38 Burst results for "Scientist"

Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on Medical Frontiers

Medical Frontiers

00:39 min | 27 min ago

Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on Medical Frontiers

"Fast spreading corona virus outbreak should be left to local officials. So as a principle we should try as the default. To get the kids to stay in school. However, that's going to vary from where you are in the country. Doctor Fauci answered questions at a Georgetown university event today. If you're in the part Of a country with the dynamics of the outbreak, a really minimal if at all. Then there's no problem at all in getting back. Early stage testing showed the first covert 19 vaccine tested in the U. S revved up people's immune systems the way scientists had hoped. This vaccine is made by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. The first U. S study was just 45 people now they will recruit 30,000 people for the final testing. President Donald Trump has signed a bill and executive order that he says will hold China accountable for its oppressive actions against the people of Hong Kong Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been admitted to a hospital for treatment of a possible infection related to a bile duct stent. And will remain there for a few days. Now,.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg President Donald Trump National Institutes Of Health Hong Kong Supreme Court Moderna Inc Doctor Fauci Georgetown University Executive China U. S
14 players who could get long-term contracts this week

GSMC Football Podcast

02:12 min | 12 hrs ago

14 players who could get long-term contracts this week

"We're going to start off the last segment talking about. Deadlines as Their short time remaining for long term contracts with the deadline for franchise tag players to work out. long-term deals is now less than a week away. As Wednesday at four PM Eastern Standard Time draws near that is the deadline for any club that designated a franchise player to sign, said player to a multi year contract, following Wednesday tag player cannot signed an extension until after the final game upcoming regular season, and thus far of the fourteen players tag ten have signed their tenders and none have agreed to long term contracts so. With the economic uncertainty, due to unpredictable future amid the COVID, nineteen pandemic NFL insider Ian. rapoport reported Friday that it appears as if several will be playing on their one year deals including Tampa Bay Edge Shaq, Barrett. Washington Guard bread and sheriff in Jacksonville Pass, rusher, Nick In jock, who so? Those who are remaining to sign their tags are Djakou Denver Safety Justin Simmons Cincinnati Wide Receiver Green, and Chiefs Defensive Lineman Chris Jones. We talked about earlier, so the players who have signed their franchise tender is deck press got of course for thirty one million dollars temp Tennessee's Derrick Henry for ten million Hunter Henry sign through ten point six. Joe Sunni in New England sign fourteen point eight for his franchise tenure Washington. Brennan Sarah Sign Fifteen million. Leonard Williams scientists sixteen million in New York Baltimore's Matthew June signed for sixteen point eight Pittsburgh Buzzed depre- signed for fifteen point eight, and Minnesota's Anthony Harrison for eleven point four so. Of the franchise fourteen, each of them had their own story, but as a whole few seemed destined for long-term signings, many seem to have some contention with the tag and lease who are filling filing grievances regarding the position that they were designated ad

Brennan Sarah Sign Justin Simmons Derrick Henry Washington Guard Anthony Harrison Joe Sunni Leonard Williams Ian. Rapoport NFL Matthew June Chiefs Tampa Bay Hunter Henry Jacksonville Chris Jones Shaq Tennessee Nick Washington Baltimore
Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on Chip Franklin

Chip Franklin

01:09 min | 54 min ago

Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on Chip Franklin

"Of the American Medical Association network that a cove in 19 vaccine is closed. I think I'm optimistic that we will have one or more vaccines available. Before the first of the year. You can never predict scientist but I do think that that we're on an accelerated course here that I've not witness before. A change of plans for the Trump Administration hearing in a lawsuit brought by M I T and Harvard University had just gotten underway when a lawyer for the U. S Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that the Trump administration was rescinding a rule. That would have caused many international college students to leave the U. S. If their schools held on Lee Online classes. Instead, the return to the status quo under the policy international students in the U. S. Would not have received new visas if they had to take all of their classes online because of Corona virus, and they could have faced deportation. Universities felt the White House was pressuring them to reopen. I'm Steve Kastenbaum, Joe Biden has outlined his vision for the future. In a speech dedicated to the need for the nation to embrace efforts to combat climate change, the presumptive Democratic nominee, let off with criticism of the rush to get the nation back to business. Mr President Open Everything now isn't a strategy for success is barely a slogan. But the address to the media where Biden took no questions was mostly devoted to spending as much as $2 trillion on clean energy infrastructure to end U. S dependence on fossil fuels entirely. By 2035. Bob Costantini, Washington On Wall Street, the Dow.

Joe Biden Trump Administration U. S Immigration And Customs E American Medical Association Bob Costantini Harvard University Scientist White House Steve Kastenbaum LEE President Trump Washington
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 17 hrs ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:45 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

"Company is showing good results. Vanderbilt University vaccine expert Dr William Schaffner tells Can ex he's excited. The vaccine in its first phase looks pretty good. It created a nice immune response, which is very, very encouraging. And basically young people. Now they'll try it in older people in a larger group. The other thing about it is that actually, it made arms sore caused a little bit of a fever. The next stage and testing will begin next week when the biotech hopes to enroll 30,000 volunteers for a clinical trial. Schaffner says. More than 100 teams of scientists around the world are racing to develop a vaccine and hopes are high. That one will be in place sometime in the first half of.

Dr William Schaffner Vanderbilt University Fever
Metaflow: Netflix Machine Learning Platform with Savin Goyal

Software Engineering Daily

06:38 min | 1 d ago

Metaflow: Netflix Machine Learning Platform with Savin Goyal

"Brings us to aws flicks took the at the time unconventional decision to go all in on aws many years ago at this point, and that's treated. Netflix's really well, because it's almost, it's almost like. The the whole idea around blessed programming languages where you make a strong decision within an organization to restrict the number of programming languages with an organization and it it that constraint ends up helping the organization make decisions more quickly and allow for engineering mobility and so on. This is the case. This has been the case with aws when when Netflix? Strongly moved onto aws and continue to do that. That extends to medfly show. A better flow is an open source framework, but it has a tight coupling with aws. So why is the tight coupling to aws useful for machine learning framework? Sue I won't say that. We are tightly coupled to eight of us. So when leave it open sourcing MEDOFF. No at that point in time, because we had a good amount of operational expertise with aws, we chose indicating the details are ready for this cloud integration, but the architecture of Meta flow. Is Very much vendor agnostic, so the already have people who have ported Netflix will on top of Google cloud for example. So see I wanNA. Make sure that at the end of the day. The end user are data scientists decent to worry about any of the concerns that are introduced by using it us, Rg are. Is You're in the? Cloud windows to them. They're just writing code in an idiomatic language whether it's Biton are are, and the metaphor takes care of actually understanding the code and orchestrating that on top of the AWS RG CPU or any of the other. Providers. So so yet, so that's that's a strategy that we have been falling. We started views because that's what the US internally ethnic flex. That's what we have worst amount of experience and expertise in, but. There are people who have made it. Look at JCP, and going forward as well. It's something that's on our road, not to have a more and more indications. Appointed comparison to Meta flow might be airflow the distributed workflow scheduling system that's often used for data engineering jobs. How does medfly compare to airflow? So air is what you would come as production creates getting her in the sense that you have your email pipeline, and now you want your pipeline to run autonomously, say and all. At the stroke of Midnight Day are win some. Deed is available. That pipeline should be triggered so once once you've. Created your etl pipeline, and you're happy with how it's running at that point in time it makes sense to ported to an ear flu, or see it functions Louici for example. But. What is severely lacking in some of these two? Is the local expedients to on my laptop. I WANNA. Make sure that my workflow runs both Akil, and then I should be able to deploy it and that sort of what we can. Refer to as a traditional using this workflow on top of. Airflow audited list of functions so now met up. You has this notion of a dag and bundles in a local scheduler so menu writing your Code Medoff on your laptop at that point in time, medoff Lewis local killer may be responsible for executing your code, executing the nodes of the DAG, and you can mix and match. You can certainly talk the Dag run on your laptop to notice run. Run on the cloud with specific resources that you have already specified, and then once you're happy with the injury execution off your workflow than at that point in time, metaphor allows you to compile your dad into a specification that one of these production understand so as a matter of fact in early July, we are going to release our integration, but it of just approaches, which is production skater. Available in eight of us and you can take your workflow and this one commingling argument you can deploy on of aws. Step functions now step functions like some of the. Nice things about it is, it's a highly available Dag Scheduler, and it allows Florida running workflows, which can span a year as will end. The operation footprint is really monitoring, so you get like really nice quantities when Saginaw you're running on one of these stretching rates, lives and internally at net flicks. We chose to build one. Ourselves Sets Meson and Dorado. Bunch of talks online on specific infrastructure as well as the architecture needs on that front. and. Our internal users what they do is they invite Medoff workflow in this bag, and then just one single come online argument. They're able to export that as a means on woke view and this me, saen executor's slash schooler has a good amount of fetuses it around see how do unloading how to trigger events and other wilco finish resume. Your will close. You can sit a variety of triggers based on time the on what so you get like. All those nice features it when you're on top of one of these production rates get loose, and then you also get all the lineage tracking, and the deduc would and environments not shutting using Medicare. And do our end. Users now don't really have to consume themselves with a standing the programming model that means on provides our understanding the program model that Ilias Conscience provides. They just ride their coordinate in then metaphor takes care of interfacing in your of these productions units so now coming back to the question that you had around comparing metal fluid airflow I would say that these are ready to talking to products, and they're not competing against one another on the country they are. Supposed to work well with one another, so the situation would be back. You use metaphor your local prototyping, and once you're happy with the results then at that point in tiny convincingly just export of workflow onto their.

AWS Netflix United States Medoff Lewis Google Medicare Saginaw Akil Florida Wilco
Melting glaciers sound like frying bacon

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 d ago

Melting glaciers sound like frying bacon

"As the climate warms, glaciers are melting noisily. It sounds like Bacon fry, and you can hear bubbling and cracking and pop writing notes. Grant Dean is with the scripts institution of Oceanography. His team has been working in fall barred an archipelago north of Norway to record the sounds of glaciers melting. He says those sounds contain a lot of information that can help. Scientists monitor the effects of global warming on glaciers. For example, glacial ice contains tiny air bubbles that burst when the ice melts. So researchers are analyzing the sounds of those popping bubbles to see how they correspond the speed of Glacial Melt. And they're developing methods of distinguishing the sounds of glaciers, melting from nearby icebergs melting Dean says other tools for remotely monitoring ice melt such as satellites and radar are expensive, so he says listening to glaciers could prove a relatively simple and affordable way to track how they're changing as the climate lawrence. The glaciers are talking to us. It's their own particular kind of language. We need to decipher it to understand the future of the glaciers.

Dean Institution Of Oceanography Norway
World Health Organization acknowledges coronavirus can be airborne

This Week in Startups

06:48 min | 3 d ago

World Health Organization acknowledges coronavirus can be airborne

"I just read that. We still don't have a definitive posture on masks from the WHO? And that they are finally ceding ground to the idea that the coronavirus could partially be spread in air. I mean this is so bizarre because it's the middle of July, there are three million cases, and half a million people have died, and we are still there, and so you know when I saw that trump pulled out of the WHO You know in this weird way the way he did. It was kind of cartoonish in stupid, and you know kind of an insolent child, but the reason he did. It was actually pretty reasonable because this organization. Is Not a scientific or health body, it's an academic body, and you can see this in universities where all of a sudden things tilt away from fax, and it tilts towards you know all kinds of very very very small points of. Political capital that people fight over and so these politicized organizations are incredible and to the point at which we saw you know this past week the report that. Well over two hundred fifty of their own scientists who they rely on, said Hey. It's very clear that this is an airborne phenomenon aerosol tiny microparticles of Aerosol when people talk when they sing when they cough when they sneeze, all this obvious stuff floats in the air and if you ever closed air conditioned. Location like say a church in the South or a hotel or casino? It's not a good idea to be in there, and it's especially not about. Is especially bad idea. Take your mask off so now. The WHO is over two and as you said in his just horrifically comical way can explain as we're very clearly explaining that this is a political organization that is funded by a duopoly of superpowers that have many issues which we're going to get into today. And we have to say who the duopoly is Sax when you look at this being are token conservative here and you see the trump win. How frustrating is it for you? That trump's delivery and his persona when he is right in a person can't be wrong all the time I'm proof positive that you. You have to deal with the fact that he doesn't. It's such a stupid inane way that you don't actually get credit for the win. Well trump is often the the bull in a China shop, and kind of disrupts the status quo by. Throwing a grenade into it but frequently there there are good reasons why the status quo niece be disrupted and the the new. York Times laid out the case in a new story on who the the one that reported the scientists complaining that you're talking. It was just a straight news story, but it almost came across as an expose because whose incompetence was laid out so starkly the fact that they were slow on mass. Oppose them and. I think kind of lied about them. and then. and then to to be downplaying the airborne nature of the virus in favor of. Maintaining this narrative that it spread through touching surfaces or Which I think people are realizing now is much much less likely. And, so yeah, you do kind of have to wonder whose side is is on and the the New, York Times article kind of suggests why they do this, which is. When they issue a declaration, they have to think about the ramifications and all of their member countries, and so, what ends up happening? is they sort of start with the policy, implication or political result that they are? And then of reverse engineer, the science and You know with article talks about how you know if we were to come out and and sort of. Be Very. Clear about airborne transmission that could affect spending, or or you know political budgets all these different countries, and so they've been reluctant to do that so yeah, it's a it's A. WE'RE GONNA nation that sort of political, first, and then reverse engineers the science to fit that. And you know what this reminds me of. It's like when you have giant. Board of a company, the management team comes out, and now they've got to present like a pivot or an acquisition whatever it is, and they're thinking well. Okay. We've got this funding source. These people own twenty six percent of who this person owns twenty two percent. We've now got to present it to them. And what are the Ram downstream vacations? Luckily there's an alignment in a single company. The alignment is we want company share price to go up, but here in the world it is not equally aligned is in China's best interest. What's in the best interest and what's in America's best interest might be radically different, and they are literally funding them correct from off while there's a they are there. There's a there's this thing called Sayers law right which many of us kind of have seen play out which is at academic the saying something like academic politics. Are So vicious, because the stakes are so small, and in this interesting way, the WHO has lost the script because they fight over politics, who gets to say what who's being positioned, and they lose sight of the real downs in my opinion, the downstream implications of the things that they have because if they actually just thought from first principles and tried to be a truly independent body that said we are going to take. The capital were given from the countries that are supporting us and actually do the best. And actually published, like what is the best thing to do for example in the case of krona virus and be definitive and. We'd be a much better place, but a lot of what is allowed the posture corona virus to transition from a health issue to a political issue in many ways, has been because organizations like the WHO and the CDC. Our political bodies and their academic bodies, and so the incentives of the players within these organizations are not necessarily project the right public health positioning they are. Are At some level to think about their own career trajectory and the political machinations had happened within the organization that are blind to normal citizens like us that just consume the output, and then so when you see something like an inability to give a definitive ruling on things like masks, or you know other things. You just kind of scratch your head in wonder. Wonder is it that they're dumb and the answer is no. It's not that they're dumb. They're motivated by very different things than public health all the time, which

Donald Trump WHO York Times China CDC Engineer Sayers America
Scientists believe cannabis could help prevent, treat coronavirus

Mason & Ireland

01:42 min | 3 d ago

Scientists believe cannabis could help prevent, treat coronavirus

"Team of Canadian scientists believes it is found strong strains of cannabis that could prevent or treat corona virus infections. Wow, researchers from the University of Lethridge. Says a study shows at least thirteen cannabis plants are high in. That appeared to affect the pathways. That bug uses to access the body. Okay, now that you know this, will you partake in even more cannabis than you already do in an effort to fight off the corona virus well, I would welcome those scientists to make a recommendation. It's like it's like a wine menu. Hey try the BUBBA og. They say quote. We were totally stunned. At first then we were really happy. Which? Sense I certainly doing well. And I don't. I can't tell you that it is necessarily weed or cannabis, as I like to call it when I being professional bought. I do have a variety of different. Flavors strains of cannabis that I that I do use and maybe you know maybe my purple Kush is what is keeping me safe from corona virus. I think that's what your role with one more quote from the scientists quote, our work could have a huge influence. There aren't many drugs that have the potential of reducing infection by seventy eighty percent. Wow! He told the Calgary Herald so your nightly. Cannabis intake may actually be helping you fight off the virus

Cannabis Calgary Herald University Of Lethridge
New WHO guidance calls for more evidence on airborne transmission of COVID-19

1A

00:49 sec | 4 d ago

New WHO guidance calls for more evidence on airborne transmission of COVID-19

"World Health Organization initially acknowledged emerging evidence, suggesting that corona virus could spread through the air. After two hundred scientists signed a letter urging the WHO to update its guidance on the virus. We have been talking about the possibility of of airborne transmission and Aerosol transmission as one of the modes of transmission of covid nineteen as well as droplet. We've looked at full mineswee- we look at fecal oral. We look at mother to child. We look at animal to human of course as well and so we are producing a scientific brief on summarizing where we are. We've been working on this for several weeks now. That was who's technical lead on Covid Nineteen Maria van Kharkov at a press briefing on Tuesday but yesterday the organization concluded that there isn't enough evidence that airborne corona virus transmission is

World Health Organization Covid Maria Van Kharkov Technical Lead
Indoor airborne spread of coronavirus possible, says WHO

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:37 min | 4 d ago

Indoor airborne spread of coronavirus possible, says WHO

"The World Health Organization is acknowledging the possibility that covid nineteen might be spread in the area under certain conditions after more than two hundred scientists urge the agency to do so in an open letter published this week in a journal to scientists from Australia and the US wrote that studies have shown beyond any reasonable doubt that viruses are released during relation, talking and coughing in micro droplets small enough to remain aloft in the air. The WHO has long dismissed the possibility that the corona virus is spreading the except for certain risky medical procedures such as when patients have i. put on breathing machines. In a change to its previous, thinking the w eight show noted on Thursday that studies, evaluating covert nineteen outbreaks in restaurants, choir, practices and fitness classes suggested the virus might have been spread in the air. abalones spread particularly in specific indoor locations without symptoms a phenomenon. The organization has long downplayed. Who has repeatedly said? Such transmissions are rare despite a growing consensus among scientists globally that asymmetric spread likely accounts for a significant amount of transmission. The agency said that most spread is via droplets from acted people who cough or sneeze, but added that people without symptoms are also capable of transmitting the disease. The extent of truly a symptomatic infection in the community remains unknown.

World Health Organization United States Australia
Pete Buttigieg on Joe Biden's New Economic Recovery Plan

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

06:59 min | 4 d ago

Pete Buttigieg on Joe Biden's New Economic Recovery Plan

"Comes a covert nine tain. Of doing nothing other than predicting virus would disappear or maybe the drank bleach. You may be okay. Trump is simply given up. He's waved the white flag. He's walked away. This failures come with the terrible human cost. And deep economic toll. Time and again working families are paying the price. For this administration's incompetence. There's no other way to say it then incompetence. Speech at a factory in Pennsylvania today, the former vice president of rolled out his seven hundred billion dollar economic recovery plan today. He outlined his build back better plan near his hometown of Scranton Jr also happens to be a battleground state Biden's pitch comes as another one point, three million Americans filed for unemployment just last week as the pandemic continues as he said to take its toll for more, we welcome to our broadcast people to judge author veteran former mayor of South Bend Indiana, and of course, former Democratic presidential candidate. Thank you for coming on Mr Mayor and when you think about it. Infrastructure was always lying out there. Available to this president. It was a layup shot. It was an open net. All He'd had to do was name as he could have put his name on all those your tax dollars at work signs on the interstates. All he had to do was funded Joe Biden today gave it. A name pledged to fund it with fifty million Americans out of work. It's probably a good idea. No. Absolutely Joe Biden's put forward plan to make sure we're investing in American competitiveness investing in American manufacturing, which will do a lot of good in my part of the country, investing workers, research and development, and you're right, you know infrastructure is one of those things that. Frankly I. think mayors on both sides of the aisle. This president might actually deliver since it's very popular good for the economy. We need to do but. Even, this basic idea a. UPGRADING OUR INFRASTRUCTURE DONALD TRUMP campaign don. Didn't bother to actually do it. Joe Biden will because I think he understands the importance of a tour on. It's been something that's needed attention for some time, but now with our economy in shambles. It's also an opportunity to get people back to work. I want to play for you. Something this is. Telephone interview tonight, Sean Hannity Donald. Trump is how donald trump went after Joe Biden today. And he walks onto the stage wearing this massive mask. There's nobody on the stage, and then he takes off. He likes to have it hanging off usually the left ear I think it makes them feel good, frankly if you WanNa know the truth, and I guess that's okay, but you know when there's nobody around a. you don't really have to do that, but he feels. It's good and I'm okay with it if he wants to do that. He's got the largest basket. I think I've ever seen. It covers up you'll. You'll be wearing a mask to walk. feels. He looks good that way. So Mr Mayor? If he's GonNa litigated mask wearing masks size. What ear he hangs it off of in the midst of pandemic with fifty million out of work I'm assuming side. We'll take that fight. We Will Americans are dying is not a fight that we asked for, but and look nothing about district be political or partisan, listening to doctors should not be a partisan issue, and if you look at among the people, most Americans, trust medical scientists way more than they trust. Donald Trump but unfortunately a lot of his political protectors are allowing this to turn into a culture. Joe Biden wore a mask because he's setting an example about how to save lives, because that's what presidents did, and you know in addition to the bad policies in addition to the incompetent management I think the thing that's costing the American people most right now is. We don't have a president who has any? Any concept of the importance to setting an example of calling the American people who are highest valleys i. that's what Joe Biden was talking about from day one back when we were competing for the nomination, where his campaign was built on the left of the soul of the nation of battle, now underway the nation I think the reason you see our party united and a lot of independence in an increasing number of what I like to call future. Former Republicans all coming together to say that we want to lecture by the defeat. Trump is that you don't have to be a die hard rock real down crash to see that we need a better example set by the American presidency. Must be an interesting time for you as a veteran. You've got senator. Duckworth getting called a coward who hates America by a cable news host? You have lieutenant. Colonel Veneman men, putting in his paperwork. And you have this story of bounties being paid by Russia and Russia's President American lives of your brothers and sisters in uniform in Afghanistan and the Defense Secretary for one is a voice. We could probably use to hear right about now you agree. Do and I think that we need answered quickly about exactly what the president did not only his shocking inaction in the time, leading up to the story, came out his silence and inaction about the issue since. Ever, since the story is broken, I've been hearing from friends that I served with and look. This adds up to pack whether it's the way they talk about Senator Doctors who gave? More, to this country. Than just about any critics. Whether, it's the fact that a another were here. Colonel has career derailed fleet. Or the failure to protect troops abroad. It's clear that this administration has no respect for the military, and as one of the reasons why members of the military are looking for different. I think that represents a historic opportunity for my party. Keep reaching out again. It shouldn't be a cars an issue, the shooting way beyond politics, but right now we've got a very clear choice between somebody like Vice President Biden, who whose families military family whose son served. As somebody like Donald Trump, who's you know? Origins include going out of his way to avoid certain taking advantage of his millionaire connections to do it. As young man always rooted today where he just clearly doesn't care about protecting American troops, things like what we've learned that Russia to do. People judge, thank you very much for coming on great to have you on the broadcast tonight. Appreciate it

Vice President Biden Donald Trump President Trump Senator Vice President Russia Sean Hannity Donald Pennsylvania Scranton Jr Colonel Veneman South Bend Indiana Duckworth America Afghanistan
NIH Chief Gives Update On The Coronavirus In The U.S.

All Things Considered

11:15 min | 4 d ago

NIH Chief Gives Update On The Coronavirus In The U.S.

"Day, another record set across the United States 59,000 new Corona virus cases recorded yesterday, breaking the record again for a single day high for new infections, and that number capture surges in states from Texas to California, Florida to West Virginia. So where are we in the ark of the pandemic? Is there any glimmer of hope going to and how to square disconnects in the guidance coming from our political leaders and our most senior scientists? Questions we're going to put to one of our country's most senior scientists were going to spend this whole segment of the program questioning Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr Collins, Welcome back Good to speak with you again. Nice to be on your program. Mary Louise, So 59,000 new cases in one day. If I had told you back in March there February that that's where we would be as a nation in July, Would you have believed me? I would certainly have hoped not. We knew back in March and April that we had hit a terrible peak of infections, and we worked really hard across the nation to try to figure out How to flatten that curve and to bring that down, and we never really got it down. And now it's certainly headed up again in a way that is really quite alarming. I mean, hindsight always is 2020. But if there were one thing you wish we could go back and redo what would it be? You know, I think we learned what we needed to do in terms of social distancing in terms of wearing masks in terms of being very careful about public gatherings, especially indoors. But those were applied in a somewhat spotty fashion. People basically got tired of it, but the virus didn't get tired of spreading. And I'm afraid as things over the course of the last couple of months opened up. They weren't always following the CDC guidelines in the way that we would have hoped, and now we're starting to reap the consequences. And I particularly concerned that younger people feeling that maybe they're not so much a risk have felt much less likely to adhere to those guidelines. And have therefore been getting infected in larger numbers and then spreading it on to their neighbors, their families and particularly vulnerable people who we now are quite worried about to to where things might go next, Dr Anthony found. She warned last week that we could be on track to see 100,000 new cases a day. I interviewed him right after that, and he told me he dropped that number to jolt people to try to get our attention what she did. But have you seen anything in the weeks since he said it That suggests we are not heading for that outcome. Well, Dr Fauci is my colleague and I both worked at the National Institutes of Health. I'm actually his boss, although he is, of course, the most highly regarded public health spokesperson about this Outbreak. So when he speaks, people listen and well, they should. If you look at the shape of that curve and just do your extrapolation like you would in math class, you would say, having now hit just about 60,000 that there's no sign that that's topping out. And so his prediction I fear might in fact, turn out to be true, But we have things we condone about that. And that's where I'm hoping, Despite the anxiety that now spreads across the land again that we should not feel powerless that we are in a circumstance where we could try once again to flatten that curve by taking all of those recommendations about masks about social distancing about avoiding Being close together, especially indoors and see if we can do something to prevent this from going even further, obviously particularly important in places where we can see the community spread has gotten really quite out of control. Like Arizona. Ah, like California like Texas like Florida. But other places should not feel immune. The time to make those actions most effective is before you have a really widespread community problems. So I look in your own community see what's happening. If there's a hint that things were starting up again, everybody should take action. And so should the government leaders that have a chance to do something at that. Woo that to your earlier point, though, which is the guidance was out there in the spring and Individuals weren't paying attention. We got tired of it and elected officials were reopening anyway, Do you What gives you confidence that the advice that the best guidance from the CDC and another on other agencies will be heated now? Well, I guess I'm an eternal optimist. And so I will say when people are faced with reality, and you can't look at the current circumstance and not admit we've got a real problem. That perhaps this hope for sort of outcome that okay, it's summertime. And maybe this won't be such a problem. We've gotten past that. That's no longer the case. Anybody who's trying to Pretend we can just fake our way through this. We're not succeeding at that. So it's time to wake up. Look at those recommendations get serious again recognize that it's up to all of us, and we're Americans, and ultimately, we usually do the right thing. This is the right time to do that. Speaking of recommendations, I do want to ask you about schools and the debate raging over whether to reopen them. President Trump and other administrations have been downplaying the recommendations of their own health. Experts who will have seen the president tweeting that safety measures recommended by the CDC. Things like you just nodded to, like wearing masks and spacing. Student desks apart, he says. These air expensive they're impractical. Do you stand behind the CDC recommendations? I think CDC is our nation's expert group in public health, and we should take their recommendations as the recommendation we should follow. I mean, it is. It is complicated. Let's be clear if you're talking about students going back to school in Casper, Wyoming, where there are very few of any cases. That's a very different story than if you're talking about students going back to school in Houston, which is in the middle of a very serious outbreak, so blanket recommendations, saying everybody should do the same thing fly in the face of the reality of where we are with this outbreak, But CDC has recommendations to try to adjust to that. I think most of the school experts are looking at those Also worth looking at the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Here is a very distinguished group. That is worried as I am, as we all should be about the consequences of kids not being in school. That's a serious issue. Kids are basically being harmed by the absence of social interactions, losing up all kinds of time in terms of their learning curves. We do want kids back in school where those good things can happen, but everything in life is a benefit and a risk. And the risks are going to depend a lot on where you are at this point and how much that virus is spreading around, and that just has to be factored into the decisions. Ultimately, it's gonna have to be the local authorities that make That kind of judgment. I hear you're choosing your words carefully on. I do want to ask you since since we already brought up Dr Fauci. You and he streamed an online conversation earlier this week, which I watched. It was informative. Thank you for that. It also got some buzz because a lot of journalists have been complaining that they cannot get an interview with Dr Fauci. Here's a taste of that We have not been able to get our requests for Dr Fauci approved by the Trump administration. In the last three months, high profile figures from the task force, including Dr Fauci have been unable to secure White House permission to appear on American TV networks. I just want to let you respond to that, because, as you noted, your Dr Fauci is boss to your knowledge is here. Anybody else who's message on public health conflicts with the administration's message? Are they being prevented from talking freely? I think every administration has always had an interest in making sure that people who work for the government if they're going to make a presentation to the public, that there is some consultation about that. I do that as well. When I'm going to have this Kind of a conversation like we're having right now, but I have not been canceled feelings that you can't speak to a TV network. I need to run. That invitation passed to be sure that the administration is aware of it and that they don't have any particular issues with the request. That's been the case for every administration since I've been in the government, which is 27 years. Return you to vaccines in a couple of minutes we have left this week, The government announced $1.6 billion contract to a company to manufacture a Corona virus vaccine. This company. Novavax, though, does not have a product that has been proven. Toe work, which made me think that feels like an awfully big bet to place on something unproven. Why is that the right path if you think that is the right path. Oh, I think it is the right path. Mary Louise. I think What we're trying to do here is to have a lot of potential shots on goals. This vaccine is going to be our best hope to get past this terribly difficult year of 2020 And the more that we have multiple different scientific strategies, the more likely we are that at least one and maybe several of them will work. The Novak strategy is basically to make a protein sub unit. It's different than what's happening with the other vaccines that are about to get started in the next month or two with their phase three trials. And so it is hedging their bets. It's trying as you would, I think, want to when something is a really serious issue, and you want to be sure you succeed. Make sure you've tried several things that you have a menu of opportunities that's going to cover all of the scientific basis, and Novavax brings another one. To the table, so we're glad to have them in the team. If I hear you right? It sounds like it's it's possible. This might be money thrown down the drain. But at this point we don't have something proven, and we have to work towards something. So we're goingto as you said, had hedge your bets. That's exactly right on. I think that's probably what the public would want us to do At a time like this, where I mean, if it wasn't such a rush, we might try one vaccine. And then six months later go Oh, that one wasn't quite what we wanted and then try another one. And it could be five years or more before we actually had the answer. We don't have time for that. Think the public doesn't expect us to be doing the slow boat here, so the idea is to have several of these to invest in them expect that some of those monies are actually not going to pay off. But one of them will maybe more than one will. Ultimately, I think that's what the public is expecting. And what we're trying to deliver. Speaking of operation Slow boat and not wanting to go there. We just have 30 seconds or so left. But how do you reassure people that With the speed that this operation is being developed. The whole thing is called Operation Warp speed to try to get a vaccine that it will also be safe. Well, I want to assure everybody about that The speed is being done by basically doing in parallel things that otherwise would have been done in a Siri's of steps, but every step is being carried out with rigor and intensity. Before we have to go. Let me just say anybody who's interested by the way and signing up for a vaccine trial because they're about to get under a going to give you a Uriel Carell correctness prevention network dot org's okay. Francis Collins Francis Collins, head of the National Institutes of Health, many things

Dr Fauci CDC National Institutes Of Health Francis Collins Francis Collin Mary Louise Novavax Texas California United States Florida Dr Anthony Arizona American Academy Of Pediatrics President Trump Director Siri West Virginia Uriel Carell
Glass vial shortage could delay deployment of coronavirus vaccine

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:45 min | 4 d ago

Glass vial shortage could delay deployment of coronavirus vaccine

"Corona virus vaccine made by the Massachusetts based company Moderna. Should go into advanced trials later this month. But even if a vaccine is proven to be safe and effective, there are concerns that a global shortage of specialized glass for vaccine vials could delay its rollout. CBS is empty as tell you takes a look inside a vaccine mega factory If the race for developing a successful Corona virus vaccine is moving at warp speed than this factory floor will be a crucial finishing line. Serum Institute of India is the world's largest manufacturer of vaccines that has been tapped by pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca to produce over a 1,000,000,000 doses of the vaccine. Being trialed by Oxford University. We've dedicated all our manufacturing facilities. At the moment for the AstraZeneca product. If the Oxford vaccine trials are successful, they're serious concerns about how to distribute it. Glass vials are the safest way they can withstand cold temperatures are resistant to contamination, but they require highly specialized machinery to make If at least 7.7 billion glass vials are needed to treat every single person on the planet. There's nowhere near enough. We are in a situation where lots of things have to come together. As you know such coordination efforts at that skill also depend to a great degree on political coordination. The Trump Administration has been trying to secure supplies only for the U. S. But scientists at the W H O R warning that America first approach will only prolonged is still very global pandemic even with an effective vaccine. NPR's time. CBS NEWS London

Astrazeneca CBS Oxford University Massachusetts Trump Administration NPR Institute Of India London America W H O
UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

Science Magazine Podcast

08:19 min | 5 d ago

UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

"A UK mega trial designed. Test Treatments Cove Nineteen Haikai Sarah. We're talking about the UK's It's called the recovery trial and it hasn't differences with other ongoing trials of drugs for Corona virus. What are some of the big differences with recovery? The main difference in some senses said it's a really really big trial they have. More than two thousand patients now. In an outbreak like this if you really want to have really good clear, robust result, one of the most important things to include a lot of people to get a really strong signal of secrecy, that's something that recovery has been able to do, and really no other trial in the world has been able to get those patients numbers. This isn't a UK. And the United Kingdom has a lot of cases for its size. Is that one of the reasons that this trial has been success? Yeah, absolutely I mean if they didn't have that many. Many patients in the first place of today wouldn't be able to enroll that many patients some of the people I've talked to so for instance one of the scientists. He's from Norway. He was saying. The recovery trial is really successful in the sense that one in six patients that goes to UK hospital with Kobe nineteen ends up in the trial. Well, you can kinda wonder why they managed to include that many patients. One reason is that they have the National Health Service all the hospitals took part in that and the top doctors in the. The Nation wrote a letter to all the hospitals and all the staff. Saying you know here are the three trials that we want to prioritize in. Please try to include patients in these trials. If you can, so that's kind of how they they ended up with those huge patient numbers in the first place that allowed them to in a very short time. Get some some answers as a result of having all these patients enrolled and kind of coordination at the national level for recovery. They've seen a lot of results in a short time can. Can you talk about some of the drugs? They've been able to either give a thumbs up to or thumbs down to I one. That was a really big deal. Was the hydroxy chloroquine arm of the study so much has been set written about hydro or Quin, banning a lot of that was based on trials, either with very few patients or trials obsessional, so whether patients were randomized to either get hydroxy chloroquine or a different drug or placebo, but basically looked in retrospect and compared how patients did who got hydroxy in patients who didn't? The recovery trial date has the best data we have for civilian patients being treated with hydroxy chloroquine, and they didn't see a significant difference in how the hydroxy chloroquine group did versus suspended care. Group And they put that out in a press release, and within a few days, a lot of other trials that were ongoing that would clearly not have stronger results were ended. I wouldn't say it's quite the end of that drugstore quance Saga Probably, but certainly mocked the attorney on. And on the other side of the roster here we have a drug that actually help patients that were in the hospital, so that sex method zone. It's a steroid drug that's also been known for a long time quite cheap. It's widely available, so it's really nice drug to be shown to be effective against covid nineteen. There's been a lot of debate from the beginning about how much of the severe illness at the end in patients is really the overreaction of the immune system, and that's of course where the steroid drugs attack the pathogenesis really so they can have damp and. And Immune System, and the hope is that that will mean that that the symptoms of patients will be severe and people are more likely to survive, and then that turned out to be the case I mean they. They found that mortality when one third in patients that received accent medicine. That was really the first big randomized trial in this outbreak that showed a clear difference in mortality, the national. Health Service within hours after the result was announced, changed its standard of care to include some episode. This is pretty surprising. These aren't peer reviewed results. These are press release results. Yes. That's been a huge point of contention. There's just kind of tension inherent in this fast-moving pandemic between you know having really robust results in getting them out there as fast as possible and I talked at length with Martin Landry, one of the principal investigators of the about it his argument. Is You kind of get? The baseline results I. You can look at the data and see okay. There is a difference in mortality and might be some changes in the percentages, but nothing major, but then there's a lot of other data that you want to put in the paper that takes some. Some more work, so his argument was. This is an important resulted to change the outcome of patients right now so let's put it out and then try to get the paper out as soon as possible. After that in the paper ended up coming out I think seven days after the results. Yeah, it's a bit of a wild west. Now place is different. Hospitals have different standards of care like in the US. A lot of hospitals are using convalescent plasma. This is a blood product from a person has recovered from cove nineteen and they're using that to treat patients in the hospital. But convalescent plasma hasn't been subjected to the same level of scrutiny at the same level of evidence has been obtained. You know for that as a deck of Methadone the drug. We just talked about right and I. Mean that's the two points though that I find really interesting and one is. If you're going to give patients these drugs, anyway, you might as well be using that to generate data that then shows whether the drug works said they aren't collecting data on these treatments, so they are collecting data, very. Very. Often right, the problem is I. Mean it does back to what I was saying about randomized patients, you can treat patients with something and then say okay. We're collecting a lot of data and we'LL GONNA look back at how the patients did that. Receive Drug and how patients did that didn't but there's a hierarchy of evidence and really in that hierarchy a randomized trial just because it gets rid of all the bias season, who would receive a drug or not otherwise so everyone? I talked to really agree. Agree that we need in this particular situation that's condemning when you want to see as fast as possible whether a drug has a big effect on the hard outcome like do people die or do they survive what you need, a large randomized trials, and when you ask people why they do, it also goes back to what you were saying. A lot of people said when they tried to convince doctors to take part. The doctor say well, but I have a good feeling I think. I know what works, right. Right maybe I mean doctors sometimes willing to accept a lower standard of evidence to guide their decisions. It then becomes very difficult to get to that higher level of evidence because to do that. You need to accept that half of your patients are not going to receive whatever you believe to be the most useful. That's inherent tension in the whole enduring these kinds of trials when you have some observational data already, but you don't really have the kind of strong data that let's say with confidence. Okay, this worse. I'm here in the US. We have many many cases, but there isn't this sized patient group being randomized. Is that because of what we just talked about, or is it more a lack of coordination? The US has done one big trial though the National Institutes of health the first. Study that was a randomized placebo controlled trial that included a lot of patients. And did give a robust result didn't really see a difference in mortality, but it showed that patients receive from severe. Stay in hospital for a short time period. Why haven't more trials like that I? Think it is a lack of coordination. You can argue that the whole response in the US to this virus has been marked by lack of ordination, and then, of course it does help when you have certain structures in place so again. The National Health Service in the UK with all of these hospitals. Part of this National Health Service. Of course, it makes it a lot easier. You put in place this one structure, one ethical board, and then you kind of do it from there while if you have to piece together coalition. Coalition of different hospitals and different investigators, it becomes a little bit more complicated. I think right, but given the the sheer amount of cases, the US has had i. mean certainly data could have been generated that would have informed both the US and the rest of the world a lot better about what works what doesn't.

United Kingdom United States National Health Service Chloroquine National Institutes Of Health Norway Attorney Kobe Martin Landry Methadone Principal
How is bias built into algorithms? Garbage in, garbage out.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:44 min | 5 d ago

How is bias built into algorithms? Garbage in, garbage out.

"Does bias get built in facial recognition algorithms garbage in garbage out. From American public media. This is marketplace. I'm Ali would. In facial recognition and AI. Development computers are trained on massive sets of data. Millions of pictures gathered from all over the web. There are only a few publicly available data sets, and lots of organizations use them, and they are problematic vinay. Prabhu is chief scientist at the start up unify he and obey Babar honey. At University, College Dublin published a paper recently, examining these academic data sets. Most of the pictures are gathered without consent. People can be identified in them. There are racist and pornographic images and text, and even the idea of labeling someone, a lawyer or a woman or a criminal based on appearance will ultimately the researchers said. Maybe it's not the data. That's the problem. Maybe it's the whole field. Here's name Provo, the community has historically prior of basically put suing problems which are ethically dubious. A huge number of papers are published on ethnicity classification and generating human faces and a basically ranking people's faces as to how attractive it S. is it really a need to be solving these problems in the first place? Like what exactly it is that you're trying to automate, ask yourself. What is your technology eventually going to result like? How is it going to result in terms of like? The power in the society, the computer community has a deeply entrenched historical traffic are of basically you know increasing the rats of power on the minority groups, and if you're looking at the flagship applications, there are very few things that have ushered in a paradigm shift in the way that you know disenfranchised. Felt and entrance iced right I mean it sounds to me like what you're saying is. Don't just design a better image. Based data set the idea that you need an image based status that and that technology should be built on top of that data. Is itself flawed and will always be flawed. You hit the nail on the head. Women of Color have done tremendous work, but then every time they tried to do something. Something good in the tech, boys or bruise will invariably attack them as social justice warriors who are bringing in their canceled culture into academia us. We need to be more pragmatic. We need to be more science oriented. We need to be oblivious to all of these politics is what they're excuses. There are conversations about banning facial recognition technology that's being developed in these ways. Is this a problem for regulation to solve the? League required, but if you logistician, it's pretty easy to discover a loophole. I think one of the Silicon Valley. Cliches. And of melt for a long AMAS, if you don't allow us to the data from the public China's doing the same thing Russia is doing the same thing they will basically be. Superior to us, so these legislations I think will for the most part, put a small roadblock, but I am very confident of the ability of You know the powers to be enough, find loopholes and to kind of harness solutions. That will allow them to still stay within the legal grill. Day Prabhu is scientist at unify MIT operates one of the public data sets he in BARANI ND in response to their research. The school took it off line for good.

Scientist Prabhu ALI AI China Barani Nd Silicon Valley MIT Russia Babar
How Much of Our Food Do Moths Pollinate?

BrainStuff

04:53 min | 5 d ago

How Much of Our Food Do Moths Pollinate?

"Bees are not doing well. Since the mid two thousand colony collapse disorder has been taking out the world's most famous plant pollinator all over the world, these pont, one third of the plant's we eat from oranges, almonds a service worth some one hundred sixty eight billion dollars a year by the way, and their rapid disappearance is worrying farmers worldwide. But what if there a secret army of pollinators? Sneaking around the plants we rely on most it could be good news for food security, or it could be a neutral factor if these insects are susceptible to the same or similar pressures as BS. A study published in May of Twenty Twenty and the journal Biology letters has found moths playing much bigger part in pollinating plants than anybody imagined possibly visiting a bigger variety of plant species than bees, and doing it under the cover of darkness. Scientists didn't just realize overnight that moths pollinate plants. The problem was much of the research was limited to a few specific types of moths the. Spend a lot of time rooting around in flowers like hawk. Moths which have extraordinarily long tongues like fourteen inches thirty six centimeters long used for getting it hard to reach nectar reserves within a flower. However over the last decade investigations into how moths as a group contribute to the process of pollination found that your average moth tongue can be a effective tool for moving pollen from plant to plant. This knowledge led the study's authors to turn an eye to the rarely studied settling moths, which sit low and close to flowers and hide out in sheltered spots during the day. We spoke by email with these studies lead author Richard Walton of the University College London Department of Geography. He said our research has for the first time compared moth pollination networks with those of day flying pollinators such as bees hover flies to help us understand illustrate the wide ranging plant preferences. We discovered moths to have in an agricultural setting. We also found that malls were carrying most pollen from the flowers they visited on their furry bodies, which means the means of pollen transport from flower to flower by moths is very similar to bees, hover flies, which also transport most of the pollen on their bodies. Many social bees like bumblebees and honeybees visit lots of different types of flowers, but they also tend to target certain favourite plants that they know will provide plenty of their favorite kinds of pollen and nectar. As a result, some plant species get less attention than others. Walton said solitary bees often be more specialized visiting one type of plant while hover flies often visit flowers with a certain shape. We found that moths visit many different species of plant with a few different types of flower shape. If daytime pollinators do not visit a particular plant species often, but motte species do, and this results in pollination. This increases the chance that this plant would survive for another generation. So because malls are a bit less picky than daytime pollinators, but still get the pollination job done. Plants not preferred by bees persist, maintaining a diverse population of plants is essential to maintaining A. Resilient ecosystem that can weather threats like climate change organization. Conversely with plenty of plants to feed on moths, themselves can continue being an important food source for birds, bats and other insects. The research team observed and collected daytime pollinators as well as nocturnal moths around farm ponds the United. Kingdom and found moth food webs were often comparable to those of daytime pollinators in complexity, and in some instances had greater complexity. Walton said moths are likely providing a kind of resilience or backup to the food webs of daytime pollinators, if a certain species or number of species of bee or butterfly disappears from the landscape, moths potentially fill in that pollination gap. Taking this step further, it's also significant because moth populations are facing severe declines across the globe, as we realize that they're important contributors to the pollination process becomes even more important to protect moth populations because we might be placed ourselves at risk. The researchers found mauled were visiting plants belonging to families that are important to humans as a source of foods like apples, strawberries, pears, peaches, beans, and peas. Walton said this has exciting implications for mall. Being involved in crop pollination, it would help us to move past seeing moths as merely pests, but as important contributors to our own livelihoods.

Richard Walton Twenty Twenty Biology Letters University College London Depa
Defining AI Readiness

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:08 min | 5 d ago

Defining AI Readiness

"So Joel before we start talking about companies caught up when it comes to a readiness think it's important to get your thoughts on what Ai Readiness implies one of the pillars one of the parts of readiness at an enterprise level. Yeah When it comes to think through a readiness to pieces to it. The first is typical. And understanding the science of machine learning. And I think that is one. That's what the different choices out there. L. Services Today. You can go on a journey. With, if you've got that scientists in house, you can begin to use some of the really powerful advanced machinery tools. Fantastic, but there's also been a lot of investments made around managed. Ai Services that can take care of a lot of the data size for you so that what you really have to focus on the customer. And bringing the right data to the problem and allowing these services. To help you find the answers and help you move faster as your folks get skilled up and get more and more bad data science expertise underneath their belt. I think the other piece though has really interesting it as you think about readiness, though is the readiness of the business, because what's really important about machine, learning is that it's not just a technical problem. And what I chat with customers, a lot about is really making sure that S-. When we sit down to talk about she learning problems, and what's what machine learning problems, WanNa tackle within an organization. Is that. We have both business experts, subject matter experts and technical at the table. Because you have so much such machine learning success is based on the data that you bring to the problem and understanding what data is important. As well as understanding. What actually makes for a good prediction. If we build a model that recommends things that just aren't feasible. Don't make sense in the context of the business than that models on helpful. And so. Really assessing that both the business organization. He's value in machine. Learning the Technical Organization is ready to pursue and invest in it are two has of that readiness problem that customers need to consider and make sure that both sides of the organization are on board. Who after that Kral? Okay. This is an interesting way of slicing it I've had a lot of people put together more pieces, but I kinda like this. Really simple serve two halves to the whole deal. You're talking just to clarify here. The tech side of the house, as it were and the business side of the House as it were with us. Be The colloquial way to refer to these these parts and kind of their agreement and communication. Yeah I. Mean I think an example here would be? If the organization was resume parcels. And say that we really want to begin to engage in. Providing better, pro recommendations or better offers to our customers or better content if we're warm and media space, it's really important that in that case your product teens or your marketing teams are on board that initiative at they're going to be at the table helping craft one best solutions going to look like as much as it is of course that the development teams at the table thinking through how to implement it. Because? When you have these machine learning solution set, you're building to go. Do these things like engage your customers a much better way? These are now. Customer facing business outcomes that you're trying to pursue and making sure that these business experts are there with you and helping to guides, the solution on that I found to be really important and making sure that the the models that get bills are actually bottles that get used. Yeah the cross functional Ai, team dynamic is brand new for a lot of enterprises, especially at the level that Ai requires, we often talk about the education gap of the subject matter experts, even knowing their needed I'm more or the business leadership, understanding basic a I use cases basic AI terminology understanding how these teams to work the point that you just said there that you can't just give them the specs and let him off in a room, and then they plug it in. You know it's. It's not a plug in here. There's a pretty pretty iterative collaborative process to happen to do anything recommend products. deliver service. What is closing education? Gaps look like talking about the business side of the house. I'm wondering if you. Have noticed anything about what companies are doing and try to level up that part of the I. Guess the understanding. Gap Yeah. There's an pattern that I've seen emerge within organizations beginning through this. Actually just to take a step back, I think what's been really interesting to watch. In is the evolution of machine learning over the past few years. Because? Quite honestly, your went from machine learning being an aspirational technology to something. That's mainstream extremely fast. We're finding that to your point. There is a lot of education has to happen.

Technical Organization Ai Services AI Joel Wanna
The Fat burn Fix And Our Growing Susceptibility To Viral Infections - With Dr. Cate Shanahan

The Model Health Show

05:41 min | 6 d ago

The Fat burn Fix And Our Growing Susceptibility To Viral Infections - With Dr. Cate Shanahan

"Welcome to the model. Show this fitness and nutrition expert Shawn Stevenson and I'm so grateful to be tuning today. This episode here I am so pumped about. This is one of my favorite physicians. One of my favorite scientists and she's got a new project is really helping shed some light on a very very misunderstood topic in this the topic of body, fat. Sustain that we tend to see is a very cosmetic target is a very cosmetic issue for hundreds of millions of people right now, but in truth, our body fat is a major player in so many different dynamic ways as far as our health as far as our ability to fight infections, viral infections, even and I think that this is going to be incredibly enlightening and something that you're going to walk away with having a better understanding of this. Incredible tissue that we're all carrying around in what's led to the surplus that were carrying around for many of us, and also some more intelligent ways that we can address this in not just for cosmetic issues, but to truly get our society healthier. And hope that you've been employing different strategies to get yourself healthy right now, and also your loved ones. It's more important than ever to reach out. Make sure that our friends and family are doing some of the basic necessities of just getting some fresh air, going out and walk move their bodies, engaging in some stress management practices, and we've done episodes dedicated to these things, and also making sure that they're getting in some high-quality foods as well as supersport right now, but we just recently went on our first outing since the corn team began first outing to a restaurant with our FRIZZ nextdoor, nextdoor, neighbours, families both wint. And it was very a felt like I was visiting another planet, I definitely felt a little bit like that scene and back to the future when Michael J. Fox goes back to pass, and he's got like a has met suit on, and he winds up in a barn, and these folks happened upon him in his hands. Matsue with this delorean in the sign has his comic book. which is like the cover? The Comic Book Kinda shows what the future looks like are. These alien invaders look like. So just to get into the restaurant you walk through. The. Lobby is about five feet of lobby, and you have to wear masks. Go through the five feet, but then there people already there sitting at tables there socially distance. Of course you know one table apart, but they've got. You know they don't have mask on because you can eat with a mask on yet. Until maybe we get permanent mass installed on her face faces in little openings, but the science there. Wasn't really accurate. You know like that five feet, but then once you go pacify feet. Take your mask off, and you can each her. You know whatever your therefore, but he's a very strange experience. Because the waitress had on, the has metsu she had on the face shield. She had on the mask at that point I was like why be here in like there's so much that goes into it, and it's so abnormal. We should just go ahead and you know. Make dinner ourselves have family. Get together something like that. It's just an added. stressor is so much uncertainty in all. The tables had to be labeled that this table has been sanitized in, you know. We've hit it with the flame thrower all these different stuff just to feel comfortable going outside, and it was like this was like a you know there's a strip mall and everybody is just a very dystopia and situation, and this is the situation that we're facing right now. There is a very infectious. Virus that is that we're dealing with as a society and at its core. We Really WanNA. Look at this what we've been dedicated to. How do we get our citizens healthier? so that were not as susceptible to this virus in the mini viruses that are to come because this is right now. This is just the first of many that we're going to be faced with as humanity you know, and the thing that is overlooked in that I've really been working to up level the conversation is. As a species? What are the things that make us more susceptible to viral infections? What are the things that we can do to help? Improve our bodies response because in truth we've had such a relationship with viruses throughout human evolution that we are in fact, the human genome is eight percent over eight percent in dodge in his viruses that we are. Our genome is made of. We've had such interaction with viruses. We are made viruses on that level talking about our human genome, what our jeans are made of the human genes with the things that make us human. We're part virus. And even more tangible aspect because I think there's really a hard pill for us to swallow as society right now that we are virus ourselves. But you know this is something that we can test track now. We have some affirmation to the fact that we all are carrying upwards of three hundred trillion virus particles in and on our bodies all the time. We are. We're like a playground for viruses and. Pathogenic! Many of them Symbiotic. But this equation really plays into. How healthy are we interact with other people's virus load? How healthy are we or what can happen to damage our health immune system health that even the pathogenic viruses that were carrying right now can become opportunistic and take advantage of our system and make us sick.

Shawn Stevenson Nextdoor Michael J. Fox
Covid Science: Test, Track, Trace

The Naked Scientists

04:13 min | Last week

Covid Science: Test, Track, Trace

"First up this week, the city of Leicester has been making the headlines now unlike the rest of the UK that celebrated super. Saturday as the lockdown eased, was grand reopening for the pubs in Leicester Schools have been restricted to children essential workers again. A non essential shops have had to pull down the shutters because surge corona virus cases. The lockdown has been extended there. Nobody seems to be able to think on precisely why Lester has come top of the League for Corona. Virus cases this last month. The Department for Health and social care said there were multiple factors causing the spike, and there were no quote. Cat Homes, hospital settings or industrial processes that would immediately explain the apparent rise in new diagnoses. BA- scientists say that infections might reflect social inequalities in places where there are more white collar jobs, employees can work from home, and they can isolate from others a deprived areas on the other hand. People are more likely to have to go to work and to use public transport to do that, and that raises their risk of becoming infected. Cambridge University's Jeff Studies disease outbreaks. So, what does she make of the longer lockdown approach? That's being used to control the outbreak in Leicester I think in general terms were already on the right track. It's really about sort of empowering local authorities now when we do see sort of increase transmission in specific areas to act in a way that they know is locally appropriate, also locally effective to contain it because the way outbreak spread is obviously determined by the population. It's spreading in sort of density of the housing arrangement, the kind of industries they rely on for. For the economy there do we actually know what is the right way forward? In terms of when you have these sorts of combinations of factors, what the right thing to do is, or is it going to be a learning exercise? In different cities with different formats, different population groups are going to have to learn the hard way, and then they'll know for next time. Absolutely especially with such an unfamiliar in new virus, there is going to be a lot of trial and error a lot of trying to learn from each other and author trying to look. To see what's going to help, there is not going to be a one-size-fits-all and I think that the fact that nothing is certain should be a bit reassuring in that there is discussion and research, and that's really what's required at present. Given it is. We know that viruses spread much less will in turn. More people are out and about we're also in the immediate aftermath of lockdown when arguably the amount of virus circulating should be extremely low. Is it not rather worrying that? We've got lester happening right now? It's obviously concerning sure whether we should see it as entirely surprising. There are few features over city like Lester. That would leave little more susceptible to kind of ongoing transmission. What encourages me is that it was detected and that there is this discussion now of maybe some kind of local interventions that could come into control. There is something to be said for the fact that is. And the does seem to be less transmission because when you're in sort of orphan spaces, so maybe there is some kind of happy middle ground of opening up. The is possible with something. That sort of leverage is the the fact that we can be outside right now and not rained on chilly. For we've now got plans being laid for opening up the hospitality industry more opening up air bridges to other European countries. What your feelings on the direction of travel? As it too much too soon or do you think this is about right? I think it's important in answering this question that I make it clear that my background is very much coming from the sort of epidemiology anthropology side I'm not an economist. I'm not a public policymakers rule, but from my perspective it is worrying I'm through are ways that we can support hospitality industries to open up in a way that sort of mitigates the risk and so I'm hopeful. But the issues around international spreads do concern me, not just the idea of importing cases into Britain, if we transmission even loa, which could trigger new ongoing transmission, but also the fact that we might be exporting cases to vulnerable places. We've not only got to think about risks to our country, but the role we might play in sort of proliferating this outbreak globally to

Lester Leicester Leicester Schools Department For Health Corona Cat Homes Cambridge University UK Jeff Studies Britain
Forests Getting Younger and Shorter

60-Second Science

02:07 min | Last week

Forests Getting Younger and Shorter

"They give us paper and fuel as well as vital ecological services like cleaning the air, storing carbon and providing habitat. We're talking about trees, of course, but changes in the environment largely caused by humans appear to be causing profound transformations in trees around the world in a new study scientists reviewed global research on trends, Intrigue Birth, growth and death. They combine those data with an analysis of deforestation, and they found that worldwide older trees are dying at higher rates than in the past due to factors like rising era, temperature, wildfires, drought, and pathogens, most of the drivers of that decrease of large trees are increasing themselves such as temperatures, going up droughts or more severe wildfires, windstorms and deforestation are all although variable across the globe. They're. Increasing in so both the loss has already occurred, but we expect more continued loss of big old trees. Nate McDowell an earth scientists at the civic. Northwest National Lab. Who is one of the study's authors? So if we have an increasing rate of death, particularly, the larger older trees. What's left are the younger trees, so that's why, on average through the loss of bigger older trees are forests are becoming inherently younger and shorter. This is a problem because old trees are vitally important for sure. The increase in death does limit the carbon storage of ecosystem and can forces system to become a carbon source to the atmosphere. Second reason we cares from biodiversity perspective. Will grow trees tend to house a higher biodiversity than young four STU. And the third reason is aesthetic as as a society. We care about these trees. We have national parks named after big trees. So there's a there's a personal reason for people to care about this as well.

Nate Mcdowell Northwest National Lab
"scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 2 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lonely and as as a scientist is he must have been feeling I was just I was just allies for few minutes there not sure what to say and not sure what to do we struggled for months if not years to make sense of that moment when it happened it was only with time that I came to realize that Roger should been struggling with the well the sadness that was far deeper than many of us probably imagined so we felt a lot of guilt wondering giving Mrs sign should we have been more supportive of him I I think back on those days as a child when I would walk around the construction site at home and have those conversations with him and I now realize that haps those conversations and that more than I had thought I feel grateful that I had the opportunity to have those exchanges with him because those are the few moments were assigned joy on his face and heard in his voice as he talked about what he loved which is architecture and construction I want to talk for a moment about the general connection between social isolation and loneliness and the phenomenon of suicide the numbers are really staggering the Vic forty five thousand people commit suicide in the United States every year worldwide it's about eight hundred thousand people it's really astonishing that we don't pay more attention to the problem not just in the United States but around the world well it is an suicide sadly although it's been improving in some countries around the world has been worsening and others including the United States and I think part there's so many reasons why I think we don't talk about a deal with suicide as profound an issue as it is I think it makes people uncomfortable number one and I think it also makes people feel helpless the roots of deep depression and suicide are complicated and it's not always easy to understand where they come from there are also lots of mixed feelings that people have about suicide with their with rooted in religious believe foreign cultural norms but the bottom line is when it comes to suicide when it comes to depression the one of the greatest resources we have one of the most powerful sources of healing that we have in our back pocket our relationships with others those relationships may not always feel available in the moment so we want them but it stands out to me despite being a doctor who is prescribing a number of medications over the years that one of them was powerful medicines we have his love and the vehicle through which that love is delivered our relationships and at a time when we are struggling with such high levels of suicide at a time we seen such high levels of depression anxiety particularly among young people I think it's more important than ever that we rethink and harness the power of relationships and recognize that they are not just nice to haves but they are necessary to have an essential part of the foundation that makes us healthy well and strong I'm wondering how is a doctor and his former Surgeon General you see these issues playing out in the context of the corona virus pandemic we're all being told to practice social distancing we're meeting few friends we hunker down with family or many of us hunker down by ourselves can you see this pandemic increasing social isolation worldwide I think there's a real possibility that the physical distance thing we're being asked to observe to tamp down this wave of cove in nineteen infection could very well contribute to more loneliness I think you could contribute to a social recession if you will mark by deepening levels of loneliness is we stay apart for longer and longer periods of time but I don't think it has to be that way in fact I think this is potentially an opportunity for us to re think and re center our lives around relationships to recognize once again and perhaps even more deeply appreciate the role and power that relationships have in our lives not just to our spouses and our family members and close friends but also the relationships we share with colleagues at work with classmates at school and even with strangers in our community and I'm struck that it in a moment like this when we're all being asked to separate them when I go for a walk around the circle in which I live and if I see somebody walking the opposite direction the way furiously and smile as if either just so hungry for human contact and you know what I wave back just as enthusiastically because I too am hungry for human contact I feel like we need appreciation for the strangers in my life for the faces that I don't recognize but for the relationships that I now see are actually quite valuable so I think that if we approach this moment with intentionality if we approach this time as it is with the mindset that we are going to double down and focus on both the quality of our time with other people as well as the quantity of time that we dedicate to the people we love and I think that we may be able to come out of this much stronger in terms of our human connections with each other than when we began we may be able to use code in.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:12 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Skype a scientist and the website is offering certified scientist to teachers and parents who would need educational science content for more on how the concept works KCBS news anchors Jeff Ballin paddy rising spoke with Serah Makka novelty founder and executive director of Skype a scientist Sir I have to tell you my daughter Breanna is a biochemist and very into science education so when she suggested I check this out I did and I see why she's so excited about this is really a cool thing that you folks are doing yes thanks so much and thanks for having fun Branagh is a wonderful buy into Medicare we'll talk a little bit about how this works sure so effectively if anyone wants to have a conversation with the scientists about any type of science you could think up all you have to do is go to Skype a scientist dot com and then sign up and you fill out a Google form that will basically get a sense of who you are and what type of scientist you want to talk to you from there within about a week you'll get an email from us with all of the contact information for your scientists and then you in the scientists will pick a time to chat this can be for classrooms for book clubs library groups and of course during this kind of uncertain time families that are at home on the couch together looking for something to do and the program is totally free and then from there you just go and I have your conversation so usually the scientists will introduce themselves what they study and then it all a conversation how long have you guys been doing this and and how hard was it to ramp up we have actually been working since our January twenty seventeen and everything after we've gotten bigger and bigger it's really nice there's a lot of scientists on Twitter they're all really focusing on science communication so even in the last month our scientists proctor has doubled because so many people are kind of looking for something positive to do and have more time to kinda communicate so how are you going about finding the scientists we pretty much all word of mouth space so we have about five thousand scientists that are available about two months ago we only had two thousand but we've really been ramping up in the times of corona virus I think because people realize how important speaking with experts and and how find it's really just want to help and so both of our recruiting is done on social media who is taking advantage of this the most I mean when you look at who wants a scientist who what if you found out it totally makes bags so we have classrooms that are participating historically we've always been mostly serving classroom but there's now a lot of classrooms aren't meeting in the classroom we have some folks all having kind of doom classroom meet up at a lot of people that are at home everyone from parents with a five year old will have a conversation about anything from frogs to face whatever you want few teenagers that are stuck at the in the house and just have a a group of them together to chat Serah Makka Nolte founder and executive director of Skype a.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:38 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Nitrogen liquefies ninety-six which means if he gets anything above one hundred ninety. Six degrees Celsius boils we can see kind of what a fact that will happen on a liquid liquid boiling by first cooling down this balloon. Feel sorry for a balloon. This is the first. This is just my own breath. You mentioned something happening to your putting the balloon in the thing and that is far too big a balloon to go into that flash normally so when you pull that out of the flask. You've tiny apple shape little balloon if you can see the little bit of liquid which is sloshing around in the bottom. Can people see little things about their? Tiny amounts of liquid is boiling to blow up the whole balloon again. So is that is that the air turns liquid liquid air which takes up much less space than gaseous so. The balloon shrank. Now it's boiled again. It's expanded about thousand times blitz. Which is why swallowing. Liquid nitrogen is a really bad idea. Expanding would be that. I don't WanNa be this balloon again because basically you're thirty degrees Celsius above motion boiling point. It's going to appoint immense pressure as it to into a gas container so housing for fact walk. Can we do with putting liquid nitrogen and somewhere? We're probably not supposed to unless you have scientific supervision written many many risk assessments over the years so this is actually one of two major ways. You can kill yourself with liquid nitrogen. The other one is doing lift with it or in some kind of confined space extremes oxygen and suffocate. This is fun but when we're looking at today is putting it into container so our fizzy drinks bottles the happier. Fizzy drinks drinks some advanced. Because they will come in handy later. Thank you square. My ear defenders poor in liquid nitrogen at the moment. This is completely safe from a little bit chilly. Not Complete relatively so. This is pouring into a fizzy bottle and smoking like a horrifying mad scientist experiment. The point we become dangerous is if I put the LID on the bottle because lemonade bottles are incredible pieces of modern engineering. They cost just a couple of pants and they're incredibly strong. Fail at maybe ten atmospheres. Ten Times the pressure. We feel now which is about one hundred tons per square meter so a lot of pressure so putting the lid on. It's what makes us dangerous to do that. I'M GONNA come over here. Good Safety I we have really been. We've been to contain anything flying out so wonderful video the naked scientists website of this blowing up with no really been and it's petrified so I could put a little shot the lead thirty three to one right anyone else a little nervous who's GonNa slowly creep cross the stage..

LID apple Ten Times scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:22 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Scientific detective stories and shining a light in directions. You might not expect like gene sequencing puppy or maybe tearing apart a flower. You've taken all the parts that one. I messed up. So that shows you how good he had to get it this and even drinking a bunch agenda. Don't miss out subscribed naked genetics. Wherever you get your podcasts this week we're bringing you a recording. Allied event from the Cambridge Science Festival that was recorded back on the eleventh of March featuring geneticist Giles. Yo Chemist Liliana Planet geoscientists David Robbery and animal behaviour. Expert Ellen drinkwater so let's dive back in with Christmas jobs. We we really should dwell on your science a bit so you are a geneticist. I am so tell us what you actually apply your genetics too. So I'm actually a geneticist. And perfectly upstanding thing to do. My mother-in-law still speaks to me so this is a good thing but people often use genetics to study a trait or disease and I happen to study body weight and actually the moment I say body weight obesity actually of which is one end of the spectrum. I suddenly become the bad prison and become the bad person because I'm perceived as giving fat people overweight people people with obesity and excuse which always an interesting take. If I was studying the genetics of cancer would be giving a cancer patient and excuse I wouldn't and the reason why I'm bad it's because people understand this right people say that well but that's why you'll get a size you while you eat too much. They say that to me thank you. I lost weight. I WANNA point out when I was Vegan anyway so much and that is true. Your Body Weight is going to be down to how much you eat and how much you right. But that the question is why and at the end of the day is because different people behave very very differently around food and there's a lot of genes that are actually involved. The physics is the first demo. Dynamics you've come magic the calories in and magic calories away but it's working up to the physics why we actually get to the physics. We get why we too much. That's where the biology is and I think by studying extreme cases of obesity. So these are not going to be normal cases of obesity. These are three year old children. Who are forty fifty kilograms? Okay so that's a lot of weight. I'm seventy five kilograms. For example. One of the partways. We knew disrupted and severe. Obesity is the fat sensing pathway. Where because there's a lack of a signal from the fact that brain that brain doesn't know that in fact of you and so you continue. Actually actually that is genetic let is genetic reason why you're fat doesn't talk properly to your brain and that makes two executives a hormone there called. Leptin and when there's actually a mutation in the Hormone Leptin then you don't have any left and then your brain doesn't know how much fat you have now. How much fat you have. The thing is Charles Y. I'm slightly skeptical. And Yeah probably disabuse me of my skepticism. Is that fifty years ago. The number of people who are overweight and obese vanishingly small and now he's very very large. Now we're not evolving. That fast are we. We're not why is there a different? Whenever people studied talk about jeans they think that geneticists only look at the genes in of themselves. And we do look at the jeans but we have to look at the genes in context with the environment it turns out that every single human trait as including our body weight has a genetic influence every single trait of behavior. The trick is to ask what role the environment place now your genes as you say. There are empirical you born with them. You die with them. They don't change anywhere in between but the environment does and as the environment changes the way your genes express themselves and change actually then changes as well and so what has happened is as we get to the stage where we have too much food today. I think there's not anything to debate. Suddenly it has unmasked susceptibilities of certain people who are going to eat more in the environment whereas it was just not enough food around for people to eat too much whereas now there is ample opportunity for people to take advantage of the environment or not advantage depending on you look at and actually get to lodge now as we said we promised you demos and it wouldn't be a proper naked scientist show without them so I'd like to introduce science demo superstar and former naked scientists. He's going to put the boom in this show. Please.

obesity Charles Y. Cambridge Science Festival Ellen drinkwater David Robbery scientist Giles
"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:59 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Chocolate bars as someone who has been working because you went with the BBC quite a bit as well. Yeah if you've got an interesting things to relate you want me to tell you about funding withdrawn Cox on the air. Inter THOSE IT Open University co-production gold the planets which had that ten months ago and to the university planetary scientists were consultants and we would get a draft subscription. Tell them what was wrong with it and add to put it right. She's a production company. Got The Brian Cox and he maybe go off in a wider over out so on some glass here in Iceland somewhere out in the state to do his pieces to camera and often went off script on those so we couldn't really control what he said but he knows he. Stuff by and large is a particle physicist Rav in a planetary scientist that he lovely piece with an ipod on a glass reunites. And look at this picture picture of Uranus your favorite planet Chris Coleman and too little moons one outside there in one inside these shepherd moons and the thing about very narrow rings which Uranus has is a moon orbiting inside and outside help keep got ring really narrow and keep in shape recalled shepherd moons. I'm Brian was explaining very eloquently. Have the Ataman going little bit faster tugs rings upwards? In among a bit slow tugs of rings down was in between keeps the ring in shape and it was very persuasive. Very well done. He's talks to camera beautifully and when I saw the rush for this. We're recording it comes. Approval is great. He's done well. It's not what we plan. But he came up and it was broadcast and people on twitter were saying that was wrong because the inner ones go faster than the atoms anything orbiting something close. You are the faster you go so you got the principal rice of tokes opposite directions keeping the rings time he just got the speeds wrong. You didn't read the small print on I. I was seduced by brilliant delivery. People watching television squatted it. They tweeted are yes. We got it wrong and Bryant. Sorry I got it wrong and even more stupid because I did a masters project on these very shepherd moons doing this but when you telling the story it's very easy to just tell it the wrong way round you concentrate on explaining opposing forces doing a good job and you can get something fundamentally wrong and not realise your space probes going to take fifteen million. They did exactly the same thing once where literally it was. It was a graph. Now this isn't even a complex. It wasn't moving. It was just a graph blue line going up a red line going down and I said look at the red line going up. It went all the way except for one thing. They ended up catching it the night before went out. I wrote it down to a to a studio actually came to the naked scientists. Do actually in order to record one line and just say down down down. I stay down in and I said it correctly. Eleanor you come on the naked scientists quite often because you are insect guest creepy crawly X. And you agree. Finally because you've come back delighted. You're back in Cambridge and you have brought us a surprise. Yes I have so when I talk about science. One of the things I'm really keen about is trying to get people to realize how brilliant invertebrates earth and so. I thought the best way to do this was to bring along a guest. This is shallow combs shallow. Yup Cello comes to funny so shallow. Combs is a east African lamb. Snow was thank you. That wasn't that wasn't him? It's fun to see if you can seem a bit better away. Some of his salad quite a bank with.

Brian Cox BBC Combs twitter Chris Coleman Snow physicist Rav Iceland principal Bryant scientist Cambridge Eleanor
"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

07:45 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"Sarah's a scientist herself she does very cool squid stuff by the way and she felt like there. Was this disconnect between scientists and the public. So she thought won't okay. Let's bring them together. But I notice that there wasn't a super easy way for scientists to get in touch with the public sort of in a way that Easy for them to fit into their schedules. But Hey it's the twenty first century. That's what technology is for and so. I wanted to sort of have this streamlined. Way To get scientists talking with non-scientists. Just give people the opportunity To meet a scientist now the setups pretty straightforward your teacher. And you want to teach your kids about squids scroll through and find squid scientists and request him. Don't have a specific topic in mind. That's cool to just pick something more general like biologist fill out the form and boom. You got yourself a scientist so when you first started scape. Scientists part of your motivation was to clear up some misconceptions that people might have about scientists like who they are and what they do and what they're like. So what did you guys want people to know about scientists? I really wanted to show people the diversity of scientists. I think we really get this kind of over-simplified view of who scientists are how we behave what we're interested in outside of science in TV and movies. I mean you get this pretty much. Almost all white guys all straight people. All white guys are socially awkward with varying levels of social skill and so we know that scientists are just as varied as any other group of people. And so. It's not necessarily that. I WANNA say scientists aren't like this it's like scientists aren't only this. Scientists are all of these different ways of being and so in our program. We also ask our teachers if half of their students are from an underrepresented group in stem so that we can match them up with a scientist from that group because we really want to show everybody that there's a place for everyone in science. Yeah let's talk about that a little bit because I think we know now like scientifically we have data that suggests that when kids see people that look like them doing science they can imagine growing up to be scientists too. So you really build that idea into the scientists that you pair with the classrooms. Yeah absolutely we WANNA give as many students as possible a window into science that they can relate to. Yeah Yeah and speaking of relating. I WANNA play clip for you of microbiologist Ruth Eisenberg. She's reading a question submitted in live chat so the question is is there any advice that I would give to a young student right now that might show interest in becoming a scientists from a small town? Okay perfect so I actually come from a pretty small town where not? A lot of people went to college in general so if you have an interest in science say keep passion alive you can get involved in science activities like presentations or anything that the community can participate in a lot of colleges and I really liked that because it sounds like you know the scientists herself would have loved to have that program when she was a kid. Is that something that you hear from the scientists? Who Do these calls? That's part of why they participated in this. Yeah totally I hear that all the time. Yeah so a lot of scientists that are now adults working in science. Never really saw people like them when they were up and so I think that's one of the reasons. Scientists are so enthusiastic about participating in this program because they wish they had something like it when they were young. Yeah no I mean I do. Don't you I mean that's probably by? You made it right totally. Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean I think I remember the first time I met a lady scientists who specifically the thing that I wanted to do and that that was a transformative moment. I think yeah I hadn't even met a white woman scientists until I was a sophomore in even in my department studying Marine Science and we had zero female professors at all so I mean as a white woman so imagine how much worse it is for. Somebody other folks. It's just like yeah anything that we can do to show people How welcome they can be science the better. What other kinds of feedback do you get from scientists from teachers from kids? We've got a lot of feedback. I didn't necessarily expect to get for. Example are scientists will say that when they talk to people who have never really thought about their area of science before that they'll have these questions that are like. Oh my God. Why have I not gone way? You kind of get totally cool. Things that are like we'll blow the mind off somebody who's been studying this effort twenty years. Well Can I. Can we talk about that? Because that's a point that when when I think when people think about scientists doing outreach they really think that the benefit is only for the person that they're trying to reach out to but in reality you get these people who haven't been thinking the same way that all the other academics that you've been surrounded our thinking and you can get like really good ideas about your own science from having those conversations. Yeah absolutely a person who hasn't been taught to think in the exact rigid way that your field thanks. Having that kind of naive can be totally amazing. It's like it's definitely not. It's a two way street. And that's one of the great reasons to have conversations with people and not just deliver Information Athem. A lot of really awesome stuff can come from those conversations. Yeah so what has surprised you the most since launching this project so many things surprised me that it's kind of hard to pin it down. I think once I participate and they get like a bunch of fourth graders so like electrically enthusiastic about what they're hearing about that really remind scientists. How COOL THEIR JOBS? Because when you're working on a grant and you're reviewing other people's papers and you're trying to get your own work published it can kind of disillusion you on how totally cool our jobs are. And then when you have like a fourth grader. Just like beside herself shaking about hearing about your squid or your termites. Wherever you're studying it can be a real like just awesome reminder and get you excited to go back to the lab the next day. That's been amazing so I've kind of a big question for you. What does it tell you that people have this much interest in talking to you? Know Real live scientists over video chat. I think people are just really thirsty for authenticity today. I mean I think you get so many things kind of filtered through various forms of media. I guess and they're just they just want something real. I feel like a lot of people just want to see partially like behind the curtain of how things are really being done and just want something directly from the source and so I think that that's why our program has been so super successful because we get people direct access to the science right as we're learning that information. Sarah McNulty is the Executive Director of the nonprofit skype a scientist. You can find out more about their live sessions how to sign up all that jazz at SKYPE SCIENTISTS DOT COM. We'll put a Lincoln are episode notes to this episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez edited by the way special thanks to Emily von for her fact checking in Production Madison via shortwave from NPR..

scientist Sarah McNulty Ruth Eisenberg skype Lincoln Rebecca Ramirez Executive Director Emily NPR
"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave from NPR. Lock EVERYBODY TO SCRAPE. The scientists live just as a heads up. We are running these about once a day Monday through Friday ish during this delightful quarantine time that we're all in Sarah McNulty's just starting up video livestream. She's the Executive Director of the nonprofit skype scientists generally me matchup scientists with classrooms and other groups to chat about science and generally make science accessible for as many people as possible and make people feel as welcoming science as we can the CROON virus pandemic has slowed down a lot of businesses. But but skype a scientist so a massive spike in its audience over the past couple of weeks as schools have closed in more and more people stay home before we may have had like twenty people. Show up to a livestream And now we have over five hundred showing up every livestream which has been amazing. Plus Sara says they've had a similar boom in scientists reaching out to lead the live sessions. All right so I am a paleontologist and I'm so excited to be here today. I this is the team interaction. I've had in about a week so I'm real sorry really excited but had talked to anybody in a long time outside my house so I'm in these days. The questions scientists are getting are just as silly an insightful. As ever like do rats sparked don't know that's a good question. I don't know if they fart. I do know that they eat their own coup. But I don't know if they are. How DOES BACTERIA SURVIVE INSIDE SQUID? When the sweater babies they don't have any beneficial bacteria inside them so they actually get them from the seawater. There's a special organ in and of course. Have you ever eaten the bear? Have you eaten the bear? I don't know how to answer that question but no I have never eaten a bear.

scientist Executive Director skype NPR Sarah McNulty Sara
"scientist" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

01:51 min | 5 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"We're talking to the youngest scientist we've ever had on the podcast. Brother and sister Oscar in May Johnson were nine and twelve years old when they conducted experiments in the Galapagos Islands. Go UP AGO. S- like the most famous science place in the world absolutely in this episode may an Oscar or going to share their story of science discovery. Before we get to this week's episode. We've got some new patrons thank on Patriae on Abdulah an odd non argan Silas Henry Anton Stella and Joshua enjoy. We also have some more of our patrons that are having birthdays coming up. Liam whose birthday is on February twenty third Brady Happy Birthday on the twenty fourth Christopher in Grace Mom and dad are proud of you know you accomplish your dreams and happy birthday on the twenty fifth Luke Biggs who loves dinosaurs also. Happy Birthday on the twenty fifth. I like dinosaurs to tell you. Happy Birthday on the twenty sixth Emma White Happy Third Birthday on the twenty eighth Hazel Fades completely on us on the third of March Henry. Stella Mom Dad and your brothers love you so much along with your passion for dancing skiing and robotics and happy birthday on March fifth. And lastly Charlie Happy Birthday on March fifth. Thanks to all of you and to everyone who supports tumble on Patriot. If you'd like to get a shutout like these people or get a happy birthday wish from yours truly on our podcast. Just go to patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast pledge at the five dollar level or higher once again that's Patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast well Disneyworld. We all know it. We're do we because if you haven't been there lately well you.

Silas Henry Anton Stella Galapagos Islands Oscar scientist Luke Biggs Emma White skiing Liam Patriae Charlie Johnson Brady Christopher Joshua
"scientist" Discussed on Famous Failures

Famous Failures

11:09 min | 10 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on Famous Failures

"WALC ladies and gentlemen to a very special episode of famous failures it's a special episode because I have a new book coming out is titled Think like but I I wanNA share just a little bit of background with you and explain how you can preorder the book and get bonuses that for some categories are worth ten x the cost of the box if you want to check them out right away you can head over to rocket science book dot Com I was zoomed multiple identities over the so my life and one of the identities that I cherish the most is that of a former rocket scientist I was Astra Physics Major in college and worked on the opposite nations team for the two thousand and three Mars Exploration Rovers Project I've been working on this book for over two years now but in one sense I've been working on for my entire life because all of the was the knowledge practical insights I've gathered over the past thirty seven years of my life are all in this book and here's the good news you don't have to be a rocket scientist to think like one in the book reveal nine simple strategies from rocket science so you can use to make your own giant leaps in work and life whether it's landing your dream job accelerating your business learning a new skill or creating the next breakthrough act the book will inspire you to take your moonshot and enable you to achieve lift off I've been ecstatic with the early reviews of the book I want to share a few of them with you Susan Cain The New York Times bestselling author of quiet says thinking like a rocket scientist is not rocket science packed with witty writing insightful advice and integrating stories this must read book will change the way you see the world and empower you to change the world itself mm-hmm grants who is in Eurotunnel's bestselling author originals says that the book is bursting with practical insights Houston we have solutions Daniel Pink who is the New York Times bestselling author of books like when Dr and a whole new mind says by the time you finish reading this endlessly fascinating book your thinking will be bigger better and bolder Julian got three who is the best selling author of how to make a spaceship says this book will make you look at the world with a different Lens and we'll help you make your own seemingly crazy moonshot a reality to celebrate the launch of the book filed a set of amazing preorder bonuses which you can find by heading over to rocket science book Dot Com and if you'd like you can also just go over to my websites Roll Dot Com and head books at the top I won't go through all the bonuses here because they are listed on the on the webpage but importantly the digital version of the Look if you preorder any copy any edition of the book you can download the digital version right away so you can read the book now today before the the book is released to the public the digital version is available for all devices including kindle nook IOS android personal computers unit. You might be wondering why I am running a preorder campaign really is for two primary reasons the first is that pre orders carry enormous weight and Book Promotion Major Bookstores. is used preorder numbers to gauge public interest in the book and if the preorder numbers are high they'll stock more copies of the book which means more readers will see it and can preorder bonuses are my way of thinking you for supporting this podcast for supporting my writing and ensuring that this book will be one of many to come so if you plan to order the book please choose to preorder it and once again you can do that by heading over to rock assigns book without further ado here's a short cert- from the book's introduction in September nineteen sixty to President John F Kennedy stood before a packed Rice University Stadium and pledged to land a man the moon and return him safely to the earth before the decade was out it was an incredibly ambitious promise the original Moonshot when Kennedy gave a speech the logical requirements for a moon landing hadn't even been developed no American astronauts had worked outside a spacecraft to spacecraft had never docked together in space NASA didn't know whether the lunar surface was sufficiently solid to support a lander or whether the communication systems would even work on the moon in the words of one ASA executive we didn't even know how to do Earth orbit determination much less project Orbis to the moon getting into orbit around the moon not to mention landing on it required mind-blowing position it was like throwing a dart at a peach twenty eight feet away and scraping the fuzz without touching the body and what's more the peach which is the moon would be in rapid motion darting through space on reentry to the earth the spacecraft would have to enter the atmosphere at the right angle tantamount to locating one particular Ridge on a coin of one hundred eighty riches to avoid grinding too hard against the atmosphere burning to a crisp or skating across it like a stone skipping on water for a politician Kennedy was surprisingly candid about the challenges ahead here's what he said and they'll I realize that this is in some measure an active faith and vision for we do not now no benefits await us but if I were to say my fellow citizens that we shall send the Moon Two hundred forty thousand miles away from the control station in Houston a giant rocket more than three hundred feet tall the length of this football field made of new metal alloys some of which have not yet been invented capable no standing he stresses several times more than Eh experienced fitted together with a precision better than the finest watch carrying all the equipment needed for propulsion Guidance Control Communications Food and survival on an untried mission to an unknown celestial body and then return it safely to were reentering the atmosphere at speeds of over twenty five thousand miles per hour causing heat about half that on the temperature Zahn almost as hard as it is today and do all this and do all this and do it right and do it I the nicktator doc yes even the metals needed to build the rocket hadn't been invented we jumped into the cosmic void and hope would grow wings on the way up miraculously the wings sprouted in nineteen sixty nine less than seven years after Kennedy's pledge Neil Armstrong took his giant see for mankind a child who is six years old when the Wright brothers took their first power flight lasting all of twelve seconds and moving one hundred and twenty feet would have been seventy two when flight became powerful enough to put a man on the moon and return him safely to the earth this giant leap which was taken within human lifespan is often hailed as the triumph of technology but it's not rather is too great triumph of a certain thought process rocket scientists I used to turn the seemingly impossible into possible it's the same process that is allow these scientists who scored dozens of interplanetary holes in one supersonic spacecraft sending these spacecraft millions of miles through outer space and landing them exactly where they want is the same thought process that brings us closer and closer to colonizing other planets and becoming an interplanetary species and it's the same thought process that will make affordable commercial tourism the norm to think like a rocket scientist to look at the world through a different Lens rocket scientists imagine the imaginable and solve the unsolvable they transfer and failures in the triumphs and constraints into advantages debut mishaps has solvable puzzles rather than insurmountable roadbocks. They've moved by blind conviction but by self doubt their goal is not short term results but long-term breakthroughs they know that the rules are in set in stone the default can be altered a new path can be forced in the modern era rocket science thinking is a necessity the world is evolving yet dizzying speed and we must continue me problems in our daily lives those who can tackle these problems without clear guidelines and with the clock ticking enjoy an extraordinary advantage despite his tremendous benefits we often assume that thinking like a rocket scientist is beyond the ability of mere mortals without a special kind of genius has the common saying it's not rocket science we identify with Elton John's rocket man who despite being selected for a Mars mission laments about all the science I don't understand and this book will not teach you the science behind rocket science you won't find any graphs on these pages no aptitude for crunching numbers is required. lurking behind the elusive subject of rocket science are life changing insights and creativity and critical thinking that anyone can acquire You won't be a rocket scientist by the end of this book by you'll know how to think like one I once worked on the scene for the Mars Exploration Rovers Project which sent to rover a my rocket science past remains the most interesting part of my resume during speaking engagements the person introducing me inevitably says something like the most intriguing thing all of them were thinking talk to us about rocket science instead although we glamorize rocket scientists there's an enormous mismatch between what they've figured out these were necessary features during the pelvic age keeping us safe from things poisonous foods and predators but with this book my goal is to create an army of non rocket scientists who approach everyday problems as a rocket scientist you'll take ownership of your life you'll see.

scientist WALC Elton John Mars Exploration Rovers Projec thirty seven years three hundred feet twenty eight feet twelve seconds seven years twenty feet six years two years
"scientist" Discussed on Linear Digressions

Linear Digressions

13:01 min | 11 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on Linear Digressions

"Individuals spend spend some of their time with one team and some of their time with their core team or you could even split it up by what the people are doing for example <hes> for engineering if you're working more on infrastructure. You can't sit with the team. That's using your component because a lot of teams are using your component and so you probably want to sit with all your other infringing years if you're doing something more specialized than your day to day work. Maybe you spend most of your time embedded with the team knowing that there is is a place that you can go to bounce ideas off of if you have a problem like that yep now. This isn't the only these aren't the only options <hes> for how you can have of your data science team organized than i think. It makes a lot of sense. These are some of the more natural options if you have data scientists who are actually working directly on products products in like big technical organizations like the one that the ones that you work in like the one that i work in a but a lot of data scientists are working at companies that are not ah tech companies right there working at companies that make <hes> consumer packaged goods or that are <hes> insurance companies or you know any any number of other things i guess we're those people said yeah and so they depending on the the maturity of the analytics organization they could be could still borrow uh sort of this model if it's a pretty tacked up place <hes> but there are a few other types of models that you see in some places that depending on the context could make some sense so one thing i'll call out is that sometimes the data scientists are just thinking about how to optimize the operations of the business itself like they might be doing things like reporting on key business intelligence metrics and arguably. Maybe some people would even say that calling that data science the answer a little bit <hes> a little bit of a misnomer but we'll leave that aside for a moment because i think sometimes that's just reality as the people with the data scientists title or working on and just metrics and dashboards so there's that model where they're sitting perhaps in sort of the operations part of the company and just helping every quarter order pushing out reports and updating dashboards and helping the general decision makers know what is the state of the company insofar as it can be measured with data so nope. That's that's a model. There's another model called <hes> the consulting model by the way i am taking a lot of this from a a really excellent blog post that was making the rounds on the interwebs recently <hes> by <hes> partisan nor nor zad <hes> entitled models for integrating data science teams within organizations so we'll definitely have a link to this <hes> on linear digressions dot com. I should've mentioned that up at the top but <hes> <hes> another model is that sometimes the data science team is sort of centralize like before but it gets loaned out to different parts of the organization shen for kind of like consulting internal consulting projects so that could even be more than one individual from the data science team <hes> yes and so it's this these things start to really become important when you have a team and you're trying to coordinate the relationships amongst members of those teams if there's only one data scientist at an organization relation than you know whether they better on a product team or they're more centralized it almost looks the same right but in the consulting model you have these days scientists who are loaned out to various teams on kind of a consulting basis <hes> working on individual projects or where their skills are particularly needed versus and they will come back in the rotate through other teams versus on the embedded motto where they're still there fulltime so the consulting model has some nice advantages especially the teams aren't big enough or there isn't enough complexity to their data work that a fulltime embedded scientists on a team makes sense <hes> so with consulting model. You can just be part time. People can be spread around a little bit more and you can do you know arguably a little bit more with less depending on the size of the organization. That's funny. You know who else who else uses that organizational model is <hes> bands. They've got touring dates. No one city owns them and it definitely wouldn't make sense to split up the band but one person in each city and then there's another model that i don't. I hadn't even thought of before this article but i think it's an interesting point at some company is their strategy is to make the data science. <hes> functionality spread across everyone in the organization so it's not just a thing that specific to the quote unquote data scientists scientists but instead. There's a certain level of literacy. That's expected of just everyone there in the course of their day to day jobs and depending on the company. Maybe this doesn't make a ton of cents for all the organizations but you can imagine that maybe this is in the long run where the field is going. I mean people in all different walks of life. Irks being expected expected now to be more and more data literate and so saying instead of having all of that data savviness centralized in one person or in one team instead. It's just embedded in every single employee in the organization which is pretty interesting. You know actually this. This happens a lot with q._a. People people some <hes> organizations will have people who are dedicated to testing the software this produced and some other organizations like facebook was like this for example is basically basically said no testing engineer. You are the engineer and you're responsible for testing the code that you right in a sense. You're basically saying hey everybody. All of the all of your engineers should be testing engineers yeah and so i think the the thing that's nice about that. Is it means that nobody nobody is off the cook for having to think about these things <hes>. It's intellectually stimulating in some ways on the other hand. Maybe not for everyone like i. I could imagine not everyone loving the time that they spend testing their software but <hes> and it also means that there isn't like a privileged class or an underclass asser or anything like that any notion of certain types of work being only for certain types of people in st shares yes now. I think it for data science. This can be pretty challenging because asking you know someone who's already an expert in presumably some kind of engineering field or is a fulltime product product manager or whatever else to be accountable for data science at the same level that you might expect of a like classically trained rained data scientists. I put a lot of responsibility on their shoulders right. Yeah that's rough yeah so i think that especially if you're in and <hes> you know maybe a younger organization smaller organization that doesn't have dedicated data scientists yet because it's just not at that level of maturity where it needs them then this is maybe the world that you live in but at a certain point it probably does make sense to start having people who specialize in the data certainly and maybe even just have the title of data scientist okay so katie <hes> not to put you on the spot but do you have a favorite <hes> strategy of all of these of course it depends is i guess on the size of the company and all the stuff but do any of them sing out to you. Yeah i've done a i've had experience with a few of these these models <hes> in my time leading working on teams leading data science teams <hes> i think that the best last one the most stable one in the long term is the hybrid approach where you have the the mentor ship the best practices the career paths that sort everything centralized within a data science team or department <hes> but the people who were on that team spend most of their time embedded within teams and doing doing work alongside engineers and products. I think that this is nice because it allows for you know the data scientists to be as his close as possible to the work which means there's a maximum chance of their work getting used in being relevant but at the same time allow some sense of shared identity density and and shared best practices which is important for data scientists. I think the downside is that there can be a fair amount of complexity and end coordination that has to happen and sometimes it's unclear what's what belongs in the centralized bucket and what should be <hes> decentralized for example. If you have some kind of you have a data scientist on one of your teams who recognizes that that team <hes> builds a lot of models they go into production and they need to get a little more formal about modeling release process that something that should be just built by that person independently and deployed on that team or is that something that should be centralized an owned by the whole data science team and everyone then starts sharing that as a best practice actress i just use this as a simple example <hes> but those are examples of things that when you have kind of one foot in one world and one foot in the other there are than things that you have to think hard about which way you want to handle them because you don't have a default answer for some stuff for you as a software engineer engineer. How does this mirror somewhat the way that you think about organizational structure for software engineers like what what resonates with you the most <hes> i think it definitely this definitely works when you're talking about specialization right <hes> if you're at a company who has a lot of generalist list engineers in those different generalist engineers kinda take on whatever is in front of them. You don't really need the i. I guess you're large enough engineering enough that you don't need the same <hes> thought about or maybe it's not that you don't need the same thought but it's a different kind of organizational design that you need to think about but yes specialization definitely and actually to answer the question i asked you i agree with you. I prefer i personally having seen a couple of these organizational design structures in my career. I prefer when things are separated out in in that way where you've got <hes> you've got some pieces centralized than some pieces distributed but the only thing that i would add is also asking the people who are being supported by the data science team to be responsible for some amount of the data work so for example <hes> they may be responsible tipple for knowing how to use the reporting software right rather than them bothering data scientist who maybe has better things to do than to run a report for them. They need to be responsible for for understanding how to run the report now. When things get more complicated when you need to run a super complicated report or you need to actually do some investigation gatien that's when an individual or a team might reach out to someone who specializes in data science so <hes> i guess title <unk> to kind of close out with an interesting observation.

scientist engineer facebook testing engineer product manager software engineer one foot
"scientist" Discussed on Got Science?

Got Science?

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Got Science?

"So so this is a program that places PHD scientists who are either early career mid-career late career doesn't matter in the government for a year to two years to see how they can use their expertise within the within a government setting. I'm trying to find where their expertise fits into policymaker. Gang and also figure out you know, how this big bureaucratic unwieldy seemingly a thing like government actually works. And so I wanted to to get a feel for how I could use my experiences in grad school, my commitment to wanting to democratize access to the products of research. So make sure that they're communicated to the public, and they're also communicated to researchers. So that we're really making sure that science has a place within the public discourse. So what do you see as the danger of science not being part of the public discussion? I see a lot of decisions that are being made based on emotions and emotions alone, which I am a very emotional person. And I find that for me to take a step back to identify in my emotions as fear or or. Or excitement or what have you take a step back and think well, why what does the evidence say, and what are the consequences if I don't act in in accordance with the ovens because there are some times when I take strange vitamins because I see them advertised advertise, they'll make my hair shinier, and I want that. And I look at the evidence, and it doesn't really back it up, but there's also no health risks. So I think well, why not just doing your own experiment. Yeah. Just doing my own experiment. And if it makes me feel better than that's fine. But then of course, there are other cases like climate change, which it's here it's happening and we've caused it. And if we don't act now than we are really risking the health and livelihood of our planet of our fellow people by by neglecting the evidence. So I think that's really the risk of of not of not communicating about where science falls in public discourse. Because. Sometimes it's benign to ignore the evidence and other times, it's completely catastrophic. I wanna pivot to inequity in and bias. I mean, many people think, hey, the science is the science there can't be inequities or by sees can you give some examples to our listeners. So they know what we're talking about. Yeah. So I think it is really a common refrain is that scientists are purely objective, which ignores the fact that scientists are people, and we can be trained to recognize our bias in the ways that they're creeping up into our research, but often that's not really something. That's very much explored in scientific training is identifying the biases that come up as a product of of how we're raised. How we're socialized how we interact with one another. And so I think that the way that this really crops up in the case of women minorities. Disabled people. People LGBTQ people is that people people's assumptions of, you know, I'll take me as an example. I'm a woman in case, you can't tell by my voice. And I've had people tell me that some of my bold ideas are over ambitious, whereas if that idea came out of the mouth of a male colleague of mine that would be seen as visionary or bold yet innovative, cutting edge and the way that that creeps up when I'm writing a scientific paper or applying for grant money is that they'll look at that over ambitiousness and say that it's unrealistic and not worth funding. And so that starts to hurt the careers of women starts to hurt the careers of people who don't conform to the stereotypes that we've been socialized to accept as as what a scientist looks like which is typically white SIS gendered, male and. So unless we're having these kinds of conversations about the ways that bias affect who gets to do science than we're really not going to be able to course. Correct. Despite how however many, you know, fun diversity initiatives we throw out there. Despite however, many kind of kinds of like by moments that we try to have unless we're really interrogating the bias that we hold even I as a woman hold certain biases that are implicit against women. Just because of how I've been socialized within this greater societal context. And I think that also if we're keeping certain people away from the bench, if we're keeping certain people out of these conversations, not giving them a seat at the table. Then we're really especially when you start.

scientist two years
"scientist" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"Why don't you talk about how this is this technique of saying, I'm not a scientist is sort of this rhetorical crawfish. Ing you can way to get out of having actually talk about something. You don't know anything about? Why don't they just say, I don't know? I mean. Yeah. That's what that's what a scientist would say. Right. I mean, scientists are trained to to be fine with not knowing something to be fine with uncertainty and everything I think that's just a political tech. Right. I mean. I think politicians are generally trained to to never admit that sort of weakness. I I mean, I I would prefer a politician who just says, you know, what I'm not sure I will try and find out. But that's yeah. I mean, it probably just is a sign of, you know, trying to sound strong at every possible point. Yes, you know, in general politicians never going to tell you when they don't know something. So it's good to keep that as a rule of thumb when dealing with politicians Stroh. Yeah. So they they what they are telling you might actually be reworded version of I have no idea what I'm talking about. That is a good thing to keep in mind. I think you're right. So I assume you put the most important thing. I so we'll firstly we'll talk about his over-simplification. And if you could define what that means in your term. Based off the book itself. What is over simplification? Well, first of all, I would not say I put the most important one. I put the simplest one. I if you want to start with that one out. That's fine. Okay. We'll start with the simplest. And then you tell me what the most important is. We do that. Okay. Great. So the over simplification is sort of the more self explanatory titles at ease. I mean, it when a politician takes a often, very complicated scientific topic and boils down to sort of sound bite sized and completely ruined. The actual science in the process. This is I think it's important to make the distinction that decision. Just trying to explain something. Clearly, it is very important for both the scientists and a politician not to mention a journalist to be able to explain a complicated topic in simple terms. That's fine. If you're doing diligently, and well, it's when they take that idea of trying to boil something down and sort of use it to their advantage to completely ruined. In what the actual science is that you get the over simplification. And so like, what's like, a really good salient example, and you can pull one straight from the book if you want to be like sure, so the one that I that I led the book with that. I think is a pretty important one and just sort of interesting one is to do with a whole lot of politicians talking about a fetal pain the pain that a fetus supposedly feels while in the womb. You get every couple of years, and they did it again last year, the Republicans in the house and sometimes Senate ticket up they try to pass a Bill that they called the pain capable unborn. I'm going to get the name wrong here. Something about pain in fetus. Although they called an unborn child and the idea being that at twenty weeks. Scientists told us. The fetus feels pain, and they will get up in in the in the house chamber or in on TV and say this over and over and over and just those simple terms at twenty weeks, a fetus feels pain which sounds very sort of scientific like we've figured this out you get to twenty weeks, and suddenly you can feel pain. This is absolute bullshit that doesn't make any sense. Actually, what science does tell us is actually pretty difficult to say for sure, but it's probably closer to twenty seven or eight weeks before the sort of neuro anatomy is in place to actually feel paying too. But it's tough anyway. Because pain is subjective experience. I mean, I don't know that you're feeling pain until you tell me, you're feeling pain or screen about it. You know? But if you're a fetus, that's kind of hard to do. So they are taking this very complicated..

scientist Stroh Senate Bill twenty weeks eight weeks
"scientist" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Science Show

"Word scientist was uttered in public apparently hue didn't want to refer to the popular brilliant astronomer mathematician mary some ville as a man of science so is karen kupa says technically the first two sport the title of scientist was a woman philosopher stephen gawk raja some you'll tell the coleridge the poet the philosopher certainly thought that you couldn't pursue any cultural or scientific tiffany's without a firm theological grounding but she thought of in terms of anglicanism he thought that basic understanding of what he considered to be religious truths in religious precepts was necessary to frame any general views about the role of science and culture is very much on side with hugh in that case he was indeed and they were both very influenced by content in this respect even though it was in both cases it was a bit of a reworking of canton a more religious direction it took office century for the word scientist to be commonly accepted historian will add shwe hicfa to the term used to describe someone working in knowledge production was natural philosopher that is very ingrained a very prestigious term and all of a sudden you're trying to change to a new term to describe knowledge production to scientists so many is rather degrading the why was tom nology language why was it so important to that time massive changes in knowledge and hill is very king to police new scientific terms to make sure that the robust he was responsible for michael faraday is adoption of electrochemical terminology such as electrode cathode electrolysis and i on so in this way he'll became a powerful broker in the coining of new scientific terms and guiding the direction of scientific knowledge human into that built in the sixteen hundreds the oakpanelled renne library trinity is a book lovers dream pass me shakespeare's first folio on newton's principia mathematica delve into original milton works or one of the eighth century medieval manuscripts but no i visited trinity to look inside the huel archives which cat for by librarian nncholas bell where searching renne library looking at funding of lessons.

scientist michael faraday shakespeare newton nncholas bell karen kupa stephen gawk hugh shwe hicfa tom nology oakpanelled renne library milton
"scientist" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Good science that they can't stop themselves from falling yeah those kinds of traps it's an interesting question and it has to do with how deep does their philosophical understanding of science go and honestly you could be a successful scientist without being philosopher in that you could you could be technically good in your field you could be obviously very knowledgeable and you can have certain attributes like being creative being able to think outside the box right think of of new ways of explaining phenomenon thing you know being good at designing hypotheses and research to test those hypotheses and knowing how to move the ball forward you know in your research and yet not really understand the critical thinking element of science you know and those are the people who are technically good scientists and they may be brilliant at what they do but they just don't fully grasp the mechanism of selfdeception that we need science to protect us from and so they fall into those traps because they didn't really really fully understand them and we see the whole spectrum i think most scientists have a pretty good understanding of of process but a lot don't you know or they or their understanding is ultimately superficial which is why so many scientists fall prey to things like p hacking hacking i think is mostly a phenomenon of scientists who don't understand the critical thinking aspects of science so they do things and without understanding that that completely invalidates their research you know so that's we just need more i think more thorough in universal education in the sciences in critical thinking and selfdeception we've said it before i mean there should be courses that are in the canon that teach critical thinking it should be starting the earliest age possible and.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"The hour he's the author of the formula for miracles worst science reveals the secrets of the spirit and rent talking about work programme being cut a push in this direction i think an instant healings when we when we're talking about health success talk about the power of intuition is it the most important and powerful tool we have had absolutely and one of the mit serve our world is that it's all about knowledge and and education and then a little color company that's not true at all the absolutely the most important thing we have in life is our intuition and let's talk science for a second uh people most people think we had well what makes great scientists this there's super smart someone like einstein uh if you actually read what einstein road and when he talked about key repeatedly emphasized the importance of intuition and if you look at all the great scientists of in history newton einstein pests like galileo etcetera all of them were intuitive s every single one of them and so if you're smart that can make you a mediocre scientist but you combine that with him tuition that's what makes a great scientist and of course if intuition it's important for a scientist of course it's important for everybody and it's unfortunate that most of us again another myth of our society that's not true at all most people think you're either born psychic or you're not no it's like a gene you have or you don't uh that's not true everybody has the ability to develop and build up their intuition it's just that some people have a natural talent easier for that but that's true of everything in life isn't it some people have a natural talent for singing were playing the guitar or running really fast but others don't but with the proper training everybody can develop their intuition everybody can learn.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on Science in Action

"The tremendously important their important both as the measure of being an excellent scientist bob it's also that influence on governments around the world every time a major ipcc report comes out it gets a lot of attention that probably the most important reports that a dumb in climate scientists and also important presumably for the careers of the people that right them yes i think so it can be prestigious the ipcc was awarded the nobel prize for peace in two thousand seven these reports he don't get paid to write md no you've done their purely voluntary so with the survey of how much women were having a presence oil having a voice at she was the difference between women having a presence in having a voice while you can have a lot of token women sitting round the table but if they're not given a chance to speak then then not really participating or influencing the report four amine we see this a law generally across sciences people sometimes remember oh we should have some women on that panel but then the question is to they get the opportunity to speak an all they listen to said what we try and find out with your survey how women felt about their experience with ipcc we were trying to identify the barriers to the participation and very importantly we were hoping to make some recommendations that would improve the situation what we asking them what did you find out from them i think the first thing to say is that many of them reported a very positive experience but interestingly a lot of women that said they didn't face barriers when we asked them about what the others did they reported the many others experience barriers i think the largest barrier that we identified was english language ability a lot of people saw that as a barrier to happing voice and of course that it would be experienced by men of.

ipcc nobel prize scientist bob it
"scientist" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

EFT/Tapping Q

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

"So the scientists in me looks at the emotional part the physical symptom that's coming up and then i look at the body part in the organs or the system that is giving you a sign and then is a scientist goes in and go okay gallbladder issues bile bile is a really nasty looking color it's kind of this yellowy orange color it's usually assoc associated with kinds of angers and frustrations so then you can start layering these things and go you know what i have a lot of anger and i have a lot of digestion problems because i can't digest the anger i'm feeling towards myself or towards someone else so then you can go beyond just this is the temporary have an ache or have a little bit of indigestion and then you can go okay what am i angry about who am i angry with is this new or is it old you know is this just my pattern or does it my family pattern for generations my family has been angry and then you can start dissecting the present moment and then you can sit down and start going through systematically and look at where in this example you're angry and start releasing all the issues about anger and then look at the patterns of where you've learned about anger from either your family members or someone in school or you know your boss or just society in general about what we need to be angry about than so then i kinda start taking them apart in i go through that kind of layers.

scientist