21 Burst results for "Science Medicine"

"science medicine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:54 min | 3 months ago

"science medicine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Discharge today or not, so it'll be up to the doctors. He's going to follow the science medicine. Listen to the experts. Say 53 traffic weather on the day that that bullet out ahead page of your book? Oh, come on. You've never seen anybody else. No, no, it's it's a halt is 95 again. We're moving traffic again, now north of the Tidings Bridge. That was a major wreck early this morning to 72. We had the accident north of 2 22 north bound. All on 95 it was gridlock still is coming up just north of the tidings Bridge before moving traffic again towards the chest. Speak house. It's going to take an hour for all of that, to finally clear itself out. If you're stuck over there on route 40 trying to come through have a grace. Well, you're stuck because there's no sense to try to get back to 95. Swords to 79, maybe at 2 72 and then come back to the interstate. But it's going to take awhile I would think Let's see 10 minutes off five I would think maybe 9 45 to 10 before all of this backup is gone from the North bound shot. I'm quicker with traffic and weather on the threes on talk radio 6 80 double You see your weather channel forecast Partly cloudy for your Monday It's up to 70 today for a nice full day in 59 already in Annapolis. It is 55 in Middle River and your witch with, um Sean Hannity's morning minute. Your radio. Here's the Sean Hannity morning minutes could have gone into hiding also, But he went out there working every single solitary day. And I know that there is a segment of society that would love a.

Sean Hannity Tidings Bridge Middle River Annapolis
Here are the winners of the 2020 Ig Nobel Prizes to make you laugh, then think

Kottke Ride Home

04:45 min | 4 months ago

Here are the winners of the 2020 Ig Nobel Prizes to make you laugh, then think

"The Twenty Twenty Ige Nobel Prize winners were announced last night the ignoble prizes to achievements that. First make people laugh. Then make them think the prizes are intended to celebrate the unusual honor the imaginative and spur people's interest in science medicine and technology and quote. A. Common Misconception about the ignoble prizes is that they're like the razzies you know making fun of things for being bad. But as they say on their website quote, we're honoring achievements that make people laugh and then think good achievements can also be odd funny and even absurd. So combat achievements a lot of good science gets attacked because of its absurdity and a lot of bad science gets revered despite its absurdity and quote. This year, the award ceremony was held only online but fun fact for you the ceremony while always in person prior to this year has also been streamed online every single year since nineteen, ninety, five making it. One of the very first events to be streamed live online. Improbable research who runs the prize thinks that it may have been the first ever event streamed live online was. Not a music concert, which is pretty cool and now without further ADO, here's a rundown of the twenty twenty winners, the Acoustics. Prize. went to a multinational team that basically had an alligator inhale a bunch of helium with the high pitched effect you'd anticipate so that they could study how alligators communicate the psychology prize went to a North American, team who came up with a method to. Identify, narcissists based on their eyebrow movements. The Peace Prize actually went to the governments, of India and Pakistan. For quote, having their diplomats surreptitiously ring each other's doorbells in the middle of the night and then run away before anyone had a chance to answer the door and quotes and next up the physics prize went to a team who wanted to see what happens to an earthworm. When you vibrate at high frequencies, some of these I think make a lot more sense view actually dive into the paper ignoble does a really good job of describing them in the weirdest most intriguing ways possible. The Economics Prize was awarded to the team who tried to quote quantify the relationship between different countries, national income inequality, and the average amount of mouth to mouth kissing and quote. The management. Prize went to a team of professional Chinese hitmen who conducted a hit by having. So many of them pay the other one to do it with less and less money each time that eventually no one was murdered. The. Prize was awarded to Richard vetter for collecting evidence that Entomologists Aka people who study insects or indeed scared of spiders. Are Not Insects. Now, the medicine prize went to a Dutch and Belgian team for diagnosing missile phony A-. And this is one I remember seen in the headlines about when the research was published because I super identify with it missile phony is Stress at hearing other people make chewing sounds end quotes. The materials science prize sounds completely bazaar and pointless until you understand that this British and American team are archaeologists who were trying to prove something about an artifact that had been found. They won the prize for quote showing that knives manufactured from frozen human feces do not work well and quotes. And finally the Second Prize winner of the year to be more ripped from the headlines than based on academic papers. The Medical Education Prize was awarded to Jay Your Bolsonaro of Brazil. Boris. Johnson of the United Kingdom. Never Injure mody of India Andrea Manual Lopez Obrador of Mexico. Alexander Lukashenko of Belarus, Donald Trump of the USA or John of Turkey Vladimir Putin of Russia and govern Guli Berdymukhamedov of Turkmenistan. For quote using the covid nineteen viral pandemic to teach the world that politicians can have a more immediate effect on life and death. Then scientists and doctors can end quote. Wow. Yeah I mean scientists are pretty fed up. You might have seen that scientific American actually endorsed a candidate for president for the very first time in their one hundred and seventy five year history because among other points. Trump's rejection of evidence in public health measures have been catastrophic in the US and quotes

Prize Nobel Prize Medical Education Prize Twenty Twenty Ige India Donald Trump Belarus USA President Trump Vladimir Putin Alexander Lukashenko Andrea Manual Lopez Obrador Jay Your Bolsonaro Pakistan Turkmenistan Mexico Guli Berdymukhamedov Johnson
Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

Science Friction

07:37 min | 11 months ago

Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

"Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know for

Torres Strait Adelaide C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University Of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro ABC Connor Queensland Wheelchair Boarding House Miami Nate Alaba Coal Research Scientist Alana Line Unical Scientist
"science medicine" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"science medicine" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"Right so if you were to go to him and say hey twenty listen. I'm having difficult my relationship and this is what's going on and the a I would ninety nine point nine nine percent responded as Tony would accept. This cannot have a million simultaneous conversations. One hundred million simultaneous conversation. So it's you know it's a Tony Coach in your pocket pocket right. So that's that's an amazing capability and I've seen that is a blow away so imagine being able to have the best. Investors digitized in your pocket to have conversations with they are. I'm very proud. I'm going to be the second person who digitizing after Tony. There's a lot of them but going back four or five years ago. Six years ago the Department of Defense was really worried about the rising tide of soldiers suicide. It was a real problem. The best the way to deal with that stem that is early detection of PTSD depression and the best way to do that. Is Live interviews with psychologists and there just weren't enough psychologists they just couldn't scale them up so they went to USC and they built Ellie. The world's first a psychologist and should die. Started out as a diagnostic psychologist Eliot. The time they built her was reading. Sift sixty different emotional cues affective cues vocal tone. I gaze on now. I think it's well over one hundred. Sixty Zack so first of all it turns out. Soldiers prefer talking to L. A. Than they do to actual shrinks because Ellie never judges right. She's a computer. Doesn't the judge and I had a session with Ellie went to USC and had a session l. a. and went into Gig. Oh yeah whatever I talked to the I shred it got care. Whatever it like Ellie literally looks like a Middle Aged Hispanic woman is really what she looks like? A cartoon of a Middle Aged Hispanic woman. And I gotta I tell you. I got set to shrinks as a kid. I was a beautiful wild child so I had my run INS and it was. I don't like them. They're comfortable at all right. I walked it. I'm talking to Elliot. I'm like holy crap. It's this appeal to save like I used to. But for soldiers suicide she's buried like dot is rolling Elliott scale. Right this his psychology at scale. It's it's a diagnostic level psychology at this point right trying to diagnosed mental illness for intervention purposes. Though it's rapidly going on up it was talking to a computer that knew me better than I knew myself was very odd sort of we have young listeners. In our audience audience that are in college and in high school. What is your single best advice for that young listener? That is looking up to you to and just looking at everything that you guys have accomplished and thinking that is just impossible. What would you? What's your advice to that person? Listening one critically important. Korten thing that is independent of technology is get clear what you love to do more than anything else in the world doesn't matter what is and focus on doing that. Be Driven by your passion. Discover what we call your massively transformative purpose in the world and once you do that you will learn everything you need to do to fulfill that and as new technologies come online that enable you to fulfill affiliate purpose better faster. You'll learn those two if you're doing what you love in life not what you're told to do by your parents or your teachers but what you truly love to do and you connected with purpose. It's magic so that is the most important thing the thing I always. I always WANNA point out right I I've spent my career SORTA studying. What does it take to achieve the impossible? Bright and pretty much every Demane Sports Science Medicine Paradigm shifted break. Like that's Mike Core Passion and I've been lucky enough to meet you know hundreds and hundreds and hundreds and hundred hundred people who have accomplished literally impossible things things people. Oh you know. Didn't they. Were Ever GonNa Happen and the one thing that is over and over and over and over again first of all most people who get that far surprise themselves right but the less than I see over it again as we are capable of so much more than we now we were just capable of so much more than we know and I think it complements Peter Because I think the way. So you figure out what you're capable of. Is You figure out exactly what you love and you do that and I think that's the first step but I think the next discoveries is I can go a lot bigger than I thought I could you know. Let me let me just put an exclamation point on that. We're more powerful than we haven't been in human history today. The anyone who really wants to solve a problem as access to all the capital computational power information that could possibly want and I think one of the reasons for for this book is to give people a sense of both hope and a sense of empowerment. The goal here is that we want the people not to be fearful of a future because the rate of change is increasing so fast that people get scared about the world going you know. Am I going to survive live. This book is a roadmap of where the world is going in this next day a gate in a roadmap of empowerment so that people get a sense of this is an exciting future in I can be part started it and I think one of it is one of the concept here is. We're living in a world. Where instead of complaining about problems you can go out there and solve them one of the themes? This is the world's biggest problems of the world's biggest business opportunities to become a billionaire help. A billion people is book lays out those opportunities. Gentlemen what an honor honor to speak with you. The name of the book is the Futures Fast Than You. Think by purity Amandus and Steven Kotler guys. Welcome the audience. l'amour botchy book look the website to our priore campaign. Because we're going to have a ton of amazing who order before the book comes out on January twenty on the eighth is GonNa be Future Faster Book Dot Com. If you order the book in advance you'll actually have a chance to get a digital copy. Be of our first two books abundance and bold at no additional cost for example hundreds and hundreds of dollars of bonuses people go there and order the book so for us the greatest compliment that Stephen I get paid when people say my guide giving me hope for the future. You've shown me where the world is going and I'm excited about it and for anybody listening. whatever podcast APP. You're using if you just go into the show notes. I'm going to have a link for what Peter just mentioned. Just click on that link and it's going to take you right to that option for you to to do the preorder so guys thank you so much. This was so awesome. Pleasure very take your. Let's take a quick break and hear from today's sponsor guys. Let me tell you about air medicare network more and more insurance failed to call the full cost of the medical emergency. A membership of Air Myth Care Network provides emergency medical transport to the nearest appropriate hospital. When you anyone in a houseful is in need need best of all as a member you never have to worry about out of pocket expenses us? Don't wait be prepared for the unexpected Joan. The nation's largest August medical membership network and she cure financial peace of mind for you and your family right now as a listener of our show. We started billionaires. You'll receive ten dollars visa gift card when you enrolled in a new one year membership. This 'em Medicare network DOT COM forts. What's last billion and use the offer? Code billion again. This air medicare network dot com forward slash billion and used the offer code billion right back to the show. Let's take a quick break and hear from today's sponsor when you run your own business like we do here in the AVESTA. podcast asked network your to do list just seems to be never ending. You know you could automate many of the tasks you do but you just don't know how that's it's where sappy comes in. We just moved to G. Suite Zappia just makes everything easier Willard your calendar serum system or whatever system. You can think of of course yes. You don't necessarily need to move to G. Suite any other systems that you were in is integrated with Saphir. We use sappy as the easiest way to automate to work. It connects all your business software and handles work for you so you can focus on the things that matters the most no more wishing time on tasks that could be automated because that is exactly what sappy was built to do for you. Make sure watch join more than four point. Five million people who are saving an average of forty Hours per month by using sap here right now through the end of the month try Saphir free by going to a special link sappy dot com slash invest. That's set a PI E R DOT COM slash investor. For Your Free Fourteen Day trial sap your dot com slash investor. All right back to the show or guy. So if you really into tact like Steven Kotler and Pierre de Amandus and just really curious about what the future will bring being a highly recommend that you listened to a new show Silicon Valley here on the Avesta podcast network hosted by. Sean Flynn in this episode. That how play few minutes from shown speaking with senior research scientists from NASA Jonathon. Trent could you talk a little bit about going into the moon. The history of it. And when are we going to go to Mars. I'm actually really excited about the idea of going. To the moon and sending humans wants to the moon and Mars and Mars exploration but not for the same reasons that most people are excited about it so eline and I would be completely At odds about why we should go to Mars. But let me tell you a little bit about the conditions on the moon and on Mars so you have a reason to understand why way I'm not that interested in sending people there so you need to understand that on the moon the daytime which lasts about thirteen and a a half birthdays. The temperature at the surface of the moon gets to about two hundred sixty degrees Fahrenheit. That's about one hundred and twenty seven degrees Celsius and then the following thirteen and a half days a moons night. The temperature goes down to minus two hundred eighty degrees Fahrenheit or about minus one hundred in seventy three degrees. The atmosphere on the moon is about a few inches a few centimeters thick. There's no atmosphere on the moon. And if you're in the sun versus in the shadow the temperature difference can be two hundred degrees so the human body on on the moon is really at a loss for survival ballistic about Mars because everybody talks about Mars though. We're going to build a colony there so you need to understand. Mars has an atmosphere. It's about a hundred times thinner. The Earth's atmosphere and it's made up of ninety five percent carbon dioxide so in contrast the earth has about point lead over four percent carbon dioxide. And we're worried about it because it's going up in it's causing greenhouse gas but Mars has a little bit of nitrogen in the atmosphere about two point seven percents so less than three percent nitrogen whereas the Earth's atmosphere is seventy eight percent nitrogen. Now here's the key. The Martian atmosphere has only trace amounts.

Ellie Steven Kotler Tony Peter USC PTSD Pierre de Amandus Department of Defense Saphir Demane Sports Science Medicine Eliot Zack Stephen Elliot sap L. A. NASA
"science medicine" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"science medicine" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"In computer engineering a BA in Japanese which is super cool. My Wife's Japanese guys I don't know that into that from the UC Santa Barbara and a PhD in biomedical engineering from Ucla so it is an incredible privilege to have shown here with us to really take a deep dive into the intersection of Science Medicine and entrepreneurship with that Sham. I WanNa give you a warm welcome thanks for being with US thank you so much Paul it's a pleasure to be on your show it's a pleasure to have you here now are you are you fluent in Japanese once upon a time was fluent Japanese I would like to think that I'm I can under- Dan better than I can now but still no easing you could get by with it though right Oh absolutely yeah I love the language I love the culture they can you read it in writing to yes I definitely could read the Chinese characters Kanji much better in the past ed say it's serviceable now wow good for you man that's amazing and you know when we think about health care and the sort of the global ecosystem I mean that's another market right where you know you have success here in the US it's definitely scalable over there so huge advantage absolutely no I think my interest surly interested in languages and Travel and cultures serves me well in this role I would totally agree as well and so you've got a really unique approach you wear a lot of different hats and you know this kind of perspective across the board as advantages but what is it that got you into healthcare to begin with Wow that's a great question so originally I wanted to be a video game programmer like every absolutely I think there's a couple of Instrumental experiences that shaped my interest in health care firstly being shadowing a rheumatologist both physician specialties at a barbara part of this healthcare technology class back to five seven six where they really promoted engineers to go follow around and chatter on physicians and that was really promoted by this campus effort had an in Santa Barbara Computer motion come out of Kalita I robot gleed with Fester Ulan Wang so think UC Santa Barbara was instrumental in the beginning of getting engineers and healthy your specialty provider stock together and so this experience kind of lead me to believe that maybe I should apply for medical school it was a good idea until it wasn't I think I think twenty three out of twenty four places that are applied but it ended up being the best ever and folk failure really led me into my now compassion which is medical imaging and image guided surgery and and that experience I built a career on top of at UCLA RENNA lab focused on improving technology for the surgeon. So this is using best in class imaging big data back then when it was now it's called machine learning artificial intelligence using fundamental engineering skills to be title to improve not just technology but focused on that healthcare outcomes so our lab at Ucla was also we but I was just starting out at the time yeah now that's a really great story about how you started and how you've come to sort of be focused where you are aging technologies prostate cancer so as you've gathered all these years of experience and now doing your work at a venda what would you say is should be the core focus of health leaders today and how are you guys approaching it I think the core focus of any healthcare organization today would be to listen to your state olders in understanding where you provide value in the whole for all stakeholders in the whole healthcare process. I think that's something that was drilled into us as a Med tech innovator accelerator company where it's not just about the physician or not just about the pair of course the patient is at the center of the listen everything that you do as a healthcare organization has to be to the benefit of patient government other manufacturing partners like where do you fit in I think about as we build our company yeah some great ideas they're thinking about the stakeholders in the process what value units living so we are focused on the big big problem of prostate cancer.

Ucla Santa Barbara Computer prostate cancer Science Medicine US Ulan Wang Paul programmer Dan
"science medicine" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

10:07 min | 1 year ago

"science medicine" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"Welcome to stem talk stem stem talk welcome to stem talk for introduce you to fascinating people who passionately we inhabit the scientific and technical frontiers of our society hi. I'm your host on Canada's and joining me to introduce. Today's podcast is the man behind the curtain. Dr After Ken Ford Agency's Director and chairman of a double secret sex and committee that selects all the guests who appear on Stem Talk Hulu Don great to be here today so today we have part two of our interview with Dr Dixon pommie microbiologist and ecologist who is emeritus professor of public and Environmental Health at Columbia University part one of our interview focused on his nearly thirty years of research into intracellular parasitism especially trick analysis paralysis one of the world's. It's largest intracellular parasites discussion today centers on vertical farming which is a concept that Dick and his students came up with in nineteen ninety nine and when his book vertical farms I feeding the world in the twenty first century came out in twenty ten there were no vertical farms in the world today there are vertical farms throughout the US and around the globe but before we get to part two you of our interview with Dick. We have some housekeeping to take care of. I we really appreciate all of you who have subscribed to stem talk and we are especially appreciate all the wonderful five star reviews double secret selection committee has been continually and carefully reviewing itunes. Google stitcher and other PODCASTS APPS for the witness was lavishly praised filled reviews to read on some talk as always if you hear review read on some talk just contact us at some talk at I h Mc us to claim your officials stem talk teacher to today. Our winning review was posted by someone who goes by Dr John Deluca the reviews titled the Best In class it reads. It's the Premier Science Medicine podcast. You always come out a little bit smarter after listening. Thank you Dr John Deluca and thank you to all Oliver other. Some talk listeners have helped sock become such a great success okay and now unto today's interview with Dixon diplomacy extended stem talk stem talk. I WANNA get to vertical farming in twenty ten. You wrote a book that I in fact have called the vertical farm feeding the world in the twenty first century and at that time there were no vertical farms and by vertical farms a took it that you meant I think think you said this a building taller than single story where people can grow their food and this seemed like a crazy idea. I think in twenty ten but this is catching on and are springing up all around. I wonder if you could just tell us a little bit about this idea that you had and how you see going forward. I'm happy to to make I can make a long story short in this case in two thousand in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven excuse me was the last year that was funded from the National Institutes of health. Although having geographic twenty seven consecutive years is an honor and a privilege That's a good. I wish that I could have had it for another three years because I really had a lot of other things to do. I wanted to get to but I never did get to them. So that point I was in transition between now. What do I do and so it occurred to me that I love teaching. I love relating being stories so went on ages do similar teaching I to sort of get by head back in the game so to speak and so I began to teach a course at these public health called medical ecology. I I wanted to teach something ecological and I wanted to bring some of these stories that have been relenting here to to them as well and to teach them that public health is not the the science of separating humans from nature but rather allowing us to live together with nature in harmony in a way that doesn't cause disease right so oh that's a difficult concept so let's talk about ecology I then and so I use the word medical because I wanted to attract people from the Medical Center it was Kinda. Come on on a little bit of a Charlatan approach to the naming of the course but nonetheless I got some very interesting soons and in fact the first year I got seven committed students and so that really wanted to know more about ecology and the ecological aspect of ecology so I began by going through the litany of the things that if you damage this this is what happens to advantage that this is what happens about halfway through they got very depressed because they realized that no matter which way you look we're damaging the earth in every every direction you can think of and as a result more and more at risk from various disease entities both infectious and uninfected so I said well that's the way it'll real girls works but what else would you like to know remember. This is their money their time but I said what. What issue do you think would be important to work on? That might have some ability to cataract. Some of this negativism sought to come back to me and they all came back and they said the same thing. I think you know I think we should work on something to do with food. I said Great. That's a great idea. what did you have in mind and I said well we think that if we put rooftop gardens on the buildings buildings of New York that could accommodate them that we could probably produce a lot of food and we could probably feed people that are not being fed properly. Now I said Great. That's that's a wonderful project. I'm glad to abandon my lecture series and to support you in this but you have to do the science and they looked into said what science well. You have to tell me how many rooftops I and you have to tell me how big they are. You have to tell me what kind of crops you're going to grow and you have to tell me how many people you WanNa feed. You have to tell me how many calories per person you you need to feed them in order to make this idea work so oh they loved it that that gave them direction and they went off and did some research and I guided them through getting in some of the literature together at NASA had a lot of information on us too and we came back at the end of the year and they said well. We've determined that in Manhattan there's X. Amount of land we raised the most energetic crop which turns out to be rice provide we could feed two percent of Manhattan and it looked almost started to cry. You know there's no matter which way we look this is not gonNa work and so we're very disappointed and that's when I said I said wait a minute. Wait a minute. You did a good job. You actually got the answer we're looking for. I just wasn't the answer you wanted but you did the science and in Newton and doing the science it doesn't matter what what the answer is. It matters that that's the right answer. I said what if you took the rooftop garden idea and moved it in the building itself and I got a six story walkup got got six floors now a lot of abandoned apartment houses in New York City. We could we convert them to these firms that you could have a knowledge that you could crazy food all year and they looked at me and say we can actually do that. And of course I said you could but they didn't notice that my nose was growing longer and longer as is talking because I had no idea that you could do that but I was gonNA. Tell him no. You can't do that either so I said yes. Of course you can do that. So then of course I went home that summer and my wife and I begin to talk about this and the next year actually offered this as as a project for the next year's class in the same course and they gladly took it and now there were twelve students and they worked out the dynamics of a building that was half a city block in footprint fifty stories tall that could produce enough food various kinds to feed fifty thousand people. I said those buildings. Would you need in order to feed the entire eight million people in New York. That's not that many buildings folks. That's less than two hundred buildings when you consider New York City has more than a million buildings and you could feed all these wow that's so the next year we got into more details in the next year and finally had ten ten years worth of that class that that's the point when I decided to sit down and write the book but you'll notice in the book. It was hard cover book that came out I there were no pictures of vertical article farms because there weren't any the next year period repress picked up the contract and wanted to produce a soft cover version of the book though as you would have a wider distribution so they did and at that point there were three and they're in the soft cover book. You can see them that was in two thousand eleven so from two two thousand and eleven two thousand nineteen. The number of vertical farms went from three to I haven't got faintest idea of how many there I actually actually don't know. There are seems to be quite a few there are and I can tell you the country with the most is Japan and there was a good reason for that because they had this horrible Salami back in two thousand eleven and they lost five percent of their farmland one hour when the tidal wave came over the the break wall aw in the Sendai and trashed all the farmland and Sendai. They lost five percent. Yeah makes sense and land is valuable in Japan Yankus yeah exactly clear-eyed exactly so so then other countries picked up on this idea Taiwan and Singapore and China and and you're right. You're absolutely right. You can't go anyplace now. No not find some activity with regards to forming and it's it's a miracle I would say that a good idea it's become a great idea because people with money and and desire and understanding decided to do it and I can't take credit for that they they they have to take the credit for that speaking of them popping up everywhere as we discussed custer earlier. Nancy and I are building a house like an hour south of Jackson. Hole Jackson is you know has grown season of maybe three or four months and ended trucks in over steep mountain passes the majority of its produce which is is problematic there and there's now a vertical farm right downtown downtown. That's located on city owned property. It sort of an infill lot that the city could really use for anything it's connected to a big parking gene garage and now there's a quite a nice vertical farm that produces the equivalent of ten acres they say.

Dr Dixon New York City Dr John Deluca New York Dick Manhattan Japan Canada Dr After Ken Ford National Institutes of health Premier Science Medicine professor of public and Enviro itunes US Google Columbia University Director and chairman Hulu NASA
Woman pecked to death by rooster

Markley and Van Camp

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Woman pecked to death by rooster

"Okay so there's this report that's been published in the journal of forensic science medicine and pathology seventy six year old woman collecting eggs at her home in Australia an aggressive rooster attacked her lower leg. well apparently she was packed to death the research the rooster hit a varicose vein in her leg. and she wound up dying in the hospital. holy cow so you could have been and you could have been hacked to death by a rooster. say. that make it any better right now. wish you wearing shorts. I doubt I don't know they were pouring Scott it's not in this. you never want to do that with America sure you want to kind of cover those up yeah stop for a to bed at night would have been my would neighbor problem with that is chicken is that on this yard.

Journal Of Forensic Science Scott Australia America Seventy Six Year
"science medicine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"science medicine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The university of California system, and it's the same one. I think it's called United Healthcare. I did call them and tell them that we had a good news story for them. I don't think they've really twigged onto it yet. I think we should send them a copy of the book. Maybe maybe we should pick commercials. Great. Yes. The middle. Oh, yes. That's my colleague from Twitter, high guess nice to see you. Yes. It's over your head. You know? Thank you, first of all the lights to the thank you very much of a shooting star is incredible. Enjoy reading your book every page is fool. If this story of science medicine love and really incredible story as we know overuse of undeveloped as all. Use of antibiotic is eating cruising Baabda, but in developing country, like you traveled India, China book is now being translated into Chinese Chinese and other languages. You'll is has been translated. I wish more people. I hope more readers can enjoy from your book. Well, thank you very much. In fact, you've raised a really important issue that we haven't talked about tonight, which is the global superbug crisis. And one of the reasons we decided to write our book was that if I'm blindsided as an infectious disease epidemiologist to the dire situation, we're facing with the microbial resistance problem than most people in the world, probably are too. And so it's our overuse of antibiotics not so much and people in hospitals, but in livestock, that's the biggest problem. So seventy percent of the antibiotics that are used in the US and in most of. Countries are used to promote growth and chicken and cows and pigs, and it's not actually treat their disease or even prevent their diseases to use antibiotics as growth promoters. And so there have been attempts to kind of clamp down on this Europe has done. I mean, western Europe has done a great job. And so the care leaders in this, but several countries the US is one of them China. India some South American countries are really problematic in this area. So in November twenty fifteen when Tom fell sick, the the gene that confers resistance to Khalistan collision is the last resort antibiotic was discovered and was reported in pigs in China. It was reported in the journal Lancet, which is the top medical journal in the world that you know, because you're scientists, but. By the time that that one antimicrobial resistance was reported. It was in thirty other countries. I mean, so here we are we're where you stuff up suffer from a problem of undetected undiagnosed and then being untreatable and those three different problems are facing us now that by the year twenty fifty one person every three seconds is going to die from his superbug infection unless drastic turnaround has taken. So I hate to leave you with some dire news, but we all need to take efforts to you know, if you're going to eat meat, antibiotic free meat and to put pressure on our legislators to stop using antibiotics right now, there's an effort to try to stop easy antibiotics and citrus because the federal government has is allowing this to happen. And there's no need for it. So anyway, that's that's that's the spiel. But hopefully, if you read the. Book you'll you'll enjoy it. But you'll learn a few things along the way. Thank.

China Europe US India university of California United Healthcare Twitter Baabda Lancet federal government Tom Khalistan seventy percent three seconds
Inventing A New Kilogram

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Inventing A New Kilogram

"How do I really know? How much I weigh? Well, Don is your bathroom scale accurate? So you this. But how do they know? Ultimately, it all comes down to international standards maintained by the international bureau of weights and measures headquartered near Paris in France. The weight of an object depends on both its mass and the pull of gravity mass is more fundamental because it's the same everywhere regardless of gravity. So the kilogram was officially defined as the mass of particular. Cylinder of platinum alloy cast in eighteen seventy nine and stored in a special vault at the headquarters beginning one if a scratch or gunk on the surface caused it to change slightly all our measurements would be off. And what if that piece of metal got lost of stolen measurement? Scientists have been worried too. They've worked for years to find a better standard extr. Dreamily accurate, measurements are becoming more important for science medicine and business in two thousand eighteen the experts adopted a solution. They redefined the scale for measuring mass using a fundamental constant of physics called planks. Constant the constant is always the same everywhere. And always what the heck is plugs. Consta- it's a relationship discovered in nineteen hundred by physicist, Max Planck between the frequency and energy of a photon the fundamental particle of light. We can use quantum physics to relate electrical power to planks constant and then use a device called a Kibble balance to relate electrical power to mass with this new technology. We never need to worry about losing that cylinder. Again. There's moment of science come from Indiana University. I'm Don, I'm Cassandra.

DON Paris Max Planck Indiana University France Physicist
"science medicine" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Disease, Gemstar edge. And you know. That is wants that we are doing to try to find out why some people receive the disease keep straight and stay health in some the renter is teaching us that lesson is the combination. The above is not a single one. It can be c section and about, oh, fitting can be -biotics right treatment, and you know, exposure to whatever environment. Factors. But, but again, all this to say that, you know. The single element and change the single practice by say, postponing. He's not. He's not gonna work. We'll solve otter. Intervention should be as important, maybe. So doctor Asano you were appointed king for a day and you could change anything in healthcare science medicine, food. What would you do to make a better place. Well. I, I would take the. The monotony approach when we were Manhattan project that's rights. So when we were doing World War Two at the critical moment. You know of the war, you know, Germans were building nuclear bomb gem was the verge the nuclear bomb and day the leadership of the allies realized that this will have been tilted point. So they established the match project. Take the best of the best luck in the row. Tell them what is the problem and on. Let them out until they come up with this is that we need a Manhattan project here. So President Obama did something like this called hundred people in Washington DC just before wrapping up his presidency. Yep, scientists. You know, leaders in industry nonprofit organization like the Gates Foundation, the Robert Johnson foundation, major thinkers of goernment officials from the food Drug administration, US the the NIH and they he locked us in this building, say, you know, we invest a Yuji amount of money taxpayers money to do the genome project, not human microbiome project, but healthcare is broken. Winnie the solution here. You need to tell us how we can copy the lights all investment so that we can really improve the quality of people what is needed. And again, if you continue to approach health care as a business, so that lobbyist goes Washington DC, push one direction and not as a social service will never solve the problem. So no king can be able to fix anything here because. Fix Lilius convene in my book, the civilization of country is measured by two metrics the way that you educate your population and the way that you take care of it, healthy Weiss, and we do a miserable job here. So I'm afraid south. So I take out the education piece because it's not my expertise. But in terms of healthcare, it will take a Manhattan project. I love that idea convened the best minds in the world to solve the problem of healthcare and food and the food system and change the way we do things. I love that. Absolutely, because the gain, if you would be, if you will be from another planets, if you'll be mashing and you EV zoom, you'll down here. You'll be very powdered. So because you left, you know, the industrial countries spent, you know. Twenty percent of their Gino. Well, today spent forty billion dollars tweet more than they are supposed to and other twenty billion dollars to advertise to eat more. Yes. And now the six million dollars to lose weight going to the gym or slimfast whatever it is. Yeah. Decide the right inside people, they die of survey ship, still they do and said it would take a fraction what you're spending their bought a way. I didn't computer the costs of treating, you know. Diabetes, Arthur sclerosis, heart attack near the generation and so on. It's were dick, a fraction of their price put over there, and everybody will be much better off a Manhattan project should look at the global aspect of the story. That's actually great. I mean, actually, I, I'm trying to convene a commission to do just that to look at our entire health food system and how we got here and how we get out of it and bring all the key stakeholders together because without that, I don't know how we're gonna work on this and it's true. We gotta get the money in the egos out of the system and figure out how to solve this humanity. Well, that is a beautiful goal thing. Dr. John, thank you for being on the doctors, pharmacy a place for conversations that matter if you like this podcast, play subscribe to it and leave a comment and share with your friends on Facebook and Twitter, and we'll see next time on the doctors pharmacy..

Manhattan Washington DC President Obama food Drug administration Gemstar edge Asano Gates Foundation NIH Weiss Facebook Robert Johnson foundation Yuji Dr. John Twitter twenty billion dollars forty billion dollars six million dollars Twenty percent
"science medicine" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on Science Talk

"Introducing simply light. Can you hear that? That's the sweet sound of less sugar and fewer calories? We want to make sure you here. It's less sugar and fewer calories because it tastes so good. Welcome to scientific American science. Talk posted on August second, two thousand eighteen. I'm Steve Mirsky. On this episode, what starts to happen is the quality of the science starts to erode and the result, what we're seeing is a significant number of studies to get published aren't true. That's the familiar voice of Richard Harris. These been on National Public Radio for three decades covering science medicine and the environment and his. The author of the book rigor mortis how sloppy science creates worthless. Cures crushes hope and wastes billions who actually spoke in April two thousand seventeen. When the book first came out in hardcover it was released as a paperback. This year I met with Richard Harrison recording studio at New York University. Richard, let's talk about the title of the book because I think that's important to get out of this is not a book about dead bodies, although in some ways. Well, yes, yes, rigor, mortis is not about the stiffness that comes with death, but it is was for me an irresistible pun rigor being what is missing or in short supply in biomedicine right now. And I hasten to say that rigorous not dead in scientific research, but I will say that it is. It is limping along a little bit and it could use a good jolt of energy. Let's talk about what the what the issues are. Right. Well, there are many issues depends where you wanna start, but we could start talking about the deepest issue, which is I think that there's something amiss with the culture right now in science, biomedical research in particular. And I think that that culture is being being put into trouble by the funding problems that are. Facing by medical research. The h. budget doubled between nineteen Ninety-three in two thousand three. And then congress had we've done enough and they stopped that didn't increase at that didn't decrease it, but but inflation has been eating away that budget and between two thousand and three and twenty fifteen in real spending terms. The amount of money is basically gone down by twenty percent and that increase at the beginning important because built a huge number of labs. They hired a bunch of people that were more mouths to feed, and now there's less and less money to do it, and that is created a hyper competitive environment. And that's really the back story to this whole book, which is that that pressure that that searched for funding that that brutal fight for funding makes people do things that they don't necessarily want to do. People really honestly often have a choice between doing what's best for their career or what's doing best for science. And that's that's a, that's a position. No one should be in, but. That's fundamentally what's going on here. I just want to say because you know, we, we have a wide audience and we mentioned the h. and we should probably just say what that is and what they do. Sure. The NIH is the national institutes of health. They provide about thirty billion dollars a year for for biomedical research. They are by far the leading federal agency that that provides research for civilian research in this country bigger than the National Science Foundation NASA, all of the rest of those things that you may have heard about, but they basically put out grants to universities across the country to the researchers were working those universities. They fund some research on their campus in Bethesda as well. But that is really the backbone of of funding for biomedical research in this country. And I'm talking here not necessarily about the end stage of drug development because they're pharmaceutical companies are taking the baton, and they actually spend more than the NIH does in drug development issues. But the funds. Basic research. They go from just the biology saying, hey, here's a great idea. This might be something useful as a drug or medical advance of some sort. So they are. They fund the research that that no one would fund otherwise, because it's not obviously profitable, it's exploration, right?.

mortis NIH Steve Mirsky Richard Harris Richard Harrison Richard National Science Foundation NA New York University congress Bethesda thirty billion dollars twenty percent three decades
"science medicine" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"By those folks i became active in that movement in the nineteen nineties and that led me to more generally explore the question of what's the relationship between our bodies and our personal and social identities and what should be the role of science and medicine in mediating those relationship so there's various things that mediate that relationship so who gets to tell you what your body means sometimes it's a religious organization like a church sometimes it's the state telling you what it means sometimes it's medicine sometime acid science and in my work because i'm historian of science medicine i was especially interested in places where science and medicine would be the determining factor in telling us what our bodies mean right when you talk about this intersection between the body and identity you know the psychology interpreters tuition between the body and mind right you know it's very interesting it's interesting the different ways that those things can come apart are those things can you know in in the general population we've all sorts of correlations in some people focus so much on the general trends and then kind of treat those who have these kind of real unique mismatches so to speak although that's probably terrible horror to us actually but in ways that they come apart that the question is you know how can we show them humanity right and fit them within a larger scientific framework yes and and a social framework because with danger comes in is not that scientists can't make sense in because you know the scientists can't make sense of you but your life is fine it doesn't matter where it matters is if the social system can't make sense view annan assistant where science is very powerful as in our culture then it really matters if science can't make sense of you in its public than there's a question about gigante socially so that's what can happen in that is what happened in the late nineteenth century with regard to people who were what we today would call intersex people were between male and female types biological whose bodies came into.

gigante annan
"science medicine" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"At all bush just a mistrust of science medicine right it's a mistress of science and medicine it's a purse new tone merge do filters mode gonna put disease oh you gotta resort to a bill kebir he didn't say anything about vaccinations causing autism had no it was absolutely nothing like that when he said vaccines caused was eight o zero stay interesting take much much different than autism boop her said but the ruling class you smallest smallpox vaccines in africa and hepatitis b vaccines in america to thin out the black hispanic and gay populations as they were considered by the most evil among us to be expendable we'll this is what a lot of a pro life people say as well about margaret sanger the woman who founded planned parenthood it kind of raps all into it as well just that she is a person while she was extremely racist but that was her that was uh that was her planned out way down at a black high black and hispanic populations but it's weird how like bad idea has been around for very long time in the idea of aids being especially the two aides was incredibly scary in the early nineties this was definitely who is viewed as the plague telling everybody they do because they didn't know how to because at first when they just made it grid and they said it was a gay disease they helm like isolated and so people weren't as panicked about it and soon as really came known than anybody can have it it was i mean it was very scary see how we used it to i i see having a mistrust of government and i also get the idea of because w what did we did the civilised tests.

bush america margaret sanger africa
"science medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mean in the first place it's an incredibly difficult problem right just i mean understanding want how a of a brain will degenerate overtime there's there's there's even a fundamental disagreement about what is the mechanism of authors the there's lack said there there's the towers and the beta people would raise a sort of intellectual fight about what what the underlying mechanism is yeah and then as i mentioned the you know the guy who studying it says i'm trying to measure cognition how do we measure cognition and it's a disease that takes you know can take many many years to develop so you have to vote out of patients than and on top of all of that if you're trying to study it in mice or something i get a sense of what's going on and to accelerate the process we have no idea how analogous mouse experiments early humans in fact i learned over the course of this reporting the book that there's that that monkeys and other primates other nonhuman primates tend to have remarkably high levels of the of the some of these proteins that are associated with alzheimer's in their brains and they seemed to be perfectly healthy so it's like so i mean they're out clumping together but they have these these bitter amyloid they're very are are in high concience chretien's in in animals at saint a very clear cognition so it's so maybe that's so maybe we deal with his proteins differently than the animals do or maybe there's something called cylinder sauntering on that hard to measure the monkeys cognition now i think i think they have that porn all right yet it but it's you know maybe it's just a fundamental even though there so who related now maybe there's a there's some through the fundamental biological difference or maybe the whole bidding amyloid thing is completely wrong but yeah i mean they're these are i mean some of these i mean are i am sympathetic with scientists who who are struggling with some of these problems that are incredibly difficult problems to even even to understand let alone to try to develop drugs to combat it's hard would you speak about studies for pharmaceuticals to.

alzheimer concience chretien
"science medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For your experiment you'll you'll do twelve mice you'll say it's a pilot study new cross your fingers that if you had done it with the right number of mice he would get the same result so that's a problem partly because of funding constraints and partly because scientists no make the best with they have and and sometimes that's enough often it's not enough and and then scientists are sometimes lobby in the way they use mouth mice an experiment right right you mentioned even that the kind of bedding that used for mice in one experimental one part of it might be different an app or their this group with mice will be more stressed out then this group of my and so many little so some things that can go wrong exactly and you can if you have if you start with a group of mites for your experiment if you if you if they if you're not careful in some of them we put 10 from the same litter in one one part of your experiment and ten from another litter and another part of your experiment the difference may not be that you that the experiment is different on one the other it may be that you've got different litter so so the answer is assigned to should know that they should mix them up so that some from one litter going in each side of the experiment but those sorts of things don't always dawn on scientists and the and so those are the kinds of problems that i talk about loon route down en en cell lines i remember i mean probably a number of you here of red the immortal life of henrietta lacks and i remember reading that learning about here's this this this cell line from it from a cervical tumor correct right very virulent tumor and an end that it there is the first time that that scientists were able to keep cells growing and multiplying outside a body and was very exciting now you have this these cells that you could test drugs upon all but i didn't realize is that not only are they immortal but they're kinda like out of control the other kudzu at away grow like crazy and they outcompete anything so if you're not entirely careful in your lab and you get one he'll also.

henrietta
"science medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That mice are not to simply furry little people although we often tend to think of them as such as those for the problem we we think well they're mammals were mammals what could possibly go wrong the answer is a lot can possibly go wrong because because there i mean they're useful for getting some basic ideas about what's going on but you shouldn't take literally what we see in the mouth and assume that's going to work at a person and so that's that's one thing the other thing is that this scientists who use mice often don't use enough weiss because it's turned out to be expensive to do some of these experiments and if you're university scientists and you have a grant that gives you a certain amount of money if you don't if you can't afford a hundred mice for your experiment you'll you'll do twelve mice you'll say it's a pilot study in your cross our fingers that if you had done it with the right number of mice he would get the same result in that so that's a problem partly because of funding constraints and partly because scientists no make the best with what they have and and sometimes outs enough often it's not enough and and inside israel sometimes of sloppy in the way they use most mice and experiments right where you mentioned even at the kind of bedding that used for mice in one experimental one part of it might be different an app or their this group of mice will be more stressed out then this group of my and so many little there's so many some things that can go right exactly and you can if you have if you start with a group of my for your experiment if you if you if they if you're not careful in some of them reporter or 10 from the same litter in one one part of your experiment and ten from another litter in another part of your experiment the difference may not be that you that the experiment is different on one that the other it may be that you've got different litter so so the after is assigned to should know that they should mix them up so that some from one litter going in each side of the experiment.

weiss israel reporter
"science medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"Lot they can't control condensation haven't figured out have do that you've been told that the consensus is that there's manmade climate change it was a famous petition put together by the national center for public policy research in two thousand eight doctor arthur robins the oregon institute of science medicine announced that more than thirty one thousand scientists had signed a petition rejecting the theory of human cause climate warming ever hear about that no fact that petition has muffed doctor john britton now retired professor industrial instrumentation at universe his southampton her britain we thought he'd have a little fun he composed a list don't remember liberty and tyranny out of how old is that but i don't even know seven eight years oh nine maybe he put together a a list of alarmist claims and news reports news reports that may make global warming caused whereas cost there's so many i had the shrink the font type and put it in four pages of the book for one radio shy decided to read all or did i get complaints fairly adel ended here you do it it'd be the usual crab i'll just read a few of them to you climate change has caused or is caused by acne agricultural land increase afghan poppies destroyed africa devastated african aid threaten african conflict aggressive weeds air pressure changes alaska reshaped allergies increased alps melding amazon a desert american dream and in february breeding earlier are not breeding at all ancient forest romatically changed animals head for the hills and artika grows ice in arctic ice shrinks and articles an an arctic sea see life is at risk it's an alphabetical order anxiety treatment algae blooms archaeological sites threatened arctic bogs melt arctic in bloom arctic ice free arctic lakes disappear arctic tundra to burn atlantic ocean less salty atlantic ocean more salty atmospheric circulation modified i'd of the killer jellyfish avalanches reduced avalanches increased baghdad snow bahrain underwater bananas grow beer shortage beadle infestation better beer i'm in the only into the bs it would take an hour maybe two.

climate change john britton professor britain global warming american dream arthur robins oregon institute of science me africa alaska in bloom baghdad seven eight years
"science medicine" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on KKAT

"Lot they can't control condensation haven't figured out have do that you've been told that the consensus is that there's manmade climate change it was a famous petition put together by the national center for public policy research in two thousand eight doctor arthur robins the oregon institute of science medicine announced that more than thirty one thousand scientists had signed a petition rejecting the theory of human cause climate warming ever hear about that no fact that petition has mocked doctor john britton now retired professor industrial instrumentation at universe his southampton britain quite thought he'd have a little fun he composed a list don't remember liberty and tyranny atta how old is that but now i don't even know seven eight years oh nine maybe he put together a list of alarmist claims and news reports news reports that may make global warming caused whereas cost there's so many i had the shrink the font type and put it in four pages of the book the point one radio show i decided to read all of them voted i get complain fairly adel ended here you do it it'd be the usual crap i'll just read a few of them to you climate change has caused or is caused by acne agricultural land increase afghan poppies destroyed africa devastated african aid threatened african conflict aggressive weeds air pressure changes alaska reshaped allergies increased alps melding amazon a desert america dream and in february's breeding earlier are not breeding at all ancient forest romatically changed animals head for the hills an article grows ice in arctic ice shrinks in articles an an arctic sea see life is at risk his enough better quarter anxiety treatment algae blooms archaeological sites threatened arctic bogs melt arctic and bloom arctic ice free arctic lakes disappear arctic tundra to burn atlantic ocean less salty atlantic ocean more salty atmospheric circulation modify attack of the killer a jellyfish avalanches reduced avalanches increased baghdad snow bahrain underwater bananas grow beer shortage beadle infestation better beer i'm in the only into the bs would take an hour maybe two hours to read.

climate change john britton professor britain global warming arthur robins oregon institute of science me africa alaska america baghdad seven eight years two hours
"science medicine" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on WTMA

"Is that help i think it helps a lot they can't control condensation have a figure out how to do that you've been told that the consensus is that there's may make climate change it was a famous petition put together by the national center for public policy research in two thousand eight doctor arthur robins with the oregon institute of science medicine announced that more than thirty one thousand scientists had signed a petition rejecting the theory of humancaused climate warming ever hear about that no fact that petitioners mocked doctor john britton now retired professor industrial instrumentation at universities southampton or britain we thought he'd have a little fun he composed a list remember liberty and tyranny out of how old is that book now i don't even know seven eight years oh nine maybe he put together a a list of alarmist claims and news reports news reports that may make global warming caused whereas 'cause there's so many i had the shrink the font type and put it in four pages of the book point one radio show i decided to read all voted i get complaints for what are you doing here today will be their usual crowd i'll just read a few of them to you climate change has caused or is caused by acne agricultural land increase afghan poppies destroyed africa devastated african aid threatened african conflict aggressive weeds air pressure changes alaska reshaped allergies increased alps melding amazon a desert american dream and infineon's breeding earlier or not breeding at all ancient forest romatically changed animals head for the hills and artika grows i said arctic ice shrinks in articles an an arctic c c life is at risk his enough barrack order anxiety treatment algae blooms archaeological sites threatened arctic bogs melt arctic in bloom arctic ice free arctic legs disappear arctic tundra to burn atlantic ocean less salty atlantic ocean more salty atmospheric circulation modify right attack of the killer jellyfish avalanches reduced avalanches increased baghdad snow bahrain underwater bananas grow beer shortage beadle infestation better beer i'm in the only into the bs there were taken our maybe two hours to read.

john britton professor global warming climate change american dream infineon arthur robins oregon institute of science me britain africa alaska in bloom baghdad seven eight years two hours
"science medicine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Is that help i think it helps a lot they can't control condensation haven't figured out have do that you've been told that the consensus is that there's may climate change there was a famous petition put together by the national center for public policy research two thousand eight doctor arthur robins the oregon institute of science medicine announced that more than thirty one thousand scientists had signed a petition rejecting the theory of human cause climate warming he ever hear about that no fact that petition has mocked doctor john britton now retired professor industrial instrumentation at university is southampton britain we thought he'd have a little fun he composed a list now remember liberty and tyranny how old is that but now i don't even know seven eight years oh nine maybe he put together a a list of alarmist claims in news reports news reports that may make global warming caused racecourse there's so many i had the shrink the font type and put it in four pages of the book the point one radio show i decided to read all of them voted i get complaints for what are you doing here you do it the be bit usual crap i'll just read a few of them to you climate change has caused or is caused by acne agricultural land increase afghan poppies destroyed africa devastated african aid threatened african conflict aggressive wheats air pressure changes alaska reshape allergies increased alps melding amazon a desert american dream and in february breeding earlier are not breeding at all ancient forest romatically changed animals head for the hills and artika grows ice in arctic ice shrinks in articles an an arctic sea see life is at risk it's enough berrocal order anxiety treatment algae blooms archaeological sites threatened arctic bogs melt arctic and bloom arctic ice free arctic lakes disappear arctic tundra to burn atlantic ocean less salty atlantic ocean more salty atmospheric circulation modify right at tackle the kill a jellyfish avalanches reduced avalanches increased baghdad snow bahrain underwater bananas grow beer shortage beadle infestation better beer eminent only into the bs it would take an hour maybe two hours to read.

john britton professor global warming climate change american dream arthur robins oregon institute of science me britain africa baghdad seven eight years two hours
"science medicine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"science medicine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Lot they can't control condensation haven't figured out how to do that you've been told that the consensus is that there's manmade climate change there was a famous petition put together by the national center for public policy research two thousand eight doctor arthur robins with the oregon institute of science medicine announced that more than thirty one thousand scientists had signed a petition rejecting the theory of human cause climate warming ever hear about that no fact that petitioners mocked doctor john britton now retired professor industrial instrumentation at universe who southampton britain we thought he'd have a little fun he composed a list don't remember liberty and tyranny out of how old is that but now i don't even know seven eight years oh nine maybe he put together a a list of alarmist claims and news reports news reports that may make global warming caused whereas cost there's so many i had to shrink the font type and put it in four pages of the book during one radio show i decided to read all of them boarded i get complaints what are you doing here you do it it'd be the usual crowd i'll just read a few of them to you climate change has caused or is caused by acne agricultural land increase afghan poppies destroyed african devastated african aid threatened african conflict aggressive weeds hair pressure changes alaska reshaped allergies increased alps melding amazon a desert american dream and in feb in breeding earlier are not breeding at all ancient forests dramatically changed animals head for the hills an article grows ice in arctic ice shrinks and articles an an arctic sea see life is at risk it's enough barrack order anxiety treatment algae blooms archaeological sites threatened arctic bogs melt arctic and bloom arctic ice free article lakes disappear arctic tundra to burn atlantic ocean less salty atlantic ocean more salty atmospheric circulation modify right attack of the kill a jellyfish avalanches reduced avalanches increased baghdad snow bahrain underwater bananas grow beers shortage beadle infestation better beer i'm in the only into the bs it would take an hour maybe two.

climate change john britton professor global warming american dream arthur robins oregon institute of science me britain alaska baghdad seven eight years