37 Burst results for "Scorsese"

Fresh update on "scorsese" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:25 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scorsese" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Social media. Thank you all for being interested in the stories that we wanted to tell. Season Seven of blackish wraps up Tuesday night on ABC. NBC, also announcing the freshman sitcom Call Your Mother, starring Keira Cedric will not be renewed. NBC announcing some lineup changes of its own cutting back on the voice and new season will run this fall. But not next winter, the first time the show will skip a cycle. Also, NBC's fall schedule has no sitcoms on it. The Hollywood reporter points out. That's the first time in a least 50 years. Robert DeNiro, recovering from a leg injury, suffered at his home alone location for the upcoming Martin Scorsese movie killers of the Flower Moon. His rep says in a statement that DeNiro heard his quadriceps muscle and will be treated by doctors in New York. And Oscar winning actress Cate Blanchett with the birthday Friday. She's 52, Jason Evans and ABC News Hollywood. I'm Jay. Frosty baby. See radios super tips from the Supernanny. If you have more than one young child living at home, you know that getting them to get along all the time can be a challenge, but not for the Supernanny. Jo Frost, she says. Your kids just need a clear picture of what's expected of them. And then for you to enforce those rules is important that they have boundaries, and that may explain to their Children exactly one..

Robert Deniro Jason Evans Cate Blanchett New York NBC Keira Cedric Martin Scorsese Deniro Tuesday Night ABC Jo Frost 52 Call Your Mother JAY Friday Hollywood First Time Oscar Next Winter Season Seven
Fresh update on "scorsese" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:21 sec | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scorsese" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Being interested in the stories that we wanted to tell season Seven of blackish wraps up Tuesday night on ABC. NBC, also announcing the freshman sitcom Call Your mother, Starting Cura. Cedric will not be renewed. NBC announcing some lineup changes of its own cutting back on the voice and new season will run this fall. But not next winter, the first time the show will skip a cycle. Also, NBC's fall schedule has no sitcoms on it. The Hollywood reporter points out. That's the first time in a least 50 years. Robert DeNiro, recovering from a leg injury, suffered at his home along location for the upcoming Martin Scorsese movie killers of the Flower Moon. His rep says in a statement that DeNiro heard his quadriceps muscle and will be treated by doctors in New York. And Oscar winning actress Cate Blanchett with the birthday Friday. She's 52, Jason Evans.

Jason Evans Robert Deniro New York Cate Blanchett NBC Martin Scorsese Deniro ABC Tuesday Night 52 Friday First Time Next Winter Oscar Hollywood Season Seven Cedric Starting Cura Call Your Mother, This Fall
Stories About Mothers, Featuring Trevor Noah

Fresh Air

01:58 min | Last week

Stories About Mothers, Featuring Trevor Noah

"Sunday is mother's day and we're going to listen back to some great stories about mothers. we begin with. trevor noah. Host of comedy central's the daily show. He south african the son of a black mother and white father. Their relationship was legal. Under apartheid which mandated separation of the races noah grew up during the apartheid and post apartheid errors. He became famous in south africa as a comic and tv personality and spent years traveling. The world doing standup. He talked terry in two thousand sixteen. So racial identity is a big part of your comedy. When you're doing stand up. Your father is white. Your mother is black. Your father is i. Think of swiss and german ancestry. Do i have that right. And your mother sosa casa. Thank you. I don't think i can do that. And i know your mother was jailed briefly. I hope in south africa. I assume four for opposing apartheid for doing some kind of dissenting action. Yes well the sensing action was being with a white person. Who was the white person your father. The s he was jailed so no no no. no white. people didn't get jailed for that. That was Why people were warned not to do it again. But then if you're a black person called fraternizing across country boundaries. Then then you'd be arrested but my mom. My mom opposed the system as a whole so. She never let that stand in her way. You know and i. I think i pick up a lot of i. I have a lot of my mom's demeanor is that she never even even when she told me the story. She wasn't an angry she just went. It's it's a stupid thing. And so i refuse to listen to. Its but she never came at it from a place of anger. If anything should defied it and she didn't she didn't give it the credibility that it was trying to create in in the world

Trevor Noah Sosa Casa South Africa Terry
The Things Smart Sellers Must do in 2021

Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

The Things Smart Sellers Must do in 2021

"Real estate podcast. Show dot com. What are the smartest sellers of the summer right now. It's spring of twenty twenty one. So what are the smartest sellers of the summer and fall doing their signing up. There are already signed up many of them. They know that time is the bast best thing you can have on your side when you're getting ready to make a really great grand opening okay. A scorsese movie does not come out two weeks. After it's made the buildup can be years the grand opening the coming soon attraction The previews the storytelling. It's all a work in progress. The same exact thing happens with every one of my smart sellers This year and in years past and more than ever there are people that are going to be looking at your property and wanting to hear the full story about it. Not just the mls details not just the four hundred sixty characters they get to read. They want to hear the real story going right back to when it was built going back to when you did the kitchen and all the details. All that kind of stuff is what people really love here. And it's just not being told saw the smart sellers. Those of you. Who are out there. Were getting ready to make a move in the next game in the next season or two. Now's the time to get started. Now is the time to sign on you go to home dot real estate podcast. Show dot com. You find out of course where you stand right now and you'll get an idea of course of where you are

MLS
Sharon Stone Discusses Her Autobiography in Candid Interview

BBC World Service

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Sharon Stone Discusses Her Autobiography in Candid Interview

"It's nearly 30 years since Sharon Stone played Catherine Tramell in the film Basic Instinct. It was a role she craved, but only managed to get after 12. Other actresses turned it down. It became a huge box of his hit on that infamous uncross ng and crossing of the legs scene remains one of the most controversial and talked about moments in film history. The movies that followed include an Oscar nomination for her role in Scorsese's casino alongside Robert DeNiro. More recently, the Laundromat with Meryl Streep on on the small screen. There was last year standout performance in the Netflix series, Ratchet. At the height of her career in 2001, having had several miscarriages on day after adopting her first child, Sharon Stone, suffered a stroke and almost died. She's now written her autobiography, the Beauty of Living twice in it. She talks about the fact that some people saw her as a very strong, difficult woman and how upsetting that's peanut times as she told the BBC's Emma Barnet. We think what it really is, is that I don't have the capacity to lie, and I think that people find that quite off putting And when I tell the truth that can seem quite offensive or the favorite Hollywood word difficulty. I do feel that in business. We're often put in positions that we didn't ever see ourselves being put in. And they're often crisis moments where we have to reconsider. I'm in this position. Now. What am I going to do with regards to the me to movement? Now are a couple of years on from that deep do you actually think Because the other thing you talk about being the only woman on set, you know men were doing your hair. Men were doing your makeup. Do you think it has got any better? Yes, because legally, they're just things that cannot be explained away anymore. You just can't say why can't she have a female dresser?

Catherine Tramell Sharon Stone Robert Deniro Emma Barnet Scorsese Meryl Streep Oscar Netflix Stroke BBC Hollywood
Jamie Foxx to play Mike Tyson in boxer's take on his life

Tony Katz and the Morning News

00:18 sec | Last month

Jamie Foxx to play Mike Tyson in boxer's take on his life

"Scorsese will be the Executive producer. The serious we'll take a look at the boxer Mike Tyson's life as a whole. I'm John Herrick on the level on the going on w Why. D c dot com Virginia William Hill, America's number one sports book is now here Way have a

Scorsese John Herrick Mike Tyson William Hill Virginia America
Jamie Foxx To Play Mike Tyson in Boxer's Take on His Life

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Jamie Foxx To Play Mike Tyson in Boxer's Take on His Life

"Mike Tyson versus Mike Tyson it's a battle that will take place on TV but not in the way you think recently Hulu announced it was making a mini series about Tyson's life but the ex heavyweight boxing champ was not involved in it now Tyson is throwing a haymaker of his own he says he is producing a limited series on its own life and he has a heavy weight talent Jamie Foxx attached to it fox will star as Tyson and will work along with filmmaker Martin Scorsese as a producer no word on when either project will make it to air or what outlet it will be on when it does I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Mike Tyson Tyson Hulu Boxing Jamie Foxx Martin Scorsese FOX Oscar Gabriel
Episode 56: Best/Worst Remakes and Jamie Sings! - Drive Of THe Week

F That Noise

03:07 min | 3 months ago

Episode 56: Best/Worst Remakes and Jamie Sings! - Drive Of THe Week

"We start every episode with drive of the week if you don't know what a drive is dr a line from a movie or a tv show said with exceptional velocity and volume and this segment belongs to jamie klein. All right ladies. Gentlemen and fucking michael g lombardo. The nineteen ninety five classic. Martin scorsese masterpiece casino. Oh casinos starred the great robert deniro. Joe patchy sharon stone don rickles and kevin us and so we seen. I was going for casino. This is a good drive by sharon stone. Whose nominated academy award for. The film was quite good and this is a good drive that she says to her husband played by robert deniro keith. Takeaway shoulder beaver out of your hair. She calms down. I will let it roll down. I will let her house for five minutes if you gentlemen. Were escorted her out if she happens to not want to leave. Because i don't like that's fine. She gets middling now so good of a dry because she says right to lean so good. Yeah try so much impact at her career win right down the toilet afterwards. Once he did that she's in film hall of fame assche to but if you look what more does she want. But if that i agree with the rest of that i agree all those nominations. Forget it drive of the week. I agree i agree but like if you listen closely now she says fine with a soft s and then she digs in for the fuck. You fine fine. She worked with their accent code. Find really be mad at someone to drive. Something i actually. I don't know if you do. Okay that's fair. Well pete you're man of principle and i applaud you for to digging your heels standard around mmediately buckled on that. That was the driver of the week brought to you by trash. Men media for the latest blu ray. Dvd commentary and reviews had a trash man media dot com and also on facebook and twitter. I just wanna add. Also we just got some new reviews by tyler stephenson just recently posted yours truly and we also have one from travis north. That just got posed a lot of good reviews. Check it out. Also don't forget to check out meet up deserve to step back latest news and absolutely noble shit. Wait i might. Mike was

Jamie Klein Michael G Lombardo Robert Deniro Joe Patchy Sharon Robert Deniro Keith Don Rickles Martin Scorsese Sharon Stone Academy Award Kevin Tyler Stephenson Travis North Facebook Twitter Mike
Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

Morning Edition

07:02 min | 3 months ago

Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

"The 19 sixties, Fred Hampton was chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party. He was a rising leader, organizing disparate multi racial groups in Chicago. Until police shot and killed him and another Black Panther member in an early morning raid. There's a new movie about Fred Hampton out this week, it is called Judas and the Black Messiah. It's not a question of ball. It's a non violence is a question of resistance to fascism or non existence within fascism Film got rave reviews after its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival last week. It's the second feature from director Shaka King who, until this project came along, was on the verge of giving up making feature films altogether. MPR's Andrew Lyne bonked takes it from here. Yes, Judas and the Black Messiah is about Fred Hampton and how he led the Black Panthers in Chicago. But it's also about William O'Neill, the man who infiltrated the Black Panthers in spied on Hampton on behalf of the FBI. Shaka King told me that the Lucas Brothers who co wrote the story, sold the idea to him like this. Their pitch that they laid out was we want to make a movie about Fred Hampton and William O'Neal. That's kind of like the departed the 2006 Martin Scorsese movie Inside the World of Cointelpro, or Counterintelligence program, the 19 sixties project where the FBI infiltrated and disrupted groups like the Black Panthers, and I was like I see it. I'm done. I'm in Judas is a tight, intense movie. Yes, like the departed and other Scorsese type crime movies. It's a long way, though, from King's first feature film newly weeds from 2013. So what you got here? Newly weeds tells the story of a young couple in Brooklyn who smoke a lot of weed where Judas is loud and fast. Really? Weeds is quiet and tender. I'm done. I'm done online. Won't want Wanna hang out. We hang up. Yeah. How are we supposed to go to the Galapagos? If you mind the bag every two minutes. It hits similar beats as movies by other indie darling directors like Joe Swanberg or the Duplass Brothers. The film Independent Spirit Awards even gave King the Someone to watch award after it came out, which came with a $25,000 grant. Not bad for someone fresh out of N Y. U film school. But after that initial fanfare, I was so depressed after making newly weeds and my expectations for the release just not coming to fruition. The movie didn't get much attention outside the festival circuit from agents and distributors, largely because it was a movie with black actors who no one knew on at that time that was deemed worthless. The film's release in 2013 wasn't that long ago, but it was just before what a friend of Kings jokingly dubbed. The Black Excellence Industrial Complex. You're Selma's and Moon Lights and Black Panthers when movie studios realized they could make a lot of money by releasing films by and starring black people. Nearly weeds. Loss of momentum burnt king out on the idea of making another feature film, But he did have an idea for a short rolling around in his head. It was kind of silly kind of outrageous, sweetheart. Lips. Excuse me, miss. It's called Moon Yang's after the Italian slur for black people want heard on the streets of Brooklyn in it, King and two others play these three black guys who talk like they're in the mom movies. King has such a fondness for It was somewhat inspired by King's experience growing up in a mostly black part of Brooklyn, but going to high school in South Brooklyn, where everyone the Irish Americans, Greek Americans, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, all talks like the Italian American kids, and those kids were Hilarious. They were profane. They were quick witted, and we were not friends put like I could appreciate their sense of humor. The movie is a concise examination of race, gender gentrification. As King's character gets into an argument with his sister over a MetroCard, you did not have a dime. Put 1000 until the white guy comes by and says hi to the sister. Hi. How you doing? How are you? You guys just don't know what both outta here. Oh, Polluted the movie is fun and poignant, and the process reminded King how much he loved making movies. That movie saved me. You saved me. I didn't see that or know that about Shaka. But I could understand, and I could see how that could happen. Charles de King, no relation to director Shocking is the CEO and founder of Macro which since its founding in 2015 has produced movies and TV shows featuring non white people, including Judas and the Black Messiah. It was before the oscarssowhite moment. Of 2015. There's a lot that's happened since then. There is much more of an openness and I think an understanding of the business opportunity there. Which brings us to King today, making a movie about an anti capitalist black radical at a very capitalist Hollywood studio without watering down the politics. The deal is to respect the authenticity. Fred Hampton Jr is the current chairman of the Black Panther Party, Cubs and son of Fred Hampton. He says he and the other Panthers had their guards up when they were approached about this film. The Panthers have long been subjected to propaganda campaigns and misrepresentations. But he says King and the rest of the cast and crew definitely navigated the crossroads between their creative goals and the Panthers. Political ones. Well enough, anyway. Revolutionaries never satisfied. You know, I wish there was more political cartoon. We could've pushed. In a certain point, However, I'll put the people's need before before my needs my wants and desires. For instance, the relationship between Fred Hampton and his partner, Deborah Johnson, was a tricky thing to get right. The poet.

Fred Hampton Shaka King Black Panthers Illinois Black Panther Party Andrew Lyne William O'neill Lucas Brothers King William O'neal FBI Joe Swanberg Duplass Brothers Film Independent Spirit Awards Brooklyn Chicago Black Excellence Industrial Co Sundance Film Festival Moon Yang Martin Scorsese
Use Books (And The Internet) As A Door, Not A Mirror

Trent365

02:16 min | 3 months ago

Use Books (And The Internet) As A Door, Not A Mirror

"Well i just finished a number. Netflix series lockdown is certainly helped me. Take care of my to do list on netflix. If nothing else and this time it was the series. Pretend it's a city which is a short interview series. Between martin scorsese director. And fran liebowitz the american author and humorist and fran is a lover of books and in this series. She talks about her love of book several times but one of the lines that really grabbed me was way. She said that a book should really be a door into a new world. And that's the beauty of reading books particularly when you're young it's a chance for you to escape the world. You're in a chance for you to go into another fantasy world or at least to learn about another different world. And i guess the inference in a lot of what she was saying was that. That's what's missing today because we're not reading books like we should or as like we used to and i think it's an interesting comparison to the internet because these days in the internet. We're all stuck into this world of social media which oftentimes thanks to the algorithms of course is really a mirror. It's a reflection of what we are interested in what we like and what we do. It doesn't necessarily show us new things over time. And that's the serendipity that fran talks about in this series as well of walking into a bookstore and just discovering a book opening it up using that as the door into this new world. Learning something that you did not know so. I think the comparison really is apt in today's world. And i think we should be using books as we should the internet and social media and everything else that lives on the internet as a door not just as a mirror that reflects who we are and what we are and it's something you may recall. He's got a very good memory. I spoke about way back in episode fifty to this show where i spoke about the need for businesses in general to look out the window. Not look in the mirror with her that we should reflect. We should take a good look at ourselves in the mirror but that is only gonna show what we already know will show us the image of what we already have but if you look out the window and have a look at what's going on around you you can actually learn a lot more. And it's basically the same point as frame was saying in this series. It's on netflix. Check it out. Pretend it's the city pretty funny actually or

Netflix Fran Liebowitz Fran Martin Scorsese
Show 7a  "Magic of Hollywood" Redux with Larry Wilson - burst 02

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:34 min | 4 months ago

Show 7a "Magic of Hollywood" Redux with Larry Wilson - burst 02

"Film we do a we do a cut away and walks through the door and then we cut to the other side of them come in well it doesn't mean the doorways the same location right right. It's exactly like magic and it's no surprise that serves interesting. Great filmmakers like orson welles huge magic fan interest but it does make sense. What you're saying is i mean. There's the term movie. Magic for a reason will the first magicians Starting up the first. Magicians but the first filmmakers george me as frenchman filmmaker in paris. He was a stage magician. I saw a tv special about him. didn't do the movie man in the moon. Yes yeah and that was all tricks. Well we'll scorsese's films yes scorsese's film. Hugo is about george malays and his origins and he realized it's typical of magicians. He just saw this film medium as a way to do his magic act. Better you know you can do all these tricks. You could shoot him walking onstage. Then stop the camera. Move someone off. Start the camera and they would appear to disappear in the film right exactly so all these. There's a huge huge history film of affects

Orson Welles Scorsese George Paris Hugo
Coronavirus: Hollywood Filmmakers Issue Warning Theaters Are Facing Extinction

News, Traffic and Weather

00:36 sec | 7 months ago

Coronavirus: Hollywood Filmmakers Issue Warning Theaters Are Facing Extinction

"This week. Some of Hollywood's biggest names names joining joining forces forces to to warn warn Congress Congress that that movie movie theatres theatres are are facing facing extinction. extinction. Jason Jason Nathan, Nathan, with with a a story story like like a a plot plot out out of of the the Avengers. Avengers. Dozens Dozens of of Hollywood Hollywood heavyweights heavyweights joining joining forces forces to save movie theaters. Clint Eastwood, Jordan Peele, Christopher Nolan, Lee Daniels, Martin Scorsese, Greta Gerwig andMe or sending a letter to the leaders of the Senate and the House, asking them to work together on cinema stimulus cinemas. Support millions of jobs, the letter states. But now we fear for their future, and it warns that the country can't afford to lose the social, economic and cultural value Theaters provide multiplexes have been mostly empty since the start of the pandemic.

Jason Jason Nathan Congress Congress Hollywood Clint Eastwood Jordan Peele Greta Gerwig Martin Scorsese Lee Daniels Christopher Nolan Senate
Oscars set inclusion standards for Best Picture nominees

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:23 min | 8 months ago

Oscars set inclusion standards for Best Picture nominees

"In other news that's rocking La after years of Hashtag Oscarssowhite. The Motion Picture Academy has announced a major rule change to hopefully make the Oscars. Hashtag. So right, the Oscars are making inclusion requirement for best picture consideration starting at twenty, twenty four, those movies must meet diversity requirements in two out of four production categories widening opportunities for underrepresented groups. They include women, minorities, and people with cognitive or physical disabilities promoters of the initiative say the changes will better reflect the diversity of the movie going audience. So this is encompassing the totality of the people that actually work on film. All Shift From now on movies can only be nominated for best picture if they meet certain diversity thresholds wherever Martin Scorsese is right now he is shitting himself. He's probably calling dicaprio begging him to make a plan come on your show. You can't play black you can do anything I know you can personally. I think this opens a bunch of opportunities I. Hope that long running franchises will just switch up the races of people and never address it. Like how dope would be in the next Batman Movie? He's just Jamaican I beat about. What? Did you. See. For. What you want to see if what give him dude my you know what was funny man is soon as the story came out so many people read the headline and they just started panicking bitching online people like this is censorship you can't force filmmakers to create whatever you want I mean, how can you make a period piece with diversity? There were no black people but. You actually read the story before chiming in people would have realised that in fact, these new standards which only take effect in two thousand, twenty four I'm not that strict. For instance, a movie qualifies if it has just one lead role from an underrepresented group and thirty percents of the crew from an underrepresented group as well. Right? Even if it has just thirty percent diversity in the Marketing Department or an internship program for an underrepresented group and by the way. They define underrepresented groups as Black Asian Hispanic Indigenous People, women, the disabled community or members of the Lgbtq community. So in other words, it's super easy to meet this criteria.

Black Asian Hispanic Indigenou Martin Scorsese Motion Picture Academy LA Dicaprio Marketing Department
Avatar: The Last Airbender Creators Depart Netflix's Live-Action Series

/Film Daily

03:38 min | 9 months ago

Avatar: The Last Airbender Creators Depart Netflix's Live-Action Series

"Okay, let's start off with A bit of news that I'm sure comes to some disappointment our own ht. What is going on with Avatar the last air bender they were GonNa make a live action TV series for net flicks. What is the update? The latest update is a real bummer for avatars last Air Bender Fans Michael Dante Di Martino and Brian Connie ebsco who created the original acclaimed nickelodeon. Animated Series have parted ways with net flicks over the creative direction of live action remake series. De Martino Post announced in a post on the website titled An Open Letter to Avatar last air bender fans saying that they couldn't control the creative direction of the series and decided to just exit the project altogether and he he had some pretty not I wouldn't say harsh but not. Veiled for in terms of thinly-veiled In like knots unhappiness with Netflix production So he said at one point The project, which is still ongoing has the potential to be good. But what can be certain about is that whatever version ends up on screen, it will not be what Brian and I had envisioned or to make. So this is a massive bummer for Avatar. The last Air Bend Fans because De Martino. Goes involvement in the first place was kind of the reason that There was somewhat cautious excitement for this because these the creators at donors in executive producers for the new Netflix series and they promised or shared rather that they would be deliberate. Choice to a cast as. A people of Color and ethnically accurate to the depictions in leverage animated series and the. The memory of the last live action attempt. Ed Bender is still strong in fans mines, and we don't want a repeat of that. So now that contracts go rhino are gone, there's a lot of fear that the the. Disaster will be. Repeated. Yeah, we shouldn't insinuate that this disagreement it's probably over like the the the racist of casting or anything could be like story or character that we don't even know what the disagreements are over. This is a little surprising to me though because my conversations with filmmakers on and off the record has been that like Netflix's is pretty hands off with stuff. So I'm actually very surprised that big Conflict here I'm curious as a as a fan of Avatar the last air bender now that the creators are known no longer involved in this, would you still be excited to watch live action series not at all? My cautious excitement from before. Has now turned to a sort of read. which not to say that there can you know the situation can't come out the better I'm sure that there are some great. Writers and creators out there who could have an affection for Avatar last bender could. Steer this in the right direction, but it just feels like. Martino and Connie lasko are such a major part of Avatar less air bender and its success in why such great perfect animated show that they're not being involved in stepping way in a in this situation where it seems that they clash with the Netflix's executives in some way can't really know what? I sure what it just doesn't dumb. Bode well for the production at large.

Michael Dante Di Martino Animated Series Brian Connie Netflix Ed Bender De Martino Connie Lasko Executive Nickelodeon
Netflix is Hollywood

Land of the Giants

05:03 min | 10 months ago

Netflix is Hollywood

"Where are we? We are in Los Angeles. We're about to turn onto sunset. Boulevard Hollywood maybe in Hollywood. Okay, so we're. We're approaching. Hollywood hills. Really Tall Palm Trees. So should we explain why we're? We're driving through sunset radio. There's a bunch of billboards here, right? That's what we're. Getting at. Less Ronnie our producers, etc piled, a newborn, took a drive down Hollywood's main drag. It's a traffic jam packed with billboards promoting new TV shows and movies. I've been covering the business of media for a long time, so I served as tour guide for this trip, but Ronnie is a data reporter who mainly writes about tech companies. She doesn't typically pay a lot of attention to what's going on in Hollywood. Here, we have a a the crown net flicks up on the right. Have you watched any of the crown yet? I have not. On the left we have marriage story billboard. This is a Scarlett Johansson. I don't think I want to watch that. You may not be the right person for streaming roddy in a row. We got the Irishman. That's Scorsese's film and then DOLEMITE is my name. Reading that right. Alfie, these are both movies. They're both movies. You can see on Netflix Sega. Any of these this is this is a worthwhile trip for learning. What's on Netflix? You could just actually go to your browser. Are these like already outer. These are like I don't know. Someone like hermetically sealed raising. A drive down, sunset isn't just a chance for Ronnie to see what's coming on. TV, it's a way to watch Hollywood talking to itself, these billboards are messages which are very much directed at Hollywood except now. netflix's doing most of the talking. Stranger things net flix. The politician. Net flicks, one billboard tuna flexible work three Netflix. Netflix well years ago when Netflix was first getting into its own programming. Executive there told me that because they were tech company. They didn't have to do things that traditional media companies do like renting billboards, so it could show big-name talented netflix serious about Hollywood. That guy turns out was wrong. Netflix has decided loves billboards so much that it went out and bought some for itself, and now the company owns many of the signs on the Strip. This, you still look like before streaming. That's one of the main ideas we keep running across as we're working on the series, it's almost impossible to imagine what the world like before Netflix. Even though that time was just a few years ago. If you didn't know any better, you'd think. Netflix's has always been a huge part of Hollywood. Syphilis can be fatal to your baby free. Check that out not flick show. UNCLEAR UNCLEAR? Welcome the land of the giants. The NETFLIX's effect. I'm Peter Coffee. Today. We're talking about how NETFLIX's. Would outsider that no one took seriously took over the town and change the lives of the people in it. Are the CO founder and CEO of Net flicks. I'm going to conduct this interview netflix style. I'M GONNA. Have like five questions you're GonNa love and five thousand. You've never heard. Today. It's given it. NETFLIX's remade. The media. World to companies becomes so omnipresent in our lives that CEO Reed. Hastings even counts as a sort of celebrity. He's a big enough deal for a guest spot Stephen Colbert. You're like one of the big one of those big new media disruptors. Why did the entertainment industry need to be disrupted? Just for the fun of it. On this happened really quickly. We talked to Kim Masters veteran show business journalist at the Hollywood reporter who said that a decade ago Netflix's was an afterthought for big media companies newcomers from Silicon Valley or anywhere else did not strike fear in the hearts of moguls. There's a thing that happens in Hollywood. Which is the outsiders come in, and they think boy. There's a lot of stupid rules in Hollywood and people sure do dumb stuff, but we're going to be much smarter than these idiots, and then they get kilt. It turns out that Netflix was the exception to the rule. It didn't get killed at one. And NETFLIX's did it with Hollywood's help. You can trace all this back to two thousand eight, which is when Netflix's really broken into streaming by getting his hands on a bunch of blockbuster movies for a bargain, Ben, price, it had made a deal with stars premium cable channel. Let netflix's stream always rate movies from Sony and Disney so stars had created the service called Vong which nobody listening to this podcast is GonNa Remember, but there was a service before Netflix's. That was streaming. Streaming movies called. Longo Van Gogh was losing seventy million dollars a year. Rich Greenfield is an analyst with light shed partners. He's been following digital media closely for years, and in walks, Reed Hastings in Ted Sandoz and says hey will take that streaming content. You could sub-licensed to us and we'll pay you. Tens of millions of dollars Netflix's use it as the base to build their streaming service, versus what was historically just a DVD service. And the rest is they say is history.

Netflix Hollywood Ronnie Reed Hastings Los Angeles Scarlett Johansson Reporter CEO Longo Van Gogh Stephen Colbert Peter Coffee Scorsese Roddy Alfie Rich Greenfield
Truth vs Hollywood

Filmspotting

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Truth vs Hollywood

"Welcome to truth versus Hollywood I'm David, Chen and A. Truth versus Hollywood is look at films that are based on a true story, but we don't just talk about the film. We also talk about that true story. On this podcast will touch on what really happened. How that differs from the film and why and we're not just talking, heads will hear about the true story through interviews from experts, witnesses and people who were involved in it. It's both the real facts and the real facts are l. fix. What do you think that Joanna I loved it today Ridge? Today! We're talking about Martin. Scorsese's classic film Goodfellas Goodfellas is based on the book Wiseguy. Nicholas Pathology which, in turn is based on life of Mobster Henry Hill Hill was actually alive when the film came out and was very pleased with his film based on him, and as we'll talk about later, it definitely had an effect on his life. Pathology worked with Scorsese to write the screenplay and the film was. was a complete. It nominated for six Academy Awards and won one Joe Pesci for supporting actor. It's considered one of the best gangster movies of all times. If I put it on their list of one hundred years, one hundred movies and the Library of Congress decided that it was culturally important and added it to its preservation archives all right well. Let's get to the movie itself. It stars Ray Liotta. Hill Robert Deniro as Jimmy, the Gent Conway, who's based on Jimmy the Gent? Burke Joe Pesci as Tommy devito based on Tommy desimone Paul Sorvino Paul cicero based on Paul Vario and Lorraine Bracco as Henry's wife Karen Hill. Many real life figures at this movie was based off of an apparently Henry Hill ended up getting paid five hundred eighty thousand dollars because of the use of historian, this movie, which is a lot of money to pay to a mobster who has done very horrible things you know in watching this movie again. John Robinson one of the things that. I kind of realized you know or reflected on is the fact that we've been lost you decades seen so many movies about bad men, doing bad things, and that this movie kind of one of the prototypical examples of how they can be glorified an elevated in this. Movie makes that lifestyle look really glamorous while at the same time depicting some of the negative consequence lifestyle, but at the same time it does rubbed me the wrong way that like the people who are involved often are rewarded. We also saw this Martin. Scorsese's Will Wall Street as well. Similar dynamic, there so I'm kind of curious like as you're reflecting on your overall experience of watching the movie, and now that we know little bit more about what happened with the real life characters, and we're GONNA. Talk about it during the courses podcast like. How did it strike you that? This is based off of Real Person I. Think Scar says he couldn't have picked a better release. Go subject to to glum onto here than Henry Hill because though he is gangster and he's fully involved in this gangster life, he is a the likability of this character, which is really what's Cortesi was going for I've seen interviews. We talked about the nineteen thirty two scarface, which was the first time he ever saw. Gangsters depicted as really likable. When you Henry Hill. And he does terrible things, but he's a gangster who is a little squeamish. We see this the film and it's corroborated by true story of his life. He was violent crimes, but he wasn't a a mass murderer and You know the the charisma of him. I think is really important. He wasn't one of the most vicious people in this story. And so I think you're making good point that like. If you're GONNA choose an entry way into this world. Henry Hill is probably the ideal candidate in this case so. Well, the film opens with three men driving in a car, having a seemingly normal evening. It's then revealed that there is a captive in the trunk and than shortly after him, we mmediately get Henry's voiceover with the iconic line as far back as I can remember I always wanted to be a gangster. It's one of the most. Openings and Awesome History Joanna Robinson after nearly three decades. How effective did you find this opening? Well, it's funny. I did not see I was eight years old when fellows came out, or maybe nine so I did not see it in theaters and I didn't see it until later in life and but by then it already seats into the culture because it was so iconic. You know there's. Maniacs good feathers, pigeon parody, and like all sorts of stuff, so I'm going to wear of the beats of it, even though the first exposure to goodfellas was. Is what you're saying. Thousand percent absolutely. But you know so by the time I had seen it. I had also seen so many things that had imitated it, and this is true of like so many of our great films like by the time you get around to watching it. Maybe you seen a bunch of people. Knock it off and so you're like well. How groundbreaking? Is this

Karen Hill Henry Hill Hill Scorsese Joe Pesci John Robinson Goodfellas Goodfellas Henry Nicholas Pathology Martin Joanna I Ray Liotta Hollywood Library Of Congress Academy Awards Tommy Desimone Paul Sorvino Pa Robert Deniro Joanna Robinson A. Truth Jimmy Paul Vario
Apple and Paramount to make a deal for Martin Scorseses next movie

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Apple and Paramount to make a deal for Martin Scorseses next movie

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Melanie and Matt. The streaming wars as you know as many people who are listeners know are underway. Hbo Max Coming out onto the field of play this week. A lot of people finding it a little including me a little tricky to figure out how to get that even though as a spectrum customer I should be able to access it but it doesn't show up on my TV. Because I have Roku so it's some people can't find it. Some people like it but we are seeing apple seeming to up its game with some big high profile deals. They are spending money. It's a little reminiscent in some ways of the Netflix strategy. Where we seen them angling for high profile expensive awards movies awards prestige movies apple is now throwing. Its hat into that ring. You know backed by the might the economic might that wealth of Apple. Yeah and this is a big project. Martin Scorsese Film. Sources are saying it's between one seventy five two hundred million dollars depending on who you believe probably will go much higher than that given scores as he's track record. It's got Leonardo DiCaprio. It's called killers of the flower moon. And this is a really really interesting play for Apple. Because you saw Netflix's get a lot of attention for the Irishman last year. Whether it was good or bad you can debate that. But it got them into the Oscar conversation in a meaningful way. They didn't walk away with best picture but they were in the game and apple will likely be in the awards game when this movie eventually comes out. What's interesting here? Is the deal structure. You've done some reporting on that because it was originally paramount. Paramount got cold feet and it ended up at apple after a bidding war. After you know it was shopped around town and this is essentially. What I think is going to happen with a lot of movies. Going forward where they get developed at the studios than the price inches up inches up inches up studios where once upon a time they might have taken a risk on a big movie from a big director are now going to get cold. Feet and income streamers just clarify something about that. Paramount is not out of this game. Scorsese has his deal there and they did release them to shop this around but they own the property the underlying novel and this is a very dark period piece set in Oklahoma in the nineteen twenties. Leo DiCaprio originally was supposed to play a good guy. Paramount was really interested in that version. Then he changed it so that he was playing a kind of a villain character and I am told that paramount felt this is now a less commercial movie with the same budget which point they did say go ahead and shop at around and there was a really long pause and apple did step up but it is still a question of a deal with paramount because it is expected that paramount will at least get some sort of a percentage at pop probably released the film in theaters. Which is what. Scorsese did not get with the Irishman with net flicks so having explained all that. Let me say I would pay money? Actually to see tensor Endo's at Netflix's sit down and explain to me. The cost benefit analysis of having spent which I think was certainly over two hundred billion dollars on the Irishman. Yes they got nominated no they. Didn't you know we? They have all the data. How many people sat through it. Did anybody subscribed because of it. It's a black box for people like us but this is this is something that apple is now saying. We're in it. We're in it in a way that will make Scorsese happy with theatrical release and ironically make paramount happy because paramount will have its name on this movie and we'll probably get a good chunk of some kind of a piece of whatever box office it generates win it can get made because we're all stuck now waiting for protocols and an insurance policies to make filming possible so we will see. I will note. This isn't the only movie they bought. They bought Tom. Hanks's movie Greyhound from Sony for supposedly around seventy million. That movie was done studios will sell as you suggest Matt with movies. That you to bring in cash right now I would say many cases. It is not a great vote of confidence. When you see these deals made in the movie itself but it will be high profile. It is Tom Hanks and for Apple. They obviously decided it was worth

Apple Martin Scorsese Netflix Leonardo Dicaprio Tom Hanks Matt Kim Masters Melanie Hollywood Oscar Oklahoma Director Tensor Endo Sony
Martin Scorsese And Leonard DiCaprio's Next Movie Is Going To Streaming

The KFBK Morning News

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Martin Scorsese And Leonard DiCaprio's Next Movie Is Going To Streaming

"Apple is going to have a new movie directed by Martin Scorsese starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert deniro these are big names yeah the name of the film killers of the flower moon okay yeah so it's apple's biggest a foray into the film industry all of the streaming services are just hammering the theaters and the big movie companies now they are they're going after the big stars the big directors good screenplays yeah can you imagine the checks they had to cut to get those three and they can cut on apple there's a lot of air masses yeah like in one day they make

Apple Martin Scorsese Leonardo Dicaprio Robert Deniro
Apple To Team With Paramount On Scorsese-DiCaprio-De Niro Drama 'Killers Of The Flower Moon'

Mac OS Ken

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Apple To Team With Paramount On Scorsese-DiCaprio-De Niro Drama 'Killers Of The Flower Moon'

"Of an Irishman sized GATT for Apple. Tv PLUS DEADLINE. Says it's heard that apple has won the bidding war killers of the flower moon. The film adaptation of the book set to be directed by Martin. Scorsese starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert Deniro according to deadline the deal which calls for Apple. The finance and become creative studio gives the movie a hybrid situation and the best of both worlds. The film will get a wide theatrical release through paramount before it becomes the biggest film title so far on Apple's streaming service the actual release I dig the optimism.

Apple Leonardo Dicaprio Robert Deniro Scorsese Martin
Kingpins Daily: Henry Hill

Kingpins

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Kingpins Daily: Henry Hill

"Today's quote is from Mafia so Henry Hill an associates at the Lucchese crime family as many Italian Mafia. Al FISA COOLED. That is. He wasn't associate until his arrest in nineteen eighty off to wish he turned. Fbi informant eventually. He sold his life story to Simon and Schuster in the book. He'll explain the appeal of joining the mob at the age of twelve. My ambition was to become a gangsta. Be a wise guy to me. Being a wise guy was better than being president of the United States to be a wise guy was to own the World Hill. Wasn't the only little boy to see. The attraction of the Mafia lifestyle for decades in the twentieth century. Italian communities like Hills Brooklyn neighborhood. Brownsville showed children what joining one of the crime families could do for you. There was the wealth. The Glamour of the guns. The secrets and the rituals. The respect and fear of the community generally speaking the power joining the Mafia as hill put it was to own the world. Show the president of the United States might own the world too but he owned it from somewhere far away somewhere with alien rules kid from an immigrant family didn't know and thus was unlikely to aspire to in contrast mob guys are wiseguys as hill and his pals called them stuck around the neighborhood in their sleep cars and fancy suits. They spoke a language. The kids could understand a language drawn out of old world conceptions of honor and violence a language memorialized in storybooks in spoken around the dinner table by Sicilian. Grandpas and fact wise guys with such an integral respected part of life in many Italian American communities that they will also called goodfellas hence the name of the Iconic Award Winning Nineteen Ninety Scorsese Film. A film that was based on Henry. Hill's life story. The film like hills quote displays. Just how alluring. The life of King Pin can be despite the violence and despite the possible consequences which Henry Hill experienced in full as a young protegee of the Lucozzi organization in the early nineteen sixties. He was involved with arson gambling. Schemes truck hijacking loansharking assault and drug dealing in the early nineteen seventy S. He served four years in prison for extortion but once he got out he was back on the streets or rather at the airport. One of his most notorious crimes was the one thousand nine hundred seventy eight Lufthansa heist he and several other. Lucchese associates rubbed a cargo terminal at New York's JFK. Airport came away with five million dollars in cash and nearly one million dollars in jewels. It was one of the most lucrative cash robberies ever occur in the United States and hill and his cronies got away with it. Only a small fraction of the lutes was ever recovered and the only person convicted for the crime was an airport worker. Who abetted the thieves but hill didn't escape the law for long two years later in nineteen eighty? He was arrested on drug trafficking charges by turning informant for the FBI hill was able to weasel his way out of both harsh legal punishments and death on the streets at the hands of Lucozzi enemies after a stint in witness protection. He published multiple books about his life. And did the talk show circuit the glamorous life was still his for the taking but even getting out to the mob didn't erase the violence from hills life in two thousand three his son and daughter. Greg and Gina Hill published a joint memoir about their mafia childhood. It clarified the ways in which hills violence and drug use tore his family. Apart as Gina explained in an interview on Fox News on my seventeenth birthday. He beat me with an inch of my life and then he took a butcher knife to a picture of me. Henry Hill may not have served out the jail sentence. His crimes deserved but he and his family paid the price for his glamorous life of Mafia law the little boy in Brownsville Brooklyn got what he asked for but not perhaps what he wanted.

Henry Hill United States Gina Hill FBI President Trump Brooklyn Fisa Lufthansa AL Brownsville Fox News Schuster Greg Arson Simon King Pin New York Assault
"scorsese" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"scorsese" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Have conversations with that that deal with the interesting subjects so to speak and open your mind you can learn from them see. Didn't want them to know about your pass. Not necessarily sometimes tell stories and things like that kind of interesting place. I came from in in a sense I was still part of it and only learned that by the time raging bull. Really you know it was time to we thought could really change and said reinvent myself self am and become the director you know An effect it did but not really not really so ultimately after a New York New York I just sort of caved in and said okay. Look this is who you are. This is what you do These themes that you've been dealing with New York New York and Paul schrader scripted taxi actually driver analysis and Libya All of that's fine and good and that's something that might sustain you and had a universal interest but the problem is you can't you can't you just can't deny or pretend it didn't exist in terms of the world you came from the that forms you know And then included everything. Because don't forget the sixties were still It had the counterculture like a lot of the hippies. Oh can I just stop you there for a second I you can tell me if this is true. I read that when you went to woodstock. You're actually wearing cufflinks. That's right tell me more. I lost one of them as a shame. Yeah I know it wasn't a great one but I lost Austin. I had a friend cups. I have French cuffs on my shirt and then I started wearing jeans after that by the way radical. Yeah no I know I read riddick pushed it there a suit to woodstock well. It wasn't a pseudo was you know I I dressed differently from these. The all looking me very strangely and I would dress very differently and I still do. So you know I went back to what I in the seventies all change of course we were wearing more landers things but and it was very enjoyable to do that and But in any event no. What's I just wasn't prepared for a look? I'm not prepared for country for the country okay. I'm not a country person. Oh Yeah especially with. Yeah just I'm not however I did wear cowboy boots frye boots for talk. If if you're just joining us. My guest is. Martin Scorsese his new film. The Irishman is nominated for ten Oscars. We'll talk more after we take a short break. This is fresh air this message comes from. NPR sponsor Tele Doc. Have you ever needed a doctor late at night or while traveling Tele Doc offers twenty four seven access to board certified certified doctors for nonemergency conditions like a sinus infection allergies flu rashes. And more telus board certified doctors can diagnose treat and we're authorized prescribe medications to be filled at the pharmacy of your choice. Download the APP today or visit Tele Doc dot com slash fresh air teachers and students. You wanted to step boring book report and make podcasts instead. NPR student podcast. Challenge is here with a new podcast to give you all the tips and tricks to making an amazing podcast of your own and share with your friends. My guest is Martin Square says his latest film the Irishman Stars Robert De Niro Al Pacino and Joe. Patchy it's nominated for ten Oscars and it's available title to watch on Netflix. Enersen select theaters. So I just want to read a little bit of what your schedule was. Like in the seventy th. This is a list of years and films for you boxcar car. birther nineteen seventy. Two Main Street seventy-three. Alice doesn't live here anymore. Seventy four taxi drivers seventy six New York New York seventy seven the last wall seventy Wendy eight raging bull nineteen eighty king of comedy nineteen eighty-two. I'm just thinking your schedule. A must have been insane. That must have been like a whole lot of stress. I am yeah just collapsed and out of that came raging bull you collapsed. You collapsed and then you made raging bull. Yeah John Collapse like collapse with the you know the same old story You know having a pet to tell you withers drugs or not. You want to get into drugs but the issue is with the failure of New York New York or considered failure so to speak. I I like that film of La. Yeah exactly at that. Time was considered a terrible flop. They be considered that people. Now look at it and say what is very very different. Okay but with that failure in be Ab- For me a certain artistic failure for this big experiment that I wanted to try There was a a lack lack of Something happened like I felt. The creativity was just punched. Out of me and Yeah you saw that. He sought some Interesting times we're taking these drugs that this sort of thing but Ultimately it was an experiment a curiosity to try to find. If I could ever care enough to get back on to get back on set to care enough I didn't care anymore and I had to find if I can make another film. I felt a little bit about wools. Also made you feel that again. Because that's what he goes through. Oh say well. I didn't know that Deniro knew it. he more or less knew it because because he also wanted to be He had been working out he was. We were thirty five and thirty six years old and he knew that he really had to make it as soon as possible because physically he wanted to do is gain all that weight. It can be very hard for him if you've got older. And he knew I was the right person to make it and he kept pushing me pushing me and I kept rejecting it for like two years. I don't know anything about sports. I didn't boxing to me was always an image of two small an image and a sixteen screen black and white up two small figures kind of moving around a white square. What is that you know? I never went to a fight so I don't know I saw fights in the street. Yes but not not in a rain and so and and I knew You know certain things about it But ultimately I also didn't know how to shoot it so I came up with my own way of shooting like music saint so Like covering music in the last waltz for example and in New York New York and I applied the same principles To the fight scenes in raging bull but primarily. It's that the rebirth in a way he's reborn and I thought pretty much. That was it but it took about twenty five years before before we could agree on the subject matter to make our next film that became Irishman. Trying to do other things we were trying to do. Really what we were trying to do was is a a remake a bed beautiful in two weeks in another town. Those Hollywood right. Yeah but in a way this is what it is better than beautiful is like three films and won to begin with exactly. Yeah so that's a Lotta films to do that. We wanted to do our version of it and we we were living it and we couldn't figure out when to start and went to stop you know and also sometimes you get into things things that happened to you and say what you do that. This person will be upset or data data and so we found. We found the common ground on on on Irish really. I'm glad you did. Do you still consider yourself Catholic. I think so yes. Yeah and like have your beliefs changed from what you believed about like heaven. And how L. in life and death from when you were an altar boy well of course you were child and you had the child. So what's the The Saint Paul thing I put away childish things now. How we're stuck with the adult things? So what's your adult vision of of death. No and of what if anything is after. That's a that's a good question. Of course I I don't know I think I know the sound this way. It sounds is rather naive. I guess but the point is that I do believe in Something beyond the material I mean I do believe in This machine Moran and away body wouldn't be the same without the spiritual ritual part of it. Whatever that is and people say well it's the brain synapses?.

New York New York woodstock Paul schrader sinus infection New York Martin Scorsese director telus NPR Libya Netflix La riddick The Saint Paul Martin Square Austin John Collapse Robert De Niro Alice Moran
"scorsese" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"scorsese" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Certified Merino wool and Eucalyptus fibers. Making them. Something you can feel good in and good about find your perfect pair today at Aubert's dot com. Let's get back to my interview with. Martin Scorsese his new film. The Irishman was just nominated for ten Oscars including best picture. Best Director and best supporting actor for Joe Patchy and Al Pacino it's available for streaming on net flicks and it's still playing in. Select theaters the Irishman reunite. Scorsese with Robert Deniro. Who starred in score says? He's mean streets taxi driver and the King of Comedy Deniro. An Patchy Star says Raging Bull Goodfellas and casino. You Know Scorsese grew up in the little Italy neighborhood of Manhattan and was raised Catholic before you decided to become a filmmaker. Did you ever think about becoming a priest. Oh yes yeah. I thought that was I. I had it made sense. It made sense they spoke about put in simplistic terms. Good and evil you know how the hell are we supposed to live in this life. The morality Equality all of morality. I guess but it's part of the human condition. What do we do? What are we supposed to do it? My father taught certain things between right and wrong a Very strong a very strong opinion but I saw different things in the street could tell you And not even not even to get into the kind of thinking. That's an Irishman that's another level that somewhere else and has nothing to me but Meaning when I was growing up but Yeah E. is one priest by the Prince Bay. He made a difference He told us you know you. You don't have to live this way. Don't don't don't get married right away if you don't need to think explore the world but but you didn't become a priest so wh what what what would happen was that. You can't become a priest because you want to be like the priest who was your mentor Once you get into say wait a minute. This is really serious seriously. You have to have what they call a vocation you know and it's like you have to love the mass. You have to understand what that means and I I. I didn't know I didn't know and it was a major shock. I was You know expelled from this preparatory. Sorry seminary how come you were expelled. Why didn't do anything more by? I stopped after about two months of doing the work I just stopped doing the work and behave badly. The class clown kind of thing. Did you want to be expelled. We were trying to get out of it but didn't want I didn't know I didn't know I guess it wasn't. I guess you know I told everybody. And I had this kind of holier than thou routine going on. Oh my son's going to be a priest you know that they didn't like that but basically that's what he wants and he was always sickly. Anyway you know let them go there And that sort of thing and then I you know you have to come back like the prodigal son completely Nfl Yer your failure fifteen eighteen. So did it feel better to kind of like get thrown out because that's a kind of like statement and as opposed to saying like I want to do it. No no I knew what is missing something truthful and I knew I was missing the very essence of how you should live I really did. Did you feel like you could find that essence through art through making movies. Yeah ultimately it's but that took a little while I mean it was always there. I was doing things with my friends and stuff like that. Adult cinema movies had become so important to me because I would go to adjust basically spent a lot of time there but couldn't really play sports or anything like that. Maybe I should have. Maybe you should have been like Teddy. Roosevelt did everything with asthma. But my parents are old fashioned and As I said uneducated in the doctor said don't do this you didn't do it Did you spend a lot of time as a kid at home. I'm wondering TV or reading books movies on TV watching movies on TV. That was a Lotta a at the school. Was Right around the corner on on my street and For lunch just go home. My mother was working so I just go in and there was a sandwich waiting for me or whatever and maybe there was a film come on channel eleven you know in the afternoon and certainly after three o'clock I had that apartment to myself. It was amazing. I saw Cocteau's beauty the beast. I saw my diary of a chambermaid I saw The Southerner Renoir began fat fascinated by renoir because I got got to know that it of course his father was his great painter too and I saw these pictures of paintings in school. Like those amazing and I became fascinated by some some of these especially if the film had subtitles. I found that very curious like Bella. BET subtitles fantastic. Then these onto Parodi Redeem one night was on. I only saw the first our children paradise. Yeah fulfill had subtitled. You can speaking this language. Would you their trust in a very interesting way. Culture is very very different. It's certainly such a different world from the when you were growing up and you you got out of your neighborhood by going to Nyu so we're once you start going to Nyu which was a different world even though it was near to where you grow up yes We you I imagine. You're coming home afterwards. Will you a person and both of those worlds. Yes and what was the difference. The difference mean streets there. Charlie mean streets kind of characters a blend of my father and me in a way a My father and his relationship with his youngest brother who was always getting in trouble. I was in jail so his brother was de Niro character. Yes yeah and it was reflected in myself a close friend of mine and our friend was always in trouble and so it had ah it referred to both both the my father's worthy my world. I didn't realize this until years later. It's about my father and my uncle but primarily early. It was about in a sense me to a certain extent trying to get out of there And living you know going due to Washington Square College Reading Moby Dick. And I don't know and then beginning with this These filmmaking courses which were just really They're not. It's not the way it is now. It wasn't the way it is now. You have to understand too between sixty and sixty four. We're right at the height. Nineteen eighteen fifty nine and sixty of the French way. The Italian new wave incredible Russian cinema Japanese cinema which by the way Japanese film the first Japanese film I saw was on channel. Nine with commercials dubbed English is who get sued Mizuguchi that was amazing which we finally got to restore a couple of years ago Indian films such at rate All of these new cultures all mixed together but the the the excitement Aikman of a new vocabulary being created by Dr by John. Cavities buy a house. Frampton by Jonas Meek is in the whole underground Shirley Clarke. For God's Sakes Amazing you met you met Robert Deniro when you were both around sixteen. Yes where did he fit into your your life and into your world. Well in that area as I say not necessarily the college crowd But different little clicks clicks. I guess you'd call it now but there are other groups and they will hang out in different with the call social clubs and he was with them and sometimes they'd mix and I remembered him as the Nice one. So when you met you had no idea that either of you know would must be in the know so must have been a big surprise when you met up again. Yeah we Jaycox and Burnham Blooms House and Christmas dinner Brian. DEPALMA put us together. Uh was nineteen seventy. I think and that after dinner Deniro looked at me and said you know I know you used to be with the Joe Ian Kurti and this guy that guy and I said wait a minute. How do you know that because at that point I was denying it? All what do you mean no. I don't want anybody somebody to be a filmmaker. You don't go to Hollywood. Probably have made movies or something you know and you with With people who you can actually.

Robert Deniro Martin Scorsese Aubert Director Joe Patchy Al Pacino Nyu Prince Bay Burnham Blooms House little Italy Parodi DEPALMA Nfl Joe Ian Kurti Roosevelt Cocteau Hollywood Shirley Clarke Washington Square College
"scorsese" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"scorsese" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"Hey everybody we are live. What's up everyone? Welcome to show me the meaning. Wise cracks movie podcast. That's right. I paint houses. Welcome welcome my name is Jacob. I'm filling in for jared who is out today on vacation. Haitian I'm joined here by Ryan as you just heard fans whatever and Austin out in Australia still. Yeah we're down under or man down under night no matter crew to talk about a Nice Ole Mafia movie. Today we're discussing. The Irishman written by Stevens alien directed by Martin. Scorsese Sese starring. Everybody Robert De Niro Al Pacino Joe Pesci Ray Romano. I can keep going on as always. Let's go around and get first impressions. And what was it like the first time you saw this movie. If you watch the second time like me and Austin on if you did Ryan what was it like the second time you saw it and Let's start with you Ryan. What was it like? Tell us will you know you. You call this the Irishman. I think someone needs to explain to. Martin Scorsese that movie's called the Irishman. Because he put a title screen Fr- I heard. Did you paint houses at the beginning I saw that I did. That was bizarre. I thought it was pretty cool though. Yeah I was anticipating more title screens throughout chapter visions and then weren't so so retroactively. It made me think okay. I mean that was a very conscious. Big Block lettered decision. What's going on there? You know real quickly before I get into my thing I Review Jake. I hear you say that you went into this first screening. Not knowing feeling it was a true story that's right. I didn't know that you caught that. That's crazy to me okay. Let me let me well I I go into every movie pretty much movie knowing nothing because I've been disappointed far too many times so anytime I like. Get too amped or two jazzed. I get disappointed so what I do now. Is I kind of go in knowing nothing. I knew nothing about this movie. So I went to with jared at the Egyptian theater now that Netflix runs the Egyptian And Yeah I just saw it and I to me I was like. Oh He's just made another goodfellas made another casino. We'll great casino. We're both about real people to true stories. Yes I don't know anything. I should not be here hosting filling in no no I. I didn't know much so about this movie and I didn't know much about those stories. I just didn't know much about what's going on. I knew Jimmy Hoffa was obviously a real character. I wasn't sure how much of this was fictionalized around him. Then then in the second watching and researching this podcast I I watched I had no intention of coming on the podcast. Now that I did I was like oh Okay there's a lot more going on. Every single character can be kind of Google Research. That's interesting every moment like the Nashville court scene. I mean everything is sort of a historical moment so it felt more like watching Lincoln this this time. Okay not not not to be disparaging but I thought it was a little more historical. There's more to get out of it so anyway. What was it like the first time you saw it right okay? Yeah because I'm I'm the opposite of you. I read like a fuck ton of movie blogs and movie review site too so I i. It's pretty rare that go into movie completely blind. I do you know I try to stay away from spoilers and stuff obviously but I knew a lot about this story going into and I haven't read the book I heard you paint houses but I you know I pretty much know the entire story And yes I could not wait for this movie. This was the fucking. The expendable of of Martin Scorsese verse. Or whatever I do follow follow. You were friends on facebook. I did see the anticipation with your full. On fucking list of Martin Dobson Tireless. I ranked every Scorsese film that I've ever ever seen you know Willful Wall Street's at the top trying to see where the Ryerson would follow in and basically I really love this movie. I mean it it is not the home. Run on out of the ballpark hit that I wanted it to be. You know it's not good fellas. It's not as good as casino even in my opinion It doesn't But but I don't really really at the end of the day. I think it was even aspiring to be like those movies even though it obviously does fit in nicely next in the filmography with those total it has completely different aesthetic whereas those films are very very tightly bound together by their aesthetic. And this one's ten times slower It's three and a half hours hours even though I guess the other two or three hours but this feels way slower obviously Because you know it's about fucking geriatric people goodfellas meets grumpy old men and what I did but I really liked it like I two saw in one sitting at the Egyptian theatre like you which I think is the only way to wash movie. I do think that I'd be curious here. I'd be curious to hear people's emails. You know like the difference between the people that watch in the theater versus the people that watch it like three parts on Netflix. Because that I honestly it by the time you're on your third sitting. Watch the Irishman. If that's how you did it feel like you're you're pretty much. It's like a chore for You. You're like all right. I got this movie people. Tell me it's supposed to be important whereas you know we. We saw three hours which was too long. It is a WHO long movie I would say doesn't need to be three hours but I will say that. I was completely engrossed in engaged the entire time I was rarely Li- like twiddle my thumbs Yeah so yeah to me like it. Fired on all cylinders with the aesthetic the pacing was cool and different The de Aging was weird. But honestly I liked it at the end of the day in in kind of made me my imagination. Run Wild with the possibilities of how you can apply that stuff. I mean. Obviously they looked old old even when they were young. Sometimes which is you know. Didn't work perfectly. But I got used to it so overall I mean I give it a solid a minus like a pretty great really great movie. I will tell you very briefly before you get the also I. I had a funny I. I went on a date to see this movie with somebody. Our second day she it was her idea to see the three and a powerline movie. And I'm like okay great but I I've been wanting to see it. Let's go and then we go to the Egyptian and I swear to God for. She starts coughing right right which she's sick. UK Get Madison for coffee. But she does it every ten seconds for three and a half hours and and I was never going to say anything. I got some water to help. Then everybody around me literally start saying hey can you please leave after about two hours of her being there so my I was in this like painful so I was in this curb your enthusiasm episode from Hell where we're literally me and my dad are ruining the whole movie for five hundred people at the Egyptian Just like because of something. She can't change she's sick. What is she going to do? You know and so then I'm sitting there And then she says Ryan stay here. I'M GONNA go in the back and so I listened to her and I didn't leave leave. That was never going to date with me to a movie. I'll leave you in the movie if you're sick and you can go back and honestly I mean you you. Everyone felt bad for but it's because she was sick. What are you going to do? She can't help but yeah I mean. She's coughing so did you watch it again. Dan Yes so so that you experience was a little fucked but I did enjoy but then yeah I did watch it with my folks when I came back for Thanksgiving and and and we watch it on Netflix. But in the two parts and that was definitely not fun is the first time even though the first one had the coughing incident. So let's go to you Austin. What was it like watching the the first time I it was like watching it again? Yes the first time I saw it in the theater second time. I did a two part viewing on Netflix. And I actually didn't mind the two two part viewing of it. It felt kind of Nice like it was a mini series. Almost you know and I went in with. I guess the historical Biographical Lens so I went in knowing that this was going to have some sort of there was going to be like entertainment historical biography you know and it totally was totally was and and I. I was hesitant before seeing it because I'm kind of tired of so much cinema right now. I know that Scorsese is not the average director director. What's up Oh to say say what tired of too much cinema well? Contemporary Cinema not tired of the cinematic form. I'm bored with what is being produced. And so when I saw that it was gonna be another gangster film I was like I mean. How many times is he gonNa make a gangster film? I was like I know it's him. I should give him like a long leash but then I was like also in this landscape. Cinema seems to be saying the same shit reproducing the same stories just with different different names attached to it so I was. I was a little bit Mr Mick grumpy face before I went in right and.

Netflix Martin Scorsese Ryan Scorsese Sese jared Austin Jacob Robert De Niro Martin Dobson coughing Jimmy Hoffa Google facebook Nashville Big Block Stevens director Joe Pesci Ray Romano Australia
"scorsese" Discussed on The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

"Today I am going to be looking at the latest film. From Martin Scorsese and it's a film. It's notable because it's currently playing on the Netflix streaming service. It is called the Irishman. It is an R. rated film it did give some theatrical release before it was put into Netflix. But I'll get into that. In a moment. It has pervasive of language. It has strong violence in. It runs another notable thing three hours and twenty nine minutes. The main star is Robert Deniro with sizeable sizable supporting roles. For Joe Patchy Al Pacino Harvey Keitel Stephen Graham Ray Romano Anna Paklin and bobby kind of Ali are in the film. Martin Scorsese as I mentioned is the director Stevens alien credited with the screenplay of Irishman is a tale that is spun from the vantage point of an older man. He's in a nursing home. And then we get to see a series of very extended confessional flashbacks as the main body of the film. A Robert Gordon. Euro is in that lead role of that old man. The World War Two veteran meat delivery driver named Frank Sheeran who back in the nineteen fifties. He got get involved as a Hitman for the mob after he met and he provided his services to a well known crime boss named Russell. BUFFA Lino Beverly knows. Played by Joe Pesci she in the film now during his time working with Russell. Franken's up meeting and then becoming a close confidante of the nation's most influential union boss Jimmy Hoffa and then he's played by Al Pacino Hafa was known for using strong-arm tactics to bring the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Union to power organized crime had a significant influence in this era on the unions and in business and really up to the highest levels of government. So frank finds himself on the rise. He plays bodyguard and a man of trust to Hoffa in his attempts to keep control of the most powerful union in the country. Now if you know your history you know Kinda wear this is going to go although although you know the mystery of Jimmy Hoffa kind of still exists today this film attempts to answer some of those questions now. The Irishman is a notable film for for many reasons. I've already given you a couple but in Martin Scorsese's long and illustrious career he struggled with the financing here for over a decade to get. The movie made his way. The current studios make decisions primarily for wet will make them a prophet cinema for art and these Oscar Bait Prestige films. They end up getting packaged with a similar notion in mind they want to have their budgets limited and to market them on the hope that perhaps it might take off often become lucrative for them after languishing for several years. Martin Scorsese may depress to push forward with the Irishman. After the release of silence in Twenty Sixteen eighteen however the financially struggling paramount pictures they paid for domestic distribution rights which was good but then they scoffed at the exploding costs of putting forward word. The filmmakers vision as it was the ended up dropping out when the leading financiers a Mexican company called Fabrica Cassini. They cancelled their one hundred. The million dollar bid to fund the money when the costs looked to skyrocket well above that amount Scorsese ended up bucking then the traditional studio system in two thousand seventeen to make his film with the Streaming Service Netflix Netflix. There's no need to worry about selling tickets because they really have a platform already for their viewers you know they have a different prophets structure that relies on getting new subscribers to sign on to see their wealth of entertainment that they provide and they want to keep all subscribers from canceling because because they're satisfied with them continuing to get fresh content of quality so they footed the hundred and five million dollars for the exclusive rights to the Irishman and in addition to that the overall budget to make film into one of the best films in the career of one of the best film makers of all time. That's quite a feather in. Netflix is cap now. Despite despite not being made by a major studio Scorsese here received a hefty budget to make the film he wanted a hundred and fifty nine million dollars. That's the kind of money that studio's really. I usually only afford the movies. That Scorsese has recently criticized as so-called not cinema in his interviews of late. You know he's a longtime sinophile and he's also been a cinema Peres to eat. Long has been extolling the merits of the theater and crowd experience to take movies. And that makes his marriage to netflix particularly striking they. They would split the difference by releasing Irishman exclusively into theaters for twenty six days before it ended up debut in on the streaming service. It's not a popular way to do it. Some major as your chains so major theater chains have been resistant to showcasing films that ended up going quickly to digital so a lot of them chose not to carry it. Not only because short runs cut into theater profits because the longer that films run in their theaters the more of the percentage of the take that they get but audiences are also hesitant to pay for an experience into theater when they could see it on Netflix in just a short number of days. So Scorsese has since softened on his initial criticisms of the studios in their quest forever. Profitable temple releases here. He chooses to let his work speak for him and it speaks volumes. The Irishman is best argument in reminding cinna files on what it's like to see a visionary filmmaker deliver an honest to goodness artistic and dramatic achievement in crafting challenging cinema cinema set of trying to service audiences by making strictly what we want to see which is usually what the temple releases do not. What is the Irishman well? It's an adaptation one of this two thousand four true crime book that was written by a former Delaware. Deputy Attorney General. He ended up turning into an author. His name is Charles Brandt. He published a book upon on which the Irishman is based. But it's called. I heard you paint houses in book. Form The book chronicles Frank Sheeran's alleged activities working for the Buffalo Crime Family and details els his purported involvement in the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa. This is a book that Robert Deniro read during his time when he was directing his film the Good Shepherd that was back in two thousand six. It has some similar subject matter because it gives some history of the Bay of pigs which is kind of what the Good Shepherd was revolving around Deniro connected acted with Charles Brands Book. He ended up handing it to Martin Scorsese to read and he thought it could be a possible project for them to work together instead of the one that they had been planning which was of the. Don winslow novel called the winter of Frankie machine. Now Scorsese felt that if deniro was finding it so passionate about this potential project and the way he hasn't I've been in some time maybe it would be worth pouring all of their time and hearts into getting a film that they truly wanted to see made at this point in their career so he ended up optioning the book immediately after reading it in two thousand seven and yet he still struggled to try to bring it to the screen and that lasted for over a decade because initially he was struggling with scheduling all of these actors that he wanted to appear in the film to be available. And then there was a darker reality as timeline on studios were becoming more reticent to provide the funds necessary necessary to bring such a sprawling epic gangster film too big screens in this era of massive releases that concentrate on superheroes and big budget action Chin and whatnot. This was not going to be a lucrative film in most studios mind so the rest is of course history. We see it on Netflix. Now in this film will end up marking the ninth feature film collaboration between the Director and Deniro. They had not done a movie together. A full-fledged movie since Nineteen ninety-five Gangster Opus called Casino now also from Casino is Joe Patchy he reportedly had been asked by. Martin Scorsese dozens of times to come in to do the film before consenting they say over over fifty times PECI really had not appeared in any movie other than doing voice work since two thousand ten love ranch and that was his first significant roles since since one thousand nine hundred ninety eight lethal weapon four so for the past twenty plus years. He really hasn't done very much. She said he was through with gangster movies in particular but Scorsese insisted listed. This one would be worth his wild come back to you deniro. So played a role in getting pets. She to reconsider. And the actor finally consented when Netflix got involved because then the project changed from a pipe dream to something that actually had solid backing an interest in Deniro was right. The film is different and the Irishman's not just about the rise and fall all of a criminal empires so many gangster films are. This is about more than that. It's about the corrosive nature of crime itself on those participate in the life of killing and thuggery. This is a story of a man at the end of his life. He looks back at all he's done and this is also made by people who are also looking back. At the kinds of films they've done and in that retrospection altogether they find a defined poignancy in the tolls that are paid and traded away to live a wretched life. It's something that really can. Only be observed at the other end of life looking back back a retrospective gangster film not commonly seen anymore although both knew each other and traversed the same cinematic circles for nearly five decades. The Irishman also marks the first collaboration between Martin Scorsese and Al Pacino. They discussed making films together for years so they definitely were on the same page. They're the most promising project that almost became a film was a bio pic on a Jewish Italian artist named Modigliani that dissipated due to studio reticence back in the day back in nineteen eighty. The United Artists Released Heaven's gate. That was a big budget art film and they ended up taking a bath on that. They really faced bankruptcy after that and they ended up getting scooped up by MGM and that made a lot of studios Shy Away from putting forward the funds necessary to make lengthy and lavish art films like that Pacino did appear For three prior films with Robert De Niro though the first of course the all time classic but they didn't work together on the screen. That was the godfather part to the second time. It was much more notable. They made a great film. Ah called Heat Michael Mann's film and the ended up sharing a key scene in that. which a lot of people found very riveting because here were two titans of acting from the the nineteen seventy s through the nineteen eighties working together? The third time they actually worked together much more. But it was a lacklustre misfire. The very few fans really care about beyond the fact that there is is a pairing of Pacino and Deniro that was called righteous. Kill after that last one de Niro said he would like at least one more chance to work with the Chino but it would have to be in a project that they both could could be proud of. Making and the Irishman I think is that movie that they should be pleased very pleased that they made now all three of these actors give their best performances on film in decades especially especially Robert Deniro. He acts like the film really means the world to him. And that's probably because it does. It is a passion project for him even more so than it is for Scorsese. We witnessed Deniro's passion. You can see a scene that comes late in the movie. He as frank struggles to spin a hopeful assurance to be concerned wife agonizing about her husband. Who's been missing for a couple of days? Frank knows of course what happens to the husband Jimmy Hoffa but he has to maintain this facade of being a family friend and to be able to consoling in that effort and he's struggling to find the words. You know this is evidence not only of the scene but throughout this whole film of a masterful performance. I think this will will allay naysayers who have long. How did that? The actors best work is long behind him. Meanwhile Pacino is electrifying as you would expect as Jimmy Hoffa's both menacing and comical comical is a mix of strengthen actually vulnerability that really could only come from one of the great actors in Cinema. It's really a well rounded part. It's not just to stereotype. And although he's rarely acted in the last two decades I think Joe Patchy really seems like he hasn't missed a beat here. Even longtime squeezy collaborating Harvey Harvey keitel gets a smaller appearance. Although the role may be too small to garner him to kind of accolades that these other actors are getting. The Scorsese is still in peak. Form here here with the Irishman his use of steady cams to at intimacy and to comment on some of his other works and music to punctuate the time in the setting in the mood of the film. And there's a heap of emphasis on period details. Here is very immersive. He had already had a shorthand with these lead actors. He'd worked with before I guess Pacino was new to him but he is also Louis season actor that's used to improvisation reactions and he has played variations of tough guys like Hoffa throughout his career. So he didn't really need a lot of guidance. Scorsese here is discovering covering new facets by not portraying these top gangsters as unapproachable or glossed over with menaces so many other films dude instead. They're flawed their Pity they're concerned with very mundane issues on a human level. Russell doesn't want people to smoke in his car. and Jimmy Hoffa really can't get over someone meeting with him unless they're wearing a suit especially if they're late that really bothers him to no end and I guess if you want to read into this in all these ways. These behaviors are a measure of control. Roland respect. That drives them. They expect and setup arbitrary rules as guideposts on how others should behave around them whether they continue to have that respect as measured by whether other people are willing to indulge in not smoking in a car or being on time and wearing a suit a really dogs these men to no end if they don't get that respect so very very telling their the film features over two hundred fifty characters to portray throughout several decades heavily researched period wardrobe sets vehicles. Guns ends other props that are appropriate to each era. Six thousand extras were also utilized in the course of the shoot and that shoot took place at over one hundred different locations Israel locations not just done on a movie set now. Does it need to be three and a half hours long now if you will just want to tell this as a story I guess it didn't need to be. You could probably do within two and a half maybe even less than that but if you removed even an hour of this film you would likely lose many of the important smaller and more relevant reflections and those personal tidbits that feel so unique in this world that Cortesi and company are creating Scorsese here deliberately brings in details like.

Martin Scorsese Robert Deniro Jimmy Hoffa Netflix Al Pacino Frank Sheeran Joe Patchy Al Pacino Harvey Ke Russell Joe Patchy Joe Pesci Al Pacino Hafa Harvey Harvey keitel Robert Gordon Don winslow director Lino Beverly Stevens Fabrica Cassini Delaware
"scorsese" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

Collider Movie Talk

16:19 min | 1 year ago

"scorsese" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

"All had a wonderful week and we've got a great show plan for you you today with John Rocca and Eric Eisenberg but has always we kick things off with the call sheet and we've got quite the lineup here of course it is Mondays we got to begin with the box office report and it was a huge huge weekend two for joker it only dropped forty three percent which means it made another v fifty five million dollars as for two newcomers we had a winner and a loser the addams family took to spot with a very solid thirty million dollars but then Gemini Yeah Man could only snag twenty point five million which is a fairly rough go considering the film's reported one hundred thirty eight million dollars production budget now now moving over to that Martin Scorsese story yet again according to the Hollywood reporter Scorsese echoed his previous comments about marvel movies during a press conference for the Irishman and here's what he said it's not cinema it's something else we shouldn't be invaded by it we need cinemas to step up and show films that are narrative films the ears have become amusement parks that is all fine and good but don't invade everything else in that sense that is fine and good for those who enjoy that type of film and by the way knowing what goes into them now I admire what they do it's not my kind of thing it simply is not it's creating another kind of audience that thinks cinema is that of the Classic Story and we'll tell the tale of a physician and a veterinarian living in Victorian England who discovers he can talk to animals stay tuned for the panels content up on the site right now but what we want to highlight is one called the best Halloween after the show we need to wrap up today's call sheet on a very sad note because actor Robert Forster.

John Rocca Eric Eisenberg Victorian England Robert Forster Martin Scorsese Hollywood reporter one hundred thirty eight milli fifty five million dollars thirty million dollars forty three percent
"scorsese" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

14:30 min | 1 year ago

"scorsese" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"Not this is this film not an exercise in this bringing us into the subjectivity of an inmate we start the movie inhabiting the gaze of teddy one who dismisses mrs these inmates as insane but once we realized that we've been inhabiting the very perspective of one such inmate we recognize them as human and in a way i do think maybe maybe scorsese's making some sort of comment about cinema in this in that the charade that dr after khali is putting on at the end of the movie is the very charade of cinema because unlike other visual narrative arts cinema has the ability to bring the audience audience into the character's point of view and that's what this movie essentially does it uses its form like we were just talking about disjointed editing flashbacks exaggerated lighting in color saturation in order to make experience the perspective of an insane person and so i think this question of do you rehabilitate evil is is not only a central question of psychology and psychiatry but one of cinema i mean if you wanna use an obscene example one would certainly not want to see a movie that tells the story of lincoln's assassination from the perspective of john wilkes booth there's no need to redeem him there's no need to rehabilitate that evil i think perhaps the more appropriate example would be nazi them since this movie deals heavily in imagery of nazi atrocities and i think that this is particularly poignant can you talk about people who are dealing with PTSD after world war two and if we consider the film kind of retroactively knowing that teddy what he went through during the war we come to agree with with doctor colleague who believes that once again you should treat patients not judge them so ryan what do you think i don't i think you're foolish it this time jared all right yeah i think that i obviously martin scorsese has dedicated his life to cinema you know and i do think he was yeah like having a lot of fun playing with the form while also kind of doing this commentary on compassion for the worst amongst us yeah 'cause you're right cinemas the only medium that could possibly get you in the mind of a serial killer really good book could too but not in the way that this audio visual experience can i don't know yeah i think you're i think you're onto something yeah i mean what's interesting talk about that i feel like recently like scorsese's been a little bit under fire little bit i sort of depictions of sort of characters and racist and sort of things that they say especially like goodfellas or mainstream and whether or not by having these sort of bad guys savy's things is he endorsing their world views and i mean that's interesting that yeah no no no not at all but there is something to like scores as made it made his career of like having sort of you know troubled protagonists or anti heroes goodfellas taxi driver all these movies where the people that are on screen are not really very good people but we are as an audience we're supposed to empathize with them and sort of understand where they're coming from and so that fits into that sort of theory especially yeah i mean bringing up goodfellas goodfellas is a ride as much as it is a moving i mean when you see that ah steady cam shot of him entering the club and he's going through the back doors and paying off all the doorman and we are in her perspective we are so impressed by the majesty agility of this man who seemingly knows everybody has unlimited connections unlimited power and yeah i mean i don't think you could make an argument that goodfellas was or casino or any of those movies doesn't glorify it does lifestyle i mean that's always been the scorza criticism even with something like wolf of wall street how that's the best damn we'll talk to them i feel like that one is a bit more ambiguous than the other two now at least casino in goodfellas fellas in that i do think there is some kind of critical edge to the wolf of wall street that i don't think exists in the other two i think they're all kind of critical in their own way but you're right that like the form of wolf of wall street is very much like open ended kind of until the end but yeah i yeah yeah mostly wolf wolf of wall street smart critical us and how we we let someone like jordan into our lives we're still about an anti hero though kind of like you were saying before about all of his movies yeah so do you think that the movie has this kind of balance in the sense that if we have dr collie on one side who says has that i'm not here to judge i'm only here to heal and then andrew or teddy on the other side saying no these people must be condemned is there this balance in the sense that when when it comes to psychiatric patients we should be more we should humanize them and we should treat them but when it comes to nazis we you should just unilaterally condemn them or do you think that do you think that that is kind of just divorced from the nazi flashbacks i mean it's hard art because i feel like the movie almost comes down on teddy side at the end where his argument as you know don't help these people let them you know don't help them at all and at the end of the movie he it doesn't help himself he wants to not remember he doesn't want to be healed healing is not the answer and this movie living in delusion is like die a hero don't live a monster as a as a sense okay so so let's talk about that so he set last last thing he says before he's walked off to be lobotomize which would be worse is to live a monster or die as a good man so i'm assuming he means that living is a monster would be living as somebody who constantly has to revert back to this fantasy of andrew latest or i'm sorry the fantasy of teddy yes and i and then dying a good man is just going to get lobotomize is and becoming a zombie if the rest of your life and we're in agreement that he just chooses to die a good man i think so i think that's the ending of the movie right at least but wait wait it's not it's not him living is a monster now he's going to get lobotomize at the end the movie but he's using using then you're saying he knows that yes i think so but what is he thinks he's doing because he seems to be teddy again so does he think oh i'm just going to give up to the government that's going to experiment on me and then how do we read then if he's not actually andrew latest who recognizes that he has this mental disability ability that makes him go in circles with this identity you know what i'm saying i mean he makes a choice at the end like he knows if they if they if they think he's crazy they're going to lobotomize him so he makes the decision asian to pretend to be crazy so they take away his memories and so he can live out the remainder of his life zombie but not thinking he's a monster anymore okay so it doesn't make a difference whether other if it's him recognizing that he's crazy therefore i'll just die while i guess that doesn't make sense sorry i'm talking i'm talking with search him recognizing that he's not him recognizing as crazy is is horrible for him i think it'd be much happier in his delusions i never got that reading this very interesting actually makes that makes the ending more interesting to me but i definitely thought as all right he's not well let's take out his brain you know like he's he literally slipped back into his fugu state and and yeah i i didn't see it as him having in this you know literally role playing but being smart enough and self aware enough to know what was about to happen to him i felt that's how i read it wait wait you are not saying that he's role playing at the end i think he is i think he's aware of i think he's aware of everything i think he remembers everything i think he's pretending to be crazy at the show is one hundred percent yeah i never even thought about that interesting yeah that last line i've really suggested that like he is very cognizant of who he actually is okay to me you think i agree with you because i think that's what i tripped up on when i said what i'm saying doesn't make makes sense to me the last line was like a paradox like he basically he was saying this true thing that that that applied in in while he was as as the detective as teddy it made sense to him but from what we know the audience and also i'm sorry all right i'm not articulating this well at all basically i think that he at the end was choosing to live as a mom or to live as a monster instead of dies a good man but then they were taking them off to die because in your mind he reverted back to yeah he made the choice to make the delusion he's gonna live in just be like you know even though he's already come out of it before he knows deep down subconscious that he is this monster he would rather just live as the monster underneath you know his skin of his role playing thing detective guy then come to terms with who he is but then they're gonna kill him for that yeah i think i just i disagree i i mean living as the monsour answer would be living with the sins of the past if he was acknowledging that i've i murdered my wife my wife murdered her children because i didn't give her help like that is living as a monster monster that is what being a monster is to him you know dying is a good man is dying as what he was doing before all this crap happened where he was a detective and he was investigating things and he was on the outside of the right that that is you know dying as a good man at least at least wasn't wouldn't dying as a good man being i know i am emma monster i'm gonna go die of sacrifice myself and you know like like become lobotomize d- as the monster as opposed to as you're delusional character you created i would i would argue the lobotomize ing is you know living or dying as a good man dan le that is that is that is that i mean what what more what we're delusion can you have been just being lobotomize not remembering anything not remembering your pass now remembering in your sense like i feel like that is that that's the ultimate out for him from his while muchas yourself yeah i mean yeah lying i mean the movies all about delusions asians so yes it's better to lie to yourself than face reality so it's a tragic exactly so sad i was gonna say it's exactly he's movie we did last week so another thing that i'm going to say bolsters my point about scorsese sese commenting on the power of cinema or the responsibility of cinema is that they're this film is saturated with allusions to hitchcock doc and i did not realize this the first time i watched it but there's actually a great article in the guardian by andrew pulver who points out some of the hitchcock ian in references so one of also before you even say that you know it's based we already mentioned dennis lehane the novel it's it's based off of you know he did like mystic river and then every fucking ben affleck directed movie basically gone baby gone and the town so this is a kind of a prolific pulp novelist that got you know it's him got scorsese kind of doing a hitchcock riff on his novel continue sorry oh no i was just going to go into some of these examples so there's the camera right under the shower head when the water turns on which is pulled right out of psycho oh there's dicaprio peering over the cliffside and deciding that he has to go down slowly just like in north by northwest there's a gun follows its target while affixed to the camera kind of like a video game like we see in spellbound there's a tree smashing through a wall just like in marnie there's dicaprio caprio going up the stairs of the lighthouse is shot like jimmy stewart and vertigo and max von side ou- plays a creepy shadowy nazi that evokes the one in notorious so those are the ones that andrew pulver points out in the guardian but he's also says that there's probably more so if you guys listening know of any other hitchcock references hit us up movies at wisecracked dot CO but if i were to say that there's any greater meaning to this reference to hitchcock doc i mean would you guys you guys are probably the two of the biggest film historians i know would you feel comfortable with the notion that hitchcock ryan you've seen more movies than anyone i know the idea that i'm a film historian would you feel comfortable with the notion that hitchcock hitchcock is the godfather of subjective filmmaking yeah i would say that that's a one one of his many titles you could give him for sure in the sense that he's known as the pioneer of the guy who tried to bring you into either the protagonist mind viewer the antagonists mind view through the manipulation of editing through camera movement maybe he wasn't the first one certainly that would be my only sort of caveat whether or not i feel like there are people before him that were doing similar things but but yes for you know in terms of suspense and you know bringing you into the psyche of damaged characters psycho and frenzy and all these movies i mean that was is not typically done chain not in not in US cinema at least yeah last thing i want to talk about is violence i don't really have much to say about this do think it's interesting how teddy's called amana violence one of the guards even tell them that there's nothing to society accept violence the guy even calls it god's gift to humanity and then one of the crazy patients is paranoid he doesn't want to leave the island because the h. bomb is outside did did you guys other than the fact that you know it's part of teddy psychological profile that he's dealt with all this violence and he's a violent guy was there anything else going around in your mind about this well this does this tie back to your critique on cinema itself i mean another criticism of scorsese is is depiction of a finance to.

scorsese khali teddy one hundred percent
"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"I am on the kind of psychological the pairing of the psychological with somebody with physicality with only interested in torture essentially through various different guises emotional psychological of how he uses julia louis this character i find that character really memorable this eighth hey femy makes cape fear one of my favorite school safety films trusting so told you told me to me to be an interesting ones well because you brought him up as a favorite scorsese character and certainly think he's one of the most indelible scorsese characters but he i don't like him as a bit like with jordan belfort or everyone majeure bill for you don't like him i knew people i told me too growing up the people good that's tricky what am i am any suddenly just goes off on one police lesson with spider is just extraordinary innings jordan piece of acting welldeserved also for middle joe patchy although we should have got more lethal weapon three as well let's be honest so good just a great interest i fuck you at the oscars always golden globes always of course also the empire awards as well to know forget do not forget they right the wrongs of cinema favorite quickly moment greatest moment in it's crazy film i'm gonna gonna take one take one from each of you in god's the opening credits of raging bull okay was which is rotate around ring to cover rusticana and his pure poetry okay for me it's mean straits and it's deniro's entrance with the two women and the camera over sleigh phrases on capitol and you kind of have the music that kind of show for me particularly deniro's entrance is gone into that.

julia louis jordan belfort joe deniro scorsese
"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Exactly and i also as a study of obsession and fandom to the extreme world it's really quite chilling also does make me laugh i mean it's cooking comedy is not necessarily comedy but it does make me laugh jokes deandre quite funny yeah ludden pretty good the comedy store of an evening you saw republican doing material yet you wouldn't feel to be all right but then there was growing lewis terrific japan hunt he's amazing yeah i think that's a real nuance to you mentioned early rate skull size is kind of how he digs into the mail funky and constructs of masculinity within society and all of that and it fails like less of an architect and say charges piccolo what have you actually maybe not actually is i different kind of lock type in different examination of masculine or you probably heard a dozen twitter arguments with people just like rip republican you have no idea woman one so i could pass through expresses himself you know three volunteer other ones just somebody's entitled to a psychopathic degree yeah it's where this scorsese's most conventional film cinematic lii is short bayrak tv show in a way is there isn't a lot of the kind of camera move moon no practical econ expect from them and as interesting as well one of the reasons why wasn't well received at the time yeah p won't you want grand fireworks and again really give it here okay so we're going to bring this boy home has has he made a bad film.

scorsese lewis japan twitter
"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Going who pressure to be man and again scorsese fame and the place in the end is so moving and went on the ride is amazing she plays his wife uses kind of engine simile very lovely she's absolutely scheming in berlin i had a certain critical reevaluation as well as i do remember when it came out people weren't falling over it but again over the years it seems to me to become movies that people kind of almost forget the martin scorsese directed always announced coming out on criterion collection yeah so there's no greater honor freely for film for for the rock and armageddon to be joined by one hundred them so yeah maybe he's now time to for people to revisit that three hours isn't a member being three hours yet yeah just under that okay age of innocence dan anything surprised on your list everybody talks about so on it's in the last session of christ king comedies number two like really okay is that is when the five that with with ega ega by process elimination you can probably guess what are i don't know is shut to ryland surprising to have on my list i would say so awful that was great fun terrific scrape funny small so he's inception really enjoyed the ruffalo india and everything is better for having in it does he help out you have my curiosity now you know have my attention sorry no i sorta i let it be worthy of tan but then again i think there's a purely guided by sentiment i put after hours on my top ten yep as well which i think is a really interesting film but it was a there was a time i mean he made after hours and then he made color of money i think the caller money was his next movie lenny makes less than christ which obviously very personal movie they'd be wanting to make ages color money's speed a strange almost the old one out amongst those it doesn't really seem on the surface of it all.

berlin martin scorsese ryland ruffalo three hours
"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Scorsese returning that milieus near going back to gangsters and crying and that's exciting then about wolf of straight didn't feel like an older generation filmmaker trying to make film casino always say he wasn't sets day kind of felt like a modern thoroughly modern film and i think that's what's exciting is what does that will look like through school say's these gays now at seven days off the wall street was astonishing exciting anything being made by any exciting upcoming filmmaker at time on his financially because i've done my martin and done it quite instinct with scribbling out half of it he's he's made since signal signal here here so since since since the style of the century really five films since the central okay so the have don't tell you go here you go in there if you go in there i liked hugo it was sweet now he didn't it didn't didn't massively impress me it's how i got to meet martyrism because i hope that the press conference for that so i have a soft spot for hugo which is wise number eleven am i but it is director explore new tricks and do new things and trying to hook up with this new funky technology that young kids are oral talking about but i'm not sure i would have thought that the three d movie from scorsese might have been more of an event felt more more fight lynn away and it didn't really for me philip about the birth of cinema in the love of cinema i didn't really feel that from that much it didn't really work for me.

Scorsese martin hugo director seven days
"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Okay so chris you go into through empire did you go into scores he's for empire but i my first memory of scorsese film is seeing the trailer for after hours attached to a copy of something so probably terminator aliens or something like that and just being quite wanna see that film i saw scorsese films before it was aware of scorsese yeah so you growing up as inventor aware of taxi driver but i'm not sure that i was aware of scorsese in the way that i was aware of spielberg when i was when i was growing up so i think i saw after hours and the color of money before i knew martin scorsese was so probably the first score sese film and i saw knowing who's cortesi was it probably was goodfellas because i was sort of sweet spot and i had parents who were really really laissez faire with what i watched and they didn't mind i was thirteen or fourteen when it came out and jess i just i just rented it and watched it so probably would have been at an end from there i have very very strong memories watching taxi driver for the first time thinking you want this guy's pretty good from for me he seems to be the filmmakers filmmaker does seem seem fair he seems to be if you asked most directors i would say especially to campus living directors to their favorite living directors i would imagine the most if you spielberg jackson right go right to the real influences on them you know it would be scorsese.

martin scorsese spielberg jackson
"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Yeah but i've had them turn the heat down to so we're going to be talking about martin scorsese in this one start over the nice very very simple thing he's he's pretty good isn't he he's all right few into that kind of thing like good film amazing like your what was your introduction discourse as a when did we i went marty scorsese i'm going to call them ardila way through of men and once i'm titled when when we first meet marzi marty scorsese when did we i bring them into our lives i i met moscow sese i love stevensville contorts lucas and they were movie brats and he was the movie brats so i was reading about him and my dad i was thirteen years old and my dad put me in an overcoat and took me see raging ball to try to get me in the hallway wrote i didn't happen but we try it again again again i saw so i'm an earlier wall relatively early doctor okay so remember the first one you actually got the see yeah mean streets would have been on on on video okay yeah mean streets that's a good start terry what so no hard over coats trying to get actually i did that once for the delinquent okay and i was only younger are now this is tikey relevant but i had i had a massive perm don't i thought poem when the colder and i got in the delinquent delinquent school sese that's the first on negative nation in the same conversation i i got scorsese via my brother which is actually how i got into most violent films i think i've podcast before about my love of violent movies and actually good fellows was the one i i saw and she widely close for by cape fear and i have a big love of mobster movies movies and so i i mean goodfellas as well the soundtrack completely hooked me in i'm a big fan of goal groups of that kind of air.

martin scorsese marty scorsese terry moscow contorts lucas scorsese thirteen years
"scorsese" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"This is our american stories and for the hour the making of martin scorsese's good fellows the godfather was a classic the sopranos while what tv but you want to talk a movie that left a mark fell as as the 1990 american biographical crime film directed by martin scorsese it's an adaptation of the nineteen '86 nonfiction book wise guy by nicolas pull edgy fill narrates the rise and fall of mob associate and rehill and his friends over a period well homeless 25 years 1950 55 to nineteen eighty but after wrapping his first feature film mean streets in 1973 martin scorsese never saw himself making another gangster movie that is until he picked up the book by nicolas pull edgy called wise guy here's scorsese apology on how good fellows was set in motion having dealt with at world to a certain extent i cup therefore never really wanted could touch upon at world again but i i found that the the style of the book was so interesting i try to see if i can make a film like the style of this book because what's the point making of the gangster picture they've been several books about mob boss's but it was like getting a hold of a soldier in napoleon's army had sawai what i want to know how it worked inside the tail detailing till everything detail i was interested in the manusha of how to lives a wise guy atlantic into the frame of mind up a guy works that way every day and you also have the voice of henry so much of that book was just is telling the story the marty cold and he said closed again my mind has marty scorsese's he said i'm film director movie director i think he said he said you know i am i said i know who you are and he said well i'm calling it because he said i just read your book need that i've been looking for this book for years i said well i've been waiting for this fall goal all my life so he said i want.

martin scorsese napoleon henry marty scorsese director rehill scorsese 25 years
"scorsese" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"This is our american stories and for the hour the making of martin scorsese's good fellows the godfather was a classic the sopranos while what tv but you want to talk a movie that left the mark fell as is a 1990 american biographical crime film directed by martin scorsese it's an adaptation of the nineteen '86 nonfiction book wise guy by nicolas pull edgy the film narrates the rise and fall of mob associate and rehill and his friends over a period while homeless 25 years from nineteen 55 to nineteen eighty but after wrapping his first feature film mean streets in 1973 martin scorsese never saw himself making another gangster movie that is until he picked up the book by nicolas pull edgy called wise guy here's scorsese apology on how good fellows was set in motion having dealt with at world to a certain extent i felt that far never really wanted could touch upon that world again but i found that the the style of the book were so interesting i try to see if i can make a film like the style of this book because what's the point making other gangs to picture they've been several books about mob boss's but it was like getting a hold of a soldier in napoleon's army had sawai what i want to know how it worked inside the tail detailed until everything has detail i was interested in the manusha of how to live as a wise guy i want to get into the frame of mind up a guy works that way every day and you also had the voice of henry so much of that book was just his telling the story the marty cold and he said to close again my mind has marty scorsese's he said i'm film director movie director i think he said he said the you know i am i said i know who you are and he said well i'm calling it because he said i just read your book and he said i've been looking for this book for years i said well i've been waiting for this whole goal all my life and so he said i want to do it but he wanted to.

martin scorsese napoleon henry marty scorsese director rehill scorsese 25 years
"scorsese" Discussed on The Howard Stern Show

The Howard Stern Show

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on The Howard Stern Show

"Howard stern scorsese you get that part in the film and then you're onset scorsese says do you listen when you punching jona he doesn't look real so they tell you to punch them in the face did you poncho hard in the face and he broke his teeth a look jonuz grand guy and i've i've a tunnel respect for them but i i her door i heard and tell that story on your show job in and that was a big thrill for me were in character and they tell you there but the truth is i said to join before we started i said hey look man it's martin scorsese movie moveement almost lap you for a wasn't a punch slap okay i suppose let me slap you and as soon as the scenes over its let me back off camera smacked should ademi way of titfortat i get i and i always offer that two people but i think we should do it for real can score says it i we do a fake like kid kid point anyway directed the niro come on man and an annual join a he just he he was the something he was totally into it and and you know we kept talk and it's true you know it really wasn't working and then i think it was really leo who source stepped up and said you know i think you guys should do it for real and joan a you know he'd be p p was brave man he said okay is going to be the real ponds everybody i want everyone to be ready you know they're ready would like an ice pack and shit like that and you know i figured if you only get to eat oh it's sort of a trick of the trade of stunk guys who have the most respect for you you just make sure you do it wants like do right you gotta make sure they get an onfield works.

niro Howard stern martin scorsese
"scorsese" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Case and down in this case martin scorsese is saying bought there's too much emphasis on box office reports and ranked made of this part of that and that he thinks that creators should be addressed i should be free to make their own ambitious storytelling that doesn't abide by what audiences or what studios wind and and this is kind of in defence of our when he thought mother which has their nine off evening us down an which had a frustrating online tomatoes even though had polarizing reviews by an f on cinema score so he was kind of reacting to that and i think that it's very funny that there score say the emmy's executives i blaming magnate as for decade wreath ends but that renchmade ff beef could become the scapegoat either four on infants not wanting to see wrote formulaic movies or in scorsese sat keith outings is not wanting to fee on relief that i am bishop and data like pick one um but it it's almost like martin scorcese is not writing illwill seems to me that he does in no orange meters this iran reading this essay it seems like he's taking on uh for a better term us has film crew critics and film journalists uh saying that we we don't have as much urged the critics don't have as much knowledge these days which might be the case uh i'm not gonna argue against that as a whole there's a lot more film critics these days and i think that the knowledge behind those from critics is uh.

martin scorsese emmy keith iran
"scorsese" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"scorsese" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Been doing graham they've been grasping for franchises and stuff with the fantastic beasts and all that like it's there there're sort of troubles as a studio over the past few years have been uh extremely wellpublicized and like the the whole dc thing as like a i would say it's been a mixed bag and that's probably being generous at this point but yet it seems like oh a whole new direction for for them i can't believe it they got scorsese involved as crazy and it also seems weird because warner brothers was pitched you know a red sun move movie by jordan voight roberts like you know other filmakers of pitched like these kind of like one off what if kind of tales from wunder brother seem so much more interested in having this connected cinematic universe yeah it also makes me wonder if you know we know that the flash movie is gonna be called flashpoint there's been a lot of speculation about that kind of being avery boot of this uh dc eu i wonder if you know this might reboot the joker n n i mean would we dare to suggest that they could possibly introduce a new batman in this movie if they decide to if ben affleck doesn't want to be involved moving forward i dunno i didn't say that you said that long just galymzhan speculating rural just not where i also be all about an a completely separate universe that it sat in a different time period that me gotta dc movies so that we may maybe we have two different dc governance anti one that exists in the 80s and the other that exist you know whenever the fact with windows i love that idea bribed you think that's like a legitimate thing that they could do because you have to think about like like general on it that's right like are they going to be able to tell the difference between.

graham scorsese warner brothers ben affleck windows jordan voight wunder