31 Burst results for "Science Museum"

"science museum" Discussed on Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories

Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories

05:54 min | 2 weeks ago

"science museum" Discussed on Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories

"With hugh towards. Y'all love it. yeah. I've seen that said alley. It's nice but the air and space exhibit has a spaceship. You can actually get in and you can push.

"science museum" Discussed on Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories

Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories

14:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"science museum" Discussed on Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories

"The hello away. Islanders to be calm on our way island. Now part of the quad pod network. Today we are happy to share a favourite story and relaxation. With you before we begin..

On Monday, ‘Christmas Star’ appears in sky for first time in 800 years

WSB programming

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

On Monday, ‘Christmas Star’ appears in sky for first time in 800 years

"And look to the skies tomorrow evening for an early Christmas present. The Christmas Star, as it's called, will appear in the night sky. For the first time in nearly 800 years, it'll appear that Jupiter and Saturn are merging even though they're really hundreds of millions of miles apart. Tell US science Museum astronomer David Dundee tells Channel two action news The best time for viewing if you look in the direction where the sun sets and the sun will set around 5 30 in the Southwest. And as it gets dark around six o'clock you'll see a above the tree line. Don't wanna miss this potentially once in a lifetime opportunity, you'll have to wait until the year 2080 for your next

Us Science Museum David Dundee Saturn Southwest
Redlining left neighborhoods vulnerable to heat

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 5 months ago

Redlining left neighborhoods vulnerable to heat

"For decades. Many banks refuse loans to people buying homes in certain urban neighborhoods. the lenders claim the loans. Were too risky. But that assessment was heavily influenced by the race of residence. This practice is called redlining and it left lasting damage. In many communities reduced individual wealth home ownership and investment in schools and transportation in recent research shows that formerly redlined areas are also more vulnerable to extreme heat. Jeremy hoffman of the science museum of virginia says these neighborhoods tend to have fewer shade trees and more pavement making them hotter nationally. It ends up being about four and a half degrees. Fahrenheit warmer on average during the summer in these formerly red light areas than in their non redline neighbors the problem will get worse as the climate warms so hoffmann says to protect residents health. It's important to find immediate solutions like building. Shade structures at bus stopped planting trees and adding parts could also help cool neighborhoods in the long-term reimagining with of the individuals in the communities that were redlined. What's their vision for what their community looks like in the next ten twenty thirty years

Jeremy Hoffman Science Museum Of Virginia Hoffmann
Miami won’t have an NBA voting site after county picks Frost Museum over AA Arena

The Steve Holland Retirement Wealth Show

00:20 sec | 8 months ago

Miami won’t have an NBA voting site after county picks Frost Museum over AA Arena

"Arena N. BA players proposed The idea of using sports arenas is voting places and other n BA venues around the country will serve as such because they're large enough to keep people apart from each other. While casting ballots. The county says it will adapt the Frost Science Museum into a polling site instead. With Lord his news. I'm John McChrystal

Frost Science Museum John Mcchrystal
What Is Pi?

BrainStuff

04:26 min | 1 year ago

What Is Pi?

"Come to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio rain stuff lauren. Bo-bottle here the number referred to as pie has mesmerized mathematicians for four thousand years. It's the rarest of back medical constance and unfailingly accurate ratio. That's also never ending. The digits of Pi have been calculated out more than twenty two trillion decimal places without ever repeating a. That makes it an irrational number. The definition of Pie simple. It's the ratio of a circle circumference. That is the length around the circle divided by its diameter or at the links across the circle. But what's remarkable? Is that no matter. The size of the circle you're measuring that ratio of circumference diameter will always equal three point. One four one five nine two six five three five eight nine seven et cetera usually shortened to three point one four divide the circumference of a tennis ball by its diameter. And you get three point one four divide the circumference of the planet Mars by its diameter. And you get three point one four divide the circumference of the known universe by its diameter. You get the point. Pie is critical to several basic calculations geometry physics and engineering including the area of a circle which is Pie Times Square of the radius and volume of a cylinder which has pyre squared times the height of the cylinder when ancient Babylonian attempted to measure the precise area of circles back in one thousand nine hundred BC. They signed a value to pie. A three point one to five. The ancient Egyptians came up with three point one six zero five the Greek mathmetician archimedes working in the third century BC and the Chinese mathematician. Xue Changsa working in the Fifth Century. Ce ARE CO credited with calculating the most accurate approximations of Pi before Calculus and supercomputers gave us a more definitive answer. Then in seventeen o six. The self taught Welsh mathematician. William Jones assigned the Greek letter P. To this magical number without end possibly because P is the first letter of the Greek words. For periphery and perimeter symbols use was later popularized by Eighteenth Century. Spec petition Leonard Euler but wasn't adopted worldwide until nineteen thirty four. The fact that Pie can be found everywhere not only in circles but an arcs pendulums and interplanetary navigation and intimately long has inspired a cult following that includes plenty of Geeky tattoos and even its own National Holiday National Pie Day was officially recognized by the United States. Congress in two thousand nine but the definitely not square roots of the holiday can be traced back to nineteen eighty-eight and a man named Larry the Prince of Pie. Shaw Shaw was a beloved longtime employee at the exploratorium. A Science Museum in San Francisco California and came up with the idea of Pi Day on one thousand nine hundred eighty eight staff retreat following the death of exploratorium founder. Frank Oppenheimer the date for celebration. Well because the first digits of Pi Three Point one four March fourteenth or three fourteen even better march fourteenth is also Albert Einstein's birthday making Pi Day nerd doubleheader the first Pi Day celebration was nothing more than Shaw and his wife handing out slices of fruit pie and tea at one fifty nine. Pm One five nine being the three digits following three point one four but the holiday quickly gained fame in the bay area. Shaw eventually built be Pi Shrine at the exploratorium a circular classroom with a circular brass plaque at center. Every day celebration at the exploratorium ended with a colorful parade led by Shaw blasting his boombox with a remix of pomp and circumstance set to the digits of Pi and circling. The Pie Shrine. Exactly three point one four times. The parade ended with the singing of happy birthday to Albert Einstein. The prince pipe passed away in two thousand seventeen but the annual exploratorium party continues as do Pi Day celebrations. The world over popular ways to celebrate include. Baking a pie orb some kind of circular treat and holding pie recital contests the current world record for memorizing and reciting the most digits of Pi was set by Sharad Kumar Sharma of India in two thousand fifteen when he recited a staggering. Seventy

PIE Shaw Shaw Pie Times Square Pie Shrine Albert Einstein Pi Shrine Sharad Kumar Sharma Exploratorium Tennis Leonard Euler Frank Oppenheimer Xue Changsa William Jones Congress India San Francisco Science Museum United States California Founder
"science museum" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

13:52 min | 1 year ago

"science museum" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"The two hundred ton meteorite that was found in Greenland. It's crazy The hall also contains Extra Solar Nanno diamonds. which has diamonds with dimensions on the nanometer level? More than five billion years old and these were extracted from meteorite sample through chemical means and they are so small that a Quadrille Ian of these fit into we'll volume smaller than a cubic centimeter my brain. I know it's what to do with that. And Yeah it's a Latino diamono diamonds so so you can't get a ring diamonds. Sorry to somebody's like us. Jimmy got me this beautiful ring. Yeah uh-huh diamonds and if they can't see it then that's on them. You know the worst GONNA say they're like my ring is the Yes. These are NATO diamonds that they're that they're lying. Yo Oh yeah. They're definitely lying to you if you can see it. Then they're lying all right something that you would enjoy and I also enjoyed the Harry Frank Guggenheim Hall of Minerals. Love Him and are all. I love mineral houses. Hundreds of unusual geological specimens it had joined the Morgan Memorial Hall of gems showcasing many rare and valuable gemstones. I'm stones on display or many renowned samples that are chosen from among the museums. More than one hundred thousand pieces included among these is the Patricia L.. Marolt which is a six hundred thirty two carrot or a hundred and twenty six graham twelve sided stone. It was discovered during the nineteen twenties in a mine. High in the Colombian Andes was named aimed for the minor. Owner's daughter it's nice. The Patricia is one of the few large gem quality emeralds that remains uncut. Wow also on display is the five hundred sixty three carat or one hundred thirteen grams star of India. The largest and most famous star Sapphire in the world is cut cabin. Sean style as I mentioned in my gem episodes episodes put number. Was that I you know I really should episode on on jibe diamonds. It's called diamonds are forever. Yeah it's good. It's pretty good. So the star of India was discovered over three hundred years ago in Sri Lanka And most likely in the sands of ancient riverbeds from where star sapphires. Continue to be found. Today it was donated to the museum by the financier J. P. Morgan and the Star of India's polished into the shape of a Tana's I mentioned before to enhance stars. Beauty among other notable specimens on display are a five hundred and ninety six pound or two hundred and seventy kilogram. Topaz us a four point. Five tonne specimen of Blue Azure right malachite or that was found in the copper queen mine in Bisbee Arizona Olsen the coach synergy synergy synergy. I love this so At the start of the twentieth century this happened And a rare one hundred carrot or twenty gram Ram Orange Colored Parashyn Sapphire from Sri Lanka considered quote the mother of all pads so a para Schon Sapphire Sapphire just means that it's like a pinky Orange Sapphire that's found in Sri Lanka specifically the collection also includes the midnight star a one hundred sixteen point seven five carat here at deep purplish Red Star Ruby. which was from Sri Lanka and was also donated by J. P. Morgan to the AM and h like the star of India in the same year nineteen ninety one so we just had these two to huge storms? Like sick when I sent him home. The museum also has a huge extensive collection of fossils in fact the great weight of the fossil so bones lead designers to add special steel reinforcements to the buildings framework as it now houses the largest collection of fossil mammals dinosaurs in the world. One more thing the Hayden Planetarium connection to the museum is now part of the Rose Center for earth and space housing a glass cube containing the spherical space theater as. Oh you most people fearful theater in a glass cube. Yes ooh yeah. That sounds pretty famously. Neil degrasse Tyson is the director of that Planetarium K.. And now we're going to get into some smaller but very important science museums. That should be mentioned the Science Museum. That's that's just what it's called. It is a major museum on exhibition road. In South Kensington London. It was founded in eighteen fifty seven today. One of the city's major tourist attractions attracting three point three million visitors annually. The museum was founded in eighteen. Fifty seven under Bennett woodcraft from the collection of the Royal Society of Arts and surplus items from the great exhibition as part of the South Kensington. Museum in eighteen eighty five science collections were renamed the Science Museum and in Eighteen. Ninety three a separate director was appointed. The art collections. Were renamed the art museum which eventually became the Victorian Albert Museum. Victorian Albert is an extension as part of the science is museum at one point interesting. The Science Museum now holds a collection of over three hundred thousand items including such famous items as Stevenson's rocket puffing billy which is the the oldest surviving steam locomotive the first jet engine the Apollo ten command module a reconstruction of Rosalyn fucking Franklin's model of DNA and the Wikipedia Pedia Page said Francis Crick and James Watson's model of DNA. And I scratched it out out and I wrote an all caps. Rosalind Franklin and you can check out what are episode Rosalyn effing Franklin and Yeah Structure of DNA. It's very good. Some of the earliest remaining steam engines including an example of a new common stain steam. Engine the world's it's the first steam engine a working example of Charles badges difference. Engine the first prototype of the ten thousand year clock of the long. Now I do not. I don't know what that is. And I you know what I purposely didn't because the clock of the long now is so that's that's tight and documentation of the first typewriter. It also contains hundreds of interactive exhibits and the museum houses. Some of the many objects collected by Henry welcome around a medical theme. The fourth floor exhibit is called the glimpses of medical history three with reconstructions and Dioramas of the history of practice medicine and the Fifth Floor Gallery is called science and the art of medicine with exhibits of medical instruments and practices from the ancient days and for many countries countries. The collection has a whole strong in clinical medicine biosciences in public health. So next we have who boy these sedate. This lonely story the city of Science and industry abbreviated. CSI or simply CSI. It is the biggest science museum. You're a big. I know my mouth said it okay. I'll try again. I'll try again. Is the biggest Science Museum in Europe. It is located in Parc de la Villette in Paris France and is one of the three dozen French cultural centers of Science Technology and industry. It is also known as the CC. Sti It promotes science and science culture. About five million people. visit the CD. CPA attractions include planetarium a submarine the Argo not and image. I'm ex theater known as LA yoed and special areas for children and teenagers. The seat date is classified as a public establishment of an industrial and commercial character actor and establishment specialising the fostering of scientific and technical culture created on the initiative of President Xi Scout. Thong the goal of the today is to spread scientific and technical knowledge among the public particularly for youth and to promote public interest in science research and industry. The most notable feature of the bioclimatic nick facade featuring the park are the three greenhouse spaces each thirty two meters one hundred four feet high thirty two meters wide and eight eight meters twenty six feet deep the facades of lists Seir were the first structural glass walls to be constructed without framing or support fins. Yes very very cool. We'll get away from Paris. Shanghai Science and Technology Museum is a large museum in Pudong. Showing it is one of China's most visited museums with three point. Five million visitors on average annually and the museum was planned for a key project for popularizing science in the Yangtze Delta region. It opened after an extensive building project in December of two thousand one. So it's relatively recent museum Jim. At the time of the opening it was the first science and Technology Museum authenticated to meet ISO nine thousand fourteen thousand quality and environmental standards. Say No more. It's very green between its opening in two thousand ten. It attracted nineteen point. Five million visitors of the museum is dedicated to the popularization of science science. With an intended theme of the harmony of nature. Mankind and technology it has fourteen main permanent exhibitions and four science theme cinemas. The exhibitions include spectrum of life and natural exhibit which imitates the scenery of the Yunan province and displays the diversity of its creatures children's Rainbow Land Light of wisdom's Children's Ramo. AIMO late of wisdom I think is about like the history of science in China World of robots where you can see all sorts of cool robots and spiders fighters the Chinese ancient science and Technology Gallery showcases ancient Chinese inventions and works the explorer's gallery features Chinese and foreign explorers and the academicians gallery features contemporary scientists. From China particularly Shanghai there was previously also an audiovisual discovery paradise a small scale Hydro Electric Electric Power Station. A seven hundred square meters seventy five hundred square foot rainforest an aviary aquarium an earthquake center including a motive platform with video allowing visitors to experience. Simulated tremors simpering tense The exhibitions were intended to represent cutting edge scientific development using innovative and and unique exhibition methods. But many have not been updated since their installation. Apparently this is common in China. Where museums often subcontract all their exhibits designed to private firms without any long-term arrangement for updates? Yeah so next is the Deutsches museum or the German Museum officially Deutsches Museum von mice divert and did not to listen shaft undetected nick. Your Dutch is so much better than your friend I know. Isn't it amazing. I don't know what it is It's also known as the German Museum of masterpieces of Science and technology in Munich. Germany is the world's largest museum of Science and technology with about twenty eight thousand exhibited objects fifty fields of science and technology. I could not find how many objects they have. In their collection it receives about one point five million visitors per year. The Museum was founded on June Twenty Eighth Nineteen Ninety three at a meeting of the Association of German engineers as an initiative of Oscar von Miller a German engineer. It is the largest museum in Munich and for a period of time. The museum was used host pop and rock concerts including the WHO Jimi Hendrix and Elton. John This is interesting the main site of the Deutsches Museum. AM is a small island in the Isar River which had been used for rafting woods. Since the Middle Ages. The Island did not have any buildings before seventeen. Seventy two because it was regularly flooded prior to the building. Ending of the Zillow. Vince Stein. Spiker which is the Shiva Stein Dam in nineteen. Oh three the city council announced that they would donate the island for the newly built deutsches museum and and the island formerly known as Colin subtle which is coal island was then renamed museums sincil which is museum island before during World War Two. The museum was put on a shoestring budget budget by the Nazi party and many exhibits were allowed to get out of date with a few exceptions such as the new automobile room to cut dedicated on May seventh nineteen thirty seven. Hitler really loved his car. SARS by the end of nineteen forty four. The museum was badly damaged by air bombings with eighty percent of the buildings and twenty percent of the exhibits sibits damaged or destroyed as allied troops marched into Munich in April nineteen forty-five museum director. Carl Basler barely managed to keep the last Standing Bridge to museum island island from being blown up by retreating German troops so following the war. The museum had to be closed for repairs and temporary tenants. Such as the College of Technology in the post office used museum spaces their own. Buildings were being reconstructed. The museum is also home to the Central Committee of the liberated Jews representing Jewish displaced persons in the American zone of Germany after the war in addition to the main site on the museum since the museum has two branches in or near Munich and one in Bonn and that is a non-comprehensive but I thought interesting yes some highlights highlights of international science and Technology museums. He Lauren. Oh you're so welcome I think another highlight. Yeah the Field Museum in Awe. Yeah the field museum and we will be. Oh we're going there. I didn't want to do another Chicago. Chicago's museum because I didn't want anyone to think that we were we're learning. We're learning they'd be in Chicago for Geek Bowl Ya'll yeah. I'll do the field museum when I do. History museums is to. There's a lot of like laugh. Yeah sure so. Mike Quiz today is called. Did you hear me. I said Zoos museums a quiz on animals. You would see at the zoo questionable one. There are two geographically distinct types of elephants that are recognized. Can you name them both question number two. You won't see this programming language at the zoo at least not in a cage but the real story is that it was named for a bunch of silly people not an animal. What programming language am I talking about questionable? Three name this zoo animal animal these precious babies have the thickest for of any mammal in the animal kingdom they float together by wrapping themselves and each other and seaweed and that's called rafts and a group of them is called a romp question number four true or false grizzly polar bear hybrids exist in the wild and they're air called grolier.

Science Museum Deutsches museum Field Museum Shanghai Science and Technolog German Museum of masterpieces India Sri Lanka largest museum of Science China Technology Museum art museum Munich director Victorian Albert Museum Science Technology Chicago J. P. Morgan Harry Frank Guggenheim Hall of Morgan Memorial Hall Extra Solar Nanno
"science museum" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"science museum" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"They purposely fire. Fire it so that there is some crazy all right things that will harm your objects. No matter what you do one is wheeler one is humidity committee to is light the ideal setting for most storage environments is seventy degrees Fahrenheit or twenty one degrees Celsius give or take one or two degrees and fifty fifty percent humidity give or take five percent however this various with your type of collection paper likes it. Colder than that and textiles prefer a slightly more humid home and ceramics and stone owner comfy. Basically anywhere you go magnetic media would prefer to be very cold very cold. Icy cold humidity is more important than temperature. If your temperature fluctuates but your humidity remains relatively stable than you're pretty good. You're not great but it's if that's the baseline then you're pretty good however that doesn't happen happen naturally. It is cold and dry in the winter. It is hot and humid in the summer especially on the east coast of the US. So self contained h fax systems are essential in your space. This high humidity promotes mold. Growth creates expansion damage to hygroscopic materials. which is just materials that absorb and release water? As the humidity fluctuates actuates that's like would paper et Cetera And corrosion of metals as well to name a few low humidity causes desiccation drying cracking and embroilment especially in paper and textiles. So keep an eye on your humidity if you have grandma's wedding dress which don't worry everybody has grandma's wedding dress Keep keep it. Don't keep it in your attic. Keep it in your own spaces. Keep it in the spaces that you live in because you like to keep it at a regular temperature and a decent humidity so it will hold up better if you keep in your spaces instead of putting it in the basement or the attic. Which tends to fluctuate more so so? Let's get into some science museums. Yes let's go stateside to.

US
Terminology and Science Museums

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

10:10 min | 1 year ago

Terminology and Science Museums

"So we can have a dialogue again. This is exciting. I love talking about museums with my museum friends and I hope you guys like it too but first first of all I wanted to. I neglected to mention something in my last episode with regards to conservators and this is very important for trivia purposes. One of the best solvents for gently cleaning the surface of paintings is human saliva and that sounds gross in weird but in fact any conservative that you talk it was like Oh yeah absolutely spit on that well not spit on it. I actually I got a chance to do that at work. The other you've got to spit on I got to spend on some painting raining so We were cleaning some Oil on board me and my coworker Carol. Hi Carol she doesn't listen to this podcast and She gave me a bunch of thin sticks and a bunch of loose cotton and she taught me to grab a piece of cotton and roll it up and stick it in my cheek and let it sit there and then pull it out. Roll it around the stick and then gently like buff. The surface of the vichy was hazing. You she he did the same thing. We're both both like cotton or cheeks like like the Godfather and cleaning the surface of paintings and it is this is an excellent solvent because it has a gentle and like I'm enzyme that breaks down the surface of dirt but doesn't harm The the image the image or the varnish. That's the word I'm looking for and this is why people don't want you to get up close and personal with the paintings museums because it's covered and spit. They're covered in human spirit. You guys just thinking they don't want you to spend on at least don't spit on them because it will break it down eventually eventually. Also zoos museums yes. One hundred percent hundred percent user museums. They have a collection process. They collect animals and they have a loan process. They loan animals to other museums for certain amount of time. There's paperwork involved. They have the accession process. It's more gruesome than a normal museum process shirts. They D- Accession. There's paperwork involved when an animal shuffles off this mortal coil. So I wanted to give a shout out to you my cousin the zoo not my my work cousin the chiefs that your cousin is zoo. Steve's yes yeah Steve's brothers the Internet my cousin Xue facts okay we we. We have a friend in listener yes Jane Liz Zookeeper Oh keeper. Yes Hello James. Hello James and we decided we're just going to go to the zoo with a microphone and having talked to us. I think it's a good idea and I think I think he would be down for it. He's been like really. I mean I feel terrible because we have been in touch with him and we just have not gotten a chance to like hook up and actually do an episode. But he's a great guy he he has very interesting work. He's funny interesting and we're definitely going to do an episode soon. And that's I think we definitely should go to the zoo do like real. NPR Shit Man Mandalay Bay. She goes to the zoo. I love that okay. That's it misinformation goes to the zoo. Get Ready James. We're coming for you all right museum terminology. Time time okay. All of these terms are for my award. Winning powerpoint presentation entitled Life Is Short and then you die physical deterioration and how to prevent it. It is not award-winning. It's just one of my powerpoint from class but okay I term inherent vice. which was my team? Name for Trivia and Grad School and. Yes we want a lot Inherent Vice is the tendency and physical objects to deteriorate because of the fundamental instability of the components of which they are made as opposed to deterioration caused us by external forces. What does that mean it? Basically means that the makeup of the object is slowly destroying it from the inside. And there's nothing you can do about it. A good example of this as newspapers the process by which the paper is made is very acidic which causes the paper to yellow and crumble eventually which is not reversible by any conservation mean all objects have some kind of inherent vice as a result of the baseline law of entropy of course but we're not going to get really philosophical about this because that's just looking into an abyss is that we just don't have time for today. My students in my injured archives course get a whole week of me just telling them how terrible everything the thing is. Light is bad. Water is bad. Air As bad heat is bad touching things as bad like just. Don't yeah just don't that's the that's basically. Yeah this is your stuff is going to die. Yup Life is short and then you die. That's why I called that. My students laugh but it's true. The next term is foxing. Your must be familiar. smiliar with this. It is an age related process of deterioration that causes spots and Browning on old paper documents. The name may derive from the Fox like Reddish Brown color of the stains or the arrest. Chemical Ferric Oxide which may be involved paper so affected is said to be Fox. I see this a lot with like bookbinding Oh yeah absolutely foxing also occurs biological study skins or specimens as an effective chemical reactions or mold on Melanin. The causes of foxing aren't super stood. It might be mold or the oxidation of metals. Like iron or copper in the pulp or rag from which the paper is made but no one is entirely sure it is reversible but it is kind even intensive process so a lot of times if the paper is already unstable foxing. Isn't that big of a deal and so a lot of conservatives we'll just leave it mhm unless it's like super bad and you can't actually read the paper yeah The next word is crippling Crippling the distinctive network of fine cracks in glass which is visible to the naked eye It's one of the symptoms of Glass Disease Aka sick class or glass s. l. nece nicer bones. Yup Bird bones. Glass disease is caused by an inherent instability the chemical composition of the original glass formula It is irreversible double but able to be slowed down by tight climate control which we will talk about in a moment and and Lauren did a really great episode heart glass. Yes I did an episode episode twenty one year. So we're back there in the catalog early enough first year and also if you like glass may I plug the series blown away on Netflix. which there's like competition show about glassblowing very fascinating so yeah glasses? Amazing like if you're a local New York state. I highly recommend the Corning Museum of glass which talks about the science the history the art and like another thing of glass. It's just all about glass and it's a big beautiful museum that got a great a gift shop off their gift shops fantastic and they do hot glass shows where they actually like make glass in front of you and talking about the process and it's really cool So highly recommend and go to the Corning Museum of Glass. The next term is called cobbling cobbling is a plea distortion of paper parchment or textile. It appears as has wrinkles puckers or ripples often in parallel ridges without creases liked buckling but appears in waves. So cobbling just kind of looks looks like like a rumpled sheet basically like on your bed also just as an FYI words like weeping oozing desiccation or drying out offc gassing the evaporation potentially dangerous chemicals into the air or fry -able which is easily broken apart or flaking tends to be words used in other fields as well but all have to do with pound object is damaged or breaking down the just going back The like this cock owing paper happens because Paper if it absorbs water and then when the water out so this is why you don't want your humidity and your temperature. Allocate Awhile Talk Yeah. That's that's a big thing that'll happen that you can like clearly visible that Yudo. Something's wrong paper starts doing yeah. It's a very obvious symptom Kim of that also a couple of words that are not necessarily damage But definitely our weaknesses in the object. So so this term correct floor. Crack Laura's a fine pattern of dense cracking formed on the surface of materials usually oil paintings. It can be a result of drying aging aging intentional patterning or a combination of all three and the term is most often used to refer to temper Oil paintings but it can also develop old ivory carvings painted miniatures on ivory backing. Recently analysis. Chrysler has been proposed as a way to authenticate art basically. It's just the way that paint is layered in the process of actually painting getting the piece of artwork sometimes certain layers Dry faster than others or there is an off gassing process during the drying process and it damages the surface level and so it actually shrinks or expands spending and causes these fine cracks Which is interesting Crack floor in Pottery is called crazing in that at similar in that it's fine. Cracks appear on the surface of the material most often the glaze layer of pottery ceramics and beautiful it is beautiful and especially like both cracker crazing. One could argue is desirable desirable in certain cases. Like when you see Chrysler and a painting you know it's old it's an antique Lens Air of like authenticity to it. crazing and pottery is seen as like a textural benefits and it does make the peace weaker to a certain extent. You're not supposed to like DOC put. You're not supposed to wash or soak pieces of pottery. That have crazing on them. Because that means that there's a weakness in the water can get into the poorest part of the pottery but it is very beautiful in some potters and artists. Like make sure that it is purposeful like they purposely fire. Fire it so that there is some crazy

Corning Museum Of Glass James Carol Chrysler Steve Chiefs Jane Liz Zookeeper Yudo Mandalay Bay Grad School NPR FOX Browning XUE Lauren New York Netflix. KIM Laura
"science museum" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"science museum" Discussed on The Leader

"Hi I'm David Moslen. Both the Tories and Labour have been talking about immigration and our associate editor has been left a bit confused. The Labor Party says it. Let's lots of people in but underneath maybe. CBS got plan not to the. Tory said they wouldn't let lots of people in but underneath they've got a plan to do say Julian Glover on the impossible things that country was promised before breakfast it also the RMT's called a twenty four hour strike on the Victoria Line by this newspaper. Things to unions reasons US beauty hideous and there's two pieces sit side by side and one is a very hard high-backed wooden chair. Basically people were sat in their head was pulled back over the top and they were restrained. While people put the Tay correspondent Robert Decks visit the new exhibition exploring five hundred years of medical history. The taken from the Evening Standard's editorial column. This is the leader of an old thing. Become the newspaper or head to standard dot co UK slash comment in a moment. Julian Glover examined the immigration stances of the Tories and Labour the Conservatives have dumped to these amaze he's one hundred thousand goal for net immigration. The party says not setting some arbitrary target. What they will do is bring overall immigration down but give skilled workers his preference under a points based system at expert recommendations are editorial column has spotted problem? It's a classic example. Live trying to have one's cake and eat. It presumably cooked by police chef in Italian cafe and served by a waitress from Romania. The reality is that in a world connect economies and competition for skills. We need immigration. We Congratulate Pretty Patel for admitting much by dropping the harmful and unsustainable oh cap of one hundred thousand migrants a year. It's something this paper has long and painful Julian Glover. We've said in the leader the Home Zachary's promised to impossible things before breakfast water those she's probably to cut immigration while letting people into person at all jobson support our economy and be part of a global world that we are so if you don't like immigration you hear the first bit if you do maybe here the second truth is neither side is completely telling the truth on immigration Labor's also all over the place. It's one of those days when parties go on the radio and scrapping fall out and voters probably just roll their eyes and think my goodness. How many more days as are there in this election is immigration that high up in this election? It's possibly high up. Because it's often said to be one of the the things that drove brexit and is often said to be one of the things that gives reason for Brexit. We can to coin a phrase take back control of our borders control free movement from the European Union and then there's a great cliche every politician rolls out and we headed Julie Today an Australian style point system it sounds. It's tough and exciting well. I'm half Australia. Australia has a higher level of migration than we do because he's trailing style points this to get lots of points to people who come to Australia do jobs back a growing economy said just because you've got control doesn't mean you're cutting numbers two different things. Something leader says today is that people are going to want to move burden and do so in large numbers and it calls for politicians to just be honest about that and about what Britain can do. So we congratulate the government in the leader. They might be surprised to hear it. We congratulate them for getting rid of the completely ridiculous cap on numbers that the government had previously promised to stick with Theresa may became very defensive of long after every realized it was nonsense and couldn't be mad only just set something up to fail and had lots perverse consequences like the way students were treated. which held back the global competitiveness our universities and start people who've done well at university trying to get jobs to work in Britain which you might think the point of having higher higher education in the first place so good use the government? The stop pretending they've got number nowadays pretending a really vague thing which is overall like to control migration to the UK. Well overall isn't really a test of anything. It's just a vague word. And how is Labor. Got It self tied in. These particular immigration knots that it seems to call it self tided over its policies. Well hasn't got a policy at the moment. As we were told this morning we have to wait for the manifesto and apparently will learn everything from that when it comes. The Labor Party conference very much in favor of movement as liberal stranded Labor or at least a sort of. Let's let's get rid of nasty rules and restrictions on migration a kind horrible right wing sort of thing so that Labor wants to be open and talk about free movement to those votes at the Party conference which went that way. Another bit of Labor thinks migrants coming in hit undercut the workers who live here already undercutting wages doing their jobs. You might say they're actually doing jobs that need to be done because we have really high high levels of employment and low levels of unemployment but nonetheless that pretty anti migration and lend mcklusky. Who's that person who really runs the neighbor party? Top Union boss Union bosses are always called Union. Bosman top union boss. Len mccluskey said hang on. Don't listen to the Party conference wait till you see the manifesto at that slighter menace. You always get get with the suggestion that will actually be tougher controls so again. The Labor Party says it. Let's lots of people in but underneath. Maybe it's GonNa plan not to the Tory. Said they wouldn't let had lots of people in but underneath they've got a plan to do so next in a twenty four hour strike. We'll hit one of London's busiest to blinds this month. Why we think the union behind it is being childish.

Labor Party Julian Glover Labor Australia UK Union Union boss Union European Union brexit associate editor Evening Standard Tory CBS David Moslen Britain US Pretty Patel Victoria Line Len mccluskey Robert Decks
"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

15:17 min | 1 year ago

"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

"Now did you know that my father was a general communications headquarters all those smart machines. Let's your name Mussa off the record is well my name's Dr Elizabeth Britain and I am a curator of Technology Science Museum on the Coach Exhibition About Alan Turing in two thousand twelve and so that we would be able to put them on display and also making their staff available so we've been working mm to let their objects be seen by the public yes anything that couldn't be put on public display they weren't over thirty objects on display have not been on public display before we worked with other lenders ming-turn Oakland Exhibition no she did not. I think she was busy that evening. I can imagine display our historic section where we're standing now deals with different to stark episodes. Arctic approach so in the middle of the historic section we have what is essentially a timeline we're in the mid nineteenth century to keep communication secure as the information was being sent from pacified until two thousand thirteen whizzing we have three nick machines it was still being used for commercial traffic rather than German military traffic we have a naval example from nine which was an enigma machine basically reverse engineered by Polish mathematicians. Aw so did any of those machines shivers I would definitely say holding if time until it was a genuinely heart-stopping moments of just sheer joy and excitement and and just these really incredible stories behind these objects comes through for our visitors apart from Alan bloody good at crosswords or poetry or classics who turned up yet are some women who worked at Bletchley Park we have our rather wonderful photograph of May Specie who is increase the diversity of the staff G. H. Q. On we also have some of the objects they use location to join Q.. I wonder if they really did that so legend has it so one CO system is not only the world's first electronic cipher machine one in their store on we are the first museum to put it on display and as far as we know it's the only commanders in the field the first step of revealing the communications of others as replaced so this is the machine that kept Britain's ultra traffic competely secure yes so we're standing in front of a display of secure telephones from the are two notable differences firstly it doesn't have a dial on on secondly has second war and afterwards it wasn't particularly secure at the beginning of the war we have a rather impressive actually very easy to on inverse at the bottom of the case we also have a briefcase so john she used during the Falklands war including to call up the Ministry of Defence I prime minister if I look over there I can see to KGB officers in disguise for our events procam so I have no doubt that a large number of G H Q staff it'll just a more general interest in codes ciphers communications how we keep our communication presumably a little Russian how something almost so the doormat reads welcome with Rice clip. It's considered a quite pedestrian north London suburb American communists who were spying behalf of Soviet Russia in the UK in the late nineteen fifties and a lot of the objects that we have on display here were either used to conceal communicated to Russia and they also had a powerful radio set that they communicate send and making a nine hundred sixty s by coincidences just out has been a book a lot of nuclear material to Moscow and got away with it well they still and hence the name Portland spiring and they are pretty sure that they were sending or the impact of hot on the or or indeed the Cold War How clever new Manchester's at Ryan yes so it will be opened in London until the twenty third February interest. What are they come to look at say to you about this well I think people some basic aspects to codes and ciphers but also the sort of personality traits needed types of teamwork and persistence pattern recognition so we have puzzles designed fear I wouldn't be very good at the solution anyway so we're standing next to of machines that look a little bit like cash registers this is an artwork called Murmur Studies and words that are representative of emotional content like r. e. and then it prints out and I think a lot of us think about the electronic content and the way that we communicate today we probably think about communications we can't physically manifest digital content that we put into the world and hopefully their information people just like this sort of tactile nature of the fact that they can pull out a piece of paper and I think finally which we finished oh there's so much it's beautiful the Weirdest Mirror you've never seen or maybe some kind of our sh- work pattern that you're commitment they can't just throw it in the schools your I would do because people code access see what they're put it in resin than mounted in the circle of life so it's really really quite beautiful but it also represents we wanted this to represent the Fox stash although this exhibition shares more on chair and we did want to acknowledge that this exhibition can't be completion to so this rather ed thanks very much I was with Dr Elizabeth the new book by Professor Frank Close of Oxford about that sensational spy doc and their online from Arin frank close on guy dis chiefs evolving species after that asteroid wiped out the rest of the dinosaurs.

What is adversarial AI and why does it matter?

All Things Considered

04:18 min | 1 year ago

What is adversarial AI and why does it matter?

"In fact there's a whole field of study known as adversarial a I actually aims to make artificial intelligence a little smarter as part of an N. P. our special series on the technologies that watch us dina dina temple Raszyn has more. artificial intelligence is all about showing the machine millions of examples so we can learn to recognize things in the real world and there's a pretty famous experiment about how easily this can go wrong it was conducted by a team of researchers led by UC Berkeley professor don sol let me start playing the video she and her colleagues made a video that showed how the full daylight and in this case for the system well it was driving a car the video is less than a minute long and it doesn't have any sound but it rocked the A. I. community so in the media at UC two frames side by side thank split screen all you need to know now is that each split screen is subtitled so you can see how the A. I. and specifically a subset of a I called image classification is making decisions inside the autonomous car you see the prediction given by the image classification system to try to predict what the traffic sign as so it's sort of like the car starting to think I'm a sign is coming I'm gonna have to make a decision right so song inner team had the A. I. system read to stop sign one was a perfectly normal stops the other was manipulated song had put one sticker below the S. and another above the in stop and is the car gets closer to it the subtitles are describing the A. eyes decision making process it reads the regular stops on just fine installing the card prepared to stop but the one with the stickers it thinks the sign read speed limit forty five miles an hour which would allow the car if this wasn't an experiment to blow right through the intersection to carefully place stickers was all it took to make a self driving car ran a stop sign so you were expecting it to mis read the sign and then it didn't you're happy about it is surprising so given how well it worked it works so well the people who were developing driverless cars tap the brakes. now to be fair songs team didn't just randomly throw some stickers onto a sign they knew exactly how the a size image classification system worked they knew which pixels of the sun to manipulate to fort which got the attention of people over DARPA the defense advanced research projects agency and understand why the military's top research arm was so concerned I went to door by headquarters to meet with have a sequel for us in Haiti now have thank you for making this she's the director of something called the guard project guard stands for guaranteeing a I'd robustness against deception and just like it sounds it's looking for ways to make artificial intelligence more hack proof the way a I makes decisions is a bit of a black box but see common says if you understand what the system is chosen to focus on you can fool it and if your door but you're less worried about a stop sign then say putting a sticker on the tank and because that sticker with his particular kind of we think that this time his acting ambulance and he needed to be opened the gates to let the ambulance corps and the reason to study all of this isn't to scare us about ARI old though it does that too researchers want to understand the limits of it so they can fix it kind of like gold fashion hackers who used to call up software companies let them know about flaws in their coding so they could send patches don songs is the bottom line is machine learning an AI aren't as powerful as people think they are we do really needs Neil and more break throughs before we can really get there so would you ride in a driverless car that's the day. I mean you. how you doing having a test drive. and by the way dawn song special stop sign with the stickers isn't fooling driverless cars anymore it's now hanging in the science museum in London. of an exhibit about our driverless future. dina temple Reston NPR news

NPR Reston London.
London, Doug Miller And Fifty Years discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

London, Doug Miller And Fifty Years discussed on BBC World Service

"We're now in the science museum in London is holding a series of special events to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo missions and with me is the museum space curator Doug Miller can you describe what we have here well we're standing next to a real spaceship it's been around the moon is the Apollo ten commercial is the only part of that mission which came back to earth with three astronauts inside fifty years ago this was the dress rehearsal mission from hello left because Apollo eleven when that little bit further and landed on the moon wow

London Doug Miller Fifty Years
 Brazil's Bolsonaro cancels New York trip amid backlash

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Brazil's Bolsonaro cancels New York trip amid backlash

"The Brazilian president Jaya Bolsonaro has canceled a planned trip to the United States following protests from environmental and gay rights organizations. Mr. Bolsonaro was due to attend a ceremony in his honor in New York Leonardo Russia reports in a statement the Brazilian government regretted the decision and said that spouses and organizers of the annual event had come under huge pressure from the mayor of New York, Bill the Blasio and several groups miss of the Blasio accused mister Vosa model of making racist. Misogynist and homophobic remarks and campaigned openly against his presence in the City New York's science museum, which was originally due to host the event announced last month. It was

New York Jaya Bolsonaro Brazilian Government Leonardo Russia Blasio United States Science Museum President Trump Mister Vosa
Downtown St. Paul utility cutting off coal

Climate Cast

06:36 min | 2 years ago

Downtown St. Paul utility cutting off coal

"District energy and Saint Paul stopped burning coal last month. Why well it is time and that time is being set by environmental factors and economic factors two biggest things running. Are you tilde business? We are nonprofit. So we're mission driven. So the environmental does take take a lead for us. And we have been reducing coal over the last sixteen years were down fifty seven percent on our carbon since two thousand three when we integrated the biomass and combined heat and power. And we know it's time to start looking at more carbon-free carbon reduced technologies for the system. So this coal piece. How much of an impact does removing coal from your energy portfolio have on greenhouse gas emissions at district energy. So the covert. Are not quite as impressive in this last year. But that's because we've been slowly reducing over the years. So from our last heating season, it'd be about a sixteen percent reduction, but sixteen percent is another impact carbon. We are happy to make what's replacing that energy in the mix. So 'bout fifty percent of our heating mix is already coming from that renewable energy from the biomass and combined heat and power. So it will be increasing the gas for the time being but looking at the system as a whole efficiency is also really played a part the more efficient. We get on the production side and our customers have been doing a fantastic job of reducing their peak loads and overall operating loads. So it's not even just about replacement is that we don't need as much as we used to tell us about you mentioned biomass. I see that you're burning waste wood for energy is that efficient, and what are the greenhouse gas and particularly emissions there. From an efficiency standpoint. You look at still gonna high efficiency combustion. We co fire it would natural gas. That increases the. Efficiency of the combustion factors. So in that boiler. There's about ninety percent would about ten percent gas or really intentional about trying to keep our biomass collection really close to our home plant because we don't want to be wasting our energy on transportation either. So that's a big part of things too. And when you look at the carbon missions EPA has continued to codify, especially waste would as a carbon neutral fuel. So it's really important when we're thinking about the difference between grown for purpose. And when we're helping the region solve something like an emerald ash Borer problem where it's got to go somewhere and see if we can turn it into renewable energy. It's looking at kind of efficiency across systems. Let's talk about what waste what is. What is it? What are you burning? Well, the when it gets to the plant, it's wood chips. So doesn't look all that different than landscape mulch that most people are used to seeing stores or in their garden. I, but when it comes to the wood yard, it's all shapes and sizes, it's logs its branches you go out and do a buckthorn bust or you go. Out to the Saint Paul drop sites. So it's really Woody sticks branches not as much leaves other things like that. You're not getting a lot of dense energy from that but trimmings land clearing for special projects things that are going to be producing something that doesn't have any place else to go. And where does it come from is it from, you know, homeowners and cities or whereas that waste would coming from well all of the above. So we work with tree trimming companies, we work with many, municipalities and counties so about one hundred mile radius. You have municipal contracts county contracts, if there's a storm we've gone out to help communities clean up after storms, and we help chip and bring that back to the plant what about customer demand for lower greenhouse gas emissions. Are you seeing that from your customers? And if so how did they communicate that? Absolutely. I'm glad to say that we're part of an organization called the sustainable growth coalition. It's about thirty fairly high profile businesses. That are oppa. Rating in Minnesota and are committed to lowering greenhouse gas emissions impact circular economy. So really great collaborative. And some of our customers are part of that including Ecolab and state of Minnesota and met council. So you already have this really high profile commitment to doing better than the state's goals for greenhouse gas, and even beyond that, we've got many who are getting more involved in lead certification or reporting on carbon who wanna start tracking water. So I've been with the company for ten years, and I've never seen the demand. Like, we have right now for more renewable solutions high efficiency solutions in vacation to it's really an exciting time. I read district energy expects to announce its new sustainability platform and greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals by this July. What can we look for their? So now that we have this big milestone with coal. It's not okay to just sit back and rest on what we're doing. So we wanted to take a look. Look at several factors. So we're looking at water carbon efficiency of the system as a whole and then renewable integration. And so we are going to we've been doing a lot of data analysis to really get a good hold of where we are. And look at the technologies to see where we can be. So I think we'll see some really short term goals probably related mostly to efficiency because that's the stuff that you can get to first and most economically, and then we'll start to look at more technology integration. And that's where partnerships with the science museum clean energy economy. Minnesota and others. The the emerging technology into the marketplace is really giving us a mic citing opportunities. So I think we'll expect to be at least on par with some of our other utility partners out in the greenhouse gas emission goals, but we hope to do some exciting things within that platform to. Let's talk about some of those partnerships big buildings in Saint Paul you've been working with on energy solutions in greenhouse gas. Emissions. You mentioned the. Science museum. Tell us what's going on there. Well, the science museum led by their facility staff and Pat Hamilton and others have been focused on being an example for others. So a whole way across the the museums portfolio they've really been focused on using as little as possible. Again, what we want to see from her customers. First and foremost is on a fishy. So they have also been looking at technologies that allow them to be less dependent on fossil fuels, which includes doing heat recovery chiller. So they're able to capture that we start to do some heating in the building. It's not all that different. When we look at the scale ability of heat pumps in the sector. I think that's going to be a big solution. As we look at what we call fourth generation district energy systems where you're going to look at more solutions at a customer building like that paired with a backup community energy system like ours.

Science Museum Saint Paul Minnesota EPA Ecolab Emerald Ash Borer Pat Hamilton Sixteen Percent
The Strange Story of Hazel the Outlaw Mummy

Your Brain on Facts

04:20 min | 2 years ago

The Strange Story of Hazel the Outlaw Mummy

"To ensure that mccurdy's rambling days for over. Mccready is hardly the only outlaw turned famous mummy. Take the case of one Hazel Farris, born in Kentucky in eighteen eighty or fisa child and later married to a man with whom she drank heavily and fought loudly. Her history has morphed into folklore, but by all accounts on August. Sixth nineteen o five the couple had an argument over Ferris's desire to buy a new hat. If you've been in a relationship for any length of time, you know, that wasn't really what they were fighting about. The two came to blows and fairus ended up shooting. Her husband who died on the living room floor. Neighbors heard the gunshots. Summoned police the situation did not improve upon their arrival because fairus shot and killed them to. A passing deputy sheriff heard the commotion gained entry to the house and tried to restrain Farris during the scuffle. The deputy tripped on fairus his husband's body accidentally firing his gun and shooting off one of her fingers. There is eventually broke free and fatally shot the deputy as well. So she shot the sheriff, and she did shoot the deputy. With five murders under her belt at five hundred dollar reward for her capture, which I couldn't put into modern figures because the inflation calculators don't go back that far serious fled to Bessemer Alabama to try to begin a new life. One version of her story has her posing as schoolmarm another as her working as a prostitute. But both agree that she drank excessively. She took up with a new man, and when they became engaged fairus confided in him who she really was he immediately gave her up to police on December. Twentieth. Nineteen oh six fairly certain. She wouldn't emerge victorious from a second. Shootout. He sulfurous committed suicide by drinking some combination of whiskey fuel, oil, and arsenic. Ferris's body was taken to Adams vermillion furniture, which also sold caskets and as such functioned as the local funeral parlor. No one came forward to claim her body, which was strangely mummifying rather than decomposing. There is speculation that it's because of the chemicals fairus drink. But I don't put a great deal of stock by that. Regardless of the reason, the corpse had long jetty and certain renown Adams began charging curious visitors ten cents to see the notorious outlaw. After a time fairus his body. Hit the road when Adams loaned the corpse to various exhibitors, including his brother and Tuscaloosa palace, wonders sideshow operator, captain Harvey leabeau's, well and Seabrook's who featured the well preserved remains in his traveling show for forty years when he died Brooks left Hazel to a nephew on the condition that any money raised from displaying her be donated to charity as the story goes Brooks's, nephew, displayed Ferris's mummy to raise money to build churches in Tennessee, just let that paradigm sinking the nephew. Eventually brought her back to Bessemer where she became an infamous attraction at the newly formed hall of history. The hall of history also had exhibits. More typical of modern history museum such as the door to Martin Luther King junior's jail cell and Adolf Hitler's telephone. And it's housed in a restored railroad terminal. Just like the science museum here in my hometown. After a long run at the hall of history. Theorist became the subject of a National Geographic documentary, which is we're reality reasserts itself over folkore. An autopsy performed the documentary indicated the mummified woman had died of pneumonia not poisoning, but one of her fingers had indeed been shot off sometime well before her death. The state of the body tissue was consistent with having been immersed in arsenic. It's entirely possible that the manner of fairus is Steph

Hazel Farris Ferris Hall Of History Fairus Mccready Adams Mccurdy Bessemer Alabama Kentucky Steph Adams Vermillion Seabrook Pneumonia Martin Luther King Bessemer Adolf Hitler Brooks Tennessee Captain Harvey Leabeau
Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

BrainStuff

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff, Lauren Vogel. Bam here. It's amazing. What you can find. If you shine a flashlight into your backyard trees, a biologist in Wisconsin have made a rather startling discovery that way in part startling because it apparently hadn't been recorded until now three different species of flying. Squirrels specifically southern northern and Humboldt flying squirrel, which are found across North America and into Central America sport light Brown for that when spotlighted with ultra-violet illumination lights up a hot bubblegum pink the phenomenon occurs on both the top and bottom services of the flying. Squirrels though, it's the underside of a flying. Squirrels carriage, including the flaps of skin that spread out when the squirrel glides from tree to tree really glows Jonathan Martin a biologist at Northland college in Ashland. Wisconsin made the discovery in the forest one evening just by shining a UV flashlight into the tree canopy he was looking for lichens, which are certain type. Of frogs and flora that light up in UV light. That's when he heard the church of a southern flying, squirrel as the squirrel glided by he shined the flashlight on it. And he saw a flash of fuchsia. Martin and his colleagues soon found themselves examining the skins of flying. Squirrels at the science museum of Minnesota. And the field museum in Chicago. They took photos of the skins under visible, light and ultra violet light all but one specimen of the gliders glowed pink that has been variously compared to bubble gum dayglo and lycra from the nineteen eighty s there is also the study republished in the January twenty third twenty nineteen issue of the journal of Malecki, the pink is caused the researchers say by the furs fluorescence, which is what happens when light is absorbed in one wavelength and emitted in another you may remember an episode. We did about how scorpions fluorescent bright green and ultraviolet light some birds also have this trait some fish too few mammals do though flying. Squirrels are nocturnal and are most active at dusk and dawn, no other squirrels in North America are known to possess this ability to floor s including tree squirrels like the eastern gray though, there are over. Two hundred and fifty squirrel species around the world and to be fair. The researchers have not yet tested other species for the next question is what purpose could this fluorescent serve. Humans can't see ultraviolet wavelengths except under special lighting, but other animals can one theory suggests the pink is used to confuse als, which as it turns out also have undersides that Flores a similar pink ELS prey on flying. Squirrels among other mammals, perhaps the squirrels evolved to mimic als. So as not to be eaten by them another theory, which is already being challenged is that the pink attracts potential mates a flying. Squirrels have mating seasons. But their flamboyant fluorescence is available for viewing year round. Anyway, it's not even clear that squirrels can see in UV wavelengths. Ultimately, the researchers point out that age old impetus of science, this is proof of how much we don't know and still need to learn the study concluded the ecological significance of this. Trait warrants further investigation. Today's episode was written by Jimmy Allen and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet has to works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Wisconsin Jonathan Martin Cassidy Zachary Science Museum Of Minnesota Lauren Vogel Journal Of Malecki Field Museum Humboldt North America April Callaghan Ashland Minnesota Chicago Jimmy Allen Flores Northland College Apple Tyler Clang
U.S. Climate Action Center opens

Pacifica Evening News

02:04 min | 2 years ago

U.S. Climate Action Center opens

"Action center alongside pavilions from Britain. Poland and New Zealand contrasts with the low key presence of the official US government delegation at the world climate summit in Poland. The climate action center is backed by a group called we are still in referring to the withdrawal of the United States by Donald Trump from the thousand fifteen Paris climate change, a cord Patrick Hamilton is director of global change. At the science museum in Minnesota. He said that citizens have to take the lead when it comes to environmental issues. Science museums at centers in the United States enjoyed eighty million visits last year. They are advocates for science we accept the scientific reality of human caused change. We also know that solutions exist to this challenge. And we also realize that in the absence of federal leadership responsible for all of us to step up and take action as citizens, California billionaire Tom Steyer, a possible democratic presidential candidate attended the opening of the US climate action center, it cut we'd say he urged United States to return to leading the world in tackling climate change another environmental group that climate action network awarded its tongue in cheek fossil of the day award to Germany for abandoning its twenty twenty. Target on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and for failing to support more ambitious european-union-wide targets for twenty thirty. Here's a climate action network speaker explaining the award as many of you know, if the word is an digits award people to the country that is the best at being the worst does the most to the least and who is working day and night to ensure that we do not reach fair just inviting climate agreement German officials declined to comment on the award. I

United States Science Museum Poland Patrick Hamilton Donald Trump Britain Tom Steyer New Zealand Minnesota Paris Official California Director Germany
"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

"If you have a big storm of that scale today, the effects be really devastating could be loss of electrical power in some regions for very long periods of time knocking out GPS satellites knocking out communication satellites, and you think how reliant on these technologies if they were lost for even a small periods on the disruption could be huge. And we've got here space vehicles going towards some on those loans about three or four weeks ago. So that was Nasr's parka probe which is going to fly close to the any spacecraft ever before going well within the orbit of mercury is going to have to survive temperatures of around fifteen hundred degrees celsius or more than thing. Hunkered down behind his heat shield, which points, the sun doesn't even have a telescope looks at the sun is so close that it would melt telescope so monitoring the solar wind, which is this stream of stuff that comes off the sun continuously monitoring the magnetic field part of his mission actually to help us understand and predict these storms and help signed have more time to broad warnings and predictions. When these things might hit. How long will it? Take to get their launch in August is making its fly pasta, Venus uses Venus to slow itself down strangely because space needs to do is to fall into the son who's the sun's gravity to drag it inwards. So the space rocket was launched from earth, which means it's moving in an orbit with the so users Venus slow itself down in fall into the sun. That's what happening right now, more or less and then in November it will make its first fly by of the sun. The next seven years, we'll increasingly close it will spiral make little bit using Venus to slow it over and over again, and eventually will come within. I think it's about three percents of the sun distance fantastically close to the sun. America's coming towards us on the screen looming. Wow. So this last room in the exhibition is large scale projection of this NASA imagery, so from the Knicks observatory so he wants to visit as a moment where they actually encounter the son as we really see it now with the latest scientific instruments so these authority high resolution timelines images of the sun taken by this orbiting spacecraft the watches the sun twenty four hours a day. It's like burning all of red fire with Elise eruptions coming off the surface. Wow. Explosion many many times the size of the thousands of times the size of the so you have looks like a volcanic eruption something it's called a coronal mass ejection, which is when the some Blas a huge cloud of materials these things that can call. So the storms when they hit the do you think the scale if that is absolutely unimaginable, gigantic and violent. You can see why would bit. Yeah. Thinks said worship the sun is the most logical religion because we really do depend on it for life. And also is this extremely powerful body. The this kind of dichotomy in our relationship with sun, which is always there, which is we rely on we need it. And yet also is a threat to us as well. Like a fire. Dr Harry Clinton from Cambridge showed me round the sun exhibition at the science museum in London and going back to fusion power the Chinese announced on Thursday that they've managed to reach a stable temperature of one hundred million degrees celsius a huge step forward. Infusion power. Search..

Dr Harry Clinton Nasr NASA Knicks observatory Elise Blas America science museum London Cambridge one hundred million degrees ce fifteen hundred degrees celsiu twenty four hours seven years four weeks
"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

"So this is section three which is all about human beings attempts to harness the energy of the sun to drive machines to drive industry. The story starts the nineteenth century where you have these engineers in France, particularly who are thinking ready. What happens when Cole runs out are the source of energy can rely on? And they start to build these early solo machines. Steam, punk so engines is not yet installed. But we'll be in this showcase is the oldest existing solar powered machine which was built by two French engineers and the eighteen seventies demonstrated a big exposition in Paris where a big seller engine this big parabolic dish collected. Sunlight and drove a printing press printed off this journal of the sun. It was distributed to passes by. So we have one of the surviving components of this display. The reason the French are interested in this France doesn't have much coal reserves. Where Britain had lots of call. So we were fine. The french. We're struggling a bit too power industries. So people thinking about this back. She ultimately, the French government never really took it very seriously and remained fairly cheap in abundance. So so the power diversity got off the ground in the nineteenth century, and it's only really in the twentieth century the things change so pick one object in the section one challenge. This action is very interesting things to look at. But we think this is the most interesting so the panel in the world this is a soda paddle from the roof of the White House. So it was installed by Jimmy Carter in the late seventies. He was very pro solar energy as a result of the oil shock in the early seventies. When the oil embargo, and he made a speech about how if we could harness the sun than we cut our dependence on foreign oil, and we can produce clean energy that doesn't pollute era water, and he puts on the roof as makes speech, which has a recording of here. And then he says I hope in the two thousand this is not. Museum piece. We hope this other panel will still be providing hot water for the White House. What happens when Reagan comes president? He's a big supporter of oil takes panels down. So it shows this political football energy still suspect Trump input map again bomb. Put some on the White House roof when he was president. And I think that's still there as far as I know. Maybe Martin green from the universe. And you Southwell had the world record the silicon which is one of the main ones, of course, for I think about thirty one years, right? Okay. The conversion this subsection is rather than trying to use the sun directly. It's about recreating the sun. It's this is about the attempt to harness the power source of the sun, which talked earlier nuclear fusion, this instrument here is gonna mass spectra graph which was used to demonstrate in about nine hundred nineteen the ultimate source of the sun's power, which is the fusion hydrogen together to make helium and then over here, we have this is a modern nuclear fusion reactor from a private company actually near Oxford where they're trying to commercialize fusion fusion, if you can do is making us on earth often if you can do it you've got unlimited clean safe energy forever. There's enough hydrogen seawater to power human beings civilization for millions of years. You'd never have to worry about power again. The problem is very very hard. You. Have to contain the super heated hydrogen plasma inside a container and cause it to fuse without the reaction destroying the container is in and it's been some AP in trying to do since the fifties. They haven't cracked it yet. There are two schemes out there. I think there's one in front of you and another one in the United States, which ones leading do you now all well at a various different approaches. They're going on ISA, which is this big international collaboration with budget seventeen billion dollars, which is United States. Russia Europe, Japan or involved in this big project to huge mega reactive being built in France is run into all kinds of problems. It's very very difficult challenge. There are other companies like talking about energy who are trying to build smaller reactors, the ideas if you can build a smaller react to maybe you can get it to market quicker because one of the big criticisms if you can fusions is very expensive, and it might probably don't be ready in time to help us deal with climate change..

France White House president Jimmy Carter United States French government Cole Paris Britain Trump Southwell Martin Oxford Russia Japan Europe
"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on The Science Show

"Hey comes. The headline in the new scientists this week is a radiant of blockbuster welcoming of major exhibition at the science museum in London. I went to see it being set up and built my guide is Dr Harry, cliff Cambridge. It's. So one of the big objects section. This is a spinal carriage from the Bradford hospital in the U K. So but have been used to wheel children with TB lesions on the skin out into sunlight on the Sunday where they can be exposed to sunshine, and that would treats that Closys so sunlight becomes this health benefits? And as a result of that people start to get encouraged people told go out into the sun get as much sunlight as you. Can it's good for us. And that really is it marks a step change in people's attitude to sun exposure, one of the rid strategists in this section as well as this box, which looks a bit like some sort of confession bulbs wooden box, which is mirrored on the inside with light bulbs. It was invented by John Harvey Kellogg of conflicts feign for his sanatoria in the United States. So he ran a series of hospitals where you could go and be treated with artificial. Sunlight so you would sit in its mirrored box. Locked up your head pokes out the top. And then all the lights are turned on. And that's supposed to treat all kinds of medical elements. There's no evidence that did anything. Apart from women bet that just goes to show how sunrise become commodities as a kind of health fad almost which she had that from what is from one of his stories, we acquired it. I don't know. When actually it's been in the museum collection for a long time this one of ours. Yeah. And then you've got the effect of this on culture as well. So this is an early bathing caution from the nineteen thirties Youngson, which is one of the first bathing costumes designed to expose more flesh. The main reason for this was to get more sun. So you'd get more sunlight nobody that would be better for your health. And there's also a changing fashion tans became something that was a sign of being wealthy and traveling exotic places so you have a whole chain, which is bound up with his medical understanding as well. We're more about melanoma not yet, but we'll get to that say that colors here just gorgeous, they warm inviting nothing stark, this is the other side of the coin so people in the thirties forties. Go out and get all the sunshine and then the sixty seventies eighties. There's a massive increase in melanoma in countries in Europe in America in Australia as well. And this section experience hell's that story of gradual realize Asian the son has done. Effect attention on our health. So you've got some of the early ad campaigns encouraging people to be more aware of the dangers of the sun. There's this film that explores the history of the sun exposure, including the famous Australian health campaign slips lot which was about slip on a remember better than me slop on a hat tip on a shirt slap on some sunscreen Easter member a little jingles would encourage you to protect yourself and melanin was a massive problem because you have pale people living in a very sunny place. We don't Sunday the anymore, unless we have people the tourists lying bond, I beach and haven't been told yet speaking of beaches also have his artificial beach. This is just a moment in the exhibition with these bras palm trees, see soundscape, but you may be able to hear what you can pose have a little moment of reflection and their little who cannot speak as you can pick up to listen to different audio escapes from beaches around the world and deckchairs panel deckchairs. Yeah. Stalling as collection of historic sunglasses the moments. There's no getting way too much sunglasses collection. So from elsewhere some of the early examples of what my protections taking there is in the sun. Yes, you're about to open in a few days time, and it's going to be right through till March next may nationally next year. That's right. Yeah. And then it will go touring around the world after that. So potentially also to push including Australia sent a prefects visions to museums in Australia. They may be coming to museum New Year's biggest..

Australia science museum John Harvey Kellogg Dr Harry London Bradford hospital Youngson cliff Cambridge United States Europe America
"science museum" Discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

"Welcome back everyone this week chug him has been the whole headline really world story is an it seen pretty much every single member of the royal family get involved in what is audibly one of the most important events to happen every couple of years for the commonwealth nation it sees fifty three heads of commonwealth countries this time in london get together to share ideas on a world stage which is a fishery open stay thursday but monday tuesday wednesday been lots of speeches foreign years there's been a youth for him women's for malaria forum and we've seen prince wells in the of your that malaria no more we've seen overseas cambridge during chatting to entrepreneurs across the commonwealth we see meghan in harry chats to youth from across the commonwealth we seem prince charles hosted lots of quite important meetings yeah he took the prime minister of india to the science museum of one of those engagement it's i believe there's an illuminating india exhibit this in parts of that it's been a really interesting schedule of events for this year's chalk it seen every member of the royal family take on difference issue and i think actually allied that has been a big political story that's developed in the uk about wind rush so the windros generation are those who came over from the caribbean often former slaves or children over wanted to come and work in the u k it was an open door policy in the fifties post the second world war the british economy be ravaged and we need the workforce a lot of people came over and the british governments and caused some controversy when they said the lot of these people suddenly now have to prove why they're here how they got here etc such persistent ship the bridge pm since come out and apologized said no they don't have to do that but obviously meant wind rushes being in the news when a lot of those heads of state from this caribbean countries are actually hearing it i think that's why choke him so important.

prince wells malaria prince charles prime minister india uk london meghan harry science museum of one caribbean
How Does Salt Melt Snow and Ice?

Brains On!

01:50 min | 3 years ago

How Does Salt Melt Snow and Ice?

"Crystals how we certainly all benefit

Twitter Ron Facebook Patrick Hamilton Director Carl Reichardt Science Museum Minnesota
What is Our Circadian Rhythm?

Brains On!

01:50 min | 3 years ago

What is Our Circadian Rhythm?

Twitter Ron Facebook Patrick Hamilton Director Carl Reichardt Science Museum Minnesota
"science museum" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

BBC Let's Talk About Tech

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

"One of those ronnie apps and they going random central park i'll go into loved yet analyst he wants he new york and there was see but you you missed out on intend our lab either didn't you or lab i was there and i didn't actually manage to get the meeting but yeah it was being shonekan up to the public and families back in the uk is also i would have gone to that if i hadn't been ah new york you wouldn't believe they were showing a toy that just know in this whole public holds while you a happy unlucky enough to be in new york the toy fair and people can see over the years family came a tv on youtube i and my young apprentice were actually in south kensington at the science museum building stuff out carport and playing with it i was probably the most straight for well could introduce the type which follows now moshoeu and assure him a yes vote we were doing and there again a of other on one which ones wrong do the through the buttons elliot within several duty audubon that one's work in this one is since my eyes come dine wise on one leg it like a tank earth hope spotted one the swap will you will unfold rajoy again thank you what are you doing on he's going sideways had he ricky will sideways can you make your foods aznar moslem keno oncelauded it.

analyst uk new york kensington ronnie science museum ricky
"science museum" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"News because they walked astronauts miss most in space speaking of human relationships one of the organizers results thomas with alexei leonov and he was you'll false star city how israel relationship with alexei alexa bits yes i remember in very fondly as as my is my books and the organizer of of been basically my sheduled and he was also very carrying and he became a bit like a sit with substitute followed the to me out sit in style city have always wanted to look out for me and that she's subsequently cross paths bumped into each other but also being beamed while the support he said he's come over to to london nuts science museum events for instance he's always i think perhaps he and i do believe in some of the same things which is about to communication it's about making sure that people have got access to information in a free if a free way and that we open a poor this i need is fun and southeast hit the look not easy some so friendly and so much research pull of a and and oh cool seven years this this space will per until two big be so human as well alexei it was a perfect person to choose repulsive sawyer soyuz linkup and and that's really also i think part of why he's continued to to want to communicate and to reach out to cross countries and because he saw so the benefits seize handled the world can operate if we do it together in a mutually beneficial way hanan showman he'll be one of many astronauts speaking at the psalmist festival in bonn in 2019 now tickets for the festival will go on sale towards the end of this year so we'll keep you updated in case like us you fancy carrying alone now if you drive a couple of hours from bonn you'll reach the international space university in the city of strasbourg in the alsace region of northern france it offers a number of spacerelated causes ranging from several weeks and duration to in the case of their masters program one or two.

alexei leonov bonn strasbourg france israel alexei alexa london nuts science museum alexei seven years
"science museum" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"News because they walked astronauts miss most in space speaking of human relationships one of the organizers results thomas with alexei leonov and he was you'll false star city how israel relationship with alexei alexa bits yes i remember in very fondly as as my is my books and the organizer of of been basically my sheduled and he was also very carrying and he became a bit like a sit with substitute followed the to me out sit in style city have always wanted to look out for me and that she's subsequently cross paths bumped into each other but also being beamed while the support he said he's come over to to london nuts science museum events for instance he's always i think perhaps he and i do believe in some of the same things which is about to communication it's about making sure that people have got access to information in a free if a free way and that we open a poor this i need is fun and southeast hit the lovely not easy some so friendly and so much research pull of a and and oh cool seven years this this space will per until two big be so human as well alexei it was a perfect person to choose repulsive sawyer soyuz linkup and and that's really also i think part of why he's continued to to want to communicate and to reach out to cross countries and because he saw so the benefits seize handled the world can operate if we do it together in a mutually beneficial way hanan showman he'll be one of many astronauts speaking at the psalmist festival in bonn in 2019 now tickets for the festival will go on sale towards the end of this year so we'll keep you updated in case like us you fancy carrying alone now if you drive a couple of hours from bonn you'll reach the international space university in the city of strasbourg in the alsace region of northern france it offers a number of spacerelated causes ranging from several weeks and duration to in the case of their masters program one or two.

alexei leonov bonn strasbourg france israel alexei alexa london nuts science museum alexei seven years
"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Blink said i was pretty busy i was surprised hadden yeah also people are worse than then my car i discovered a crazy thing about me from today some driving and a radio show says hey google who rode hank gary and my phone they ended at me more the radio gave me the answer how the person it was like my fighting even know my phone has geery while know was google activated that it would hear something on the radio and then my google gave me the answer to who rode ben crenshaw by the way i think was the name well it's similar with the of you y yeah tv and somebody says i alexa a mile away lancer right alexa play paralysed failures apparently gone it but i was that it i never had that it happen with my own sitting in the sea legs to me answering the question that a talk show host here's wondering about out loud on the radio and then i got the answer before i get the answer from the house because they're on seven second delay exactly eerily secondly a mind knows i will b voice taxiing yeah and if the radio on it'll just pick up whatever whatever is beans yet and then it's just like oh it what did you send i'm really not share why is it taco bell tuesday why is it talks about the fate darnet's what is today november seven yes oh my gosh it is loud those science museum i'm stranger things shirts are a big people are wanting them pete the on the website crashed a little earlier today for the science museum in it's all up in going so you can order your danny did you order something i did i got in as i was telling clean and bradley i wait until this afternoon a gutted in about three minutes of the trans action gatta's sweatshirt for the daughter get the daughter those are going to be a big christmas get yeah i think so i don't want one i don't either so danny this year if you're going to buy his second yes yes let us for you to take that on the list oh gosh and then i tried to pay attention to this thing that they were talking about this morning about the.

google hank gary the house science museum danny christmas Blink hadden ben crenshaw pete three minutes seven second
"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"The science museum to tell us hey what's wrong with your website man just click on to by this thing and i know that you have an unlimited supply but i am number fifteen of 100 and forty nine in line what's what's the deal oh my god you you lynn everybody out there want their heidi it is have been an but i i character he'd be paid nathan or working so hard what are what platelets downtown little that we had a heck out at what back up and running and so yet though hang hide hit people act when the don't you're not gone already and that's what they can do to to to kind of worked through your time were of course talking about the brontosaurus hoodie that is a vintage science museum in minnesota model that we saw in the first episode of stranger things to the character of dust was wearing that that sweatshirt and did we i mean you've like had to basically recreate this sweatshirt we get so we god the greenclad that was on show and we what we've been talking about net netflix the pilot maker were getting it i though with the we recreated the shirt and it but they had a herbert the cell had an actual an old you know actual kirk and at gay recreated it to make it look new and on the show and then we recruit dumb that recreation we made our own where the the fvo light then predatory hoodie when you buy it on the to be happy not only the porta iraq at eight wicket of authenticity as well and and then the credit for any awaiting and the kyoto right exactly oh cool authority smarting did you ever you guys did this really quick we should just give you you know hats off to the folks behind the scenes at the science museum including yourself and then of course the folks that helped you over it networks to make this happen i mean you have like what like a week or so two weeks turnaround thank you so much yet a lot of the back you're that you're not thirty with a social media qian and then of course everybody back of our working 24th that an yuck we have had the blessing of netflix but what honey i fear we were working so hard at all boy we gotta get.

the deal nathan netflix herbert kirk porta iraq kyoto science museum minnesota social media two weeks
"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"I'm i've been i've been really proud of my moderation with stranger things to bradley we watched one episode tonight i think that that's healthy but still my favorite episode was the episode where dustin the character is wearing the brontosaurus hoodie from the science museum of minnesota while i'm here to tell you that broke the internet today still breaking and the internet is still broken we're gonna hit year from somebody at the science museum who can tell us why the internet has broken because of that brontosaurus hoodie after this on the colina and bradley shaolin mitag one a seven one lorient julia so season nine for this amazing i never region reality show their casting at the mall of america when are we going to deter donny see when it is doesn't say imagine avic worry what if we tried you alfred us i even know my hometown on and danny you see when it is trying to find out julie i know america's guy talent is guy or danny i find it he's a nineman gang far play iin gives friday december first padania you've got to clarify okay but if you wanna do that when be fun bari ruin you would think in the story would tell you the date so you know in the story to reaches this coming first of all trying i didn't read that i started at the bottom and fabulous any he when the other rooms have read in high life today he said you were going in the other day that means hariri ally really down the maury and julia with producer donny love on my talk when a 7'1 everything entertainment hence alexis with david frum first equity david now you know one day i will be calling you for my crafting heights and we will be ready for that call for that brings up a kind of an exciting thing happening right now lexus you've had a lot of customers calling us because they're find their cabin or their second home i think with winter coming the prices have dropped done some of those so people are jumping into that market right now and starting to snatch a good deal so this really is the best time to give you guys call it is because if you're approved in europe they're shopping and you see that perfect cabin or maybe you're trying to five that house to go ice fishing in the winter you give us a call well have you approved in you'll get your offers accepted and with your twenty plus years of experience in this market and helping those living in.

dustin science museum america david frum lexus europe bradley lorient donny danny hariri producer one day
"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"science museum" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Got to stop him with this over sharing he is going to blow your plausible deniability the couch area shares were we don't have pictures were never going to meet him weakens a stream a girl could dream are light now that was what happened there i don't know because we didn't get anything that ranger things broke the twitter record it became the most tweeted about streaming show that is what that one this weekend during the season to opening weekend and the peak time was eleven am on friday oor soon as it is eastern time okay and then the other big thing about that of course is that the sweatshirt dustin yeah war was the science museum sweatshirt and they're they're brian soros yeah they're trying to make it so go there hollywood i do you have to be realized that is a science museum man of loyd says it i did look at it we posted it here you can see it right there science museum of minnesota anyway doubts what that banner that's what the sash that stranger things ones we can i watch casing are just the first step was good it worst guy not excited to watch it oh yeah late last year how you doing okay i did it let me hollywood speak that you don't like it you're you're not going to watch it which is fine i'm not going to say that yet all right i just don't want to binge on it it just seems to last year's the other thing okay we've got to get to hollywood's we've got to get their we've got to do it and we need to know of this guy threw this lady under the bus not literate which is literally not figuratively heads jays from jayson and alexis if you miss second chance romance ohga worry we got you we are the highlights we went out for happy hours worrying about friday and we need about three hours off on them he ended up levy and king wanted to go out again that we can put the not one three we haven't heard at all really into the kind of weird that i look i look a lot like that guy back then scrubbed day he's like a youth that rocked fan light at the.

loyd hollywood jayson twitter science museum brian soros alexis three hours