36 Burst results for "Sciences Sciences"

Fresh update on "sciences sciences" discussed on Bob Zadek

Bob Zadek

01:41 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sciences sciences" discussed on Bob Zadek

"They are always totally silent on wealth creation. They spend all of their energy on wealth distribution, as if like manna from heaven. It just drops down as a gift of God. Hardly, and that's That I think what one learns when one studies Austrian economics one learns that as as Jeff said, and Jeff, you said it so perfectly is that Economic activity is you cannot predict economic activity except acknowledging that human beings beings act in their self interest. If they try to improve their lot. They are to some degree a bit generous. They respond. They collectively respond the way each one of us respond individually. And it is that human response. That one uses to predict economic activity. The Samuelson's of the world look backward. What they do is they forget. I think Jeff and I always enjoy being corrected by my gas because I learned something, but I think what those who treat economics not as a social science But as a I don't know that but a phrase science science. What they do is they look back, and they forget that correlation is not causation. They see a couple of variables They see they seem to act in concert. And they say, therefore those variables can predict the future and that's the fallacy they make. They ignore. As you said. We're all human beings. Is that the reasonably accurate or is that too simplistic? Just I think that Jack could. I think most economists today Don't really Understand much about, for example, economic history. There's a lot of brilliant young people. We'll go to phe economic programs. Or maybe they go to business schools of places like warden and they come out with a lot of, you know, superb number crunching skills. What they don't come out with is a sense of history. They don't really understand what came before. They don't understand some of the, uh, the hyper inflationary events of the past. They don't understand much of the workings of collectivist societies.

Jeff Jack Today Each One GOD Samuelson ONE Austrian
NASA’s Mars rover Perseverance landing

The KFBK Morning News

02:26 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA’s Mars rover Perseverance landing

"NASA is getting ready to land a new rover on on Mars. Mars. This This week. week. It's It's called called perseverance. perseverance. The The landing landing will will be be streamlined streamlined live live Thursday. Thursday. And And in this in this NASA NASA video, video, several several of the of scientists the scientists working working on the on project the project explained explained why why they they call call the the landing landing seven seven minutes minutes of of terror terror way way come come screaming screaming in in to to the Martian the Martian atmosphere atmosphere at at 12 12 to to 13,000 13,000 MPH, MPH, and and the the Heat Heat shield shield is is what what dissipates dissipates all all that that initial initial energy energy through through friction. friction. Vehicle Vehicle will continue will continue actually actually flying flying itself itself through through the the atmosphere. atmosphere. It's sort It's sort of like of like transforming transforming vehicle vehicle that that one one from from spacecraft spacecraft now now come come on, on, aircraft aircraft actively actively guiding guiding itself itself when when we're going we're going slow slow enough, enough, we we deploy deploy a a parachute, parachute, biggest biggest supersonic supersonic parachute parachute we have we have ever ever sent. sent. Another Another planet. planet. It's It's critical critical for for slowing slowing down down the vehicle. the vehicle. First First appearances, appearances, entry entry descent descent and and landing landing borrows borrows heavily heavily from from that that of of curiosity, curiosity, But But fundamentally fundamentally perseverance perseverance is is a a different different rover. rover. She's She's bigger, bigger, she she has has different different instruments. instruments. We've We've out out of a of lot a lot of smarts of smarts on the on inside the inside to to make make it it more more capable capable so so that that it can it can deal deal with with the land the land site site that that we've we've given. given. The The science science team team identified identified just just real real creator creator as as basically basically an ancient an ancient lake lake bed bed and and one one of the of most the most promising promising places places to to look look for for evidence evidence of of ancient ancient microbial microbial life life and and to to collect collect samples samples for for future future returned returned to Earth. to Earth. The The problem problem is, is, it's it's a much a much more more hazardous hazardous place place to to land. land. You You look look adjust, adjust, bro. bro. All All you you see see is is dangerous. dangerous. How How do do we we go go to a to site a site that that we never we never thought thought was was safe safe enough enough to go to go to to before? before? Wow. Wow. I mean, I mean, I know I know a lot a lot of of it it is, is, you you know know it's it's going going in in on on its its own own accord, accord, and and the computer the computer is helping is helping to to land land it. it. That's That's gotta gotta be be nerve nerve racking racking to watch to watch that that it's it's that that seven seven minute minute period period where where it's it's kind kind of out of out of contact, of contact, and and they they really really don't don't know know if if it's it's gonna gonna make make it it or or not. not. If If everything's everything's working working correctly, correctly, I I find find it it fascinating fascinating that that they're they're landing landing specifically specifically at this at this place place called called Jez Jez zero zero Crater, Crater, which which is is a really a really difficult, difficult, dangerous dangerous place place the the land, land, but but that's that's where where they they think think the the best best science science will will happen. happen. They They think think that that there's there's more more possibility possibility of finding of finding the the existence existence of of Past Past life life on on Mars Mars at at that that spot, spot, and and so so can can you imagine you imagine the the conversations between the scientists? Why do you want? You know the guys that are in charge of landing? Why do you wanna land? There's all these cliffs and rocks and bad, so I don't know, But that's that's where the good stuff is. No, that bad stuff is. Well, I just I love that You could watch it live if you want to on Thursday and check it out in some of the first pictures, no doubt will be impressive. If you're interesting you go to mars dot nasa dot gov slash mars 2020 If you if you Google Mars 2020, you'll find it. Okay, Let's go to your Top national stories

Nasa Jez Jez Google
Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

Model Majority Podcast

05:50 min | Last month

Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

"Jimmy dorsey welcome to the model majority. Podcast today thank you for being one of our very first episodes to record in the year. Twenty twenty one which is a very exciting for so many people that we are here at this point but before we get into all that one actually start from the very beginning to get to know your personal story a little bit. i love to hear about. Where did you grow up. how did you grow up. And if anything during that time leads you become who. You are today as a chef but also has an activists usc for sure so i was born in shanghai china and my parents moved to the us when i was around to pursue their both of them are scientists and so they moved to new york. They went to a school in the bronx. And so i followed them when i was up three and a half with grandparents so i was really raised by my grandparents growing up And lived in new york until about eight. Yeah that's i think that's right. I moved to seattle so i. I set my larger chunk of my childhood in seattle washington and ended up going to school College in seattle as well so like good decade plus in seattle cut the no it and during that time also like learned. I think that seattle is not the place for me. I really really wanted to go back to new york so right after college and making that switch back to new york i i. started in management consulting after college. I was a finance major in school. Originally marketing major switched over to finance was not doing so great. Marketing and very quickly knew that finance. It's fine but it was something that is not naturally good at it. You know. I think everyone kind of has their own talents and you can tell you a talented something when it's really yes you're still gonna have to work hard and there's times where you're not doing great job or what. Not but for the most part. Like in makes just intuitively makes sense to you and tell. The numbers intuitively. Don't make sense to me the way that they did to other people And i hate like the serota asian being good at math and talk about that maybe later on but at least it was like a way to get my foot in the door ever since i was young. Who was always a big part of my life. But i didn't even think about it in college or honestly dion for a while because it was never really encouraged by my family. My family going up with more traditional than they are now I'm chinese american and like and we kind of because they were scientists. They were very wary of Career or they felt that. I cannot get ahead because they were you know they were in our lab. They were always the ones that were doing all the work. If you've just look at lab dynamic it's always usually by hawk. Individuals a lot of them. Asian east asian or south asian. Doing all the research all the were all the writing but who is the main like name on the paper that you see who's getting nobel peace prize for their work in science. It's usually white men and that dynamic played out throughout my childhood. I never really consciously understood it but now looking back it was. You know my parents had these bosses. And i'd be like but you do everything and they get all the credit. I'll get it. You know so anyway. I think my parents really wanted me to find a career where i could succeed and not have to be under someone's thumb so to speak and they really wanted you know they've really encouraged less ultra prenatal careers for more careers where you can make money and you can be independent so business. Definitely they definitely encouraged. I was an undergrad business school and they were like yeah. You can now go out as a console. You do make a lot more money like you know so. They just wanted that stability they wanted to non you know. Be a lab technician salary for me Even if they really loved the sciences sciences so anyway with that kind of mind food never really felt like a real clear path. Never really thought about. I never really even explored at. I had no idea what to do right. I think a lot of people who are interested in food don't really know how many years pm and starting my career absolutely hated it. I was in the fashion and luxury division. So i usually work with clients in your fashion and luxury so i spent a lot of time By clothes being obsessed with clothes and shoes and being skinny and it was like a really tough period of time because everyone around me really encourage that behavior as well. It was always about how you lose more way out of your book. Nice you know there was a lot of judgement and it. I think it really came to a head. there was one time at At work where our partner came in and she was very fashionable. Amazing like wealthy Woman and she had brought in a bunch of clothes she had purchased at a sample sale. We We work in chelsea in new york city and chelsea market. Has this like if you've been. There was kind of large area in the center of the market. That always has sampled feels. And i guess she had gone to hurry and she just said that she would just buy everything that basically that was in her size and just figure it out later and it was. I mean there was a lot of things but let's about. But i just remember thinking of this woman coming ahead at all. You know she was. She was such a bath right and the fact that she would come in with a garbage bag full of new clothes designer clothes. It's like it's never ending hole in your heart that you're just trying to fill with dot and you can't ever fill it like spoil alert for anyone who's over there you can't feel it it's impossible it doesn't matter how much money you out you can't feel it because that's not something that can be so thing

Seattle New York Jimmy Dorsey USC Bronx Shanghai Dion China Washington United States Chelsea New York City
Fauci receives Moderna vaccine in televised event at NIH

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Fauci receives Moderna vaccine in televised event at NIH

"Veteran veteran Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci received received Madonna Madonna vaccines vaccines in in a a televised televised event event along along with with some some frontline frontline health health care care workers, workers, Dr Dr Fauci Fauci said said years years of of good good science science led led to to the the phenomenal phenomenal rapid rapid development of the vaccines. He is considered the nation's leading authority on infectious disease Secretary is our said the vaccines will help bring a dark chapter of American history to a close.

Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci Madonna Madonna Dr Dr Fauci Fauci Infectious Disease
Magic Mushrooms: Trip Through the Science

Science Vs

07:13 min | 3 months ago

Magic Mushrooms: Trip Through the Science

"My entire life. We're going to call this guy. Joseph he can remember these anxiety attacks as far back as preschool and when he says via this is what he means stomach ache. Queasiness usually dry heaving or vomiting A lot of tears a lot of crying and just you know like the world's going to end these anxiety. Attacks could sometimes go for days at a time and joseph grow up learning to deal with them. He fell in love got married. Had two kids but then something happened the brutal back a couple of years ago. He found out that his wife was having an affair. she was in love with someone else. And that's when it all hit me. i mean. I immediately spiraled into you. Horrible anxiety. The worst of my life just the world had collapsed. Was like everything. I had spent my entire life working up to and there's these two kids who are involved in everything and it just. It was all gone like i look at my kids and i would. Just start weeping. Joseph went to psychiatrists. They put him on antidepressants. But the mets didn't walk and he was just getting worse and worse. Nothing was helping one day. He sunk down on the couch in total despair and when he looked out something on the bookshelf. It was how to change your mind by michael paulin. The book came out a few years ago and helped popularize. This idea of psychedelic therapy. The drugs like magic. Mushrooms could cure things like anxiety and it felt like this might be the life raft. The get joseph out of this and i'm someone who's literally never up until this point had never taken or had any desire to take a psychedelic but at a certain point reading the book. I knew i knew without a doubt that this was going to be what i needed to do. But obviously he couldn't just to see and grab some mushy off the shelves. The fed still listed as a schedule on drug. It's right up there with heroin. And then so what do you do next. I just started calling everyone. I could think of literally opened up my contact list and my phone and going name by name and saying Is this someone who might know someone who knows someone who you know has access to seconda. Literally it was it was that i mean i called people. I hadn't spoken to in years. Weeping finally reaches a guy who knows a guy and this is how he makes someone who bill call mr troops. He's not a doctor but he gives people magic mushrooms to help with stuff like their anxiety. So after a few weeks of therapy with joseph's regular therapists where he talked about what he wanted to get out of this mushy session. Joseph bought a plane ticket and flew across the country. People are asking me like you don't know this guy. could you trust them. You know he could be giving you poison. Who knows and i said you know what if i die you know. I had nothing to lose at this point on the big day. Heads to mr shrooms apartment would set up his guest bedroom for these magic mushrooms sessions. He brings out capsules with a brown powder inside them and some applesauce apparently it helps the mushy go down better and i said all right so we just opened up one of these pills into applesauce. And he's like. Oh no no we open twenty of them so we we. We literally sat there opening up capsule by capsule and pouring the contents out into a jar of applesauce and And then i just mixed it together with a spoon and just dove right in mr shrooms. Has joseph covers is with asleep. Mosque joy supplies on the bed mites. Go out and some calming. Music comes on and soon it hits it on my god look. I'm seeing all this stuff. This is crazy. What is going on. I started seeing metallic particles in the air like glitter Like confetti like metallic confetti but very very slowly floating in the air and then joseph stop talking out loud and mr shrooms is writing down. What he's saying. Wow now it's everywhere it's right in front of me but it's a different plane. It's getting closer. well okay. So now everything is rotating counterclockwise. And i'm in the middle of it. It feels like a giant cutout. Three dimensional not cardboard of an eagle ab- all the eagle the top part of it has this presence of an eagle's head and the rest of the body feathery thing. There's this line. I don't wanna compare to ans- and through all of this. He started thinking about childhood memories and going through what had gone wrong with his wife. It was just me having a conversation with myself. And i was crying. I mean in such copious amounts and in such an uncontrollable way. And i felt like my eyes were being pushed inside my head and were on fire and so much mucus was coming out. It was like just this major. You know shedding of everything. At that point. It hit me. There was a moment where i realized that i was done. After the whole experience. I knew that the anxiety was gone gone. It's been about two years. Joseph had that session and while he's still going to therapists. He says he hasn't had severe anxiety attacks since no dry heaving or uncontrollable crying. I feel like i am cured. I feel like. I am happier than i ever was. Before can this be for real. How on earth could one trip curious. Someone's life long anxiety severe depression and if this does really what should we all be spending the twenty twenties tripping balls today magic mushrooms ditch. There tied i and get a lab cart because when it comes to magic mushrooms. There's a lot of oh my god look at. I'm seeing all this stuff. This is crazy. What is going on but then as science science versus magic mushrooms is coming up just after the break

Joseph Mr Shrooms Michael Paulin Anxiety Attacks Mets FED Depression
"sciences sciences" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:56 min | 3 months ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"That science science? No, it's total political Bs. Is it common? Am I going too fast for you? Absolutely not. Is it God e know you went to Davidson? You had troubles that Davidson. I understand in your freshman year, you know more about my years at Davidson than I do. You're looking a little too many posters on your walls during those days. Fast times at Ridgemont High if I recall Is it common sense for the governor not to hold in person press conferences while President Trump and even Joe Biden holes impress person press conferences, determined science science. No. It's total political Bs. Is it common sense to put on your mask? As governor? Newsome tells us to do while he goes out doors, eating and indoors, eating Is it common sense to put on your mask in between bites during meals? Is that common sense? Is that science science? No, it's total political Bs. Is it common sense Have family members who don't live under the same roof. Where mask while your kids were out going, God knows where, and I know your kids. They're out and about on, Then they come home and they're not required to wear a mask. Is that science science? No, it's total political Bs and not any common sense, especially during Thanksgiving and Christmas. Is it common sense to shut down the economy when 99.9% recovery rate and the overall death rate, the overall death rate of everybody His lower this year in the nation than previous years. No one knows that. But you're learning.

Davidson Ridgemont High Joe Biden Newsome President Trump
Body of Houston Police Sgt. Sean Rios escorted to funeral home

Michael Berry

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Body of Houston Police Sgt. Sean Rios escorted to funeral home

"About about 30 30 minutes minutes from from now. now. Houston Houston police police chief chief artist artist Vedo Vedo along along with with HPD HPD commanders commanders and and officers officers will will escort escort the the body body of of Fallen Fallen Sergeant Sergeant Sean Sean Rios Rios from from the the Institute Institute of of Forensic Forensic Sciences Sciences on on Old Old Spanish Spanish trail to the PV funeral home on Beemer Road for US was fatally shot Monday afternoon in his vehicle on the North Freeway. Plans for his funeral and memorial service are still pending. Gas prices in Texas

HPD Vedo Vedo Houston Sean Sean Rios Rios Institute Institute Of Of Fore United States Texas
Prime Day 2020: what you need to know

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:59 min | 5 months ago

Prime Day 2020: what you need to know

"Online shopping savings days in 2020 is on. Well, guys when July came and went with no Amazon Prime day, shoppers and industry insiders speculated. If and when the E Commerce Giants banner sales and it was gonna happen in 2020 Well, rumors were laid to rest. On Monday when Amazon announced the two day events going to kick off today and begin advertising early deals. Well, Amazon prides itself on two days shipping how the company's gonna make good on that during CO is a little bit of a question. Here's what we know, though. Do you have to be an Amazon prime member to get Prime day sales? Yes, And the most economical option is an annual membership $119.1 of the the best best best Prime Prime Prime day day day sales sales sales Well. Well. Well. Last Last Last year, year, year, we we we saw saw saw savings savings savings that that that ran ran ran the the the gamut gamut gamut from from from electronics electronics electronics and and and major major major Science Science Science is is is too too too small small small household household household items items items and and and expect expect expect similar similar similar products products products to to to be be be on on on sale sale sale today today today this this this year. year. year. And what is the average discount on a prime deal? It's about 20%. But even if you see deals marks 60 per 70% off, that's not really accurate because a lot of those deals are nearly always framed in terms of elevated MSRP, or a higher initial asking price with

Amazon Science Science Science E Commerce Giants
Other Kinds Of Novae

Astronomy Cast

06:05 min | 5 months ago

Other Kinds Of Novae

"CAST episode five eighty one other kinds novais welcome to China caster weekly faxes journey through the cosmos where we help you understand not only what we know how what we know. I'm Brisbane publisher of the Universe today with me as always as Dr Pamela Gay a senior scientist for the Planetary Science, Institute and the Director of course. How you doing I'm doing well, how are you doing good the word size just comes up your senior scientists working for a scientist a tude science science science. It, it's kind of the way I live my life. It's nice to have people focused on science it is. It is and Happy, I Canadian thanksgiving. Oh. Yeah. That's this weekend. Yeah. We're. We're not that big about Thanksgiving around here in fact my. My my sister calls no thanksgiving. All, right we we keep a pretty low key. chloe's to be coming back from university for for Thanksgiving and we'll be hanging out so so. Excellent. Yeah. But but. Trying to organize like a Thanksgiving dinner is very complicated around the house so. So ten we tend to make something Super Yummy. That's all you name. Yeah exactly. But it's also you know as I mentioned year after year it's entire. It's very civilized although I think this year. Like, nobody's be traveling in the US to attend Thanksgiving's so I think you have to worry. But maybe in future years once the pandemic has wrapped up, then consider adopting Canadian thanksgiving is your date because it's just. Air travel traveling in general is a lot easier in in. October than in November. This is true and we're starting to get fall leaves. So it's more. than. The the leaser. Great. Yeah. November they're they're they've all fallen. It's gross. Yeah. All right. So don't ever accuse us of not comprehensively covering every kind of exploding star this week we gather ball the leftover ways that stars partially or fully explode don't probably enjoy. Oh Pamela. So I'm not GonNa lie I did absolutely zero preparation for this week's episode. Because I have no idea. What's In fact, we were prepping like okay. So what what's left and then you then proceeded to rattle off a whole bunch of ways it starts getting split I had no idea. Had even had names but. Why. These these are in minimal exploding right moments in our life. You gotTa Start and start gets brighter. It could be an explosion, it might not be. And and this is where we have to go back to what does the word Nova mean it it's a new star and so Nova New Star. Yeah. So anytime, a star decides, Hey, I, may not have been visibly bright before but look at me now and hops into our sky. That's a Nova. And so far we've discussed where you have a compact object White Dwarf Neutron Star, whatever that is stealing matter from a companion and periodically flares in brightness due to usually some sort of an exploded. We talked many times in the past about supernova where an entire star decides I'm GonNa could boom either my outer atmosphere or all of myself and we've behind something or nothing depending on the stars mass and whim. Yes. Put. There's other really cool stuff out there. And the other cool stuff out there. has produced some of the most beautiful didn't actually explode remnants for Hubble and other massive telescopes to point that. So let's let's run through a couple of examples I guess of of of Stars that did something interesting but not in a traditional variable star sense because we've talked to them plenty of times but like weird variable stars, Right Right. So so here we have systems like I think the most famous may be Ada Karena. exploded. Ready. Right well or not. I, mean here we have this this star that wasn't particularly noticeable Intel in the eighteen thirties. It decided to suddenly do the opposite of bagel juice and it became brighter than Rachel. Brightest, stars in the sky. It became the second brightest star in the sky for a while. Just after serious. It's had multiple episodes of getting brighter getting, Fainter. and. It's thought that this humongous Nebula that is around it this it looks like an hourglass with an exploding waistline. I don't know how five it. Yeah. So the hour glass of material around it is is thought to be material that was given off during its great eruption in the eighteen hundreds. And its subsequent. inning occurred when all of this material cooled and coalesced into dust and that dust hit the the two stars. We now know that are lurking down in the center of this system

Scientist Nova New Star Dr Pamela Gay Planetary Science, Institute Brisbane China United States Publisher Director Nova Fainter. Hubble Intel Rachel Ada Karena.
Interview With Sudip Parikh

After The Fact

05:58 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Sudip Parikh

"There was a there was a point in my life where I could spend six months a pulling together experiments. To answer a question and this six months would be drudgery, but there was a moment of discovery even if it was a small discovery that really made all of that worthwhile and I really enjoyed it and I, became an expert in one molecule that is inside of the human body and at some point in my career I I really wanted to expand beyond that one molecule. And it's a very important. It's a very molecule year so. I'm happy to talk about it but but. What I found is that I really enjoy this place where the science meets. Meets the rest of the world. because. One of the things that I've seen over time is that science itself is beautiful. But when you can take that beautiful science that inspires all and then have it become part of the world at large, it makes a gigantic difference in many more people's lives and I found that rewarding. And that that notion that scientists. Beautiful. That's a lovely way to say it. And interact with society should seem obvious right I mean on a U. N. I R- talking via the Internet we aww take medicines we're in the middle of an incredible. Science is all around us yet we sort of feel at least the need to point out that this connection that we have to talk about this connection with science and society when it seems obvious why isn't it obvious to some people? Yeah. I think to some degree success has. Has has been our worst enemy right because success means that you don't see some of the sausage getting made that maybe used to see. and. What you really see is. Instead of you know talking about the Internet, you don't see the mess behind it. You see these wonderful sleek user interfaces that anyone can use, and it creates a separation between the science itself and the end user of that science and much the same way that in the nineteen seventies and eighties we to complain that children didn't know where their food came from. That separation that that takes science and puts it in somehow separate from from the rest of things, and it's not how do you personally and the organization fulfilled this notion of trying to help people better understand this connection? Yeah. For AAA yes. That has become building trust and relationships with influencers in our community, and so I can I can walk you through some examples of that. The triple as sponsors fellowships for scientists who are working in labs to work in policy settings. So to work in Congress to work in the executive branch and to bring their scientific thinking and their scientific experience into that policy realm. because. They're trying to build relationships with people that are that are making policy. We also have programs like that for journalists. So we have scientists who work in newsrooms and very importantly at local papers in smaller cities around the country and local TV stations around the around the country because that is where people get their information, you have to build trust with those influencers. We also have a program for seminary. INS. So that might not be the most intuitive thing, but it turns out that if you build trust early with. With seminarians of with people of faith. Even when there's disagreement, there's a level of trust in a relationship that you can build on. Later when it becomes important to build on it, you have to build that trust beforehand not. Not when you need it right and so that's what AAA tries to build those bridges with with the influencers our society. Let's talk though about trust Pew Research Center polling shows that. The public trust and scientists is perhaps not as high as we would have expected it to be what what do you attribute that to I mean you're working to improve it. So why is it where it is? Yeah. Science when we're when we're when we hold a mirror to ourselves the scientists. We have made mistakes, right? You have to look backwards a little bit and say, what are what God us to where we are today and if you are. If you're from the black community you know about to ski and the ethical violations that took place in that human subjects research you know about eugenics. About. Some of the. Some of the areas where science has had challenges with itself as as society has and so we have to we have to be able to hold up that mirror to ourselves. Say It's not that science science as a human endeavour. Fallible. and. So we have to make sure that we are building a human interactions of human trust points. So that people realize that the person they're talking to the scientist, but they're also a member community. And that member of their community has the same wishes and hopes for their children as they do. That they're going about it in a way of looking at research looking at evidence to try to answer questions to guide individual decision-making, and they're willing to share that with me a trusted person in the community, and that has eroded over time as as science has become much more removed from the everyday practical. In the seventeenth century. If you wanted to be a scientist, you could be a scientist. You a everything that was known could be found in encyclopedia type. Type of book. It's not possible today, and so when now sciences removed because the necessity of speaking with precision creates jargon in jargon takes a completely out of the realm of of the late public, and so it becomes a special skill set to be able to break out of the audience of scientists and break into the audience of the interested. Of the allies of scientists of the general public, and that becomes a skill set all its own

Scientist Pew Research Center Congress Executive
Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:18 min | 5 months ago

Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

"Could be headed back to the White House as soon as Monday that from the president's medical team who held a briefing today, here's a clip from that Dr Sean Connolly, speaking in front of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Over the course of his illness. The president has experienced two episodes, Transit drops his oxygen saturation, and and there there was was much much more more information information from from today's today's briefing, briefing, particularly particularly compared compared to to yesterday's. yesterday's. Let's Let's welcome welcome NPR NPR science science correspondent correspondent Richard Richard Harris. Harris. Good Good Morning, Morning, Richard Richard and Dr Carlos del Rio, an epidemiologist at Emory University. Hello, do you Are you? Well, Richard, I'm going to start with you. But let's hear first. Ah clip from Dr Brian Garbled E. On the treatments the president has received. We continue to plan to use a five day course of Rome disappear. In response to transient low oxygen levels as Dr Conley has discussed. We did initiate Dexter methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday. And our plan is to continue that for the time being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient

President Trump Richard Richard Richard Richard Harris Dr Conley NPR Dr Sean Connolly Dr Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Dr Brian Garbled Walter Reed National Military Dr Florio Emory University Methadone White House Memphis FDA Mark Meadows
"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

02:41 min | 5 months ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

"Than trying to argue and fight with them. Obviously with lots and lots of scientists do you think they get it that does this level of trusting something that needs work I two? When we first started out I've been at the centre a little over four years now. It was something that people tended to be aware of especially if you know if you're working in climate change or immunise immunology immunization, the areas that are more contentious. You know we're seeing a new generation of scientists come out who are very active on social media and they embrace engagement as part of their work more readily than people who came through my generation or older. So I think there's a, there's a mind side. Now especially with pandemic that we're in that people understand it's not enough for me to be the sage on the stage and throw facts out. We've got to engage a little more I. do think there's a stronger dedication to making sure that You as a scientists are listening are you really listening? Are you really understanding where people stand? We call it empathy it's really what's at the core of communication to communicate effectively and genuinely you have to imagine. What the other person thinks or feels you've got to be able to transport yourself into their experience and imagine what it feels like to be though. We hope you've enjoyed these conversations on science as you heard from brilliant minds of our guests throughout the season and standing and advancing science is paramount to shaping the future. Free thing in our world is possible because of science medical care health water food safety people should care about science because it's it affects everything they do in their lives and they care about it because they are paying for it. If they don't miss something beautiful about the world. Science is what gives us the possibility that when we have an illness or a disease there is a potential for a treatment for that, and its goal is ultimately to look into ourselves and ask why are we here? What is our origin? What is our purpose? If you liked what you've heard please tune in for some bonus episodes featuring extended conversations with some of our guests. visit pewtrust dot org slash after the fact for more information. Thanks for listening for the Pew Charitable Trusts on Dan Le Duke, and this is after the fact..

Pew Charitable Trusts Dan Le Duke
"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

07:06 min | 5 months ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

"How to communicate their work vividly clearly and more effectively to diverse audiences. Laura Lyndon filled who we heard from at the top of this episode directs the Center. What we're really after is a world that US and use US science. So we want to help scientists be able to make strong connections with different audiences. The center was Alan's dream allinace a big science fan. He's just fascinated by science and he spent. A good chunk of time when he was doing scientific American frontiers, interview scientists and learning about how he might help them respond better to questions. He was asking he also learned a lot about how to ask better questions to and it occurred to him that Improv with the School of training he had as an actor in the only training he had might help scientists learn how to connect better and therefore communicate better that was a little over ten years ago and today we've trained over fifteen thousand scientists. From different areas of stem and medical professionals to communicate their work with greater verve and passion. It is with great pleasure to welcome this year's recipient of the two, thousand sixteen public welfare medal and Alda. Two Thousand Sixteen Ellen Aldo was awarded the National Academy of Sciences Public Welfare Medal and he talked about the impact that Improv training head on one of the oldest centers participants it's not being funny and it's not being quick on your feet it's connecting. So I want to show you a video of a young scientists that we worked with and this this video. This is two. Parts first part was before he took five sessions of Improv and then speaking about the same subject after five sessions of improperly in between we didn't coach him on changing what he had to say anything he says, both videos came out of him. See if you see a difference and I love geology because it allows you to go out and look at environments over time like. And look at stand on rocks that represent anarchic oceans one, hundred, fifty, million years ago or the first biologic life couple billion years ago, and I have the pleasure of working on the coolest rocks in the solar system they come from Mars and overtime Mars has been struck by asteroids, and eventually over time you have a big impact, you can not only hit the ground you can toss stuff up move it around, but you can also eject it off the surface of the planet. Moves Around in orbit outer space, and eventually earth encounters that chunk and the gravitational field of your at the polls it in, and it survives through the Earth's atmosphere lands on the ground, and we found it and by measuring the gas in little bubbles inside these rocks, we found that it matches not the gas you would find on earth but Martian atmosphere. Different. I see a tremendous. Let's dive into that Improv. That's not exactly what you expect from scientists. It's I envisioned labs as these pretty precise places and methodologies followed an Improv seems like, Hey, let's get. Let's wing it and see what happens. Yeah. That's true. it depends on how you think about Improv. We're not talking about stand up comedy. We're talking about being present and being genuine and being in the moment I'm Improv doesn't mean you don't make a plan. You come and thoughtfully knowing something about your audience and and you react accordingly as you see how what you are communicating lance with them. And it implies that you hold responsibility and the when we communicate, it's a partnership it's not a one way street. Let me take my wisdom and package it and hurl at you. But rather like you and I are doing, let's ref off of each other and make meaning together. Sometimes simple communication skills aren't necessarily as valued as the substance of whatever it is. You're talking about, but one can't exist without the other and. How well of scientists doing and and what are sort of the traits that you see that need improving overall. We all grow up communicating. It's how we relate. We wouldn't have a society if we didn't communicate and that includes verbal and nonverbal communication. I think when we train a scientist, we get some of the ability to connect. Trained out of us. So in many ways, what are training does is it helps us rediscover not only our joy and our own process of learning about science and about each other but in our ability to connect and really listen to to people who think differently and experience the world differently than we do as scientists, we learn our special language we're tested on it, and we have to prove that we know it's a very defensive culture We're constantly having to who demonstrate that we know better when we're applying for jobs or going through exams and we we forget that the. Language, we adopt the jargon which I do not mean a pejorative way jargons a great thing. It's a kind of shorthand we want to be able to get the to get to the next step quickly, it doesn't transfer outside of the domain in which we work. So one of the key areas where scientists struggle is believing that the jargon they speak which becomes so naturalized you when it's what you do every day doesn't work when you're talking to people who aren't in your field communications a kind of clay we form together, the rules are not completely set. So we're. improvising when we when we live when we communicate, there is a part of the American public these days it is skeptical of experts skeptical science is that because scientists maybe haven't done a good enough job I, think what's at the core of this and there's some really good social science research on this is that we tend to believe things that align with our worldview and the culture in which were situated. So in some cases vaccination, for example, if someone really strongly disbelieves and you come out them and you say, but you're wrong look at this data, you're going to enhance their disbelief. Not Counter it. Whereas if you you know there's some cases in which a conversations just gonNa make it worse and maybe you need to know not to even start and just build trust. I think if we could have one goal, it's to build trust with people who may not believe in what we do in the scientific community because of that trust is there. Then maybe people's com of community expands and we become part of a larger community trying to support each other. So what I would ask the scientific community to do is to think about building trust with people who believe differently rather.

scientist US Laura Lyndon National Academy of Sciences P Alan Ellen Aldo Alda School of training field communications
"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

"I want us to understand. That we are not going to have true excellence in Science Technology Jerry Mathematics and medicine until we are equitable. Diverse and inclusive. In the way that we work. What we're trying to do is transformed higher education institutions. In ways that diversity, equity and inclusion. are supported within the stem fields We know that those are areas where we haven't done the best job in turns of being inclusive. Of, women of represented minorities of persons with disabilities. Lgbtq we just have not been as inclusive. So what specifically can? Can you do through seachange that can encourage? discreeter inclusion. One of the things that we try to do is. Work with colleges and universities to start a process of self assessment. What do I understand about the research that is being carried out? Is it research that is only of interest to the researcher or is it research that is important to the community? Have I listened to the community? Do I reach out to the community? Do I, show up in the schools the community? So beginning with self assessment. Identifying the real holes, the gaps, the barriers To achieving the kinds of change that you really want to achieve. And then putting in place an action plan research based evidence based strategies that may have been tried by other institutions of in an effective way in order to began to undo some of this or to have some of the outreach that you know that you need or to connect to the schools that you would like to be able to help serve I mean those are the kinds of things that require a deep commitment to. Equity Diversity, and inclusion from the beginning. But thin you've got tag on the actions in order to achieve that and there is research that is really telling us that the creativity the innovation that comes along with diversity. Really what we need in order to move to the next level, that is something that we have as the United States that makes us exceptional. In many cases, other places have smart people but not necessarily this full rage of diversity that is available to them that can be utilized to really move the needle on the kind of innovation in the excellence that we're going to need to a really solve the challenges of the twenty-first century. was. This summer's protests from the black lives matter unit stemmed from. Issues relating to the criminal justice system rightly but it obviously exposes a lot of other inequities. On, does will will all of this this firmament that that the nation is feeling you think help the effort that you're trying to to push. I think that it does in the sense that it shine a very bright light. ON SYSTEMIC RACISM It begins to allow us. To have conversations. That have been very difficult to have. You can't talk about systemic racism without talking about race. And you can't talk about that without talking about the experiences that most black people can recount to you of where they have been overlooked or devalued or assumed to be in the wrong place when they show up at a scientific meeting. For example. And I think that it's a lot easier to have that conversation now so. It has offered an opportunity for us to look at the institutions that have been that a products of the past and how they still maintain the vestiges of racial intolerance. So into the of Washington. And I ran into all of the deficiencies that had that had shaped my education greer I finished highschool with all as but the point was that the resources had not been put in place because I'm nobody assumed that that was going to be a little black kid who would come up George Washington carver high school who is going to be a scientist was very few classes that I took. Anybody else looked like me. All right and so. I have been alone through this journey. Yes. I did the professor thing and I actually had students who would come over to my office. I think just to see that actually existed. Okay I was the only tenure track. Faculty member in the Sciences who was black. Where was everybody else I thought everybody else had gone to another school. and. And I found out from the numbers from national numbers. That was not true. There were there were no everybody. Else's it then became. A 'cause. a way of trying to. Make sure that the next generation. Was Not going to encounter what I encounter. And yet with that. Commitment, that. Interest. I'd we're still struggling with the problem Do you sense. The things are getting better. Yes. In for some groups in some fields, what are a couple of the signs that give give you hope then? The numbers are are better. For example, the Biological Sciences the better for for women a lot better for women. They're big. They're better for next students. the numbers are increasing. The numbers had been increasing for black students in some fields. but not an all. We're still struggling in areas, for example, like physics. Computer, science in spite of the of the employment opportunities and the opportunity for innovation and invention that these feels. Offer. we are just not seeing the people move into these fields. We are still looking at faculties that are unders. We are still looking at school systems that are not providing the resources and opportunities that are needed in order to go into these fields we are still. Struggling with many of the same issues that I grew up with, and so I guess come full circle and that is.

George Washington carver high Washington United States researcher Biological Sciences Faculty member professor scientist
"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

06:44 min | 5 months ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on After The Fact

"During the pandemic, most of us are paying attention to the science of the corona virus trying to understand it and how it informs the advice we're receiving from public health experts. But what about normal times? What is the state of our national conversation on science and who is doing the talking? We ought grow up communicating it's it's how we relate we wouldn't have society if we didn't communicate and that includes verbal and nonverbal communication. I think when we train a scientists, we get some of the ability to connect. trained. Out, of us. There was Laura Lyndon filled. She's the executive director of the old center for Communicating Science which was founded by Alan alda. Their work helped scientists become better communicators and you'll hear more from her later on that ability to connect a lot of us think scientists lack at the Pew Research. Center found that fifty four percent of Americans think scientists are good communicators and that means nearly half think well, not so much. and. That may get it. How well people trust scientists. It can also directly affect the practice of science itself after all scientists need to communicate what they're working on to taxpayers and foundations and others who fund their work would you pay for something if you didn't understand it just a little bit. But before we dive into how well scientists communicate there's more talk. Like are we tapping the full potential of the scientific community? Are we attracting a diverse group of researchers who can think? Foster inclusiveness. And make discoveries that might not happen otherwise. I don't think that we're going to be able to solve the problems that we have with regard to the economy poverty climate. Change Security. Pandemics. We're not GONNA be able to solve this unless we use all the talent that is out there. That's really the crux of the matter. That's surely Malcolm who directs an initiative called change at the American Association, for the Advancement of science. Surely knew she wanted to be a scientist from the day she saw sputnik launched into space. It was a heady time for science and space exploration was on all the front pages. The growing up during the civil rights era in Birmingham Alabama, her science classroom might as well have been on the move. In addition to your own career is a scientist. You have devoted yourself to breaking down barriers and diversifying what we know as stem education, science, technology, engineering, and math. Tell us about your own experience and how you first became interested in science. I'm seventy three years old. I don't mind telling people I prefer to be above ground so that being getting to seventy degrees actually a good thing. So but telling you that you situate myself in a history of the south. The Jim Crow South. It begins to help you understand some of the things that I went through as a child. Yes. You ride on the bus. Ride behind the board it says on my side white on the other I was describing to someone the experience of the first bombing of Mugger Grandmother's Church in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, six. And how that was so traumatic. I focused on it. I can still hear it in my head when you're ten years old Christmas night and all of a sudden. There's this shaking of the house in loud so The fact is that growing up in that kind of environment. was. tends to focus the mind. Now another thing happened however in nineteen fifty sabotage and that was the the launch of sputnik which in fact, it was my own siege. UBS television. Special report. Nick One Soviet Space Center Was Report. Until two days ago that sound never been heard on this earth. Suddenly it has become as much part of twentieth century life is the where your vacuum. Ever that he was talking about science science was in the newspapers it was an above the fold of the newspaper. It was on TV everybody was talking about the fact that. We needed to be able to achieve our goals in science that this was a race for space and bad wasn't just about the science it was also about the ideology. Communism versus democracy that you were a Patriot if you studied science in math if you went into these fields. We started actually having real science taught and our elementary schools. I discovered dot only that I liked it but I was good at once I began to be drawn to the science I began to discover things about the science and about the kinds of questions that it could help answer What is race? Are we any different? What are the? What are the kind of the barriers to our understanding of who we were as people and why? Why? Might have mattered and why Different did not mean deficient. Those are powerful ideas and I I hope that any student who is able to be in school and study science realize how imperilling it is. To have a set of ideas and principles and ways of thinking given to you. That will encourage you and allow you. To make discernment S- to make decisions that is based on something other than superstition. Gut. Instinct. You helped wreck something called sea change at the American. Association for the Advancement of Science what does sea change stand for? What are you trying to do? What it stands for is stem with.

scientist Communicating Science Advancement of science Nick One Soviet Space Center Laura Lyndon Alan alda Pew Research Mugger Grandmother Birmingham Alabama Jim Crow South executive director Malcolm American Association
Trump says "I don't think science knows" about climate

Charlie Parker

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Trump says "I don't think science knows" about climate

"Trump Trump visited visited California California yesterday, yesterday, where where millions millions of of acres acres of of land land of of it it incinerated incinerated Duda Duda wildfires, wildfires, The The president president continued continued to to push push back back on on climate climate change change claims claims made made by by California officials recognized the changing climate and what it means to our forest. It actually worked together with that that science science science that that that that science science science science science is is is is is going going going going going to to to to to be be be be be key, key, key, key, key, because because because because because if if if if if we we we we we if if if if if we we we we we ignore ignore ignore ignore ignore that that that that that science science science science science and and and and and sort sort sort sort sort of of of of of put put put put put our our our our our head head head head head in in in in in the the the the the sand sand sand sand sand and and and and and think think think think think it's it's it's it's it's all all all all all about about about about about vegetation vegetation vegetation vegetation vegetation management, management, management, management, management, we're we're we're we're we're not not not not not going going going going going to to to to to succeed succeed succeed succeed succeed together together together together together protecting Californians. It'll start getting cooler. I wish you'd just watch. I wish science think Science knows, Actually, At least 36 people are dead amid wildfires in the West with dozens missing firefighters Monday had to contend with high winds and low humidity is they tried to gain control in Sacramento President Trump awarded the distinguished Flying Cross to seven California National Guardsmen. You saved 242 people from the creek fire. One of dozens of wildfires raging across California.

Trump Trump President Trump Duda Duda California California California California National Guardsmen West Sacramento
Visiting California Fires, President Trump Denies Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:30 min | 6 months ago

Visiting California Fires, President Trump Denies Climate Change

"The wildfires in the West have burned down entire towns and up ended the lives of millions of people many of last homes. So many more just can't even go outside because the air is thick with ash and smoke. The fires have also forced president trump to confront the realities of climate change, which he has so far refused to do. He was in California yesterday getting a briefing from state officials and Cake Ud's Katie or was there she joins us now from Sacramento Katie Good Morning, you're out this event with the president. The press was there and asking questions and you actually asked him straight up about climate change, right? I did I asked the president what role he thinks climate change plays in these fires and he insisted as he has for years that it's all about forest management that years of letting the forest become overgrown and not well-tended have turned them into tinder boxes. The president's argument was met with resistance from officials here on the ground including California Governor Gavin. NEWSOM, who urged the president to reconsider his stance in? Light of what the state has experienced in recent years hottest August ever history of the state, the ferocity, these fires, the drought five plus years losing one, hundred, sixty, three, million trees to that drought. Something's happened to the plumbing of the world. So there's governor newsom wearing a mask. We should say president trump not wearing a mask there in this kind of intense conversation. How did the President respond to that? he didn't seem to appreciate it in one exchange California's Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crow Foot repeated the central role of climate change in these fires and trump pretty much dismissed him. As we can hear, it'll start getting cooler. You just watch I wish science. Science knows actually. And it's interesting. We're less than two months from the presidential election but the president's comments were not really intended for voters in California and that's for two reasons. First everyone assumes California will vote Democratic in November and here in the state pretty much across the political spectrum climate change and the science behind it are not in dispute by politicians or by voters the. President's message that California is itself to blame for the massive wildfires seems directed at his supporters in other states, and by the way we should mention it's worth noting that governor newsom pointed out the federal government owns close to sixty percent of the forest land in. California. While the State owns just three percent the implication being that it's actually under president trump's purview. So. Can you just give us the latest on the fires this morning? Where do they stand? There are twenty eight major fires burning throughout the state right now with more than sixteen thousand firefighters working to contain them, and we have people who've gone through these fires and are waking up to a landscape marked by worry my colleague in Fresno Alex Hall spoke with Lee Zeldon, Suwa and her husband David they feared their house had burned down. What can you say it's scary. Especially, the first couple of days the fire was moving. So quickly that you know we had no idea if the house would survive. So I think that's how everyone feels and I know there are several houses. On the next street on Auburn road that were completely destroyed. So. Many people dealing with so much loss Katie or of. We appreciate it. Thanks you're welcome.

President Trump California Governor Newsom West Cake Ud Governor Gavin Donald Trump Sacramento Katie Wade Crow Foot Federal Government Fresno Alex Hall Secretary Lee Zeldon Suwa David
What Does The Science Say

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:46 min | 6 months ago

What Does The Science Say

"Welcome to kids, myths and mysteries. Stores were strange and unexplained people, places and events. I'm your host Kit crumb today fringe science. Sciences defined as intellectual practical activity, encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical natural world through observation and experiment. Fringe Science is considered an inquiry into an established field of study and departs from mainstream theories in that field and is considered to be questionable by mainstream science. Now. Don't confuse fringe science with pseudoscience, which is defined as a belief in some person place or event that is mistakenly regarded as being based on scientific method but many categories once considered the product of pseudoscience have slipped into the category of fringe science and many fringe science categories are now consider pure science. A short list of categories considered to be a fringe science, include cryogenics reanimation, and suspended animation. Now, let's take a quick look at each of these. cryogenics is generally the practice according to Al Core cryonic center in Arizona of freezing people who need a cure for a disease or perhaps are in need of an Oregon and will be thought at some later time when there is a cure or an organ available. Now Look at the second fringe science on my list reanimation. That is usually thought to mean restoring life. Finally the third on my list suspended animation that would be closer to the cryogenics. Separately these three would be considered by science to be way out on the French but alcorn does freeze patients and that would seem to be suspended animation, and if indeed the patients brought back to life, you would have to call latte reanimation. Still Science would scoff at the concept yet in Japan Cell Nuclei and DNA were taken from a woolly mammoth that live twenty eight thousand years ago and implanted by scientists into the cells and Ogm of living. Five showed essential biological reactions needed for cell division. This could lead to the reanimation. Mammoth. From the frozen north where the woolly mammoth was the unsuspecting subject of natural cryogenics to lab in Japan where the mammoths DNA was brought from a state of suspended animation. To a reanimated state and planted into the oval ma-ma mouse I'd have to say that's cryogenic suspended animation and reanimation that have slipped from fringe science too pure science. Now, let's plunged down the list of fringe science to the much-maligned topic pre cognition. Simply precondition is considered the fore knowledge of an event. Let's take on a huge event debt even titanic in size, and that's pun intended. It's common knowledge that the titanic was the largest cruise ship of its time. It was considered unsinkable and perhaps because of that Monica unsinkable, it didn't have enough lifeboats for all the passengers when in mid April nineteen twelve on its maiden voyage, it hit an iceberg it sank taking with it over one, thousand, five, hundred passengers but fourteen years prior to the sinking author Morgan Robertson wrote a book titled Futility described the largest cruise ship in the world he named Titan in his book he described his ship as unsinkable and not carrying enough lifeboats for the passengers. When it in his book struck an iceberg in mid April over a thousand died strangely there are well over one dozen similarities between Robertson's Titan and the titanic. And remember he wrote about the Titan in eighteen ninety eight. Pre Cognition. Well, what else could it be? Moving along the list of fringe science, you'd find past life regression hypnotism Bo scoffed at by science at both used by licensed and highly educated counselors around the world although the list of practices an event that fall under the shadow of fringe science as long one I couldn't resist looking at artificial intelligence. You probably heard of IBM's corporations creation Watson. But Watson is program to teach itself in whatever endeavor it is directed. Intelligence natural kind you and I possess is not the same intelligence. Watson has watson can look at a room elementary students and evaluate. Standing Body language which students are following the teachers teachings which are confused and which are distracted. But the natural intelligence that you and I possess would not only separate the students in those three categories mentioned. We could probably figure out why those that followed the teacher could why those that didn't couldn't and what distracted the remainder.

Morgan Robertson Watson Titan Japan Al Core Cryonic Center Alcorn Oregon IBM Arizona BO Monica
Community College of Philadelphia presents college science experience for middle schoolers

KYW 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 7 months ago

Community College of Philadelphia presents college science experience for middle schoolers

"Philadelphia middle schoolers had had a a chance chance to to show show off off what what they they learned learned and and made made during during a a new new summer summer camp camp for for science science and and technology technology students. students. Kay Kay would would abuse abuse Mike Mike DiNardo DiNardo has has the the story. story. Imagine Imagine the the fun fun of of a a classic classic toy toy without without having to have the toy you can press on the Magic eight ball. And ask some questions, and it'll answer them in random order. This magic eight ball is an APP, created by friends select seventh grader Mallika Stayton during her time at the stem summer camp at Community College of Philadelphia. It's the first time CCP has offered a stem camp for middle school students. Stem counselor and instructor Juliet Po Pl says the kid's had math classes in the mornings of the online sessions and coding in the afternoon. Stem college experience coordinator Stephanie Austin Johnson says the apse created during the program will soon be available for anyone to try. Some of our students are already ready to be uploaded into the Google place or what we're working on now about 50 middle schoolers took part in the four weeks CCP program.

Mike Mike Dinardo Dinardo CCP Kay Kay Mallika Stayton Philadelphia Stephanie Austin Johnson Google Coordinator Instructor
Planning for Students in the 9th, 10th, and 11th-Grade

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

06:47 min | 7 months ago

Planning for Students in the 9th, 10th, and 11th-Grade

"Wanted to talk about academic planning for students in the ninth tenth and Eleventh Grade Year, and the reason why it's important is because if your college bound high school student, what you do in your preparation as will set you up well for the application application phase. So a lot of times. You know when I meet seniors sometimes, they didn't do what they needed to do in the ninth tenth or eleventh. Grade Year and it doesn't sit them up very welfare success. But if you're the parent or you know your ninth tenth or eleventh grader, you've got some time on your side to be very intentional about academic planning. So to talk about rocks and the principle of rocks big rocks. And a lot of times students don't know what to plan for. When, it comes to planning out there year. So we're GonNa talk about seven things that every college bound high school students should really focus on using the principle of the rock. So it's GonNa make a little clinking noise. Okay. So the first thing that you WanNa do is really focused on your academic profile and the reason why we talk we start with big rocks I wanted have those high priorities must have in our bucket in our because we have limited time. Limited capacity, and so it's important to focus on big priorities and then fill in some of the other things things you can do in your your free time not that they're not important, but it's really important to get those big things and I. So the First Big Rock is your academic profile and when I talk about your academic profile, we're looking at your high school transcript. So at this stage in the game before we start a new school year, go back. And look at classes from the prior year to your ninth grade year and you WanNa make sure you have what I call the core five, you WanNa have your math, English science history and Foreign Language depending upon with your knife going into ten. You're probably only going to have one year of Afar language but you want to end your four year journey with at least two years of the same far language. Okay. Sometimes, students don't know what they want to major in. And so I say it's better to have more math and expected more English. Because you you may think you're GONNA do one thing and end up doing something else. So here's the other thing I want to say about academic planning in your coursework. There are graduation requirements, and then there are college entrance requirements and sometimes they're not the same thing. So sometimes, your high school only may require three years of math or three years of English or no foreign language. That's fine. All you're focusing on is getting out of high school. But if you're here, it's because you're interested in getting into college and securing scholarships to pay for it. So you WANNA have a very robust the most rigorous. Academic profile networks well for you and kind of where you're going. So I just tell students just go ahead and plan for four years of English for years of math. Three. At least three, maybe four years of history including economics. Usually they are a happy year depends on your school and civic. So you know that. And then a three. At, least maybe four years definitely going into a stem field of science science with the lab sciences. So like biology lab, chemistry, lab, Physics Lab, and sometimes students start off maybe their first year with the general science or if they right into Or maybe a physical science. But if they start right off with biology chemistry physics and the on the back in the fourth year, they may do in Earth's. Environmental science or maybe anatomy astronomy something like that. But you know I would say definitely get those three in and and shoot for four, and then you want at least two years of the same aren language like French. Wine in French to or Spanish one Spanish two I. DO I say this? Sometimes students will do Silang they'll do asl as far language. So your high school may recognize it as a foreign language in terms of graduation requirements, but the college may not accept it as a foreign language for an entrance requirements I just want you to be aware that. So. In that case, I always tell students who are interested in learning sign language in they're studying asl just slot that in Jer- elective. Okay. So we've got our core five and then are typically two electives and those who may be p. e. your driver's Ed or you know whatever whenever you enjoy doing band chorus whatever. So that's that then also when it comes to academic planning. You want to take a look at your GPA don't neglect your grade point average. So where are you right now? What's your benchmark? What's your goal? So where are you starting? You know where did you finish at the end of last semester and where do you WanNa go so begin to think about your Your academic, your grade point average, and then if you're able to find out your class rank, some schools rank some schools don't. But if you're able to find that your class rank, talk your guidance counselor or maybe log in and were high school transcript is and know what your class rank it. So go ahead and record all that now. So you know where you are starting all right now our second rock in stomach to look clunky clink noise. Entrance. Exams or entrance testing, and that would be your sat in your act. Now, this year is a little bit wonky slow messy with Kobe right? Just Kinda is what is so normally we have you know where it's very prescribing you're able to stay on track and kind of plan it all out and it's been wonderful. This year is just not kind of you know just messy. But let's say if you're so ninth grade, you don't have to worry about it too much tenth grade in the fall you'll be taking depending on your school, maybe the pricing or the psat the eleventh grade year when you take the PSAT in October, that's when it counts. Accounts for the. National. Merit Scholarship Program Okay So you want to begin to think about that plan for that no at that date is get it on your calendar. So right now, as you're thinking through these seven big Roxie seven things, I want you to write them down. So write down your current grade point average right down those dates for your upcoming test and then for students in the eleventh grade I want you to look. Ahead to spring test states and began to map them out now it. It is a little bit tricky. It's a little bit different this year because of cove in. So you know a lot of places are asking students to consider it to allow students in the class of twenty

Physics Lab Afar Roxie Silang Earth ED Kobe
Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences reopens with new safety measures

KYW 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 7 months ago

Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences reopens with new safety measures

"Sciences Sciences at at Drexel Drexel University University is is reopened reopened after after closing closing its its doors doors due due to to the the pandemic. pandemic. Is Is Kay Kay would would abuse abuse Kimberly Kimberly Adams Adams tells tells us us public public safety safety and and comfort comfort going going to to be be their their top top priority. priority. The The second second that that we we shut shut up up shop, shop, we we began began to to think think what is the world gonna need when we reopened? Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University President Dr Scott Cooper says his team has been planned mode since the pandemic began. We spoke to our members and our visitors to make sure that we're providing something that they wanted, and most importantly, made me feel safe restrictions are in place on the number People who can enter the building at one time, so there's a lot of breathing room for everybody. They can feel comfortable. They're not going to be shoulder to shoulder with people outside of their social part sign. It will show people how to navigate the facility. There will be hand sanitizer cleaners working, too, and no one is permitted without a mask and help with crowd control. We've also got time ticketing, You need to book your slot on the hour. As far as exhibits the academy's picking up where we left off with Lulu, the two toed sloth so Lulu will be back, surviving the slowest with it's torrential ascend tortoises, plus a wildlife photography. Sedition and much more. There's much to enjoy. But there's much to watch out for as well. For more

Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Drexel Drexel University Unive Kimberly Kimberly Adams Adams Kay Kay Sciences Sciences Lulu Dr Scott Cooper President Trump Pandemic.
Achievement Vs. Fulfillment: Which Do You Want More?

Marketing Secrets

06:38 min | 8 months ago

Achievement Vs. Fulfillment: Which Do You Want More?

"Right so. He has no last week at Lake POW with my family, and we had an amazing relaxing vacation, which is really good problem with the entrepreneurial brain. US EP entrepreneur personality types. When we try to relax, we can't and it drives US crazy. Because we gotta be moving forward momentum, right and so. I started thinking about projects and things I wanna to do things that are fun and like. I know some years know that I am working on eventually writing next book, which could be the bootstrap book Tunnicliffe Story, but the problem is Cleveland Stories and that done. Yes I. Don't know where it's going to go or source was kind of like this things in the back burner that I'm going to do someday. It's not a huge rush. But I'm excited for that, but I was like I almost any something fun to be creating right like I dunno, as a creator, I need to create sure has the same way right and and I'm creating. You know we have the New Tacoma Quebec's coaching programs creating a lot of fun i. want something just. Excited enjoy this is fun and lighthearted deadlines or thing just to create to create right. It's all I had an idea. For Project, I'm going to tell you the details, the name or anything. Other than it's, it's going to be the one and only time I ever talk about personal development. Anyway, right marketing guy that's. Sick with but obviously I've had access to a lot of people. Most people have access to in this world and its lifetime, and had a chance to learn from some amazing people and. Wanted to create this thing I don't know what it's GonNa. Be I duNNo, if it's a real book of it's like a book feminine, just giving away for free as the lead magnet, I have no idea. But. The title I'll tell you. The subtitle subtitle is the science of achievement. The art fulfillment in Vero Tony Robbins Talk. He talks about a lot of times to master masters signs of achievement where the had know the science and how to achieve anything, and then you have to master the art of fulfillment and funny, because he talks about a lot of times, but always struggle with that personally. Because he doesn't go deep into the whole thing you know, and so at Lake Powell this week thinking about this sure thing about the art and the science. And the science of treatment is lost. If I talked about anyway, you know here's the step-by-step, I? Here's the things you need to do things in this order and you have success, but the article films I personally struggle with like I'm such an achiever. I want to this this this and you. What's next on each next thing the next thing he moving towards? Running towards this this invisible goal that we don't really know what it is. I think a lot has producers and entrepreneurs and people like me and probably you. With the film, and like, how do you feel fulfilled and cinching? Is that the article film? It's tough because it's like art. It's not like the science sciences like here's the things to do to get the thing like this art fulfillment and I've always struggled and so as I was thinking about putting together this project. I started thinking about that and I started. Just think signs of cheating. My brain goes GonNa Mike Okay. I'm Jim achiever. Boom here's the thing. But then I started realizing that like the the the path of achievement the article film. It's almost the opposite like a union being and I served Rosina's like. Oh my gosh, they're looking deeper. Different topics have been concepts I was like. Oh, my gosh is true and so many things. Then you realized before so for example. This example shared kind of help s even what I'm. I had. Everyone talks about morning routines right. If you follow any of the fitness, guys, a health and fitness, the bio hackers the the entrepreneurs they all talk about you gotTa have more routine Tina's structure and things like that? You GotTa wake and you gotTa know. This always seems right. Talked about morning and starts accusing to do before you go to bed to increase your sleep patterns in all sorts, and and that's very scientific writes the science of achievement like do you want to have more success? You create habits. Can Habits been creating a routine thirteen? You stick the routines I think that outcome and eventually you have success, right and other big believer that actually so I'm making fun of by any stretch. It is part of the. The the science of Chiba having that right so if you by the way struggled achieving things in the past, maybe because you don't have. Scientific like you just do these things and the outcome happens just magic. It! Just it just works. So there's a science of the problem though is, is it doesn't create fulfillment. Stickney for second I did a podcast about this six months ago or something. I was in I was in. I was in Puerto Rico with brand new Bouchard big. Bunch people and one of the guys there there's getting create. Clements and Craig was We're sitting there and he started talking about. Our brains where he said you know a lot of. Older. Years of getting shorter wait times flying rallies, and actually true, so the reason why is because your brain looks for patterns of the same thing happening over and over and over again deletes them. because. It's like I. don't even remember this because dude. Every single morning we do see every single week every single thing. As, we said he said so literally, your brain is deleting nothing's happening, and so your life seems shorter because it literally is shorter because those memories, it's like Hey, every morning from nine from seven ten, the same things under remember this because the same deleted, and so because you use five hours in your memory every day and see life years go faster days go faster faster and your life goes faster. He said that the problem is he's like he's like. If you. If you want to extend you, know, extend time You have to create called him event horizons! PODCAST? Talk a lot about him, but it was interesting because he's like this mastermind group in the very first year we did it. We all in Wyoming would flew helicopters shotguns. We rode horses. It was crazy right and he was like I was an event. Horizons remember that experience for the rest of my life is the second year master. Makina Puerto, Rico it was amazing. Place. It was amazing. Is this is year? Three and we're in Puerto Rico is. I can have an amazing time. Basically, the problem is is this experience is so similar to lash. Most of it's going to get deleted from my memory, and it's just GonNa be on. Our brain will just lead because it's like Oh, this is routine done. This before is like you lose that and I think he was trying to get us to do some crazy night. 'cause he's like when you criticize horizon right now and he wanted to I can't remember what the thing was. We had some crazy thing like to stick this in our brains. We don't lose moment of this experience because it's it's. It was so similar to think before and horizon, start thinking. I'm like. Oh, my Gosh, like if you think about these things, this is the union the Yang of of fulfillment half of. The are the the science of achievement in the article. In the game because if you want, do you want to cheat me? When she the thing you need to create structure and routine and the singer where you just do the things that create the result at the end. Is, you do that, and so because boom towards you're getting achievement, right with problems, your brains lean section every single day and I'll send your your days. Your lives words. You're not fulfilled. You're not getting the article film that because of that, and so the article film is the opposite. It's the literal opposite of this first thing right it. Is You coming in? In, saying we're not going to do routine, we have to do these crazy things with extensive life extensive happens. We fill fulfillment in the moment, and it's the scene in the Yang

Puerto Rico United States Lake Pow New Tacoma Quebec Lake Powell Cleveland Stories Tony Robbins Mike Okay Makina Puerto Rosina Vero Chiba Stickney Tina Wyoming Bouchard Clements Craig
Solving hard problems and pursuing your passions.

The CyberWire

05:08 min | 8 months ago

Solving hard problems and pursuing your passions.

"My name is Matt Devo. And the CEO of Buddha LLC. I was writing a lot of my own programs I grew up in a very rural area, so you know it didn't have exposure to some of the early BS systems, and actually with my first computer did not have a disk drive or any storage medium, so I would spend all my time programming, know all of the available memory on that commodore sixty four with different applications and had written menu application that would kinda. Let me jump between the different sections, and then I would cry every time we lost power, which was quite frequently because I. had you know would lose everything that I had coded into the device minute was powered off. I was lucky again. I was in a very rural area. There are nineteen people in my graduating class, and there is nothing offered from a computer science perspective. But when I expressed interest, my high school math teacher actually go in the summer to learn how to teach computer science, and then would come back and teach me. In the interest of adapted over time when I got to college focused on not only computer science, but also national security studies became very interested in how things work and taking them apart, and you know that was kind of my early entree into Kinda true hacking, an looking at other people's programs and other people's systems, and I happened to see this convergence between the two topics that I love, and if you think back to the early nineties, really the combination of political science. Science and computer science was all around statistics and analysis, and I saw this new career field, or at least I hoped based on what I saw was increasing use of computer technology in critical things so critical infrastructure, society, finance, etc, and then the inherent vulnerability of those systems, because I was capable of hacking them. The friends that I was meeting were capable of hacking them and then if you combine that with my National Security Focus, I saw this as a new national security. Bull boats I started writing on that topic back in Nineteen, Ninety two, and attracted a tremendous amount of attention to myself, because as one of the early people to highlight the risks of what would become information warfare cyber war, so I was viewed a little bit by some of the folks in the national security circles and intelligence community as well as kind of the equivalent of the KID building an atomic weapon in his garage I was coming to the same conclusions and researching the same things that they had identified at the same time as this key national security risk that they were trying to keep under wraps for the most part. There was quite a bit of friction at the time you know for example in nineteen, ninety three I graduated from Undergrad and win straight into Grad School, and got a masters, or was pursuing a master's in national security studies in political science and the political science team at my graduate school basically told me that the topic of information warfare was not. Not Valid from a thesis perspective, so it would have been easy to give up at that point, but I was persistent, and I had folks who were advocating for me and telling me look at issues of command and control warfare, or look at this, or we're kind of giving me pointers to kind of redirect my research. It also gave me some great. I. I built a red team that that emulated the adversary during classified coalition military exercises, and during that red team was the first person to hack into systems on an aircraft carrier. While it was at sea, we did that with a nuclear submarine or these very headline, invoking the work we're doing at the time wasn't covered in the press, but internally at the classified level within Dod, these wars significant wakeup calls. My favorite part is solving hard problems I like being in the room when we're confronting something that seems almost unconfrontational. And working through the process of how to we adequately addressed that. So I really thrive on that. Kinda read teamer perspective of give me something that you think is one of your most difficult things to achieve most difficult realities that you face, and let's build some approaches for how you do are able to take advantage of. You have the interest and the passion. By all means we have the need within the community. We have a workforce that just doesn't have the numbers by way of the professionals in it so I would encourage folks. You have the interest get involved. You have to engage in self learning. certifications are great. It's great to get on the job experience, but I always like to look at the folks who built basement lab, or set up their own aws cloud infrastructure, and we're hacking against that, so I would encourage them to take advantage of the opportunities that exist for that self directed learning as well.

Matt Devo CEO Buddha Llc Grad School
"sciences sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

02:58 min | 9 months ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

"Joe them out of shopping. Robot, this sample the. The. Wave of my hand and. Is Comedy away so everybody? Listen to what I say. Scientific Method for all that it's worth. Broadcast, my opinion all over the Sweet inside this week in science this week in science, science science. This week inside system. This week in science. I and I've got one disclaimer and it should. That what I say may not represent your views, but I've done calculations and I've got clan. If you listen to the science, just understand. We're trying to the world. And this week sizes. So everybody listen to everything we say. That stat roll the die. We may read the TACO plasma. Sweet and science. Weekend Science. This week in science by. Sweet inside insists. This week in science. Science. A laundry list of items I want to address from stopping. To Dredging Rock S, I'm trying to promote more rational thought and. To answer any question, guys. Abbas. When I can always set up shop. Our own. This week sciences comedy. Data. Just listen to what we say. From the words that we said. Remember is. A! Sweet Science this week in science. This week inside. This week inside since week science. This week and science science. Inside. Inside. This week in science. This week! This week you saw..

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle drop royal duties and HRH titles

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle drop royal duties and HRH titles

"Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle have reached a deal with the queen bringing them a step closer to an independent life in a statement issued by Buckingham Palace yesterday it was announced that the couple will step away from royal duties and will no longer be using their H. R. H. titles the statement also said that they will keep their home in the U. K. but they'll be paying back the almost three million dollars it cost the public to renovate it we reach the B. B. C.'s well correspondent Johnny diamond in London welcome okay lately how are you alright so let's start with what is the significance of taking away the HRH title his Royal Highness her role Highness they're not exactly gonna be commoners now no they're not going to be commoners but I think it is an indication of where they stand in the royal rankings and that is now pretty low down if not outside of the Middle East the members of the family and the queen went out of her way in a very personal statement on Saturday evening here in the UK to say that they will value to members all's what she called my family about the science science they are no longer getting to use the articles is a really clear indication that effectively they are no longer a real oils that goes along with the fact they're not going to carry out royal duties and okay the royal towers they went receive public money they don't live most of the time in Canada Harry will give up on his military appointments this is a wholesale withdrawal from the official site of royal life Jenny do you know if this is mutually agreed upon to have that happen or if it was a kind of punishment I know you think it was a punishment I think the original line DHEA off to Harry and Meghan made that pretty soccer nouns that they wanted to step back that it would be a more often are found arrangement that Harry E. in particular about Harry and Meghan together would carry out some royal duties while still say proceeding at an independent I'm more private life from the song right but I think the contradictions in the conflicts of interest became pretty clear to both sides effectively that neck and couldn't be in the royal family couldn't be working Royals and to be independent right I'm let's talk a little bit about the money because obviously that's a big question the understanding is that the prince of Wales will continue to offer private financial support what does that mean exactly and and will they be cutting themselves off from all public funding the most cutting themselves off from public fund and there's still a question in the security in the palace never comments on security arrangements but I think it's pretty clear that the UK taxpayer is going to be contributing something to ward says security as far as the rest of it is concerned they won't take any public funding for that day to day activities they did receive some for that official duties and I are in those out so that's finished and yes an unspecified sum from Harry's dance the prince of Wales prince Charles he's been financing them to the two year number around three million dollars a year for the last couple of years their own intention to become what they call financially independent do you know what that means yet no doubt and you know it's tough because they will run a pretty expensive lifestyle and they they will need a fairly impressive income they said they will not do anything that would run against the van use all her majesty and that means it's unlikely to see them endorsing handbags in June or Instagram anytime city this is not only the U. K. but the world just briefly what are your thoughts on what this break means for the institution of the world family I think certainly insult need in terms it's quite a serious Norwalk for the role of family I mean it's good news they come to a deal it's good he is does not threats of kind of walking out and getting a tad old into the millions but thanks again hurry and Meghan with big stars they managed to reach people that the rest the role family didn't release in particular young people younger people and members of ethnic minorities you but generally you know a bit more to dismissive of the royal family than perhaps older people in the U. K. and around the world said they were important as part of the reinvention of the refreshment all of the royal family

Meghan Markle H. R. H. B. B. C. Johnny Diamond Harry Royal Towers Meghan Prince Harry Harry E. Buckingham Palace U. UK Middle East Wales Jenny London Royals Soccer Canada
"sciences sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

"This week and science is so everybody. Listen do everything we say. If you roll the die they may read the word of God this week and science weekend in science this week and science and this week in science science this week and science society it is laundry list of item. I want to address from stopping Pinghua to judging knock Nass. I'm trying to promote more rational. Thought to answer any question. You guys the changes I see when I always set up shop swung our this week and sciences comedy way. Listen to what we say. A nanny from the word that we said remember is the sweet science earlier this week in science this week inside Thailand in this week since week in science this week in science science and begins this week it science this week in science science this week it's yeah..

"sciences sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Talks about agriculture how to deal with agriculture we do know that's one of them and I'm gonna give you the big one in just a moment I temperatures of the last hundred and fifty years have increased two point seven five degrees Fahrenheit I twice as fast as they have it for the planet as a whole this is temperatures on land and out this is because the more extreme weather events we know that shifting the ranges of plants animal pass diseases member just a shark you know the shark issue you see one or two shark sightings off the coast of California and occasionally someone would be eaten by a shark and I became very big news I saw a video the other day that was taken over one of the Orange County beaches sixty sharks swimming around what's well it's changed the water temperature as change you have animals going farther north are you advise the temperatures warming up and it's just changing everything so it's this is all about global warming which of course are a lot of people that doesn't exist that's just not true don't wanna mention names president trump afternoon team certain radio stations I know it's all a bunch of crap well it is not a bunch of crap so here are the suggestions the big one is simply more forests plant forests all over the place where ever you can one of my top your house expand the parks when I'm on the mountainside it doesn't matter any place where there's land that you can plant force you plant force because forest do.

California Orange County president seven five degrees Fahrenheit fifty years
"sciences sciences" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"It is especially science now, especially science sciences evil. Yeah. Well, I'm down with. Yeah. You know me. Speaking of the CDC, though, the city of Austin is doing a study in east Gouda related accidents along with the CDC has done trial by south west. Exactly, exactly. Because right now there is no national database for tracking scooter accidents. The thing about this article, which is from wwl TV dot com is going to. I know it's going to auto play video. I no, no, no, it didn't think. In their video, though, they show how they've actually put signs on the streets in Austin. And I love this. It says no peds with little scooter painted above it and south by south west is going on right now in please. Dear God, somebody change the signs to know PTO and put a picture of R Kelly. It's all you gotta do you. Gotta Elaine and Michael Jackson street. In the news. Well, Senator Elizabeth Warren has come out and taking a big swing. That's trying to break up Silicon Valley and looking at the largest tech companies in America, she's released her roadmap. One of the first major proposals of a presidential run, which includes ambitious antitrust moves like undoing Facebook's purchase of Instagram and WhatsApp and separating Google search from the company's ad business..

Senator Elizabeth Warren CDC Austin east Gouda Facebook Silicon Valley PTO Google R Kelly Elaine Instagram America Michael Jackson
"sciences sciences" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Again. Hey. Theses ninety seven point one wash FM. Day day is day. Has my plans science science science. I'm wearing my favorite brands brands. Gimme space. Goes on. Goes on. Came to move move move. Out the way of me. And my crew crew grew grew. Came here to do. Is it goes on? Girls are. Uh-huh. Agreed. John. Gone. Ninety seven point one.

"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Science. There's a book like. The lost elephants history of the periodic table of elements. It turns out that there were more false discoveries of atomic elements than there are true elements, but this isn't the book of fraudsters other. There are fraudsters in the book, but for the most part, it's on a scientists using what we're at the time, cutting edge methods, but which we would regard as incredibly silly struggling to discover and get famous from new building blocks of the natural world. Now, when you opened up a chemistry textbook, see any of this. You get it like this mutable permanent about the universe drew everywhere, and I believe that, but it was cobbled together through credibly, messy, embarrassing process. So now chemistry cut. It looks like a complete field. We sweep away all of the storm and drama that preceded that completion. And we look instead at the behavioral sciences biological sciences, and we see that things are very messy. But that's just like the other sciences, the improvement here in having hope I have tremendous, partly because of that historical perspective. And there's so much conscious now there's much more open discussion and it seems to me that junior scientists have particular. Although, of course they're under tremendous higher pressure to conform to expectation there ideologically way, more activist about science reform than my generation was. Special. Thanks this week. The Richard muddle read tha Phra and Marcus. Munaf. Oh, if you want to find out more about Richard study will include a link to that in the episodes description on the guardian website. If you've got any questions queries, all feedback, please get in touch on email, address science, weekly, guardian dot com. I'm in some. This is science weekly. For more great podcasts from the guardian. Just go to the goal, Jim dot com. Slash put costs.

Richard muddle Jim dot Slash Marcus
"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

13:01 min | 3 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"That when we return. Hi, it's Daniel Glaser him. Latest episode. All the neuroscientists explains looks at an issue in the world of psychology. The so-called replication crisis read that and said, that cannot possibly be correct. So either something's broken about scientific publishing process. Or everything we've ever known isn't true. Psychology in science in general, is self correcting only. We actually do the correcting as great to see there's more doing this correcting unsure about our hypotheses. Listen head over to the guardian dot com. Ford smash. For such a neuroscientist explains on your favorite. Podkolzin. Welcome back to science weekly. I'm in some early spoke with professor Richard mcilwraith that the Max Planck institute for evolutionary anthropology in Leipzig. He's shed light on the family. Good science is being thwarted by systems that encourage high productivity productivity. He argues comes at the expense of what we really want, which is true knowledge about the world. Two, two guests with different scientific backgrounds to help broaden out the conversation. I'm afraid on the marriages professor cut new development at UCON and also chair of the diversity committee at the psyche. I'm Markus Munaf o- on professor of biological psychology at the university of. I started by asking the UAE so long after the birth of science. We have yet to perfect the scientific process. While you're right that the scientific method has been around for a long time, but I think we need to distinguish between the scientific method which is relatively abstract and the day-to-day practice of doing science. It's also worth bearing in mind that insci- generally, we accept that we're almost never completely right about something. We just try to become gradually less wrong by updating beliefs with evidence over time. And I think we can apply the same thinking to how we do science. We might be doing okay, Joe. But that doesn't mean that we can't improve on things. How does it look from your point of view of? We got science pretty well nailed down all. Is there a lot of room for improvement? My take on this is set signs, spin around publicly, only four centuries. It is still critically young enterprise compared, for example, to our legal systems which have been around four thousand years, something as broad, an enterprise's sciences bound to have all manner of shortcomings. But do you Mark ac- systemic problems undermine. Its potential affective nece I think we need to be a little bit careful not to overstate the situation. It's always a good idea to look at how we work and decide whether or not we're doing things as efficiently as effectively as we can be. And whether or ways of working can be updated given some of the new technologies that are available to us. So I think that the period that we're going through at the moment where people are thinking about methods and the robustness of scientific findings is healthy and it's best seen as an opportunity to improve the way that we work and bring our practices up to date. We think of science certainly on the science, weekly podcast. Anyway, we think of sciences, one of the best ways humans who've come up with for getting the truth, a scientists, incentivized in the right way to get to the truth. Well, I think that's one of the interesting questions to a large extent. We're not because the sorts of things that you get rewarded for insci- directly are publishing, particularly certain kinds of journals, getting grants. For example, all of those things are great and we are of knowledged, but actually being right is not something that we're directly. Awarded for is what we go into science for. We want to find things that were enthusiastic about a subject area and we're excited about what we do, but we gradually realized through our early careers, particularly that if we don't publish the right kinds of journals, for example, then we won't have a career to allow us to do that being that we came into science for in the first place. So there's a mismatch between what's good for signs and what's good for scientist's careers. If you like this, how you would see as well each or is it more important in a scientist's career almost that they rack up publications rather than they are right all the time. Well, I think that there is a problem not with science, but possibly with scientists sent owned in such since we're all human beings. We do want get at the truth, of course, but they're all these other things like getting the job, getting petition, getting money, all of these things and these problems are not specific to science. Perhaps it is the case. It been more aware in science. People, human beings on on subject to all these things because they need to get money from some. And that is a danger because that can obscure this search for the truth. I think to pick up on something very interesting which is that however, well trained we are scientists with so humans in one of the reasons. I think psychologists have been at the forefront of this recent debate around reproducibility is because many of the issues we're talking about our issues of human behavior in the cognizant viruses that we all have the fact that we see happens in noise for example, we see the face of Jesus in toast that cognitive bias, which is a an evolutionary throwback if you like, can lead us astray. When we're dealing with noisy data sets in any number of different sciences, there is undoubtedly though a lot of sciences published every day every week every month that is wrong or at least badly flawed. Some people may dismiss this is Lucas just lab experiments or other people might think, well, sciences is. Correcting that. There is this built in way of making sure that bad results do not get taken up. Is it an issue of levels for that question I for we need to think about what it means to say that something is wrong. So for example, you might observe a pattern in new data and that may be robust and replicable across lots of different samples. But your interpretation of what that means, for example, does it reflect a cause and effect relationship maybe wrong? Or it may be that the observation in the first place was just a chance finding doesn't replicate across different samples, or it may be that someone overly aggressively interpreted their data road doubt without lies slightly unprincipled way and generated a result spurious for that reason. So even that question of what constitutes a wrong finding is not simple. I think the need for replication and also to to come at a research question from different directions is really important. One of the approaches that were increasingly trying to adopt in Bristol in the groups that I'm partial is triangulation. This idea of coming at the same question from different directions. With each methodology or approach having its own assumptions, its own strengths and weaknesses, and critically, if those different strengthen weaknesses in different assumptions and different biases, but they all give the same answer, then you can be more confident in the robustness of that answer. So good example of finding that is robust is the J shakes relationship between alcohol and heart disease. The idea that the little bit of alcohol consumption is good few, and that's complicated by the fact that the kinds of people that drink a little bit of alcohol are different to the kinds of people who drink a lot of alcohol and to those who drink alcohol tool. And so understanding whether that's relationship which is absolutely robust genuinely reflect a protective effect of alcohol, as opposed to confounding, for example, is extremely difficult. I want to get a sense from both of you about how much you feel diversity feeds into some of these issues. Incites we know that there are issues around diversity in terms of gender ethnicity, but also political leanings in academe. What are those diversity issues and do you think they haven't impact on the sciences self? I think, yes, they are very good because science is essentially dependent on teamwork unites become very complex. It's become very difficult to muster, older, different techniques that you need explicit bit like getting players in team sports together. They all specialise in in different different areas, different skills, and in in science, we need serious finished experiments. We need explorers, we need exploiters. All of these people somehow have to discuss things together and you really need to have diverse viewpoints of the buys. You know, very, very soon light. Your believes in your prior upbringing, your background and so on. In your dreams, you up very likely to be trapped in local minima music. You. Found the onto everything. If you could wave a woman start all over again with science, how would you build it up to make sure that it does give you the truth more reliably than science we have today? I think I would change incentives and I would make it clear that there is enough time that is given to do some good research. And my main wish would be to have an agreement that the must value falling over quantity, Marcus while I think we have to realize alot. That's a nice thought experiment wherein the messy situation of having to update an ecosystem that role ready part of and that's much harder to do. But that's the situation that's that's facing us if you like, I completely agree with everything that is to say. In fact, I think that it again speaks to some of the different biases that we all have, and we need to recognize if we're going to improve the way that we work confirmation bias being. I think the one that was essentially talking about this tendency that we have to seek out information that confirms -opoly. Rather than disconcerts belief in approaches, light, triangulation, active attempt to seek out disconcerting approaches if you like, which is how science should work. But given current incentive structures isn't always the way that it does work in practice. But I think while there are many different things that we could try to do to improve the way that we work and we're going through a period where people are experimenting with different approaches that might help with that. One of the areas that I think we are trying to do better, which I think can really benefit equality of what we do is team science, which again speaks to this this issue of diversity bringing in people with different methodological and disciplinary backgrounds to work on a common project, but also to take into account of types of diversity light, not just Gendron ethnic diversity, which which we have been thinking about for some time now, but also political diversity. Socioeconomic diversity. Academia tends to be a relatively homogeneous place in many respects along all of those different I mentions and the more that we can break that up and bring in different voices, different perspec-. Actives, different life experiences that better able we will through that team science approach to be able to adopt this kind of triangulation approach that we've been talking about. Science is in many world under threat. There are people out there who do not take very seriously, do something have to change pretty swiftly and pretty majorly. I think we need to be careful not to allow others to weaponize the reproducibility debate by using it as a means by which they can drive a wedge between scientists and the general public. So we mustn't be too nihilistic about west scientists. Scientists still making progress is still giving us insights into nature in an unprecedented way. We need to. If anything say, we are so mature as discipline that was starting to take this more introspective approach to see how we can be even better. But that's a sign of strength. Not a sign of weakness. I completely agree. I think signs is indeed the best thing behalf to get at the truce. We do need the truth to get bit solutions to all the problems. He can really agree politically. As she space created Susan days more time available to do this essential work. It could benefit everyone during back to my conversation with Richard. He found that both the history of the field as well as what he sees in the community today. Both give him hope for science.

professor Richard mcilwraith Daniel Glaser scientist UAE Ford Max Planck institute insci Markus Munaf Bristol Leipzig UCON Mark ac Joe Lucas Susan Marcus four thousand years four centuries
"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

05:59 min | 3 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Things. Just you can imagine the job hosting you get eight hundred applicants or at a granting agency. There are a lot of grants and I have to triage in so proxies, get used. People use the best proxies that may be vailable to them. Things like impact factor impact factor is not something that was sanctioned by any academic organization. It was created by publisher to advertise their products. Just explain what impact factor is an impact factor is the rate at which papers in journals in a particular journal are cited authors on their papers in IM factor journals because in some countries you're. Promotion involves a calculation using a formula that includes the impact factor. Journals have published what we want is to results. But journals often select for well, hype enters are incentivized to take on papers, which will give their journals, high impact and editors have deliberately gamed the system in many times to elevate the positions of their journals as well. It was considered doing good for the journal and therefore you attract better papers. So if you're if you're selecting, for example, on the surprise, value of a result, there are many things that can make a result surprising other than its truth value, but used to be an informal proxy is that people knew IS if you get up paper in science or nature, or proceedings after Kennedy scientists or Royal Society, journal, more people will see it. It's likely to be cited that became I used to word industrialized. It became an industrial standard and then universities at condemning societies took it on board as a proxy which made it possible. The process, a large numbers of people in paper. Applications. You will find occasional people who who defend the criteria, but the system is very sticky and so trying to get enough people to coordinate civil Tena sleet to change. The situation has been difficult. What is the negative consequence of the emphasis on publications as a consequence, if you reward something other than, say, detail judgment, a debate about the truth, value of the work and instead reward. Something else like productivity than what you get is more productivity and not more of the things you want. In this study into the natural selection of bad science, Richard and his co author pull smell Dino at the university of California set argued that the scientific community is creating a situation where if a scientists can produce more papers with less data, they can get more grants to keep that longer term research pursuits alive. I asked Richard to unpack this argument and explain what it comes down to in the lab. So do a lot of small studies, small cheap studies, small numbers of subjects, small numbers, replicant units, and they only published the ones that work out because if you do enough of them your farm asterisks, this is what I call it. Why asterisk? Because the distance after puts an asterisk by a significant result, if you run enough small team studies, you maximize the chance that you get one asterisk and then that let you get publication. Let you get your next Graham. So asterisk means this is a postive finding of statistical significance. Exactly. And. I jokingly call it stargazing to harvest the stars, the individuals who do them or not cheating. They don't hide these behaviors there in print as advice, but give us a sense of how damaging how problematic this is. I wish I could. I think it's very hard to measure precisely the damage. But I think in general, the quantitative assessment damaged with come from the replication projects that have gone on, or example, pharmaceutical industries are interested in making cancer treatment drugs from initial positive lab results for cancer drugs. And so they, I said about just trying to replicate the publish papers and eighty percent of them could not be replicated. This isn't an industry where they're trying really hard to do it because they want to to get the profit stream going to do that. The thing needs to work. In this study into the natural selection of bad science, Richard and his co author pull smell Dino at the university of California said, argued that the scientific community is creating a situation where if a scientists can produce more papers with less data, they can get more grants to keep that longer term research pursuits alive. I ask Rishard to unpack this argument and explain what it comes down to in the lab in labs. Junior scientists have been explicitly taught for several generations now that the way to be successful and that needs to publish. But also to discover things is to run a bunch of small treatments to measure a bunch of potential outcomes. And then the ones with Asterix are the correct. Those are the true findings and you publish those and you don't have to mention the other thing is you said that these issues that have been raised time to gain the the need for improving science is not a new one. What should be done to scientists agree on what has to be done and how that might be achieved. I don't think that there's precise agreement on remedies is not a simple issue of say, typical industrial situation. So that's frustrating. And there are many attempts down to come up with new institutions. According to Richard aware of these issues is improving, but we need to remember that these mechanisms have been in place a long time. Historically, he says, scholars have raised concerns about them for years. After the break, we'll turn to to scientists from different areas of research help rolled in the scope of the conversation and discussed the general problems at hand. Even questionable wants to cheat. So wrong findings, simple other issues. We need to keep horizon space eight so that more time available to do this essential work. That

Richard Dino university of California Tena sleet publisher Royal Society cancer Kennedy Graham Rishard eighty percent
"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

05:13 min | 3 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"The guardian. Scientists is. We know them are tasked with helping us understand world. They study and analyze Dane, go armed only with binoculars for the first time into the. The earliest known man probably more than a million years ago. They make new discoveries. Three to one zero all engine running liftoff on Apollo. Eleven when the sciences, right help new humanity foolish. And then Tim burners Lee shows up in nineteen Ninety-one and releases the worldwide web. What about when science is Rome? Over the years? That studies have been called out across research fields spanning the breadth of science. Dubious claims in the name of science have led to record numbers of studies being retracted while scores more turn out to be on replicable. So we'll go wrong with the pursuit of knowledge and more to the point. Can we fix it. In some people? This is science weekly. No. Tell me turn the lens on science. I spoke with someone who is used evolutionary theory and analysis to investigate how science has gone astray. Richard Maccari on director of the department of human behavior, ecology culture, the box buck institute revolution, anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Richard co, authored a study which found that in fact, natural selection in the world of science has made way for bad signs. Ask Richard to stop by painting a picture of how sciences practice today and what motivates those who work in the field. I believe, are motivated by trying to figure out how nature works at university of shins and how human societies function within the context of nature. That is a decide that there aren't more Machiavellian actors as in all industries, but most scientists are pretty idealistic. When you talk to them that said that primary motivation has to be shaped by the fact that science is now industrial occupation. It's it's very large scale and it's incredibly competitive and it's become quite quantified like many other industries. And so as a result or topless, topical, desire to figure out drew facts about the universe is molded into particular forms that allow us to be successful. It's important to note that there's frustration that a lot of the way we work is tempted to run around the industrial obstacles to take us through some of the incentives that all that to shape how scientists. Walk. The topline incentives are all examples of cases where there are bottlenecks through the intense competitiveness of the field. And so every stage of our work involves intense competition for resources and access to audiences. So this begins from the desire to get into a PHD program. There is intense competition. Then there's intense competition for funding. And by tips here I should say we're talking about selection where five to ten percent of the pool is going to get into a competitive situation where they'll have the resources to do the work. They originally intended to do onto the competition for publication, which is the most famous competitive arena. And since PHD students are being produced at very high rates, we now have a backlog of people with excellent educations who do not have permanent positions in science. These competitive factors become very dire. And when I got a job, I got my first job. I think I had to publications. I got assistant professor job now, was it so unusual at the time I was fortunate, I came from a good HD program advisor who's well known in the field, but to publications, I hazard to say nobody gets hired onto publications anymore. It's virtually impossible. These days, someone like me would be competing against a big field of postdoctoral scholars. Many of whom are on their third post doc. They might have twenty thirty papers in excellent journals, and those are the people who are getting system professor jobs. Now it's really quite extraordinary change. With extreme pressure on scientists to publish papers to fill out their portfolios. The pursuit of knowledge becomes a case of survival of the fittest. So what does the situation look like from the position of those hiring new recruits. And what does that tell us about how research has developed actor? No one's intentionally sabotage these things.

Dane Richard Maccari Richard university of shins Leipzig Richard co assistant professor Germany box buck institute professor postdoctoral director advisor million years ten percent
"sciences sciences" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Received the medal of honor during the battle of any will jima the medal of honor is the highest award for valour in action against an enemy force which can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the armed services of the united states there are some though that are kind it scoffing at the nfl over this because the nfl is being criticised pretty heavily by veterans over the national anthem issues that the nfl is run into this year sauces no way to make peace man maybe and hopefully they will meanwhile in other countries and upandcoming aerospace company from new zealand made history last week when it deployed what can only be classified as a giant disco ball into low earth orbit the flashing strobe was launched alongside a less artistic payload comprised of two commercial satellites rocket lab that's the name of the company rocket lab says that the art project called humanity star which was launched on january 21st should now be the brightest object in the night sky in time the objects orbit will tilt in almost the entire world at some point will be able to see humanity star at night and at dawn who these faber favorable uh can dishes will occur from march onward the carbonfibre geodesic sphere is a little over a meter in diameter and his covered in 65 highly reflective panels because of its ninety minute polar orbit the satellite will be visible to a lot of people the new zealand engineers also took space junk into consideration is that of launching new litter into space the team behind this fear or careful to set it on a nine month orbit that will eventually return it to the atmosphere where the satellite will disintegrate for the curious there is a tracking app and it's on the humanity star website and how much they spend put the disco ball in the air let's see a lot of money to be my guess well yeah i i'm going to say millions and millions of dollars not free to put a bit anything at their so but you know we we have more light now something is not a lot but it's something really all give thank them it's it's an art project it doesn't really you know doesn't need have any logic behind it up on our product meets scott thought it's got logic dictates doesn't have to affect everyone's life i suppose or make sense apparently well here's that meant the.

united states nfl scott upandcoming aerospace faber ninety minute nine month
"sciences sciences" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"I r s herself errors and air self and don't forget this ver's and verse self though the picture for those who who having seen it already peronist read for the facebook people devoid is so needy hey can you this can you that blah blah blah in a back off within picture policy of the translates over here well i do know davila lagoon all right um the picture shows do you think this this kids wearing a wig oh i don't think so i'll go with that issue mosher and things could be a wig there could be lgbt group the headline is anxious where the story students should use others preferred pronouns whether they're within earshot or not in other words if you tell me that i have to call you zero or the or hair mirror or do if you tell tell me i have to say that if i'm talking about you and your know if you've nowhere near like i'm on vacation hawaii and you're in texas i eased i still for some reason never call you do group ads right a and and if you do they not think that's gestapo tactic today an iphone vets that somebody i mean you know what i mean i know i know why don't they believe in free speech now this person who i think is worrying a wig in this picture than has glasses on if i got into my head i would say it's probably a male uhhuh is holding a sign that says my pronouns are not up for debate and guess what i agree with him it's not up for debate if you're him you're a him if you're a he here he yup these things are not variable their fixed sciences sciences science and the science of human sexuality or human sex i should say is is fixed i mean there there's the oddball hermaphrodite or wherever calling intergender or something no but but other than that you've got mail you've got female scientifically that's.

davila lagoon hawaii texas facebook mosher iphone
"sciences sciences" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"sciences sciences" Discussed on NPR News Now

"You're listening to npr president donald trump has announced he intends to nominate white house deputy chief of staff cures to nielsen to be the next secretary of homeland security nielsen was former d h s secretary john kelly is deputy when he served in that role kelly later became trump's chief of staff the white house couch nielsen's experience in national security policy cybersecurity and emergency management she is the first dhs nominee who previously worked in the pardon of homeland security ten louisiana state university students are facing arrest in connection with the hazing death of a fraternity pledge there i lean funding of member station wwl reports one is also facing a homicide charge the arrest warrants named ten people who attended a fi dealt with data fraternity party last month they face misdemeanor hazing charges one is also charged with felony negligent homicide witnesses told police that pledges that the party were playing a drinking game police say the victim 18yearold maxwell gruber died with a four point nine five blood alcohol level six times the legal limit gruber was found unresponsive at the fraternity house and taken to a hospital where he died fight delta data has been suspended an lsu is investigating its entire greek system for npr news i'm eileen fleming in new orleans and a report by the national academy of sciences sciences rather says preventing trained ramases depend on more and better inspections of freight rail tracks on with better training of emergency crews board says most remnants including love those carrying cars crane crude oil an ethanol involved in some fiery crashes are caused by track were in mechanical defects.

nielsen national academy of sciences s negligent homicide dhs security policy white house chief of staff john kelly secretary secretary of homeland security donald trump deputy chief of staff president npr crude oil freight rail new orleans eileen fleming lsu maxwell gruber