty something like that not Massey's but you know there's some but if you think about your young adult asylum seekers who you're eighteen and going through the asylum says they've perhaps started their journey seniors four years ago in some cases shouldn't will travel traveled through different countries of applied for asylum that failed the feudal gone through all these different things in traffic being exploited. I'm not that strong but they took place and sort of cater or someone to give them that strong secure attachment and everyone needs in their life especially someone who's gone through through so much harm the top knowledge can have their and the attachment that that person will be there no matter whoa no matter who they try and push a week perhaps because they're frightened they'll get wound and can allay again or they're frightened that something happens without deletion ship so much award won't that attachment relationship is totally important a young person regardless of what their backgrounds are two cutlass where they're from but it's the kind of young adults asylum-seekers the ocean who's got their box. WHO's looking after them. Who's has been that can among thicker or not but you know what I mean. So I think actually important something I would love to see more of happenings. What more can I greater understanding of the worst. We talk about about wanting to be the best place best place in what. Oh for children and young people to grow up with. I love that can happen. We need lots to be the source starting point of all these different journeys and the way we look after and care for people we need law at the heart of all the processes that's homesick tactical through under teams from my reading these things the opposite of and and it's a bit of a bitter fine. I think all some people can I think a lot of what's going on. We're talking about immigration stats. We're talking about numbers. We're talking about these. People come back. I wonder how much money should always cannot fundamentals and I get understand thought you can't. There's there's poolside since we have to strip says no matter how much we lake them agree with them or have you. There's there's paperwork. You know what different thing there's interviews and there's all these different things tmz until we can value everyone in society then then Puerto Rican teen until we can look at I don't comparison see them for what they are or not and see them and get them kate and nurture then four Arthur Lee CIANCI's ultimately. We look after unaccompanied asylum-seeking children's clearly a huge issue for you. Yes and hope will the catheter young adult asylum-seekers takers because I think I think we have to remember that when we think of our children we don't necessarily think aqua. They're fully eighteen never darkened her door. Again I think there's an understanding these stone need support eighteen even if they think they do you know even if they're quite happy to fly off into the what they still need the stony something it fall back on and I think between unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and you know those late teen years we know that from school to show people we know that from our children it from education and care we know that young people between the ages of fifteen and twenty one thing might think they're adults. They may look like they're adults on Peter official but the reality is they are they still need support and they still need love and encouragement and someone to fall back on and that's something that particularly particular thing for me. The moment is particularly a big issue for me just because I look at this island processes services that we expect young people go through and buy that unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and also young adults and I think gosh is utterly rallied retraumatize on on hand on Heart Haiku we put her young people in that possession we would never think to a young person going through the criminal justice system in that position. We're talking at the moment in the papers about smart justice and hope we after victims of time and also how we look at dealing with perpetrators as claim as well but these people have done anything wrong. They're claiming asylum which is illegal right so we need to look how we meek. How Hey we look after them better? Now I get the immigration is a devolved matter in Scotland. Goodness knows how many people keep telling me that but health health and social care and education are so why is it the immigration continually trump's those other parts of our the Scottish government and our priorities for Scotland I look at the idea of nutty in being safe and healthy and achieve and all these wonderful positive things look pictographic getting it right for every child. Does the immigration process actually get it right for every child of course it doesn't if there's there's no way it can so for me. It's about right how we look at look after these young people and as between fifteen and twenty twenty one twenty two twenty head to look after them and make them feel cared for and really the and enveloped within Scotland within keer and communities. We're just starting point for that. Do you think that is I had a conversation received something. This morning or this care has to start when the ironic because otherwise we sort of lose we will lose our trust or we physically lose them or the the you just become middle swallowed up by processes. We have to remember that the people come on the young people come in. They're not just stop hydride. You can stop the other reasons for being here and they've all got the right to claim asylum and we need to look at high we can for wouldn't benefit the best and we welcome them into communities help weight based or will the capture them and make them feel safe and nurtured and secure because I think we've got an obligation to to them. Regardless of four parts of policier devolved or not so Lindsey. What's on your mind? Gosh the immigration system uh-huh immigration system is most definitely on my mind because we're going through that moment. I think I'd always seen the allegation system. You know you always read about immigration system. You'll look at the weakest people clean asylum until it spend your house. It's a different so then dictation systems on my main just mental health for young people Scottish on people. I'm sure just as much as unaccompanied young young people Cleveland asylum all those are issues that we need to try and improve on as I said earlier I think love and safety and security and nurture needs to come much closer to the forefront of dealing with our young people and looking after them than it currently does Lindsay. I'm so glad we connected on twitter me to thank you so much for this thank.

Scotland China twitter Oregon Scottish government Cleveland flatts France Paerson Bloomington Lindsey Arthur Lee CIANCI Atlanta Lindsay Massey Peter official Linda Andre four years
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

15:04 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. This episode features Stephen mcklusky, the phone der- of the bikes for refugees charity, which if you follow them on Twitter seems to be growing arms and lakes or should that be pedals Jane's. Bikes refugees started through a meeting that included Stephen a young gentleman from Syria called Yemen. And what Stephen describes as a bike shaped object refugee. Voices. I'm here with Steven McCloskey, the founder of bikes refugees. Hi, stephen. Hi, Stephen standard question, what's on your mind? What's marines? Well, let me tell your story story about, it's Scotland that came about a story, aboots, mind, omit, usual gentleman, from from was a refugee cold Yaman, and they got that I ain't and Canaan, bro much with no more than Clinton's Barack, and I think you have to see to something Lorne afraid about of what the future also made me bring having lefties finally maybe loved ones by Coleman and walked home of those things away. And not won't after lightning Yaman bought himself, be by from from country for ten fifteen just to help himself got owned explains news loans. The only problem was that the beat was more of our paycheck object, the walking walking, basically that was actually capable of, of getting anywhere. So Maceo and my partner base. We took care Yaman Dench of local bike. Shop to see for today. Get it fixed up and get one that would cut logs. The shorts the beach was repealing. But the guy who'd on the bake shop where cabling gifted Obata Yemen, and they. Yeah, I just over the next couple of weeks and a couple of months, I just noticed who simple thing as really made a difference to Yemen to stay help them. Save money to help them to set one TS. She's new woman Indians. He said. And a supposed to to eat. One was could be any other people Bill like the guy in the bait. Shop who is Cain, the generals off to the ache to Gammon and with other refugees who will benefit from, from heaven, I say step. So when they set in host of attest to and a bunch of effigies was once on Facebook and fast forward to half years we've had over six hundred eighty. Nearly five hundred eighty six of in before, pushed and distributed to terrific. These sailing across Scotland Costa central Rebecca's demand for actually in Glasgow. But also also Edme will and people tell the aches for a whole regions. So these are aches for kency's sustain to school to college university to act say, essential wine, which classes, people use to say, volunteering, what corporate entities to access central hill, safeties, and meetings with, with a home office, and lawyers, and people use of eight to, to come together and people in meet you in Glasgow. We have poop in also link, people all over Salem seekers refugees can be quite particularly Glasgow to isolated as well. So thanks. Yeah. I'm gonna. It helps bring people to go, so yeah, but speculative geez, about Xiamen doing new Yemen, so yeah, so young, it was inspiration censored, the Puget he is still living data book. He's, he's new here. He settled a has many friends, I suppose, he's probably happy as could be under the circumstances has prince and his family still bucking Damascus, were too old to, to flee when dominates the left a sudden and the bass Kasese with he's system. He was shape related oblique from southern border and he's been related Bethesda has also. No, listen, Edinburgh. There's no great. He's Yaman know what king take me has started full and tearing he knew speaks fluent English feted, little English, but you knew speaks English with a very strong Scottish accent. You'll see tells me as well and has what's, what's. Mighty a Scottish Lassie buffet with Ray taken and. And there's only only one spoil him in the story that don't always tell everybody less supposed to be going twenty five year old man walking tape. He's only going car. But he's abundant the mic you still can use as you still way you still say, cools. Actually on. Sake, and bake have more news. I believe, and the more novel two and a half years later, from inspiration, behing, refugee Scotland. He has no trustee board. So dominant very much involved in helping and shape the project forward as well. Which, I think as, as, as a great story, that's a beautiful circularity there, then right back to the person that inspired the soul being a core part of what's, what's moving on much, when you started this new sat down and thought rate, I'm going to start this bikes for refugees, and you'd ideas hoped would pan out, has it panned date compared with what you thought at the beginning. I wasn't quite sure how it would, you know, it was one of these things that you what did these things that you come up with, you know, when you don't. Bedroom. And then grows goes arms and legs, I mean, I remember going to put that initial in Facebook. It's been interesting. I so social has been quite quick central to the project has been very central at the style and continues to be, so that's a lot of people, particularly effigies Salem seekers link-up. But yeah. To physical all over widow with goal, but people started to contact with people like the guy and the bait shop give that for speak to Yemen wanted to do something they had seen the stories, let me say refugees asylum seekers, particularly from study, and Secondly, no shortage of people who just wanted to do something. And, and sometimes, you know, just a simple, thankfully, the core if nobody misinter- actually the scrape the jet less, and less as put more of a project that supports peoples inclusion and integration. And, and I think I think importantly as we think that when people at the saints approval, Mesa Joel Sola, down as well and say the people that you're welcome here. So I think that makes that makes a big difference. But, but yeah, two and a half years ago, people started to aids and very quickly. I suppose that started to about a problem as well, because we have no storage, also very quickly, my host start develop bakes. I had bakes chained up all day, and I'm Chris Coppola half the muster Lou this'll be it as real and settling no shortage of people wanting to help, but we had to paint storage, how to reach out and people who could help us to fix up under appeal aches, and we're no have full in tears, and Edinburgh and Glasgow, and who picks up eight so we have some really good partnerships as wheel when an Edinburgh, we have a partnership with a commute for Jay called Coppola, gee up. So we work closely with them and Glasgow. We have a close partnership with an established project associate of the cold coastal wiggles. So we have volunteers. From the fictional aches and disturb them today for jeez. Biggest demand for Nicely. nicely. And. And surprisingly as global. Saying the key population of Salem of posting Glasgow always always always always fifty six people waiting for aids and people here are pretty split to accessibly. If you're say. Say Glasgow some of the lessons make. No. If you say she can legally work and legally get also even claim state benefits, you know, so you're living off an alone today, so even even in public or is prohibitive. But you have some freedom of movement, particularly Glasgow, where you pretend to be hosted wings away from the city centre with a low of essential services, the kind of service that we take granted, you know, so just giving people that feeling of movement goes a long way to helping people just take khanate with central safeties and importantly, a little basically people helps people to connect with other people into people, meet feigns as Bill we have a volunteer, zipping, authors, matey, and Glasgow from star, whose Salem Sika. He's a great champion forsake Leno Hessel interest in one is also he, he also the one of the spikes from the poor jet he then when on volunteer, experts for his peers McAteer Beatty through some training, but he's actually left does not all he's still supports in other ways, but he's life doesn't that rolled and interesting what he's up has Kennedy Kujat, not the specs bakes for other beverage because but not bikes. Anybody and the trinity who become afford to access also, that's a look at that's the moment, but say, what really makes the project has the support begins forget from individuals who didn't bakes. But also also many power ships that the beget Israel and some place in creator partnerships. Which is Liz, what surprised you about where you've come on this journey tease, the Moton craze. Given what you go in the beginning surprise my question really surprised by the middle support. The people have come forward who who faulty about the skills that wasn't too surprising. Yeah. Before bikes refugees might professional by public, health and public health, hills, improvement and. Call coz diff'rent doesn't groups and populations including refugees, and say seekers off over the years, but before bikes when the refugee camp, the jumble, stole an offer, France and Palley myself. And so other people say up project, which shea bikes, but caravans and people would donate caravans or the words or automated, but fundraising the by kind of, on the with two fellow Philo, v- clothes and food in the paint and say to them, and we have a network of drivers who take eight a fruit essential eight refugee company for firms, and including used as shelters. And I think over the space of about. Over the year. I think we must have called the not eat over one hundred caverns. Quite a few kind of scold, Israel. Take the jungle Bobby G temp. Those two most a couple of years ago, and I still have links and some. With Manial grassroots Jay and Scotland UK that stole the closest open in much the in the north of France cave job was on his it was healing secrets. Those children and many of the combines used a mixed shale toes where fated some shelter for of the particularly vulnerable children at the but yeah, I mean is still there, but I suppose was a looking for Kujat, not necessarily. But. And the races. But I suppose I'm never so the realis- apply used by the people. Not one what to help and what to do something, which is, which is great. And that's. I support the project would exist, sensually Esmael expensive projector. But we do we need resources at costs money to two picks up each week when we give real full wheel to a new cycle met looks late says, well, that costs money stood by and the frustration. We've actually global we've for the first time even -ployed somebody for a couple of days a week as wheel mechanic, which is which is not surely helped, and I'm gay, he's also supporting volunteers have Glasgow's will Sipa so yeah, you run event. I should say you want an award this last year was that you want to know what the Saco frame, the committee of cycles yet. So yet, sober to stay just ship, yet, which is, which is, which is first of many. Oh, yeah. I think it's nice to have. It's nice to get those. Mosul for the people who support that a lot of us have, and some very, very committed and dedicated volunteers was able to give up a low of in affects and a fun vision for his as well. And just Hove angel a whole region. So what's next for bikes horrific? Geez. Can you give any? Yeah. And site to your next plans. That's plans yet secrets, I suppose what's, I think Pemberton stage in the development of the? Demand for for cases of the day, as I mentioned, always always operating lusting. Always forty fifty sixty people waiting for eight we trained get H two people as quickly as we can. But some players may take a one to see one sister painting and quickly get the needed quickly. We can get reform repealed and on the road. She said to someone apply as a form, as it online or so we have a, a website, www bikes jeez..

Glasgow Yemen Stephen mcklusky Scotland Salem Yaman Facebook Israel Edinburgh Yaman Dench Kennedy Kujat France Obata Yemen Twitter Steven McCloskey Syria Xiamen
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

15:35 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Yeah. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. I'm all as didn't is a campaign for human rights and social Justice in Scotland. She's a Somali-born Scottish refugee doctors, who co founded the Glasgow girls, a group of seven young women who campaigned against the harsh treatment of Silom seekers in response to the detention of one of their friends. The Glasgow girls story has since been turned into to be documentaries, a stage musical, and television musical drama, the stage musical toured again this year, two thousand nineteen and twenty sixty Amal was named by both the young women's movement. And the Saltire society as one of the standing women of Scotland, and in twenty eighteen she won the university of Glasgow's world changing alumni award. I'm also embassador for the Scottish Refugee Council. Since leaving university Amal has worked for the mental health foundation in Scotland as equality and human rights officer responsible for the development of the foundation's work with Silom seekers, refugees. She leads on the phone Dacians Saudi project. Amal continues to campaign and speak out. And we were delighted to catch up with her in Glasgow a few weeks ago. He is out refugee. Voices. I'm here.

Scotland Amal Glasgow Scottish Refugee Council university Amal university of Glasgow Ken officer Gordon
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Yeah. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast my name is Ken, Gordon. This is our first birthday episode. We are one year old in this episode. We interview Selena from refugee, the subject of our very first podcast to find out what's happened since we last spoke a year ago. He will not be surprised to find out. There's a lot before that as it's breathy. We have a special treatment of you. But the person that more or less came up with the idea for these casts. Jennifer, gordon. I interviewed a Wailer go. And she explains why we started doing the broadcasts and also bits about the work that she does for a grunt provider, based in London. The quality is variable, but it's a long way to London on the internet. Here's Jennifer refugee. Voices. It's refugee voices. Scotland's both the on the lane. I have Jennifer Goten Jennifer go all the way from London. Jennifer, why did we stopped refugee voices Scotland that well, so casting our minds back to this time last year both of us were feeling really first-rate said with the narratives impediments in national media by refugees in particular ones that had arrived in the UK, where integrates in for the papers, would have you believe where I remember this particular story around refugees who were living on Rossi ever leave of really, really annoyed us? And we both felt that we had to do something and kind of thought about what skills we go busted around a couple of ideas than occurred me you are appalled caster. And you have all the gear on your experience in it on. Hey, why don't we use poke casting? As a method of allowing the real stories to get there in a sense of, of amplifying, the voices of people doing amazing work in Scotland's for refugees to tell their own story in their own words being skewed. We thought pay that might be might just work. So I very over excited with myspace. The behalf had already ball. The main goal as g mail address goes to Eric with I was so excited about the idea on here that's where he'll start really remember got bit because I was doing something was in, it'll I went into a show in K motion. But the time you've got the Twitter address on geologist lined up. So. So it was very much. Born of the biased ridiculous news. But news on wanting to do something about it. Absolutely feeling feeling pissed off. I like to say on a pole. And feeling like what can we do with our skill sets and knowledge and experience in networks? What can we what can we do in a meaningful way? And we just thought you know, we're not doing the worker cells. We can amplify the voices of the people that are doing it, and that suicide today. So Jennifer, what's your favorite episode from the last year, and I think my favorite one so fire monthly the one that was by faith United and helped him effigies elevate the kind of churches Scotland project with the coordination piece on refugees, and that is that, like as much as it was an organized by the church Scotland, which is also of the Christian faith. It was multi-faith project. It just felt like a really strong welcoming initiative from the church. Scotland. I really liked the idea episode. Currently is a Corrine through a little Oley of been quite something. In terms of realization also. What people say, but Amy Corinne or throw to spend time with her was quite joyous, despite everything often are positively enter her positive, focus was very inspiring. Everyone of these things being really inspiring. Let's face it, every podcast veiled new information on the humanity of the situation finding these, these parts of humanity that are going to be a, you know, this country in the future, as while it's seeing refugees, not as a refugee in that box, seeing them as a human being. He has had to leave their home and often their family and their livelihood for many different reasons, but they are on their humans with feelings thoughts and opinions and experiences. And they're no less valid than anyone in this country's just 'cause they're not from year. And I think I am quite a believer in hearing that kind of voice of someone who's left experience of something really. Being able to perhaps change the opinion or really provoke something with people that reading an article in paper, that journalists has written about someone else counts. I think there is something very powerful about hearing someone story spoken possible by by themselves, and that, I think that was another key thing when we were setting up, this was, perhaps, someone who has a very negative were refugees, if you sat them dine with the Cup of tea, and that person to speak to someone who had fled Syria or fled the or somewhere in the world and talk with their experience. I've really challenged that Paris in who had the purview of refugees to come out of that have changed their minds that way, because it's very powerful that human to human storytelling. Another thing that really pitched us to, to do this, this podcast is while doing it for you so experience of working with refugees? Yeah, I bet yet back in February at t Gonda to visit project that we fund throughout maker, the I worked for in London. The grants is to organization called give directly who are brilliant, as you might guess, the name their work all around, giving money directly to people living in poverty. So the project has been singing Uganda was in a refugee camp large refugee camp there, which majority refugees there from the Democrats Republic of Congo. But the also have a number of Rwandan refugees have been living there for over twenty years in Uganda. The have some of the most progressive refugee policies in the world. They have basic rights, such as education land, the right to leave the settlements and the right to become a citizen, which is bad. The number of countries. But that's by no means saying that refugees have easy in Uganda all so the project yet we revisiting was giving cash transfers by mobile money to people living in the refugee settlement with no strings attached. They can spend the money on whatever they want the premise of the pilot was to test whether these kind of cash transfers are ineffective way of supporting refugees as opposed to in kind services such as a package or clothing packages etcetera. So really shifting the power balance to giving these people and families cash that they can then budget on spends accordingly according to their needs really fascinating. Really interesting on really again. Hit home. I mentioned earlier round the humanity aspects of these people. There may be assumptions that giving people money you just giving the. They're going to spend on. However, these people they had a life and their form a country where they had jobs. They had family bills to pay on. They had to budget, people know how to manage their needs. And when you give them the cash to do that, that's incredibly empowering that they can say, here's what I need. Not what I'm being given by this agency, this agency has inches e it's by will I can do for my family. It was very inspiring, incredibly powerful on spots of ideas really energizing, visit and great to see project is really disruptive and innovative way of helping refugees in these countries. So, yes, must my limited experience of working refugees, but really inspiring visit on really when I came back made me want to even more unlearn even more by the different challenges, the refugees face around the world's June for could really interesting project other any. Early learning points are interesting fights coming into. Yes. I think it's, it's really interesting as a pilot. So the idea is that next at be scaling up to prove that it is a valid way of supporting as people in hoping that it can perhaps be taken on by some of the large agencies that were presented. But certainly when I was there really positive comes to a number of one on one into us with refugees who had received the cash transfers they have spent on school fees that they've been able to pay, which is excellent a number of medical bills debts that they owed other people when they've had to borrow to pay for medical bills or still 'this never place. There was a lot of meeting the basic immediate needs stockpiling of grain and other foods is great to see the number of livelihoods projects that people were were gauging annual number had boats motorcycles, so that they could be registered Buddha Buddha drivers, which is a form of light motorbike taxi take. Can you gotta so that they had to share light to buy the bike in the first place using the cash transfer? But then the gets making income on its Swiss itself things that he just didn't have the capsule to up to two out there in the first instance to then be able to reap the rewards that, that this passionately Oester for them on the brilliant thing is a few people felt to actually saving the first time they've, you know, in ten years relied of started pitching, some money site. When I get the money back for my livelihood projects for emergencies for a rainy day, you know, she's really brilliant us, I think it was also a appoint around that the slightly, you know, the secondary comes I guess, or in the Senate, less expects his outcomes of cash transfers that we hired by for example, there was a couple. Hey, used the money to fix a wrist make appropriate Reuss prior to that they had some kind of slats let low of rain when it rains, it was the rainy season while we were there. He said that the thing that's really changed is their relationship as parents that they're not arguing all the time. There's so much more family harmony as a result of being able to fix the race on. I think that really powerful linked to the kind of stuff we certainly here in the UK eleborate, toxic stress of living in poverty, just a tool that can take on people in many different forms. Another interesting point, I was quite interested in when they were given the option of whether the male or the female, head of Heissel manage the budget. The women were always taking the budget that men want the responsibility, one mount even. Oh, gosh. I would not I wouldn't spend as well as she went. So I'm happy for her to be managing all our money, which was was great. And really interesting. So on the women said it made them elected had more of a place in, in the high school while they were not for husband wants money. He had to ask her. I think it really that, that was also on the unintended outcome that I thought was fascinating. From a sociological point of view fantastic project fantastic insights at this early stage. Yeah, great. Yeah. Well fuck you so much for explaining the thinking behind the origins of refugee voices. Scotland also telling his about that fantastic project. You're very welcome. Refugee. Voices.

Scotland Jennifer Goten London Uganda UK Selena myspace Twitter Gordon church Scotland t Gonda Amy Corinne Ken Eric geologist Senate Congo Buddha Buddha Syria Paris
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. This episode features Kieran Taylor talking about the forgotten history of Belgian refugees in Glasgow during the great war, a story that has many contemporary parallels. Here's Cuban refugee. Voices. Killing Taylor in your first year. PHD student at the university of Stirling and you're looking into the history of Belgian refugees in Glasgow during the war, what drew you to that subject. Well, I had about current teacher saw talking the first World War, and Scotland Oviously big issue as a history teacher. But definitely I had working species with refugees and science because with the squad shift veto, as tier and within you working as a teacher in issues to do with international education. Google says Vadim portent and saw this project when our plight for to be part of this project to the because weekday did macho definitely experiences the iheart towards an academic APD. Okay. Tell me about your project where my foot as it looks. The history of building Fiji's were being Glasgow, and we're not see this cannot often people are quite surprised and he built jeez. This is something that's because it's really a forgoing as head, not related to the first World War. Two hundred fifty billion refugees came Tippin. Tune the first World War, and the state's nineteen fourteen to nineteen nineteen nineteen and nineteen nineteen sadly most of them were deported by Belgian or repack cheated, but billion, but we can talk about an and a second in twenty thousand diligent effigies came to classical and boys, twenty thousand refugees came who were Adnan care of 'cause corporation, which was caused what city council about team and Glasgow corporation to take the responsibility for these refugees. Because Glasgow subtly was one of the few places where refugees could go because of the war restrictions that team anyone who is foreign anyone who wasn't a nationalist Betsy. Citizen couldn't go to the lakes of Dundee Aberdeen aver because these places, of course, to and there a fear of, you know, having too many foreigners near the coast, and if there was an invasion, even Bill Jim an ally say that, there would be some sort of help. So because they. Who came, and who are dispersed laws will have to stay there. And so there was a special policy. Almost today. Yep. Yep. Absolutely. Because, as you can imagine just like the wall of refugees arriving in coastal areas. Kate folks, we're being stationed in London. However, speaking problem, attics Amboise, the government, and the organization responsible for looking after the war refugees committee, decided to spare refugees to Kane Amedure, Auburn centers Manchester, Birmingham, classical London. We stay in also to Ireland you said and Glasgow twenty in gos-. You said twenty thousand. Yeah. Tweeted in Glasgow so twit so twenty in Glasgow. And where did they go with a good question is will they were spread across the city and some of them that could pair three that further we? In some refugees, being in so kudos coast to the that the, the spate and not being allowed to add to some extent, never some refugees need again. They were really supposed to be there. So we are Cain dispersed. I wrote in the city, however won't happen. Moi's Gaza corporation had a very good system of infrastructure. Not they're very organized city council for the period. So the hard very detailed moves on vegan, hosing, so many refugees were stationed and the can hosing and shared often associate glance coping city Tatum bit impoverished on refugees were late the joy, citizens, staying and whole families and rooms things. However, caused the corporation also annexed and took over some of the parks and institutions are in the city. So, for instance, rookie Glen park was used to Jose Fiji's called over the state ho several difficulties. And also the religious organizations churches to a number of refugees in the institutions, particularly the Catholic church Ruthie refugees received in those days received a new creation and nationally nineteen fourteen what we see as because of the relationship of the refugees Bilden, refugees, arriving, and because the relationship of that to the war, and this is one of the principal reasons but goes to war, the invasion of Belton by Germany was seen as a great humanitarian act. And what we see is an overwhelming support for refugees, particularly in the newspapers. And in this great Jaren that Barbara's actions of the of the gentleman will empire and things a lot and to Belgium, and courageous Bejamin, those really a portrayal Belgian refugees as I can't deserving pays entry is really been treated badly buying Germany. A not is the sum of technical of the reception receive so those babies of good discussions in play many sources of Belgian effigies arriving in God's go at central station. Fromm on, you know, people Wayne in streets, clapping tying things. These release something that we saw refugees received Jeremy nationally. However, over the course of the war, the changes, sadly, and what we see as by nineteen fifteen Beijing, Fiji's are seen as a of a drain on society on account of the fact that, you know, many people are dying in the water that's point many people dying in the water. That's point conscriptions about to be introduced and because of Fiji's are seen as Wyant the fighting why our soldiers over, seas fate, a my aunt, these buildings that we're looking after going over as Bill when spatial inconsideration for some, too. Hundred fifty thousand billion fees. And so this is how the, the narrative rookie changes by nineteen sixty what we see, as the government because of this public pronouncements against building, if because of a growing steady towards the governor actually bonds, any media reporting of negative portrayals refugees by nineteen eighteen when Bilgin effigies the war's over Bilden refugees are very swiftly patchy, too, which as a country, as you can imagine, which has been ravaged by four years of war, coincident, bombardment minute. Setis had been ravaged actually, some photographs, liter flat, and the refugees are shut, but continues in ruins unnecess-, because of fears that they'll be LeBron race between Bilden refugees, and the British public was the perceived need for the refugees as for labor more for employment because again there must have been huge, huge needs in. Partitioned straight loud, telling absolutely the gate war. We associated with mask inscription of made and that was vide- Coleman. We see whole industry tones of coop rage eerie just examples Glasgow. You many walking main are saying overseas to Fe four and so who's gonna fill the jobs. And we associate with women the women's struggle for suffrage as and this as part of the narrative, have Bilgin refugees, but also quite sort of expandable, workforce, thirty percent, reduction and jobs and temperatures the weapons and all the other things at times, the planes, sich Belgian refugees were to some extent drafted than to start building and pervading for the industrial coda me in the saints. So Belgians aren't expand the war

Glasgow Fiji Scotland Kieran Taylor Glasgow corporation Bill Jim Germany university of Stirling Bilden Google Ken Tippin Amboise Adnan Glen park Jose Fiji Dundee Aberdeen Setis Beijing
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. It's not often we get invited to sit in on a meeting for a refugee project until we were invited by the colors of Edinburgh project colors of Edinburgh is a refugee, an art project, and it's happening on June. Twenty first I joined the meeting, and then after the meeting, I spoke to co-founders more and Murio refugee. Voices. I'm an Edinburgh tonight in the university building, and I just sat through a meeting of the colors of Edinburgh project on a guys. I must say that was incredible meeting. Never I wish I went to meetings that as precise action orientated and passionate as that was, thank you so much funders phone, does of, of Edinburgh here with meat more and Murio. Let's start with you more. How did this all start? So it actually all started about four and a half months ago when maryelle and I decided to go to a star meeting stars, a society, and university, and that actually exists in most universities in the UK. And it sounds for student action for refugees. Unrecorded just side along that one of the first meetings, they had I noticed the shirt. It was really exciting really? Nice. They did a few smaller projects fundraising events. But we also wanted to do more than just fundraise bit of money. We really wanted to find a way to really talk to the public in Scotland Morales and are just yourself. I'm not so much in artist. I am more the business mind behind this. But so I still I'm very interested in art, and new kind of wanted to put him her and put his well. So we decided to say, you know, let's, let's try to use art as a medium of conveying. This message of conveying, what it means to be a refugee in Scotland. So that's how he started in not first meeting we, then after I kind of sat down after the to create a pitch a next meeting, I asked for the first ten to fifteen minutes of the star meeting, and I said, I wanted to suggest the project and pitch it to the people in society. So I did that. Recruited our first maybe five to ten people, and we quickly started working on things quickly started talking about potential ideas. How could do things talking about our actual main event, which is art exhibition, which will get you, probably later. That's that was the start of it. Eventually, we noticed we need more help need morons things. Exactly the team got bigger and bigger because we noticed that, you know, everyone came aboard has amazing ideas. So the idea it self was so ever-evolving and so growing naturally by the people came and joined so only thing we, we had to do is really recruit more people ended up with about twenty until plus minus some came on for a short while to help us, and then left and some have been there from the very start. What is the aim of colors of Edinburgh? So the main aim of colors of Edinburgh's really to convey the message and make people understand who are in Scotland, the locals mainly in Scotland understand what it means to be a refugee, especially in this country. We really try to make it a local project to make it more relatable to our audience. So every time every meeting, every time we come up with a new idea. Our main focus is still at the end. Is it going to help reach a wider audience, and make them understand? What it means to be refugee. But having said thought it doesn't only mean that we wanna talk about the negative sides of what it means to be a refugee. We also want to kind of change the perceptions of what our g is what they do. What their emissions are, you know, there's this big misconception of people refugees coming, because they're unmotivated and don't want to work and, you know, just want to kind of chill, which is we've found, so not the case every single refugee that we've been interviewing has been so motivated has been entrepreneurial has been really driven to progress in their career in their education etcetera on that kind of all contributed to our aim is. I think art is was the medium that was maybe enabling the Reggie voices to be heard in a different way to be seen in a different way and not so negative as

Edinburgh Scotland Morales Murio maryelle UK Reggie fifteen minutes
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Do? Do you can study? Steady. Volunteer. Get involved in your community. And. Tryst people, even if you can't trust everybody find someone in contrast. And then with love with this tryst, you can grow if you is relate yourself, it would be. Difficult. So get involve in your community and focus on positive things and forget about every negative things because MRs part of life. And you said reflection is a big issue reflect yes, honestly, if we can be reflective people. Reflect on everything. That happens to us that will be something we will gain a lot at the hand of your day try to what was good. What was bad and take a positive and try to reflect what was it, but, you know, and try to what could I change for, you know, so yes reflection? Thank you. Yes reflection. This is part of my life. Now reflecting. It's been a joy to sit here and can be based on your positively on your joy, and your story is inspiring. The best in your studies and the whatever I mean those. Next. Could it be? Thank you very much. You welcome refugees. Voices. Listen to that interview, so many times, and every time I smile meeting was joy, her infectious, positivity and optimism were so inspiring you can find out more about what Amy is doing on our website, which is you can find out more about Amy is doing visiting our show, spades will be food, details of her university website, and on the same page is our friend who die, who featured an episode three who's also a UNESCO ambassador all the websites mentioned, including network. Scotland over to truth commission and bridges programs are on the show notes page is well, you can find our website at WWW dot refugee voices. Scotland dot com. A huge thanks for all your support via our Facebook Twitter feeds. We've had some fantastic conversations that we have some amazing new episodes lined up. Please remember that. If you're a refuge, e or an asylum seeker who's got something on your mind. If you run a refugee or asylum seeker support project and what tell us about it in our podcast. Contact us on refugee voices. Scotland gmaiLcom. You can get on Twitter at ref voices. Scott, that's art. R E F v I c s SCOTT, and you can find us on Facebook. Huge thanks to Amy for telling us our story for her infectious optimism joy until love. And thank you very much for listening on goodbye.

Amy Scotland Twitter Scott Facebook UNESCO
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"Do? You can study. Steady. Volunteer. Get involved in your community. And. Tryst people. Even if you can't trust everybody find someone you contrast. And then with love with this trust, you can grow. If you is relate yourself, it would be. Difficult. So get involve in your community and focus on positive things and forget about every negative things because MRs part of life. And you said reflection is a big issue reflect yes, honestly, if we can be reflective people. Reflect on everything. That happens to us that will be something we will gain a lot at the hand of your day try to what was good. What was bad and take a positive and try to reflect what was it, but, you know, and try to what could I change for, you know, so yes reflection? Thank you. Yes reflection. This is part of my life. Now reflecting. It's been a joy to set here and can be based on your positively on your joy and your story is inspiring. The best in your studies and the shooter. And whatever those. Was next. Could it be? Thank you very much. You welcome refugees voices. Listen to that interview, so many times, and every time I smile meeting, her was joy, her infectious, positivity and optimism were so inspiring you can find out more about Amy is doing visiting our show, spades will be food, details of her university website, and on the same page is our friend who die, who featured an episode three who's also a UNESCO ambassador all the websites mentioned, including network. Scotland over to truth commission and bridges programs are on the show notes page is well, you can find our website at WWW dot refugee voices. Scotland dot com. A huge thanks for all your support via our Facebook and Twitter feeds. We've had some fantastic conversations. We have some amazing new episodes lined up. Please remember that. If you're a refuge, or asylum seeker who's got something on your mind. If you run a refugee or asylum seeker support project and what tell us about it in our podcast. Contact us on refugee voices. Scotland gmaiLcom. You can get us on Twitter at ref voices. Scott, that's not our e f v I c s SEO SCOTT, and you can find us on Facebook. Huge thanks to Amy for telling a story for her infectious optimism joy until love. And thank you very much for listening goodbye.

Scotland Facebook Twitter Amy UNESCO Scott
"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"scotland" Discussed on Refugee Voices Scotland | Refugees in their own words

"The. Hello and welcome to the refugee voices. Scotland podcast. My name is Ken, Gordon. I thought for a long time, but hoped to introduce this podcast that features Amy Corinne auto an asylum seeker from the Ivory Coast, who arrived in the UK in twenty eleven and after being dispersed to Glasgow spent three years, fighting to get refugee status. She has changed an amazing amount, and she's a UNESCO rely ambassador. All I can say to is relax for the next twenty two minutes, and listen to Amy. Tell us her story refugee. Voices. I'm here with Amy choline auto, Holloway, her you. I'm good. Thank you. Very nice to meet you me, too. You have done many things in your life and you're still young. So what's on your mind today? What he wanted okay? I just wanted to start with the fact that is my first language. And I wanted to, you know. Speak of. Identity of people. For example, when my story started I was seeing myself as an asylum seeker, and then as refugee. I forward that I was I am a person. So, you know, I love liberal myself as refugee instead of seeing myself, as a person, we refugees us or a person, seeking asylum, and since I've started to do this Demarcartion, I feel better. When did you decide to make demarcation? I decided when I. Completed my b o NAS in community development. Oh, yes, this is it because we have we've learned how, you know, people with we call people with disability, you know, in order, not to. Us. I don't know how to call it picture Hoti words. So, yes. So I thought. Why not seeing myself as a person we finish fees did this? And I honestly I fit lights with day when I decided it, so yes, I am EMMY from the Ivory Coast and here, I have a status of a refugee. So I am a person with refugee status. And when you when did you refugee story start started in two thousand and eleven? When I ride in London, where claimed I silos, and I has been I have been. How to call it? Here's the French word. Dispersed. So this is yes. Survey just dispersed has so I have been lucky to be sent here in Glasgow. I said lucky because when I I showed my paper to have people because we were on a bus so people were going to live and blah, when I should my paper, someone's told me. You're going to people from last very nice visit. So what did you expect it to be like an hose it? What hotter. So I claim that so I expected to be believed and then I thought it will take at least one or two months, and then I would start my life again. So in London, people have been so nice, you know, because they interviewed me and bay. I don't know if they believed in me, but we seem the I've been putting in an accommodation. And you know, I had to come here. So I was spectating same scenario. And you know. And I came here. I had my interview and I was in believed. So it took me three years to get my refugee status. So. It was I came here with Nestle, so many old and so many Choy and this was my second time to get out of my country. I went to Canada for training and people were amazing. I winced to London people way. So, you know, so I was expecting the same thing. So, yes. It's that it was Annesley very hard for me because I didn't expect it, I was in believed was portrayed as someone who all stealing lies. And you know. So I lost in my in myself through the process. I am someone happy person all with lot of dreams. So being in this position way. I had to, you know, to look for proofs to, to show that I am genuine Besson in, in need of help was something hard. But again. I have learned a lots for this process. So I lost confidence. I today I don't know if I can speak English. Oh, I can speak French. You know, sometimes peop- hard times in your life makes you lose a lot of things in your life. So visit. But I was I am lucky because I was coming from Egypt's where I completed

Amy Corinne Holloway London Ivory Coast Glasgow UNESCO Scotland Ken UK Nestle Besson Annesley Canada Gordon Egypt Choy three years twenty two minutes two months