35 Burst results for "Scientist"

Unredacted Emails Show Scientist Doubt Over Origins of COVID

Mark Levin

01:47 min | 2 d ago

Unredacted Emails Show Scientist Doubt Over Origins of COVID

"Through a freedom of information lawsuit guardian reporter Jimmy Tobias obtained newly unredacted emails detailing both the February 1st 2020 teleconference between doctor Anthony Fauci director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and virologists discussing the SARS CoV-2 virus as well as correspondence pertaining to COVID-19's possible origins After a long foia fight he tweets out I just received a bunch of new unredacted emails detailing his teleconference Emily cop a reporter with the nonprofit investigative research group U.S. right to know has incorporated these findings into an extensive and detailed timeline concerning the proximal origin of SARS CoV-2 She noted that in February 2020 when the aforementioned teleconference took place Several top virologists sought to examine the nature of the coronavirus that would go on to kill tens of millions of people worldwide Although the ultimately concluded in the journal nature medicine at the virus had not been engineered stating quote we do not believe that any type of laboratory based scenario is plausible behind the scenes it was a great deal of doubt Many of the scientists who were attempting to account for the origin of the Führer cleavage site on the virus's spike protein responsible for its relatively high infectivity were confronted with the strong possibility of human intervention U.S. rights in a reported that in January 2020 Danish evolutionary biologists and Scripps research institute immunology professor Christian G Anderson raised the matter of a gain of function study that looked like a how to manual for building the Wuhan coronavirus in a laboratory

Jimmy Tobias National Institute Of Allergy Sars Emily Cop Anthony Fauci U.S. Scripps Research Institute Christian G Anderson Wuhan
What Happened to Turn the Epic Red Wave Into 2020 2.0?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:15 min | 3 d ago

What Happened to Turn the Epic Red Wave Into 2020 2.0?

"Were focused on candidate quality and debates and arguments and who is going to secure the southern border and who's going to stop fentanyl, people like Katie Hobbs and John fetterman sat at home and to digital online fundraisers to secular godless, miserable, rich young professionals in Silicon Valley in New York that gave $2800 a piece gleefully to fund the takeover of America via act blue and the designer of it all was Marc Elias. When you have an entire system that is changing in front of your eyes and the Republican Party becomes the muscular class, carpenters, electricians, welders, plumbers, and police officers. It's harder to fund a political movement that way. The Democrat party has become the upper middle class, the party of accountants, the party of computer scientists, so they're able to raise money a lot easier, act blue, raised $1.8 billion when red raised $1 billion. And there's no reason anymore for candidates to campaign. Why do you have to debate? Why do you have to answer to voters? You don't. Now instead, you run this synthetic artificial construct.

Katie Hobbs John Fetterman Marc Elias Silicon Valley Republican Party Democrat Party New York America
America to Compensate Poor Countries for Environmental Challenges

The Trish Regan Show

01:42 min | 3 d ago

America to Compensate Poor Countries for Environmental Challenges

"To this climate thing. We'll get to inflation, but we know about that already. It's just really, really bad this year. But I want to get to this climate thing because this is a big deal. So they're meeting over there in Egypt. And for a long time now, a lot of these countries understandably that are poor and are still in their developed stages, are saying, hey, we need money because of the climate disasters that are happening here because all you people, you were using all these damaging things that affected our climate. And so consequently, we need more money to deal with this. And for the first time, for the first time, it's been set up. It's a big deal. So what's happened is they've put together a fund effectively. Their earmarking money for what is known as loss and damage when rising seas more powerful storms and other things that scientists link to climate change cause destruction in these developing countries that is possibly irreparable than the bigger countries, like the U.S., the wealthier countries will need to step in and provide for lack of a better term, a kind of reparation like system. So this is flawed on a whole lot of levels. And by the way, this had been resisted by a lot of countries for quite some time until Joe Biden and John Kerry got in there and decided that this would be really good. The fear was, of course, the legal liability, right? You have this risk of lawsuits because anything that happens, that might even be just totally out of anybody else's control. Now suddenly, the wealthier countries are going to have to step in. Now,

Egypt Joe Biden U.S. John Kerry
How cooking food and gathering for feasts made us human

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 d ago

How cooking food and gathering for feasts made us human

"If you're preparing a Thanksgiving feast this week you might be glad to know that the act of cooking makes you part of a long line in human history A recent study finds a discovery in Israel of what appears to be some roasted fish specifically carp helps date the discovery of fire for food to at least 780,000 years back And some scientists estimate our early human cousins may have been using fire to cook their food almost 2 million years ago Anthropologists say discovering the cooking of food was a big change helping to fuel our evolution and giving humans bigger brains Down the line cooking became the centerpiece of feasting rituals that brought communities together The new studies published in the journal nature ecology and evolution I'm Jackie Quinn

Israel Jackie Quinn
No Modern Actresses Compare to Hedy Lamarr

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:13 min | 2 weeks ago

No Modern Actresses Compare to Hedy Lamarr

"Henny Lamar was not just eye candy. She was also a scientist, co inventing an early technique for something called spread spectrum communications, that is the key to many wireless communications in our present day, just what is spectrum communications? Well, I'll get to that. You know how tech savvy I am so I can explain that very simply, but trust me when I say headed Lamar was one smart cookie. And I got a kick out of trying to figure out what actress nowadays could ever have the balls to do the things she did. I haven't found one yet. I know there are actresses who are sexy that want things on their own terms and whether it's a J.Lo or there's plenty of actresses, you know, Salma Hayek at this plenty of actions want things done on their time. But I'm not sure how smart they are, how book smart they are beyond that. It's okay. You can just be an actress when knows what you need for your career. That's fine. But beyond acting, beyond Hollywood, beyond dancing and singing and acting, nobody beats hedy Lamar.

Henny Lamar Lamar Salma Hayek Hollywood Hedy Lamar
Caller: Could You Imagine a Trump-DeSantis 2024 Ticket?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Caller: Could You Imagine a Trump-DeSantis 2024 Ticket?

"I just want a tall grace. I wish everybody would calm down about the comment he made about desantis. Hey, you know, it's nobody news Donald Trump by now. How are you? Todd? I mean, you know what? I'm sure I bet you their best friends. And they just they're now fighting right now. You don't think so. No. I know. No, no. You know what? This country would have, but you think they're going to have a meltdown tomorrow? Could you imagine if Trump and desantis ran on the same ticket in 2024? Well, that would cause the mountain. Trump went to scientists on running as I'm just saying, you know, president and vice president. I'm just saying, could you imagine this country would be jumping off a bridge? These two ran together. Because that is like key and T right there. They're both Donald Trump. You got to take them. You know how he is? That's why a lot of people, oh my God, he said this. He said, but you know what? I would rather have Donald Trump, tell me to my face that he don't like me, then Brandon stabbed me in the back. Patty, we're going to leave it there. We're coming up on the break, but real quick, before we let you go, you were at the rally, what was that like? How is the energy level? Very good. Very good for us. Not too much Doug. Mastriano, yeah, nah, yeah. That's gonna be a tough one. But he's having a fight his own party. So if he wins, it's going to be a miracle. Yeah, he's not good. I don't think so. But I'll be honest with you. Tomorrow, a lot of people that are going to are going to win. Guess who's back in them? They're all Trump endorsed.

Desantis Donald Trump Todd Patty Brandon Doug
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:29 min | 2 weeks ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Movies and then just an amazing and we'd always have this indoor jokes that our parents didn't get because they didn't watch the muzzle movies that it was always connect and it's actually something I really miss. So whenever I'm home, I can go to, I must my brother, because my sister is going to be in. Europe, something I must have in Europe. So I'm just left with my brother to connect with, and he is usually very open to me. Great out and watch movies. That's our team. Moving. Whether you had mentioned that you're siblings are all doing muscles now. Oh. What do you want to say more about what they're doing? I'm interested in how close native people influence career. Yeah, I think. So my brother, who's the middle child, the second one. His name is Elvis. He did his undergrad was un civil engineering, so his master is also on civil engineering. I think from a very young age, I can't see him as anything else other than an engineer. He's like how he was he would want to see how things work, my timely, and it's just something that he did, he got into naturally, because I remember the times when people would say that he wants to be a pilot, but I don't think that's him. It's just been. The way he looks at things is very mechanical. And my sister did her undergrad in a played mathematics, and her master's is on the same. And she's doing it in Hungary right now. And also for her, I guess with three completely different personalities, me being closed off, my brother, I don't know how to describe him, but sometimes I feel like as he gets him out, sometimes that doesn't mean you person, but he's always impressive. He has a very brilliant mind. You know, he's one of those people who, for me, I had to really read to be an a student for him it comes naturally. He would read something once and it's like it stuck for me I would have to like sit and read and read and reread again for it to stick and I had to

Europe Elvis un Hungary
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Learn how to do that. Even crocheting. I need to learn this. I always wanted to blend it. How do you feel after having that knitting section? Why do you do it? I did it because I used to do it because I felt like I was spending too much of my time on the screen. And I needed a break from me. And yeah. And back in the day, my aunt used to meet a lot, and also she used to crochet so most of the sweaters that we had when we were kids. And they took that. Oh, so setting for me just when thread you can make a whole. King, and I wanted to describe and see if it's something that I can do. But unfortunately, I am just going to stick on. Needing to have because I don't know how to start making strength.

King
Hundreds of elephants, zebras die as Kenya weathers drought

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hundreds of elephants, zebras die as Kenya weathers drought

"A new report says hundreds of animals including elephants and endangered zebras have died in Kenyan wildlife preserves during East Africa's worst drought in decades The reports is more than 200 elephants have died Research scientist Jim justice nyamo says elephants need for water puts a big drain on supply And it's the drought It's something to do with water and food This is Kenya's worst drought in 40 years Veterinary doctor Isaiah ololo says elephants and other animals are affected by more than just a lack of water That makes the animal immunity to be lowered And this contributes to the infection because the bacterial load and the parasites are opportunistic Then they overcome the power of the immunity and the in most cases we find that the animals will die A canyon sanctuary is looking after elephant calves many have been made orphans by the drought I'm Ed Donahue

Jim Justice Nyamo Isaiah Ololo East Africa Kenya Ed Donahue
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:01 min | 2 weeks ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Professor Brian brown's research shows that vulnerability fosters good emotional and mental health. It is a sign of courage. We become more resilient and brave when we embrace who we truly are and what we are feeling. The vulnerable scientists podcast is a space for scientists to tell their honest and authentic stories. I am your host, Sarah Kerry, who happens to be a scientist in formal science communicator and I help scientists create personal websites. If you want to support this show, go to WWW dot com slash the vulnerable scientist. You can also follow this podcast on all social media platforms. At TV scientist pod. Let's talk about the highs. That you've not mentioned when you are talking about your career path. Let's talk about that. Some of the high vaping when.

Brian brown Sarah Kerry
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

08:05 min | 2 weeks ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Scientist pod. I use this. Three okay, so at this point, we've talked about your master's experience and all that. Now, which is a pretty delved into various issues. And I love the contest of everything and you just gives a very clear picture of what it is like, you know, going through education and getting to be a full scientist, like you're a scientist, but you know, getting to a career that pays you because you still have a student. Now you're in your PhD and you know each year. And in my title. And you have been as you from getting to your undergraduate to now how long has it been? It has been, well, 8 years, 8 years. That's including the internship period of one year that you and I took. Yeah. So, and you still doing your PhD student. I don't know. Yes, you're working towards this doctrine, and you know, after that you go into research and you have your own job and all that. But what apart from your cousin who's wondering what's wrong with you? What is that like to how do you feel? Within yourself about it. Your parents okay with it, but what about you? What are you feeling about it? President, I think in the past, I'd be like, it's what I want to be in school to get my PhD and even if I get that extra or another income and still go for it. But also their moments where you're looking into creatures in the past ways taking so long to get to where you want it to be. So there's only that question of that self doubt of. It's taking too long to get there, seeking a lot of work. To get to where I want to be to be like, maybe doctor damaris to be like, to get to the point where doctor Jeremy at it's taking too long for me. So this only that's beetles. So don't. And also, I feel like, when you, when you constantly just want to be as student, it means that they are part of users, and be scared of what's out there outside school. And maybe I also feel that way just a little bit where I felt that we are not when I was getting to my PhD and thinking to myself after the speech day and May 20 another and another and another, I never stopped liking. And I realized that came out of. Just being scared of words out there after school. Because this means all my life as being in one school or another learning, but at some point I need to grow out of. I've gotten all this material from my school days and now I need to use it. In a career outside of school, and then it comes to now, do you want a canele academia or industry? But already I feel like my ads have already been set on where I want my career to go. And it would be in research. So I'm getting more comfortable in aspects. This PhD might finish soon and now I will equip for the next step that I might remove another study session only because asking where I'm never finishing. So between your masters and your PhD, what was going there, what was going on around there. So after my master's was mainly my topic was on, now characterizing this new microsporidia from anopheles mosquitos. So that was the gist of my master. But that was just the tip of the iceberg. Because a fed from that we were now working towards how does it block malaria? So that was the biggest bit of the project. So immediately I had submitted my master's disease now we had already continued working on now experiments to show the effect of make CRISPR the agonist malia in the mosquito. So we had set up all these mosquito experiments in the lab and we had tested the different. Plasmodium experiments where we are feeding mosquitos with plasmodium infected blood, and we see if this mosquitos have microscopy yet as it blocks malaria. So because I had finished my master's, it just meant that the work was really just beginning, because at the end. And from that my spare razor gave me a position to become a research assistant. Now the bigger part of the project's cutting where we attempt to test to check how Microsoft get in mosquitos is blocking. If it does, so now we are trying to feed mosquitos with plasmodium infected glands, and setting up those experiments. So my main job description was now working on. That aspect of microscopy then be and malaria blocking. After I got my research assistant position. So this was the time now we are finally finalizing on the main experiment that involves trying to check if my prosperity blocks malaria. And we hadn't published yet, so even after submitted matrices, we had not yet published this really interesting work. And so we are going into 2019. I finished my masters and I knew I wanted to do my PhD, so the aim was now to try and look for finding for my PhD. And Jeremy actually was very supportive in trying to get me a PhD. He would send me different opportunities, there's the post T one from J quite. And he would send me welcome trust ads and when interesting one was the OWS D one. For women in science, in the developing world, I think that's the full name of OWC. So he sent me that and he asked if it's something that would be keen on playing for. And at that point, because a new I wanted to do my PhD, and also because, like you had mentioned, my masters was mostly just wet lab. I knew I wanted my PhD to forecast on by informatics. To now really get what I had been taught in school about coding to get that now into action. So I knew what I wanted to do was going to be in bed for my takes. And once he gave me that,

malaria damaris Jeremy Microsoft
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

05:40 min | 2 weeks ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Them for my experts. My work is in fully by informatics. But in my head, what I had intended from earlier on was that I want to do wet lab and I want to do to drain the dry lab. So my project will include both going to the field and getting my hands dirty and also working on the computer. But unfortunately, I think the wet lab aspect of it actually laughs the brain for it. So for my master's project, I didn't do a lot of cooking, Maggie, but there was a bit of informatics aspect you need where to know we are trying to figure out what this new microscope is all about. Now we have to go to the computer to design new primers, and we have to sequence things and try and allay the sequences of sent back to us, what are they saying? Is this region conserved or not? Could this be important when it comes to assessing you? This is Microsoft and B or something else. So that was the only information. Yeah. So characterizing microscopy, seeing where it falls taxonomically. Yeah, that was. A bit underwhelming compared to now there really interesting things that were happening when I was falling down in rice ideas. Yeah. I love that you said that because I'm in the same situation where I'm doing a molecular informatics thing, but my research is mainly wet lab, the only stuff that I do is just as in very basic just prima design, trying to construct new primers and thinking, okay, so which one should I look for? Restriction answers and trying to find out, okay, what are my targets in your mostly cloning stuff and you're just trying to do a pre lab thing then designing that and knowing okay, so this is what I'm expecting is what I want then going to the lab and also the sequencing part. It was a lot. I had to. Fix for answering that for someone who might be worried there might be the same situation that like, okay, so what informatics is this anyway? Parents, at this point, what are they thinking? Because at this point, at least you are getting some stiffened, at least you are not fully depending on them, and you are far away from them. And you are very, we probably at home talking about whatever you're doing. So what are they thinking? At this point, at that point. Okay, so you mentioned that I'm getting my deep end to at least a bit less worried about me. But I guess parents are just fine. I feel like there's two ways and we still take me as a student student. And. A constantly in my calls is my mother, she asking, so what have you eaten? How managed to eat anything and is that worry in her in her mind that maybe may be events getting her new day, but I guess that's the third process and also being because we're very close family and then now you've just been thrown into a very different place. So far away from home. Who is that content way? And your parents know that your introverted and yeah, so my parents would always be worried about me and I feel like even in my 50s. And as this talking about. Now, being a student concert with a student. I have my small cousin once asked me how long are you going to be a student when I told him that and still going to school? And he feels like I'm an adult I should be done already. But in my constant need to learn, I find that as long as you're a student, is this aspect of your parents feel like probably not getting enough and the consent worry that they keep having but also that will live there to support you. Even if I tell my mom that I'm okay. The next day should be trying to spend and better. So there we go. For lunch. Pizza. And yeah, it's a nice gesture. But how would you give it to you for instance that you came? The only the only even when you're looking

Maggie Microsoft
Dr. Jeff Myers and Eric Discuss Faith Making Science Possible

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:14 min | 3 weeks ago

Dr. Jeff Myers and Eric Discuss Faith Making Science Possible

"Of Robert Boyle, the founder of modern chemistry, that kid could have turned out to be a trust fund baby. I mean, he grew up in this 20,000 ft² castle that had been built by king John, his father had purchased it from sir Walter Raleigh. And he said, now I'm not going to live that way. I have all the money that I could ever need, but I'm not going to live that way. In fact, he wrote a book called the Christian virtuoso how to be an experimental philosopher that was his word for scientist. And be one who glorifies God and loves Jesus at the same time. These people did not see a conflict between their science and faith. In fact, it was their faith that made their science possible. And Boyle invented, I always forget that the branch of science that he invented, but these are as seminal as it gets. I mean, without these folks, there is no science. Modern science was invented by profound men of Christian faith. We need to know that. We need to say it over and over and over again to those people who would lie and distort the truth and claim somehow that faith is at odds with science. That's not even close to true. That's what I kind of find so funny, Jeff, is that it's the very opposite

Robert Boyle Sir Walter Raleigh King John Boyle Jeff
UN: World "nowhere near" hitting emissions targets

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last month

UN: World "nowhere near" hitting emissions targets

"The UN says the world is nowhere near hitting its emission targets The United Nations climate office says global warming and climate change continues to be a big concern Its latest estimate based on a 193 national emissions targets finds even if countries achieve their current pledges greenhouse gas emissions will blow past the limit countries agreed to in the 2015 Paris climate accords and temperatures would rise 4.5°F over pre industrial averages by the end of the century The report forecast emissions will increase by 10.6% from 2010 to 2030 that's a slight decrease from earlier estimates but scientists say emissions need to be cut by 45% by the end of this decade to prevent what UN secretary general Antonio Guterres has described as uncharted territories of destruction The UN will hold a climate summit starting November 6th in Egypt where countries will again try to ratchet up their targets I am Jennifer King

United Nations Antonio Guterres Paris Egypt Jennifer King
Jason Johnson: 'Fascism & Nazis' Accurately Describe Republicans

Mark Levin

01:32 min | Last month

Jason Johnson: 'Fascism & Nazis' Accurately Describe Republicans

"Anyway Jason Johnson is a contributor to MSNBC and a contributor to loathsome propaganda this country I have no idea who he is or what he does But that goes for most of the people on MSL state And paulette's listen to this Cut four go I am the political scientist so I was kind of looking at the data and did some background work Now we know what he was He was a political let's start over Now we know what he is A political scientist Well some kind of scientist more like a mad scientist Go ahead I am the political scientist So I was kind of looking at the data and did some background work on this It's actually even worse than what's reported because you have to understand that when it comes to terms that are considered polarizing terms like fascism and Nazi are considered to be polarizing terms but unfortunately those are the correct ways to describe what is happening with Republicans So in many respects if you there you go there you go Stop please Oh How's your finger doing there mister producer Just curious This is pretty loathsome don't you think America Fascism nazism are considered to be polarizing terms but unfortunately those are the correct way to describe what is happening with Republicans

Jason Johnson Paulette Msnbc America
The Woke Movement Has Penetrated the Scholarly Journals of Academia

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:42 min | Last month

The Woke Movement Has Penetrated the Scholarly Journals of Academia

"Unfortunately, the so called woke movement has penetrated the scholarly journals of academia. And this includes journals of science and social science where you study matters, but what the journals do now is they say that if you have the wrong views, particularly about race, about gender or sexual orientation, or even if you are studying topics that we consider to be quote taboo, we're going to block you. We're going to not publish your article, we're going to exclude this discussion from our journal. We're going to we're going to make our journal activist in taking positions on issues, even though they are open questions as far as academic debate is concerned. Now, it turns out that there is a further escalation by the national Institutes of health, which is now withholding scholarly access to an important database. This is a database that scientists use to study the relationship of things like race and health or ethnicity and economic success. Or gender and performance in physics. So in other words, this was a database that's been available to social scientists, particularly scientists who are studying the relationship between on the one hand race ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation. And on the other hand, a whole set of outcomes, whether they be biological outcomes in the case of health. So for example, certain genetic groups may be more disposed, for example, they're getting a particular kind of disease. That's obviously been a long time subject of study. Obviously there are differences between men and women in terms of biology and health, but not held only, but also things like why is it that so few women become physicists? Well, you want to look at databases to see, for example, how many women are physics majors? How many of them take an interest? How many of them express a desire to be a physicist? How many of them? So all these sorts of questions are can only be studied if you have access to data. Well, it turns out we're hearing from James Lee who's a behavioral geneticist at the university of Minnesota. He says, quote, my colleagues and other universities and I have run into problems involving applications to study the relationships among intelligence, education, and health outcomes.

National Institutes Of Health James Lee University Of Minnesota
The Founding Fathers Were Very Clear About Separation of Powers

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:24 min | Last month

The Founding Fathers Were Very Clear About Separation of Powers

"Go back to the founding fathers, they were very clear about separation of powers and consent to the governed and checks and balances. Three branches equal any fourth grader that's taught civics of which they're increasingly not taught civics could tell you exactly the moral premise behind separation of powers. Starting in the 1920s, simultaneous, by the way, with kind of the regime of scientists and scientism is there was this fourth branch of government, where Woodrow Wilson, one of the worst presidents in American history, basically made an argument that the kind of founding fathers and what they said and what they did, that's old, that's outdated. We got to turn our back on that a new era is here. We have technology and we can govern men through different ideas and practices. Now, the implications of that is that an entire new regime, if you will, of governmental power and control was ushered in, that does not really fit into those checks and balances. For example, the power is no longer in Congress or in the executive branch, the power is in the deepest kind of chasms of the Department of Justice, the FBI, the Internal Revenue Service, the EPA, and you have this unregulated regulatory agencies that are unchecked largely unknown with unlimited power. And it's very hard to then check and balance it, and then you all of a sudden have very bad things happen. And you ask yourself, who actually voted for this? So for example, Congress should say, if you're funding gain of function research at Boston University, not only should he lose your funding, like you should be arrested. This is insane.

Woodrow Wilson Congress Department Of Justice Internal Revenue Service FBI EPA Boston University
We Trust the Science, We Don't Trust the Mainstream Media Scientists

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:38 sec | Last month

We Trust the Science, We Don't Trust the Mainstream Media Scientists

"Kind of talk a little bit about how we view science. And so critique that a lot of conservatives get is that we're anti science. Of course, that's not true. We just don't believe that science should be used to dominate nature and change nature. It should be to explore nature to understand it to allow human beings to flourish. We trust the science, we just don't trust the scientists you continually put on television that are wrong about everything and repeatedly and have no concern for the moral well-being or future of our children and quite honestly concocted the worst mistake of my lifetime, which was locking down the healthy young to destroy their lives and it was the dumbest thing we've ever done as a society.

How Do Scientists Respond to Fine-Tuning? Dr. Hugh Ross Explains

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:59 min | Last month

How Do Scientists Respond to Fine-Tuning? Dr. Hugh Ross Explains

"Talking to Hugh Ross, the new book is designed to the core and you can find his organization reasons to believe at reasons dot org, what could be simpler reasons dot org. Well, doctor Ross, we're getting kind of in the weeds, and I don't want to lose people, I want to get back into the weeds, but before we get back into the weeds, what do your fellow scientists say? Because you were talking about peer reviewed papers appearing in the premier journal of academic science nature, what do they say when more and more and more and more and more and more evidence of fine tuning comes up. I know that for many of them, it's somehow repulsive. It doesn't really square with what they think things should be like. Well, they think things should be naturalistically explained and all the evidence is telling us that's not the way it is. The example I just gave you is one of a thousand different examples. I could talk about. And so there really is an overwhelming case. And I remember I've been speaking on this fine tuning to public audiences since the 1970s. And I remember the 1980s saying, eventually, the evidence will be so overwhelming and so pervasive, non theists who have nowhere else to go, but hypothesizes an infinite number of universes where they're all different from one another and we just happen to live in the one universe by a sheer check. Wait a minute. Are you telling me that you hypothesized the loony multiverse idea back then? Back then, 20 years before the AP is even came up with the idea. Because it was 20 7 promoted. But what has happened recently is one of those fellow agnostic atheists, astronomers, Leonard susskind said, we've got to stop using the multiverse.

Premier Journal Of Academic Sc Hugh Ross Ross AP Leonard Susskind
Reasons.org's Dr. Hugh Ross Gives Specific Examples of Fine-Tuning

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | Last month

Reasons.org's Dr. Hugh Ross Gives Specific Examples of Fine-Tuning

"Am overjoyed to be speaking with my guest doctor Hugh Ross. He's the head of reasons to believe ministries has written many, many books on how science and faith are not just compatible, but by how science increasingly points to the clear I should say points to the idea that there is a God who designed the universe and it's become overwhelming the evidence from science. Before we get to the redemptive part that you were just mentioning, doctor Ross, could you explain to the most inspiring fine tuning details? Because a lot of times when I'm talking about this, I'm not a scientist, but people want examples. What do you mean by fine tuning? Give me an example. And if you're talking about the four fundamental laws of physics, that's a little tough for people. They don't normally think in terms of the four fundamental laws. But what is something in terms of fine tuning that maybe people can get their heads around? Well, I'll share one with you that I included just before the book went to press. It was a paper published in the scientific literature where they said, when we look at the early sun, it's pouring out particle radiation, gamma ray and x-ray and flaring activity, about a 100,000 times greater than we see today. And normally this would have sputtered away all of earth's water in all of Earth's atmosphere and our planet would have been permanently sterile. But what happened instead as our solar system started off with 5 rocky planets, mercury, Venus, earth, Mars, and the planet theia. But early in the solar system's history, theia and the Proto earth collided with one another. Made the earth bigger and created a debris cloud around the earth that's coalesced to meet the moon.

Hugh Ross Ross
Hugh Ross: Even Atheist Scientists Concede Deism Can't Be Ruled Out

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:18 min | Last month

Hugh Ross: Even Atheist Scientists Concede Deism Can't Be Ruled Out

"In the latest books being published by atheists astronomers and physicists, they're all conceding that D is and can not be taken off the scientific table. I mean, even Lawrence Krauss in his book on Nate said statement and his book a universe from nothing. And so they're coming to the recognition that there must be a causal agent beyond space and time that's engaged. But how I speak to my peers, as I say, well, it's not just that attribute of God that the fine tuning reveals. It reveals dozens of distinct personal attributes of the creator. And to see those attributes, we really need to look at all the disciplines of science and their sub disciplines. And so I get to meet a physical scientist. It doesn't concede that the really is overwhelming fine tuning evidence. But I encourage them. You need to look beyond what you know to look at the rest of the fine tuning data that we have and recognize this is revealing, not just one attribute of that causal agent, but multiple attributes and is leaving you no other option than that the God of the Bible created the universe and personally designed it so we can exist on this planet. So

Lawrence Krauss Nate
Why Do You Hate Conservatives?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:08 min | Last month

Why Do You Hate Conservatives?

"Why do you hate conservatives? Well, let's not say hate. Let's say dislike because you don't really hate anyone. You may dislike them because they want to ban abortion. Conservatives say they're all for freedom, but when it comes to a woman's freedom to choose what she wants to do with her own body, they sing a different tune. You may dislike them because they oppress people of color and deny the fact that America is systemically racist. Conservatives say that everybody is equal regardless of race, and that racism has little to no effect on the daily lives of people of color. So they just ignore the issue altogether. You may dislike them because they don't believe in climate change. Scientists keep telling us we're overheating the planet and conservatives don't seem to care. They're more concerned about profits than people. But what good is money if you have no planet to spend it on? You may dislike them because they're obsessed with guns. How are we ever going to stop gun violence if we don't get guns off the streets? And how are we ever going to get guns off the streets if conservatives block every common sense gun law?

America
'The Rock' Makes Studio Heads a Lot of Money

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:39 min | Last month

'The Rock' Makes Studio Heads a Lot of Money

"His eye up in the air. His eyebrow up in here, I should say and say, do you smell what AJ is cooking? I know it's corny, but that's what people did back then. It's just thinking about it makes me cringe, but we did it. Get The Rock. He's so popular. I know him in the minority. Because these films he makes make studios a lot of money. You know, people by houses on these films is a great example of this when Jerry Weintraub, one of the greatest guys you could ever meet, I mean, he's gone now. He's a great producer, a very good actor, too, not for nothing. Produced a Karate Kid, all the oceans, 11s movies. I mean, he's produced a ton of shit. But when he saw kids imitating Ralph Macchio doing that crane pose, he grabbed him and said, we're going to make a bunch of these movies, kid. And then years go by, Jerry's at the end of his life, and he sees Ralph at a restaurant. And he introduces Ralph to a bunch of his friends. He goes, this is Ralph Macchio. He bought me three houses. Yeah, because movies make a lot of money and studio heads make a fortune. So The Rock is making a fortune for studio heads, but it doesn't mean it's good cooking. I mean, rampage. The movie where he plays a scientist who must stop an albino ape that is exploded in size whose devouring Chicago, that made almost half a billion. In 2018, and then later that summer, he does skyscraper, he battles this burning luxury high rise. That made over 300 million, even Hercules as shitty as it was made 250 mil back in 2014. Who are these people rushing out to see these films? Actually, I did take the kids to see skyscraper, but we laughed through it because it was so fake. I also wanted to see Alexandra Daddario because I'd never seen her with that amazing rack she has in a movie before and it was on full display. So some of those millions are for her. But then somebody pointed out to me that, I don't know, NBC has a show and it's third season called young rock. I've never heard of this show. It's all about how little Dwayne Johnson grew up to become The Rock. What is this ever happened? Somebody still alive having their very own origin prequel series? I feel like someone's pulling a joke on me. Because whenever I see him in a movie, his acting is no different than when he was breaking a chair over the back of Triple H I mean, really. I've never seen him stretch himself beyond that. Any who? And I hate when people say any who, but that just did it. Leads me to a conversation or rather a question posed to me by a listener and a friend Adam marsh. Adam is a guy who love my writing. I hate saying love. He liked my writing a lot. He's younger than I am. I don't even know how old he is. He's probably 40 something. I'm 60. And he reached out to me. Back in the AOL days. You know, I'd love to meet with you and talk about writing and I'd love to get some, you know, you know, just tips or whatever the hell it was. He just wanted to know more about writing. It was like, I want to say like 1998, maybe, 99, whatever it was. So I met the kid at a place called Franks in Burbank, one of those places you walk into the daytime, people at the bar drinking, smoking cigarettes, and in the back, you can have a steak. Those places are gone. It was a very Tarantino like spot to make a movie, Frank's the all those places have gone in LA. It's a shame in New York too. You just, you got those people who just sit at the bar and God knows what they're thinking about, you know? The people you hoped when you were younger you'd never become. Like, what is he doing here at 1 o'clock in the afternoon having a double bourbon and smoking a cigarette? What the fuck went wrong with his life? But there we were and, you know, Adam and I struck up a friendship and we did some things together, he's actually a tremendous writer, wrote a couple of movies, not big movies, but movies, and, you know, we put together a graphic novel about my life that he thought would be great and he led the way because I don't know about graphic novels. He's more of a comic book guy, not a nerd at all. I mean, his father was a tough ass motherfucking hells angel, whatever. I mean, his father was a kick ass dude. You know, he saw his father beat dudes up in bars and shit. He comes from a tough background, but you know, comics were his thing. He knows about that, especially graphic novels. So he wanted to turn my life into a graphic novel. And we wrote this thing called sanctus CDs. Never went anywhere, but I was amazed at how good he was at it. And we're right now working on something together again, it's too early to talk about it, but hopefully with his ability and my ability, we can turn it into something. So he texts me, this is the guy I always tell you about, he'll always

Ralph Macchio Jerry Weintraub Ralph Alexandra Daddario Adam Marsh Crane Dwayne Johnson Jerry NBC Adam Chicago Franks AOL Burbank Tarantino Frank LA New York
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

07:51 min | Last month

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"That other research people have pointed out that the habit side would have an effect on the mental conjure and brain functions, or in animal? Because they are eating this particular. They seep into the ground, they are eaten by the animals, so it affects the brain of the animals. But now the bad thing of the good thing is that there is such a steel bin carried out, so there is no, this has been a simple hypothesis. As scientists, we ask ourselves then what are the opportunities there in what happened? How can we address this? Do we need to do more research? Do we need? So it creates other areas of growth in other potential areas of study, if you ask me. And then the other thing is that the Monsanto is embroiled in lawsuits. And unfortunately, a jury in California recently awarded a couple $2 billion. And inasmuch as what's known for me to address it is that, yes, the award of the money and the fact of the jury should be taken, should not be taken as a scientific or a scientific evidence, because according to their court's paperwork, it was like the vatic toys, based on the montmorency of the company, which manipulating its own research and the colluded with regulators, and then the intimidating assents. To keep secret any risks that was associated with the glyphosate. It's not that at the it's not that there is such a genic. It is now the unethical behavior. Around which the company acted and that's why they were found. So again, people who are making noise or they are against yamato, it causes cancer, weighs the evidence, or some guys were paid okay, but what was the basis of that payment based on the court paper, the court was not convinced that this scientist themselves are not even convinced that it would be the particular habitats were cosine. But the fact that the congressional statute then it created a lot of controversy. Around geomorphs, and those are the controversy now we need to be a bit careful when we are. We are dealing with it. Now I'm assuming that you are pro GMO, right? I am. Completely. So what message do you have to an anti geo? What I can say is that I think if I was to say maybe as a conclusion to say Jews are harmful, is like saying the Internet in harmful. Yes, it can be used in harmful ways. That is the Internet. But we all know that it has the potential to do wonderful things for millions of people. It has given us jobs and so forth, it has made us connect with each other. And also made the poor people access information, which triggers the wooden. So the same way we would treat something like Internet with all its benefit and, of course, potential. Not potential even we've seen several bullying. We've seen content very negative content being spread in at lightning speed and so forth. So it is the same thing we would look at the Germans like. So to oppose Jim was, I think, is unequivocally without giving without giving them a chance without looking at the what good they can do is simplistic and misguided. And what I look at, how I look at the world and even human beings is that everything and everyone is like a moon. You know? The size and the type of the moon is one to default it could be a Crescent, it could be a half moon it could be gibberish. It could be a full moon when it has a bright side that a site is in darkness. Yeah. So it is up to us to try to see how we can reduce the darkness, because nothing is perfect. Our view. I don't even know what it had been once, so I'm suspecting I haven't. But if I was served a plate of wood and I was told it is GMO, I would eat it, and the good thing is that I don't live in it was also another concern Kenyans a little GMO. Will I be first? No, and when we're looking at the national biosafety authority, they have been working on different people works. And this conversation started some time ago in Kenya until now it was banned in 2012. And when you look at around the national authority, the regulations around. Handling the GMO's products, one of them is very key is labeling that policy more products should be clearly labeled. So yes, I will definitely go into a small market and by GMO products. And it then, because let me ask you, you don't think that the things we eat today are not like they are a 100% okay. Even the work that we drink is treated at the Nairobi, what a company we do not know what they put in. We are just told it's chlorine and so forth. The AI itself, we brief in so many toxins, what is so wrong with eating a particular product that is made, to simply be judged resistant, maybe also as a take home or as a country. Is that one of the things we are looking at is actually extending our life expectancy. And what better way to learn? If not by looking at your neighbor, what they are doing, you know they say that the right ones, they learn from their mistakes, but their wise ones, from others mistakes. And I wouldn't look at it now from a mistake perspective will can also learn from other people's successes. And looking at Japan, for example, Japan has the highest life expectancy in the world, and they have allowed you more country. So if it was that bad, don't you think we should be seen Japanese, dropping down, dying with cancer and all sorts of diseases that are being used as a propaganda tool against you. How long have they used it? Some on my feet. That's a good question. What I know is that they use the Japan has not banned the economy, and we actually find that information for you. That one, I don't have an answer. So they started importing GM crops in 1996. I'm just. So thank you so much for someone who's someone who's been eating GMO since the only 96 and they are currently 20 6 years old. Yeah. What do you think? Let me know what you think on any social media platform. And tune into the following episodes to hear voices from other typical Kenyans, farmers and a GMO regulators that I promised you about. To support or learn more, go to the van der Poel society dot com until next time. Bye bye.

Monsanto national biosafety authority national authority cancer California GMO Jim Kenya Japan Nairobi GM van der Poel
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:48 min | Last month

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Every family

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:44 min | Last month

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Almost all of its medicines. And for those that are made locally, they are probably these are now genetic drugs whose partners are have already been lifted so you are simply using a formulation. I don't think we are doing any major research to produce any major drug in the country. I could be wrong, but this is as things stand now. I have not heard of a company that is really investing in novel men called research developed new medical products. I don't think that's happening in Kenya. Genetic modification will give us this advantage. Yeah? Because then we improve the scientific capacity of the country. Students or even researchers are the university levels in academic institutions in teaching hospitals in some of these research institutions. Once this scientific interaction and our knowledge and among many other things, people are now able to think widely under the light, okay, how can we apply these technology to solve some of the problems that we have? Yeah? We even hear of some people in parts of northeastern upper eastern and area where you know they have water, but they're what ice contaminated. Yeah? If we know what contaminates the water, whether it's an organic cable that can be broken down by bacteria, then we can treat those water with genetically modified bacteria. So that people get clean water to drink. These are some of the advantages of genetic engineering. So the advantages are widespread. But we've not only. Eating omaze or or are not going to be the GMO beans, or if you eat these in ten years, we'll have a leaf growing out of your ear, you know? It's really ridiculous some of the things that you hear. But yeah, so this is my message to anti GMO people. There is nothing wrong with it. It's just the messaging around it has been terrible.

Kenya
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

05:43 min | Last month

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Welcome to the vulnerable scientist podcast. This is a host sarnia Kerry. Here is the first episode of a new series that will be a bit different from the previous episodes in the sense that we are going to do topical episodes having different views from different people and of different backgrounds and expertise. The first topic of this series is the Kenyans reactions on the ten year GMO ban recently lifted. In this series, we're going to hear from scientists consumers, farmers, regulators, to a common manage on their take on this one being lifted. Amid a call to different people both in and outside my circle to give their views on what they think, I put the GMO band bin lifted. Here is what a cancer researcher had to say when I asked him why he responded to Michael. People talk about GMOs, all this week. And I mean, some of the information is you just like, where do people get these things? And I think just like any other technology that comes on that is made in the west and probably we try to implement it in Africa. The communication around these things always one very terrible tool. It is seen from an imperialist angle three, it's not done by the right people. At the end of the day, whatever is out there, whatever the masses here and all response to are things that are not founded either in science or are not factual. Somebody's opinion, which everybody is entitled to becomes the fact that runs the day other than the actual scientific fact. That is something that needs to be corrected. And it can only be corrected by getting people who are dishonor idea about what genetics is. Speaking is doctor Victor aurea, a cancer researcher at the BioTech research and innovation center at the university of Copenhagen best in Denmark. He is also a chief scientist in the integrated cancer research foundation. In Kenya, an NGO committed to promoting cancer awareness and research on ways to fight cancer. He just said that we need to be put to forgive us facts, right? Since he has a background in biochemistry, which brings with him a wide knowledge in genetics and GMOs, I asked him to explain what GMOs are. Our genetically modified organism in short in court GMO is any organism whose genetic material has been altered here using molecular biology techniques or genetic engineering techniques. What does it mean to you for the giovan to be lifted in Kenya? I think for me it's a step in the right direction. I say I say this as a scientist because we as Africa, we are always recipients of technology, all technology seems to be originating from the west, be it in engineering, the life sciences, the marine biology and all these other source of technical subjects. We are always recipients of this technology. And as long as we are recipients of this technologies, it means that as a nation, we will never we will never advance we never advance to a level where we can consider ourselves to be independent and or drive us of

sarnia Kerry cancer Victor aurea BioTech research and innovatio integrated cancer research fou Africa university of Copenhagen Kenya Michael NGO Denmark
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:06 min | 2 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"So the camera that I went to was learning Baghdad, but they do have branches in different places around Kenya think this one in KPC and probably others that I'm not aware of, but the one I went to was done in a little bit and within that specific institute, I was attached to the center for biotechnology research and development. So that's where most of the interesting work happened and this is in relation to vector style. A lot of infects work insects insect borne diseases are being researched in Cambridge. So once I got in for intense usually do like annotation or program where each week you are in a different lab doing different things and at the time they had different tropical diseases and magneto was obviously the biggest one there. So you had a Malay section that was mainly focused on the mosquito and then there was the malaria section that was focused on the human and the human aspect of it and the parasite aspect of malaria and then you had other neglect neglected tropical diseases like leishmania or soma.

center for biotechnology resea Baghdad Kenya Cambridge malaria leishmania
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

07:46 min | 2 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Many books? But for me, not as much. As much as do you, you say it not as much. I guess, of course, used to read, but not as crazy reading. Wow. So someone who's listening can get you know you. There's a way you know someone who reads the very white I don't know view of the world compared to people who do not necessarily read a especially a wide range of books not just one kind of book. Yeah. That's true. So what do you remember one nickname that you did give you? That you had a interesting when you read about that person it was interesting. Oh, you can remember. Off the top of my head, I can not remember. But when I remember is the one that he gave my sister and that was my teeth teeth. I can't remember what my tip did but he was an historical figure from the coast of Kenya. And go through some hysterical content and find out what my sister did. My teeth. Yeah. Yeah. That was a funny nickname that really stuck. And I still know we still call my sister my teacher. Oh. Tip tip. Tip tip. Yeah. Ah, okay. That's what I find out. So we'll just say that you are introverted, you or you are introverted or what should you say about your personality when it comes to because you mentioned used to stay at home. Yeah, I'm very introverted, but it's something I've been really working on. I think just a few years back, when I realized that now, it gets to a point where you can not especially in the scientific world, you can not just be very closed off and not network with people because you're introverted, but yeah, I'm very introverted. I love having my own space and doing things around my own space. It usually a bit daunting to be out there or be in front of a crowd talking. That was one of my biggest fear, but I feel like over time, having just grown into this space where you realize that. So this is the career you want to have. And with science, you need to be able to communicate properly with people and effectively and not just the sense the scientists are there. You also need to be able to interact with local people on the ground to realize the need that I needed to sort of get out of my comfort zone out of this box of cocoon red energy and I've been trying to put myself into positions that normally I wouldn't be very comfortable in trying to set up conversations with people probably may feel out of my field just to see the feel and it's usually very interesting to see someone else's point of view from what you what you think because I feel like as introverts you usually already set in your health space you already have this sort of view of things and now you're you don't have the exposure to other people who would tell you another perspective to put in things but then when you go when you get into a conversation with other people then you're like it's such a revolutionary because it opens up your eyes to like this whole new world that you didn't know existed but all this is actually possible. Okay, you're seeing how my third person is but you also have this new idea that actually makes sense to my third process and it's very exciting. It's a very exciting adventure where you're getting to know people and people are actually understanding what you're doing and you're able to have conversations like fuck up even more questions that are interesting to find and answer to. And I guess that's how it research works where you're constantly learning and bouncing off ideas. Against each other and it just grows from there. I love that. I am sure someone who's listening who's also an introvert can I don't know sort of related can maybe get some kind of encouragement out of that because I want me for some time I used to think like I don't know when I realized like being inside you need to talk to people. To grow into properly but I don't know I started doing the way you're saying you just do things that you out of your comfort zone then you just realize how good you can actually be at it by just getting out of that comfort zone. Of course you can of course you wouldn't like be always doing that like you have your downtime and just be by yourself as you love but this moment that with time when you keep on doing it, you become even more better at it. Yeah. I can do an example of chapati. I have never used one chapati. I'm not really a fan of jeopardy. But I never really used the lecture party to the extent that I was never interested in how to cook chapati. Then it happened that I said I said living on my own, then it's happened that I had this chapati. The only thing that is remaining is the chapati what sort is it called flour and the ugly flow. But now ugali tends to daily on its own, right? So the only thing that makes sense to cook right now is something that has donated. So and of course I don't have the rest of the things that needs to cook. So I have to cook chapati. I have an option and I can always make some black tea and all that. I have my supper. So I had to teach myself how to cook chopped butter in these days I'm really good at it by the way. And it is coming out of wanting to get off that comfort zone. I'm like, now, let me do something that I'll be uncomfortable doing and see how it goes. So you just realize, oh, you can actually be good at it assisted. I still, if I feel like in my life, my normal life is something that I'm struggling doing. I will engage in doing it because I want to be, I want to feel I want to feel, oh, I can actually do this thing that I'm struggling with if I can do this, for example, chapati. Anyway, interesting analogy. I like this. And yes, I can and I had who doesn't like choka cheese.

Kenya
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

08:11 min | 2 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"It's very different. It's a different experience. I don't know, I've tried putting away my thoughts. It's a bit different and less typing on phone, but typing on a laptop. It's a bit different. But when I write just literally on the diary, I have so many diaries that very kind of books they're really kind of books like those books that have empty spaces in the dates where it's a calendar. So I like that. I even know I have one that I'm writing on what you just I'm just taking notes of what you say so that I remote to ask you. So yeah, talking of asking you, you've said that your parents instill some sort of thing. That's why all of you guys are in science. What is that? I think from the from the time that we were able to decipher what I wouldn't say from the time that we were born, but from the time that we were big enough to know what's going on, parents still didn't ask the spirit of other beliefs that education is really key. It's very important. Not to say that they limited us from venturing into other skills, which are also very important, but them growing up from both of them are actually festivals in their respective family. And then growing up from that and being teachers, they had this passion for education and millions of how important it was and pushing us to try and get that passion to keep learning every time. Now, that's what the instilled in us. And my parents actually have in their house. They have this room with just that full of books, books, all types of books, historical books, fictional books, any type of book that you might be interested in interested in readers have this whole collection and my dad keeps getting new books every other month. And it used to be very, I guess when you get so many books and it's sort of class class, the room, you're asking, is there an end to it, but then my parents would be like, there's no end to lining. So even if you feel like you've read too much of it, there's still more to learn more to read. So in the past, I was smoking on fictional stories because I love to read. But then my parents repository of books. I also learned how just how much interesting historical books are, and what my dad used to do to keep us interested in history like Kenyan history or African history is he would give us nicknames based on interesting characters from this example books that you read and now with that would be QS, why is that calling us this? And then we'd want to read the historical books to see what did this person do and what characters that see me that is portrayed in this so yeah, so just having that passion to keep reading and keep learning and not just focus on fictional but also you're going to historical facts that think that really happened or you're going to now scientific paths where you reading about the history of my Libya or you're reading about how HIV came about and the sort of things that are that have been done to control HIV, how the rarest is evading drugs. So with that kind of exposure to this book, I think that's what she got us to be sort of. Really interested in science, this learning how things come about. And it's interesting, maybe my presence is to have a different journey, connection to the books that we have in my dad's library. But for me, I found that a lot of the books that I used to resonate with were mostly scientific books that he had in his collection. So I would go through most of them in this scene. Especially the biological senses books and just look around and see what's going on, what diseases are coming up or just being curious of how the hard work, why does it beat like this? What is it? Why does it stop? You know, the normal question that keeps have and we're lucky enough to have books in my dad's library that could answer most of these questions. And this was way before Internet was like, I see where you think of something and what you do. We have this whole book that takes you through the journey through the mission. Yeah. You are, oh my God, I can't even imagine how much information that you have in your head right now. Instead of reading that early and all these questions, like all these kinds of books, friction or educational, it's historical. It's pretty interesting to hear that, you know, my relation with books was a bit different. Ali only just different from what it is right now. Early on, my parents used to sell books. And. Before the stem cell in the books they have to read the book. So there was that culture of reading, but this room that was full of books. And people used to come because they were the administrator, but there was that message of books around for people to sell books. So do a lot of this whole room that was full of books. And I did not like that room, but for some weird reason I used to say that I was the first one and the first one, but when I feel like I need to be on my own, I'll just go to that room and just look for books that I enter. I'm going to have pictures or that have an interesting font, that's what I read. Yes, I do. We actually had. My parents library. Yeah, so that's the one I actually, I remember, that's the one I remember reading. So I used to like, yeah, I used to like the sections with the jokes in realization where I used to go through the jokes. If I used to read the whole book, I'll just go to the age of. I guess I didn't have a crazy culture with books. Even now, I feel like there's a couple that just said that you see it as sort of, I don't know, so so for lita of some sort, and now we have a whole corridor full of books because there's no process to put the books. I really do that. I know we made this conversation where you can hear mom talking to my bed and she's like getting books but there's so many books that are sitting into the living room. Oh, for me, I think I'm actually who came up with that I was like, oh, this is so much this no more space. Do you think it's just books? So I was like, then I thought the crew is too big. I think we can fix some books over there. So there are two parts of the query that are full of from down to up. It's just a book.

HIV Libya Ali lita
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

07:47 min | 2 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Hi, Sarah. I'm so glad to be here today. Finally. Yes, finally, finally. I don't know. Yeah. I don't know what happened last time, though, but anyway, a sentiment. Well, I don't want to speak about my country so badly but you know lord shedding happen and there was really sure when it would happen but it started during our session. You remember so equity. Yeah. Because then it took a long time for me to finally schedule I'm glad we are here now. Yeah. That's the thing that's happening. I have been curious about to hear your stories. So we introduce yourself to someone who does not know you. Okay. Like I said, a bit shy and often I don't know how to talk too much about myself. Hi, everyone. My name is Lillian by Sia nano. A PhD student at your university research she needs by informatics. My main research interests, mostly on vector control, vector biology, and other competition. Research. And I think. What else my journey started away the desire to how I came or how I was led into this path that I'm in and how that went. But then if you like, where I'm right now, this is what I'm really passionate about and it's very interesting how I got here from where I was and how I keep growing into. Now, the career that is practically my colleague, I would say that. I've never had to say that. The first two people say it's a passion or they like you. You've come to like it. But for you, it's a bit different. I'm very curious to know what your story is about and how interesting interestingly you got into bioinformatics as a career path. But before that, let us know where you grew up. Tell us more about your background. Before you even thought about education and all that, like, seriously thought about education. Okay. So I grew up in Nairobi, Kenya. Actually before that, my past few years of my life, I used to stay somewhere just the outskirts of Nairobi. But then in the middle of it all, we managed to come to Nairobi with my parents, and that's where I essentially grew up. I was a very quiet kid. Maybe my dad would beg to differ. But I feel like I was a very quiet kid and I loved to read, and I was very explorative. So I always had this question of how things were. And my parents, they were both teachers at the time, so they were very keen on education and much my skills and everything. So apart from, yeah, I am a fast one, three kids. I have one brother and one sister. Both of them, interestingly, I also in the path of science of extremely different films, nice language, but it just something that I guess was bad into us. By our time, but yes, so I grew up in Nairobi, this is I don't know if you know I come is but most of your listeners probably don't, but then it's sort of a middle class. Environment. That's where I spent most of my life. That's what I grew Louis and most of my childhood evolved mostly going to school and home and reading and like my brother and sister and usually make one of them because I don't know how to ride a bike but they do because they were very outdoorsy people but for me I usually just love staying with my thoughts and you know processing is everything that's going on to my head. So I'd rather spend most of my time with my books and generally I actually discovered that I started generally pretty early in life when the server did my brother was sending me screenshots of an old general main in things that I documented in the. Name ten when I was 9 or ten years old so pretty young and I had all these things in my head which was really interesting but one of the things that actually sprung out from the channel was when you know when you're the cube you're very imaginative and you don't know exactly how life would be. You don't know the challenges or the setbacks. So you're free to wonder in your head. So in this specific channel entry, I had talked about how I wanted to be a scientist. But obviously as a kid, I didn't know what kind of scientist I wanted to be, but there was a mention of I went to be an astronaut I wanted to see Mars. I want to be able to. Heal people I see people suffering and want to be a doctor, but I also want to so in my head, I wanted to do all these things and I knew that all these things were perceptible. That wasn't just one career for me. It was something that I wanted to do. See, there was the outside there was be with people close to me, local people, be able to improve their health, heal the seek, and also just do more. So that was an interesting thing that my brother sent me and I was like, so I was in this past all through my life, but I never realized it until now this is when it's really manifesting but what I had in my head is happening. Obviously not the astronaut did, but the science built this is great. I love this. Oh my goodness. I still generally now. I tried as much as possible, but now because things are mainly just online and the soft coffee things. So I type a lot. I have a general entry in my laptop, but I would have preferred to have books where I can actually write down because writing down this list and add to each other isn't comparable to. Yeah, taking down I relate so much to what you just said because I write more than I type. Okay, I type in a lot more. But I prefer the writing. I really love writing. Yeah, it's just different. Yeah, putting words to paper.

Nairobi Sia nano Lillian Sarah Kenya Louis
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Open it with you. The best way to reach me is how we connected. LinkedIn. So connect on LinkedIn, send me a message chair. But you can also find me on Instagram, email, or check out the website success beyond the lab dot com. Yeah, so if I can do a little promo, if people want to have a taste of a free training with me on September 15th, Central European time is going to be from 6 to 8 in the evening. I'm giving a free training for two hours. And no selling. This is not one of these trainings where, oh, I'm getting to do two hours, and then I'm going to sell you something. No, I promise. No selling. So I really just want to give a training and teach and share what I have to give to scientists. So the title is how to identify and launch your dream career. As a PhD, and people can find the event on my website, but also on my LinkedIn profile. Okay. Thanks for that. Thanks for telling us about that. Let's see. Resource. You're welcome. You're welcome. How do you feel after having this conversation? It's all over to two hours. 30 minutes. Oh my God, I hope people are going to listen to this. It's a very long conversation. To listen to. Yeah. No, I feel very full. I can feel that my heart, you know what? I was telling you earlier when you notice how you feel, your body, and you're feeling energized and you're feeling like your body is excited. So I feel. I feel really good. And yeah, so thank you for this opportunity. It was a pleasure to share my story and I really hope that, you know, people will somehow benefit from this conversation we had.

LinkedIn Instagram
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"That you don't have any permanent contracts, there is no safety, right? So scientists can easily spend, you know, two years here, and then they move, and then two years here, and then they move three years here, and then they move. And even when you become a group leader, like bob Robinson, we previous job. He also had to move. So he spent 5 years in Sweden. And then after 5 years, his contract was over, and he had to move again. So he moved to Singapore, and again, until you become a professor, which is basically the only permanent contract most of the time unless you're a staff scientist. And how long does that take for you to get to professorship? After you've got any others yeah, you probably have lots of great hair, but I guess yeah, it varies from person to person. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. But we all know that that path is very, very difficult to reach. I think if you look at the statistics, it's only like .6% to end up becoming professors, right? Yeah, oh my God, I didn't know. I didn't know. The .6, that's very. Okay. In general, it's very low. It's not even on percent. But then I also think that we need to address that being a scientist and I like this. I sometimes see this hashtag on LinkedIn once a scientist. Because I don't believe if you leave academia, you fail. Or that you're not a scientist. My God, like I'm using my scientific thinking and methodology and everything I do. Everything, even my cooking, like the way I cook a scientific, you know? I structure everything and it's so, yeah, it's so analytical. I mean, it's crazy. So I think it's important to see that that when we're doing science is like a training, so see it as a vehicle, it's a vehicle that is taking you somewhere. It's not the end destination, the piaget or the postdoc or the master, whatever it is that you're doing. And if I look back, it's easy to look back in hindsight when you're about older, and you go like, yeah, oh my God, all these skills and abilities. They come actually from my research training. So it's not going to waste. It's not going to even if you become a yoga teacher or a dance teacher, I did that actually after my PhD. I was a dancer for two years. And people might think, oh my God, you threw away your PhD, how can you go from science to dancing? I was like, why am I throwing it away? I'm using a lot of the skills and abilities. And I probably wouldn't have had the courage and the resilience to start a rescue project like that if I hadn't done a PhD. But after the PhD, I really had this attitude. You know, if I could do this, I could do anything. If I could survive this hell, my God. There's nothing you can do. Yeah. So you can also see it as a mental boot camp. You know, instead of just seeing it, I see that there are lots of posts on Instagram. There's this, what's it called? Grad school sucks and the confused post Doc. They're all accounts on Instagram. Focusing a lot on the negative side of doing research, right? That it sucks and it's so hard. But instead of focusing on the negative and that it sucks and it's so hard, why don't we see it as a training? It's an intense training and resilience. And becoming mentally tough, emotionally tough. And then once you survive that, you really feel empowered and that you're able to overcome a lot of obstacles. This is not the end of this conversation. There are more parts of this episode that are coming up tomorrow and the other days. But if you'd like to be have a test of what doctor amani said gives, these are free session. I think one hour session on 15th September on how to identify your dream career as a PhD student. What she told me. And you can go to her LinkedIn as I linked on the show notes or you can just look for doctor Marisa, or you can go to her website success beyond the lab dot com to get more details about her and to get in touch with her.

bob Robinson Sweden Singapore LinkedIn Instagram Grad school amani Marisa
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

07:37 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Science for some of these reasons. You know, this frustration that I also felt when I was younger. So that was definitely a low in my scientific career. But then that also pushed me to look for something else. I'm like, okay, you know, if you don't fit in and I could email and if this is not your world, but you're still want to create something meaningful. Using your career, I started asking these hard questions. Well, what is that? What does that meaningful thing? I'm going to create, you know? And that's really one of the hard parts started because it's safe when you're a student and you're an academia and you're on that culture. You know what to expect. You know what you can do. But as soon as you leave that bubble, uncertainty hits you. Then you go like, wow. Because there are so many possibilities outside of that world. Okay, so you mentioned that you grew up in Sudan and. Is it a biology? Is it. Like you mentioned that initially wanted to be a doctor, right? Did you know about being a scientist when you still in school? When you're still not after. If I knew about being a scientist when I was in school, like if there's a path being a scientist, okay. No, no. You just knew that. No, I only found out about science when I was like a bachelor student. Really, it was until that point, I had never considered it becoming a scientist. And to be honest, the only reason why I did it was because I wanted to travel because as a bachelor student, they offered us to do our bachelor project abroad. You can do these three, four months of your final thesis in another country. And work in a research institute. And not everybody went for that, but I'm a very curious person. I was like, wow, I get to go to another country, let's do it. So that's probably the thing that made me want to become a scientist. So I ended up at the EMBL, the European molecular biology laboratory in heidelberg, which is a very famous institute. But back then, I didn't know. It was just like, I just want to go abroad and have fun. So I had the best time of my life. These three months. It was like partying hard, working hard. And then I got to really understand what it's like to do a research. It was so much fun. So I'm like, I want to become a scientist. This is like playing in the lab and you get paid for playing. I mean, this is awesome. Yeah. If you compare that with the people who are scientists in your space like from where you grew up, if they are, do you think it's the exposure that made them seem exposure that you had that made them become scientists or something else? I'm not sure, actually. That's a good question. I think when I, because I always ask people, I talk to and I talk to a lot of scientists. I usually ask them, why did you become a scientist? And when I give workshops and trainings, I also sometimes ask people, please share in the chat. What are some of these values? That made you become a scientist. I think one common factor I hear a lot is curiosity. I think this is what a lot of scientists have in common. When you're curious and you just want to know more stuff, you know? Yeah. How was your university life like when you were doing your biology degree? Bachelor mastery mean that time? Yeah for the PhD or PhD. Bachelor. Yeah. I have to say it was boring because it was all like these lectures. You would get these super thick books of biochemistry like I don't know 500 pages. And boring lectures. And then so I remember not studying too much until it was time to have the exam, then I would study like, I was one of these sprint. Yeah, I was like a sprint student. I didn't do marathons. I did sprints. So I'm like, okay, exam is coming up. Okay, study it. And then I would actually get really good grades despite studying last minute, but if anybody's listening to this podcast and thinking, yeah, I do that too. Don't do it. And you know why? Because as the person three weeks later, what did you learn? It's out. It's out of your head. Like 80% of the stuff is gone. So repetition is key, so I definitely, if there was one thing I would do differently, if I go back, I would study more consistently because then the knowledge really gets integrated. And your memory. Okay. So you didn't do anything out of school apart from that EMBL thingy. Right? When you steal your bachelors. Related to science to me. Yes, yeah. Yeah, no, that was the only thing I did. So how did you transition to your master's? Like, how did you know you want to go to your masters? I didn't immediately. So yeah, I did a little different transition. So I didn't go straight into master actually applied for a job because I wanted to start earning money and feel like an adult. So I applied for a job as a lab technician in a research group at the university of uppsala, and I was very lucky. I mean, I think the universe has been I'm thank you. It's been sending me lots of nice people and my career. And I had the most amazing boss. He was so supportive and he was like, he was encouraging me all the time to study and do a PhD and succeed in life. So he's like, you know what? Why don't you do a master while you're doing while you're working for me. You can do both. So I had that option. So my great. So I was like taking courses in the evenings. And then the research project I did as a technician, became my master thesis. So basically for two years, I was working as a technician while doing my masters. And was it a locate, but normally must have another paid position, right? Normally not, no. So that was a ride. Oh, that was an amazing thing. And he was so great. I loved him. Robert Robinson, that's his name. And I remember asking him back then when he hired me and I was like, why did you become a scientist? He's like, I just wanted to travel the world. I found it so funny because, you know, I thought he was going to say it's my calling and I believe in science and science is so amazing. He's like, you know, it was young. And it was like the tickets to travel the world. And I was like, I don't want a job that I'm stuck in an office all the time. I want to travel and science is the best way to travel. I'm like, okay, makes sense. Would you explain to someone who doesn't understand the traveling part, as I said, yeah, because there is a downside to that, of course, that the upside is that it's easy to get jobs abroad because usually the jobs are based on scholarship or temporary contracts for postdocs. The downside of it is

EMBL European molecular biology lab Sudan heidelberg sprint university of uppsala Robert Robinson
"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

07:40 min | 3 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"And today I have a money side, right? I said it right. With that. Perfectly. I'm on his side today who will be our guest for this podcast. I don't have to agree to you because we have been talking before this podcast, right? Okay, so could you introduce yourself to someone who does not know you? Yes, so today I am founder of a company called success beyond the lab. I'm a career coach, trainer, and speaker, and if you ask me why I decided to start this company is because I was once a loss scientist myself and had no clue what to do with my career after my PhD. So after figuring out the hard way how to create a career that is actually fun and fulfilling, I decided I want to help lots of more scientists to do the same. So that's what I'm on. I'm on this mission to help scientists, not just launch a dream career, but to use the knowledge we have to make a difference in society because I believe we can do that as scientists. So there is more I can tell you, but that would be the main thing I want to share with people. Okay. What were you doing before doing the going into doing that? Be specific more about what you're doing before. Oh, my God. Sarah, I mean, how much time do we have? You have a lot of fun. We have a lot of time. So maybe I can just explain my journey into science. Okay. Because I am a career coach and career is basically like the topic I like to talk and teach about. So when I was in school, I love biology. I remember going to biology class and it was like watching a movie for me. I guess I was one of those nerds. I would be like, oh my God, this is so exciting. Tell me more. It's what he was literally like watching a movie going to biology class. And I just noticed, I would look forward to going to these lessons, like all the other lessons were okay. It was a good student in general, but biology, which just get me so excited. So I think that's how I decided them to study biomedicine because I wanted to pursue a career that helps people. As a kid, I always want, I want to help people. So I thought first to become a doctor, but then at the age of 15, I did an internship in the hospital, and I did not like seeing lots of sick people suffering. So I'm like, no, I don't think I want to be a doctor. But I still love science. I love biology. So I thought, okay, maybe if I become a scientist, I can create cures, you know? And help people who are sick in that way. So that's really what got me on the path of science. I studied biomedical science, then I decided to move to Germany, so I grew up in Sweden. And I moved to Germany to do a PhD there. At the age of 20 three, yeah, I started quite early with my PhD. And in the beginning, I was very enthusiastic. You know, I could not wait to start my PhD because I felt like finally I get to do real science because as a master's student, you would get these like short projects that are quite simple and straightforward, not like risky projects. And then all of a sudden, as a PhD, it had like three, four years to really experiment on something. But half a year into my PhD, that's when I got my first, you like to talk about Lowe's, right? So I had my first low half a year into the PhD. We're all the data that I had been working on, just went into the bin. It was really, really, just like, okay, you know, all this experiments you did, and I was working so hard. I was working nice. I was working weekends. I was working my butt off, and then my PI told me, sorry, it doesn't, it contradicts the hypothesis we had. And for me, I was like, so what? So what? I mean, it's still data, right? It's still data that it was negative data. It's not confirming the hypothesis. And that was kind of my first wake-up call. What science is like sometimes that if it's not confirming the story that we want to tell, we trash that data. And I got so frustrated and I was like, but somebody probably wants to know this information that this doesn't work, so they don't also waste half a year of their time doing it. Nobody's going to publish that. So I think that was the beginning of the downfall of my belief and my enthusiasm for science, to be honest. Yeah, because then it became like the PhD became more about creating positive data to sell a story. So we can publish versus actually looking for new knowledge. I don't know. I don't know why I'm so taken back with that. Yeah, can you resonate with that? Okay. So what did you do about it, sorry? I have to ask. I mean, I was young, you know? So I was like, I started this thing and I just have to finish it. I'm not going to give up. I'm also not a quitter. So I'm like, although I felt that it wasn't aligned with my beliefs and I felt like, okay, it doesn't seem that I really fit into this work culture and this is not what I thought science would be like. And already from the get go, I started getting these messages like, well, of course, you're going to become a group leader and you're going to become a professor and I'd never even thought of that. When I started my PhD, it was more about I love science. But I didn't have this sets vision that I want to become a professor, but then I started getting these messages, right? But of course, this is your path. And so I noticed I started getting almost like brainwashed that this is what you should become. This is what you should do to be a successful scientist. And I started struggling with that because they felt, but this is not me. So it felt like, you know, when people talk about impostor syndrome and that it's so common and I could emia. I think it's like people trying to force themselves to fit in into this box of what it's like to be a successful scientist. And then you feel you're not a successful scientist because you're not living up to these expectations and these standards. Like, oh yeah, I have a life. I actually don't want to work 24/7. Or I don't want to become a professor or publishing was not maybe my main priority. It was more about actually creating knowledge that is interesting. Anyway, I think a lot of things that academia are broken. And today as a career coach, I find it sad and frustrating that still the same issues. Our ongoing and a lot of young people are losing faith and quitting

Germany Sarah Sweden Lowe