25 Burst results for "Science Communication"

Kids Are Using Soda to Fake Positive COVID Tests

Kottke Ride Home

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Kids Are Using Soda to Fake Positive COVID Tests

"Kids in england are using soda and juice to fake positive cova tests so that they can get out of class just another example of kids applying their genius in excellent if not quite productive ways. Mark larcher professor of science communication in chemistry at the university of whole decided figure out. Why exactly this works. His you know apart from kids may be skewing. Some of the data and causing unnecessary alarm about outbreaks of their schools. It is potentially concerning that something like coca cola. Could trip the tests. I you should know that these are lateral flow tests. Lsat's in the states they're more commonly referred to simply as rapid tests as opposed to the pc are tests. That can take a few days to hear back at some cases. They're handed out for people to test themselves at home. They function a bit like pregnancy tests with two lines appearing on the device to indicate the presence of the virus. But of course. You're using a swab from your nose or throat. not you know. Pe- lords explains how the tests normally work in the conversation quotes. If you open up an elephant device you'll find a strip of paper like material called nitro cellulose and a small red pad hidden under the plastic casing below. The tea line absorbed to the red pad are antibodies that bind the cove in nineteen virus. They are also attached. To the gold nanoparticles. Tiny particles of gold actually appear red which allow us to see where the antibodies are on the device. When you do a test you mix your sample with liquid buffer solution ensuring the sample stays at an optimum ph before dropping it on the strip the fluid wicks up the nitra cellular strip and picks up the golden antibodies the latter also bind the virus if present further up the strip to the t. For test are more. Antibodies that bind the virus. These antibodies are not free to move. They're stuck to the nitro cellulose as the red smear of gold labeled. Antibodies passed the second set of antibodies. These also grab hold of the virus. The viruses then bound to both sets of antibodies. Leaving everything including the gold immobilized on a line. Next to the t. On the device indicating a positive

Mark Larcher University Of Whole Coca Cola England
"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:12 min | 5 months ago

"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Better. You'll being paid money of course and if people don't come no outside my door in his forum and get people in an ice. Sold it my. I was bored let aggressive. I came up smiling. How's your day. how are you doing. Do you like the universities. Amazing isn't it. Yeah room sure. Like why are we in here again science. Oh god is attacking me. And that's how i cope glenn so have these huge rooms. Because i was chasing people down. I went through salesman on this. And that's how it works now. No salesperson but i liked talking about science. It wasn't hard to convince me to get up till about science but then they will like to calm like while. You're a nurse onto jet tours amazon. You'll giving me half an hour but my study talking about how an eeg works at amazon. What i say. When i see brain signal is an hour long talk by itself the like any of course they need to know how many works because if i say can somebody then but they need to know what that means. Because if i'm talking about and this is very relevant with covert and stuff now. I'm not an expert umbrella. Not an expert in academia. But if somebody says we've shown that covert is going to spread to these regions in the next five weeks that's meaningless how i know from that. You're making publicity guests and onoda publicity is probably worth listening to. But i want to see you methods so i took the same approach. I'm not. I wasn't able to do the format i was given and i actually did do to talks over here. And then they re designed to do it and it led more into line. That i wasn't happy with so i made my shower. I led to a philosophy. And i'm sure as you will agree with us on many of your guests with agree with it when we go to conference hall used to go to conference. We do not talk about the findings. Will we actually talk about the methods for about ninety percent of the time and bicker about them because scientists do bicker. Nobody should ever try and pretend to. We don't imed after that when we agree where we liked the methadone. Aw whatever the finding is sure is probably just wanted as everybody agrees that the research was improperly. You took some Analysis and then it says we found that the memory in square loses ready high in winter random. I have nuclear. The memory classics grows as we figure methods of sound. Everybody's just gonna go. Yes you'll kotoka right lockton public engagement in the opposite way. They say tomato. Kill cancer you like. would you mean like eating. Tomatoes advocate for anybody. I'm so lost and listen to what they're actually saying is if we take chemical from a tomorrow when purified and cancer cells and put them in a petri dish and and put this onto the cancer cells women to a treatment it kills cancer cells betted into treatment loud. And you're like oh that makes sense that doesn't mean they're eating russia's we've seltzer. I'm going to kill kansas. Nobody was ever saying that. But if you start with the result. I i can't understand what you did. And if account understand what you did. How do i understand. Wherever i catt. Sadat was the show. The show is talk about the methods. Talk to me like you're conference. And i have been asked by journalists. How do you make the show. And i'm sitting in neuroscience twist of gun ha ha ha very funny but really and then i said no i'm not kidding go pace neuroscience and the like waltz but yet scientists liked to be spoken to scientists. Of course we have somebody on who was discussing about so coaches and origin that takes and stuff and i actually know some of the labs that he corresponds with and i know the people who work in them personally and we talk about that. That's a chat where i'm told them to the scientists. Now hayes word the show part comes in. It's my job to translate that that's the public becomes work and i'm not against doing that is work. Nobody should think that. I get to sit. It's been all day drinking expensive champagne chatting with amazing scientists celebrities and i just post them out with no effort. I'm boom i'm done is not what's happening. I do an interview. I picked guests that. I think are interesting of them responsible. Don't and then we go over the talks. We talk about what i think is important and then i have to go free episode and make it intelligible to an audience that did not have the privilege of neuroscience education. That's my unique selling point to bring this back to that. That's something that. I do arguably better than most of the shows. So if you wanted to say okay. I'm interested about how imaging working. I don't wanna know that you found his new to the brain shows hope which there is no positive brand new shows. How stupid does. I've seen that. But i won't go on a show where they told me how that actually done so i could understand what these images on the screen mean because by the way your brain doesn't actually to do do stuff. That's a statistical image that we provide. I will explain that to you. Actually have to episodes where we go physicist unexplained an mri. So what what. I'm getting in for the listeners. Whoever let's say project that resembles what you've done and i wanna talk a little bit more about that. Even we know we have ten minutes more of interview. But what i get is if you have something that's the that's a passion for you and if you if you want to bring it to the public you really need and tell me. Tell me how you feel about this. You need to put yourself in the shoes of the public. That's going to be listening and say what value am am. I is the listener. Gonna be getting from an episode of my show or a post of my blog. I you know. And and what's going to be unique. And as you mentioned about what. I'm offering versus all the other content that's being published every day out there. So i agree with parts and a couple of clarification so for example. I love movies and video games. Now i've never made a show on that. I don't know how to make a show better than the people i watch. Darryl just some really amazing analytical minds on things like podcasting twitch on youtube dot provide amazing insights. I didn't make a better show. So i haven't bothered however when you're thinking about get into the mind of the public that i think is a trap and the reason is my view is if an scientists our guest is interested in what they want to talk about and they have genuine infused that i work and mo- scientists do is enough to carry the episode. They found that topic so interesting. They want to spend their life on it. There's got to elise be something that talk about and yeah sure one in ten times. I'm wrong when i send it onto a review in nisi this episode because i have a bunch of people who listen to my episodes to make sure the right level in their understood most of the time. If i can find what. I think's interesting. I can find what makes that person view left. Hippocampal pyramidal memory cells so fascinating. I can probably get out of that person why you should catholic fourteen minutes to listen to an episode. But that's my point. My point is don't think it's opposite to what you're saying because you kind of have an editorial view on And you say you also have people who listen to kind of vet an episode but you you are still trying to digest or or take in what the person says and then work the episode in a way that at the end. There's a there's a line there's a message. That's going to be intelligible and palatable to your public right that's things yeah that's what i was saying when you have to have your your end user in mind when you're producing something is was in that sense the actually line with what you're saying but also on occasion the job podcast is not to explain to you the audience to work in a way that you will understand. I am offering an opportunity for you to understand. What the guesses. Because if somebody says explained to me is the case of people will ask for what we already.

amazon half an hour fourteen minutes ten minutes twitch next five weeks Darryl Sadat russia lockton ten times about ninety percent one youtube dot tomorrow eeg
"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:49 min | 5 months ago

"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Who. You are where you were. Let's say two three years ago. And who have this burgeoning idea that that they they'd want to also kind of put their their their interests out there in some format Bill talk about if you can talk about the process of how to three years ago three or four years ago in your mind. This idea came up in how you then you know what steps you follow to then make it happen and make it into what it is today. Okay okay so. This involves a series of paradoxes. They are important to mention that. This is gonna sound weighed on. You're gonna have to find jeweled line in the set of contradictory and i'm going to be very clear from the outset that they are contradictory. I i if he wants to be public engagement. You need to know. Do you want just go to a school back. When it could be done obviously cove. It will eventually pass on this. We follow good routines. And i hope everybody is safe out there. We follow good routines. Then you can go to schools. I've talked to a class. They put me in front of four classes about back each hour. That was tiring but moving to get to see kids who are just really meeting. Science to the first talk brill. Science baloney really speak to. Maybe i think maybe eight tickets to whole experience. My show goes out and gets a lot more to map but my interaction with them is different now. I chose to go for the more impersonal interaction. Now if somebody wants to come in hit me up on twitter we've had shots had people send some quite personal messages urging messages. And that's great. But i don't need that if you want to send that to me and you wanna communicate. I'm here to talk. But i do not stay awake at night needing people to dude. I in the same way that i. If i went to a school i would need face to face interaction but some people do. Some people really want not personal interaction and then looking at a feed or looking Of website just going to do nothing for them so pick because that's an independent importance scale and maybe it means you need to wait a little bit because we need to make sure it's safe. That's the second thing is if you all going to go down the side of putting out a blog or website or some variant his important pop quality aim for the highest level of quality. You can manage now. That doesn't mean that you have to make a fool blow production show but can you add it. Can you make sure it's okay. I've had audio. Were into beat somebody zoom or into somebody over skype and the odious broken up a bit but the interior was really good so i put it out that and i put it the front tank by the way. The internet wasn't great country. That happened when lockdown started in the uk band. Width was limited across the entire country. So getting a good clear coating every inch but people like the shows. But i aim to make the best quality and keep pushing what it can be and you have to be your personal barrier to anything bad going out. You have to be the one that keeps saying no. No no and the reason. I tell you this you an entity if you get somebody who pushes it out. They will be more inclined to stop. They'll say just push it up. Put it out that keep running next contract. And that's the way business works we can get into that but you ought to want to pick swings good or not and when you're doing a face to face interaction now also doesn't mattress merch. Obviously you're going to be as good as you can make it. You're not going to sit there scrutinizing over every breath maybe description wasn't as clean as i could possibly make you just going to try and keep up with slow and keep people engaged the other thing that if you want to try and do a regular put is you have to dream big an act big before you are so when i started. Everybody was saying you never going to make money doing podcasting. It's a black holes. You'll get a couple of hundred people. Listen maybe across entire world. And that's cool except i'm going okay but i want to make this network and i wanted to have more shows and i won't have international guests. I made that because that was the goal. That's they aimed for and to be honest. I did this back in my a-levels so for anybody who doesn't level is the test that you do in the capable. You go to university and i had this fate so i had friends who would literally dual the numbers and calculate the minimum tesco. They needed to get finals to pass and be like oh. I need to d-minus so i'm going to study to what the guy says. Give me a d. minus not okay ferry but what if something happens what if you get sick. You're going to get a d. minus and you're gonna fail and that's great. I studied to an a star. Because i am one of those insane people that will just do and i know there are a lot of people who don't the point but i viewed if i ain't a star and i don't get as good as i want and at least aaplo minus or maybe it'd be -plicitly go very bad and that's good enough gas me where i want to be so took the same view on the show. I was like okay. What do i want to look like. I wanted to look like an international show with sponsors and really high level gas people who are the leaders of that field. Let's start making that. What does that look like. And i did have people laugh. I i know in a mean way but kind of holy christ. You are gunning for this kind of reflexive that's like saying somebody tons of textiles guys. We're gonna fight twitter. You're like okay. Good luck you'll be just like. That was a sentence you just said and then some people would be would i. We have every single series. I've run has had some kind of sponsor we've had international shows. People who are in discussion full nobel laureates pushed for. But that means you have to kind of make it in this crazy over-ambitious way that is absolutely setting to be marked and to be ridiculed that you are unrealistic. Because if you're just gonna make shower you in a couple of months talk about some pay had and maybe you'll put the you just take the live recording of your journal club and put it up on a show. Is that something you would listen to. And if that's not something you'd listen to what you would listen to offer. You need to put the evidence so then came into this was like driving quality quality. Just keep pushing what's best. How do we save money because labs have to save money and lots of money saving techniques from being around the lab and also learning how to do things that i don't know so i'm not a finance person. I am absolutely in the creative sector and starry eyed thinking about philosophy so when i have to have cats about fines. I don't know how finance works but at one point i also didn't know about the physics of an mri machine and i did learn physics of an mri machine. To of course. So i can learn and you take those skills. So that's what i would suggest. Remember you have mendel which one you wanna talk about member which kind of audiences and how you want to interact with people and i guess that we'll bring this naturally under the unique selling point toward cooler neuro science which he finds interesting. And i'd like to thank you and focus on how you on the show to look. Think about what you wanted to be even if it crazy and push for quality even if an doesn't mean it has to be super expensive if you ever look on our show. Mascot and logo is a cartoon made by one of my mates you too smart and graphic design and he really didn't charge threat but it's a nice understandable recognizable cartoon which was really clean image. I think like onto hasty formats in specific formats different websites. We gotta clean up a couple of times or it went through these filters and it came out with four matches made in and we've got to reject but it's always been pinky my mascot in world cooler floating around and we call gas lighting brightens because it is all linked. Him did not cause me huge money. So joe means.

twitter three years ago Bill today eight tickets three two three years ago four years ago second thing every inch first each hour uk four matches a star one one point nobel single series of hundred people
"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:17 min | 5 months ago

"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Or no everyone. Who's in signs and even young scientists and even phd researchers should Develop some Some sort of like science communication and muscle doing the beach the and and then throughout their academic career. And it feels like you went to a really extreme extreme. Yeah extreme type because building a podcast is very different than starting blog or not very different but it has some particularities the starting a blog or having a twitter account. I i'm really interested on on your view and you know think of the listeners. Out there who are who. You are where you were. Let's say two three years ago. And who have this burgeoning idea that that they they'd want to also kind of put their their their interests out there in some format Bill talk about if you can talk about the process of how to three years ago three or four years ago in your mind. This idea came up in how you then you know what steps you follow to then make it happen and make it into what it is today. Okay okay so. This involves a series of paradoxes. They are important to mention that. This is gonna sound weighed on. You're gonna have to find jeweled line in the set of contradictory and i'm going to be very clear from the outset that they are contradictory. I i if he wants to be public engagement. You need to know. Do you want just go to a school back. When it could be done obviously cove. It will eventually pass on this. We follow good routines. And i hope everybody is safe out there. We follow good routines. Then you can go to schools. I've talked to a class. They put me in front of four classes about back each hour. That was tiring but moving to get to see kids who are just really meeting. Science to the first talk brill. Science baloney really speak to. Maybe i think maybe eight tickets to whole experience. My show goes out and gets a lot more to map but my interaction with them is different now. I chose to go for the more impersonal interaction. Now if somebody wants to come in hit me up on twitter we've had shots had people send some quite personal messages urging messages. And that's great. But i don't need that if you want to send that to me and you wanna communicate. I'm here to talk. But i do not stay awake at night needing people to dude. I in the same way that i. If i went to a school i would need face to face interaction but some people do. Some people really want not personal interaction and then looking at a feed or looking Of website just going to do nothing for them so pick because that's an independent importance scale and maybe it means you need to wait a little bit because we need to make sure it's safe. That's the second thing is if you all going to go down the side of putting out a blog or website or some variant his important pop quality aim for the highest level of quality. You can manage now. That doesn't mean that you have to make a fool blow production show but can you add it. Can you make sure it's okay. I've had audio. Were into beat somebody zoom or into somebody over skype and the odious broken up a bit but the interior was really good so i put it out that and i put it the front tank by the way. The internet wasn't great country. That happened when lockdown started in the uk band. Width was limited across the entire country. So getting a good clear coating every inch but people like the shows. But i aim to make the best quality and keep pushing what it can be and you have to be your personal barrier to anything bad going out. You have to be the one that keeps saying no. No no and the reason. I tell you this you an entity if you get somebody who pushes it out. They will be more inclined to stop. They'll say just push it up. Put it out that keep running next contract. And that's the way business works we can get into that but you ought to want to pick swings good or not and when you're doing a face to face interaction now also doesn't mattress merch. Obviously you're going to be as good as you can make it. You're not going to sit there scrutinizing over every breath maybe description wasn't as clean as i could possibly make you just going to try and keep up with slow and keep people engaged the other thing that if you want to try and do a regular put is you have to dream big an act big before you are so when i started. Everybody was saying you never going to make money doing podcasting. It's a black holes. You'll get a couple of hundred people. Listen maybe across entire world. And that's cool except i'm going okay but i want to make this network and i wanted to have more shows and i won't have international guests. I made that because that was the goal. That's they aimed for and to be honest. I did this back in my a-levels so for anybody who doesn't level is the test that you do in the capable. You go to university and i had this fate so i had friends who would literally dual the numbers and calculate the minimum tesco. They needed to get finals to pass and be like oh. I need to d-minus so i'm going to study to what the guy says. Give me a d. minus not okay ferry but what if something happens what if you get sick. You're going to get a d. minus and you're gonna fail and that's great. I studied to an a star. Because i am one of those insane people that will just do and i know there are a lot of people who don't the point but i viewed if i ain't a star and i don't get as good as i want and at least aaplo minus or maybe it'd be -plicitly go very bad and that's good enough gas me where i want to be so took the same view on the show. I was like okay. What do i want to look like. I wanted to look like an international show with sponsors and really high level gas people who are the leaders of that field. Let's start making that. What does that look like. And i did have people laugh. I i know in a mean way but kind of holy christ. You are gunning for this kind of reflexive that's like saying somebody tons of textiles guys. We're gonna fight twitter. You're like okay. Good luck you'll be just like. That was a sentence you just said and then some people would be would i. We have every single series. I've run has had some kind of sponsor we've had international shows. People who are in discussion full nobel laureates pushed for. But that means you have to kind of make it in this crazy over-ambitious way that is absolutely setting to be marked and to be ridiculed that you are unrealistic. Because if you're just gonna make shower you in a couple of months talk about some pay had and maybe you'll put the you just take the live recording of your journal club and put it up on a show. Is that something you would listen to. And if that's not something you'd listen to what you would listen to offer. You need to put the evidence so then came into this was like driving quality quality. Just keep pushing what's best. How do we save money because labs have to save money and lots of money saving techniques from being around the lab and also learning how to do things that i don't know so i'm not a finance person. I am absolutely in the creative sector and starry eyed thinking about philosophy so when i have to have cats about fines. I don't know how finance works but at one point i also didn't know about the physics of an mri machine and.

twitter today three years ago two three years ago second thing four years ago Bill each hour three eight tickets first one every inch one point skype a star uk christ four classes every single series
"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:49 min | 5 months ago

"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"I'm being so humble. I never post about myself. That's how it works. But if i can spend time talking about another research i'm putting up my conversation with them. That's what i want to do so i. My research is a small part of what goes on the shower. Fine that's cool. Yeah man now. So i find it super interesting and i know there's a lot of talk out there in the latest in the last few years or you see it much more people talking about how scientists know scientists the as a whole or no everyone. Who's in signs and even young scientists and even phd researchers should Develop some Some sort of like science communication and muscle doing the beach the and and then throughout their academic career. And it feels like you went to a really extreme extreme. Yeah extreme type because building a podcast is very different than starting blog or not very different but it has some particularities the starting a blog or having a twitter account. I i'm really interested on on your view and you know think of the listeners. Out there who are who. You are where you were. Let's say two three years ago. And who have this burgeoning idea that that they they'd want to also kind of put their their their interests out there in some format Bill talk about if you can talk about the process of how to three years ago three or four years ago in your mind. This idea came up in how you then you know what steps you follow to then make it happen and make it into what it is today. Okay okay so. This involves a series of paradoxes. They are important to mention that. This is gonna sound weighed on. You're gonna have to find jeweled line in the set of contradictory and i'm going to be very clear from the outset that they are contradictory. I i if he wants to be public engagement. You need to know. Do you want just go to a school back. When it could be done obviously cove. It will eventually pass on this. We follow good routines. And i hope everybody is safe out there. We follow good routines. Then you can go to schools. I've talked to a class. They put me in front of four classes about back each hour. That was tiring but moving to get to see kids who are just really meeting. Science to the first talk brill. Science baloney really speak to. Maybe i think maybe eight tickets to whole experience. My show goes out and gets a lot more to map but my interaction with them is different now. I chose to go for the more impersonal interaction. Now if somebody wants to come in hit me up on twitter we've had shots had people send some quite personal messages urging messages. And that's great. But i don't need that if you want to send that to me and you wanna communicate. I'm here to talk. But i do not stay awake at night needing people to dude. I in the same way that i. If i went to a school i would need face to face interaction but some people do. Some people really want not personal interaction and then looking at a feed or looking Of website just going to do nothing for them so pick because that's an independent importance scale and maybe it means you need to wait a little bit because we need to make sure it's safe. That's the second thing is if you all going to go down the side of putting out a blog or website or some variant his important pop quality aim for the highest level of quality. You can manage now. That doesn't mean that you have to make a fool blow production show but can you add it. Can you make sure it's okay. I've had audio. Were into beat somebody zoom or into somebody over skype and the odious broken up a bit but the interior was really good so i put it out that and i put it the front tank by the way. The internet wasn't great country. That happened when lockdown started in the uk band. Width was limited across the entire country. So getting a good clear coating every inch but people like the shows. But i aim to make the best quality and keep pushing what it can be and you have to be your personal barrier to anything bad going out. You have to be the one that keeps saying no. No no and the reason. I tell you this you an entity if you get somebody who pushes it out. They will be more inclined to stop. They'll say just push it up. Put it out that keep running next contract. And that's the way business works we can get into that but you ought to want to pick swings good or not and when you're doing a face to face interaction now also doesn't mattress merch. Obviously you're going to be as good as you can make it. You're not going to sit there scrutinizing over every breath maybe description wasn't as clean as i could possibly make you just going to try and keep up with slow and keep people engaged the other thing that if you want to try and do a regular put is you have to dream big an act big before you are so when i started. Everybody was saying you never going to make money doing podcasting. It's a black holes. You'll get a couple of hundred people. Listen maybe across entire world. And that's cool except i'm going okay but i want to make this network and i wanted to have more shows and i won't have international guests. I made that because that was the goal. That's they aimed for and to be honest. I did this back in my a-levels so for anybody who doesn't level is the test that you do in the capable. You go to university and i had this fate so i had friends who would literally dual the numbers and calculate the minimum tesco. They needed to get finals to pass and be like oh. I need to d-minus so i'm going to study to what the guy says. Give me a d. minus not okay ferry but what if something happens what if you get sick. You're going to get a d. minus and you're gonna fail and that's great. I studied to an a star. Because i am one of those insane people that will just do and i know there are a lot of people who don't the point but i viewed if i ain't a star and i don't get as good as i want and at least aaplo minus or maybe it'd be -plicitly go very bad and that's good enough gas me where i want to be so took the same view on the show. I was like okay. What do i want to look like. I wanted to look like an international show with sponsors and really high level gas people who are the leaders of that field. Let's start making that. What does that look like. And i did have people laugh. I i know in a mean way but kind of holy christ. You are gunning for this kind of reflexive that's like saying somebody tons of textiles guys. We're gonna fight twitter. You're like okay. Good luck you'll be just like. That was a sentence you just said and then some people would be would i. We have every single series. I've run has had some kind of sponsor we've had international shows. People who are in discussion full nobel laureates pushed for. But that means you have to kind of make it in this crazy over-ambitious way that is absolutely setting to be marked and to be ridiculed that you are unrealistic. Because if you're just gonna make shower you in a couple of months talk about some pay had and maybe you'll put the you just take the live recording of your journal club and put it up on a show. Is that something you would listen to. And if that's not something you'd listen to what you would listen to offer. You need to put the evidence so then came into this was like driving quality quality. Just keep pushing what's best. How do we save money because labs have to save money and lots of money saving techniques from being around the lab and also learning how to do things that i don't know so i'm not a finance person. I am absolutely in the creative sector and starry eyed thinking about philosophy so when i have to have cats about fines. I don't know how finance works but at one point i also didn't know about the physics of an mri machine and.

twitter three years ago today Bill second thing eight tickets each hour uk two three years ago one point four years ago three one every inch skype four classes hundred people first talk last few years a star
"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:55 min | 5 months ago

"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Like your wounded the visual system one billion connections. How does it ever organize itself. And then you think okay. Let's do a study what we look. Let's look at some of the actively. Now nobody's ever going to ask for. That is an episode because they don't understand exists. But what you do is you take the same example. Say food shows the guy harrison street market in the middle of no way in the middle of the country. You calling pronounce. And it's amazing and i'm going to show it to you and you wouldn't but i'm head shirt and that's almost exactly what i am going to traveling food. Neuroscience shot this. Welcome to pop up. Each day with david mendez the podcast where we explore careers in life after grad school with guests who have walked road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place. In the world of constantly evolving rules get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of the phd. And now without further ado let some pride into my conversation with wilf nelson high. I am with nelson. I am a phd research at the center for human brain health at the university of birmingham in the uk england. I'm in the center of england. Nee robin hood nottingham. That's kind of a model of our where i live for. Anybody who doesn't have a great knowledge of english trophy. I am research in multi. System regulation ambition. You'll brain is not always active. it's likes to inhibit and regulate areas that it's not using or does the need to use and i work a lot on the mechanics of how that works. I'm civic specifically. My phd has taking some of debase findings. That were really important. At the beginning of my phd. You know the papers you get given on week one day one untold read. I'm then we've taken some of those because they're in quite controlled artificial settings to try and tease out. What it's a fat looks like. And we've been applying to more and ecologically valid or realistic scenarios. So that's the general spiel of me as a researcher. I also run a neurosurgeon shown. Which i've been growing the last couple of years. I'm we'll talk a bit about that. Because it kind of translates about where i shifted and my interesting perspective. I had containment that tend to send it quite like apparently. Yeah actually. that's something. I really really want to talk about because you know doing that. Whilst you're you're leading your pc research and you're working towards your degree and i am really curious to to hear and we'll talk about it during our conversation to hear about how you're fitting that into your you know onto into your routine. How also echoes. That is having in your experience as a pt researcher so super super interesting the end and happy to have you on pop each d- And you haven't mentioned it yet. But the podcast that you run is called watercooler neuroscience and you actually small vacation network. I run multiple shows. That's going to say. Also we became a network. Wants i now did is full time. We have think fast. So if you wanna fifteen minute episode week and you don't have time to listen to a whole hour long discussion between me and guest. You can pu- think fast and we take. What was the most popular. Paul which is the current research section of my show and we made that into its own show with people around the world. I wanna talk to so yeah. I became a network which was really cool to get doing. Because i guess i guess we'll talk about it. So one of the things that shifted from my phd to my running around the business. Vote on and i am writing up my dissertation. I thinking candidates cooled only station in the uk. Uk's called right here. I don't know what the recipe times off the rest of the world i started. I'm literally the agreement on my contract. So i have a contract for my phd as many people do and it says i cannot work another full time job alongside. My page state and my supervisor was very supportive. I'm sued public engagement with some thing that i was good at and he told me literally. You are good at this. Go dude s. which is a nice endorsement. But i couldn't do it thirty forty hours a week going to get people so i do it slowly. I was only allowed. I was actually a wednesday afternoons. And if he told me. I had to do something. I had to do it. That was the agreement. I'm not fine. That was i was doing a fulltime must supervise and he's taken responsibility to get me fruit and he's done really well. It looks like struck a balance. Right of okay. There's something that's urgent on the research side. You put you put the project. You're you know the podcast on the back burner. Take care of that and then come back. It looks really really interesting. It's great that your your your supervisor had that flexibility and also identified that this is something he's good at question do does Does your lab or did digital app see some echoes of of the work. That you're doing too because if you were talking about research may be you. Were talking about your research. i'm not. I'm not certain because i haven't heard all the episodes now. What was your was your. No there was nothing related to your research. Now because as we were building upon my experiments we had one that went to rome and nocco presented at the human brain. Mapping conference in romans. Already nice reception people. Rave i'm inhibition and regulation work particularly. How do is quite rare piece of work and we are in these field. And i like working in each field but we on a huge mainstream top pick like mirror neurons or looking at functional connectivity for those you know what. Those topics are in neuro science. So why i was doing it. We were still building up. And we still actually have over half of my phd writing up and getting ready for publication. So one of the rules to hugh if anybody here is neurons. Wants to come on my show once getting contact please do. I'm very friendly. You have to be one. Peer reviewed neuroscientist in a lab industry or university. But you have got to be in. A professional laboratory worked in one way. You are reviewed. I'm the is will only talk about published work talk about what is impress all talk about what has been going over but win the case of mind where we're still looking how that answers to our analysis and master these feed into each of us. Sometimes we'll look at something and find something very interesting. It will re map. How will we think about all hypotheses hypothesis and that means we go back and we did melissa. So it's a very interesting process. And every time we think close to finishing one the over experiment feed into inside is known in. Are you need to go back and look this new concept this new failures we're building and that happens in niche because you are normally the pioneering in your own sub-field so you don't really read into the paper and go. Oh this is really interesting now. There are other people who do what we do specifically me trying to drill these fairies into the real world make them ecologically valid. There are many people doing now and because of that we couldn't devote because we're still working on it so i'm actually planning at some point to do an episode on me. I might even try and dry supervise into recording me. But i don't know if you'll be comfortable doing now and talk about it but that's nelson and also i. I've said the fav- my favorite part of this job and it is a job but nothing. I think actually talk about that. It's a business and his ruin like a business. Is i get to help my most interesting conversations of the year from running the show. Of course. I got to treat about this with john dylan haynes who is a hero of mine i.

john dylan haynes david mendez wilf nelson nelson uk nocco fifteen minute Paul Rave wednesday afternoons harrison street market one billion connections one way Uk each field england university of birmingham thirty forty hours a week rome one
IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

CRISPR Cuts

02:09 min | 6 months ago

IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

"Like everyone took wrestler guts. Today's episode we're not covering medicine or science communication. It's something different but also equally important will covering chris boden agricultural. So today with us. We have jessica lions and michael gomez and they're going to talk about their work gain casella so when come guys please introduce yourself stewart audience. Hi i'm just. lions staff. scientists. In dan rockstars lab at uc berkeley and the pi of our project at the innovative genomics institute to use crisper to engineer. Cassava without sign wants michael gomez. I'm a postdoctoral scholar in the fast food lab. At the innovative john institute also working jess on cassava and other crops for disease resistance. Thank thanks can you talk a little bit about how you got into this space off. You know either being interested in agriculture and also getting into crisper in agriculture. Now maybe tied with the shirt. I come at this from the end of genomic so i i'd morning on cassava listens twenty twelve and twenty fifteen or something some really interested in using modern genetic approaches to facilitate the improvement of africa crops so As christopher became more of a a more of an option for sava thousand certified segue on into collaborating with golden brian. On using chris burton december. I entered grad school in dozen twelve really strong interest in diseases. How they work how that plays host and at that time crisper urge and it has been a roller coaster. seeing how this technology has been applied. It's been a lot of fun. And i'm excited to apply for disease resistance but also poor consumer safety space.

Michael Gomez Chris Boden Jessica Lions Dan Rockstars Uc Berkeley Innovative Genomics Institute John Institute Disease Resistance Casella Lions Stewart Jess Golden Brian Chris Burton Christopher Africa
Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:10 min | 9 months ago

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

"Welcome to the talking biotech podcast. Weekly podcast about agriculture medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology and the good things we can do for people and the planet names kevin volta. I'm a professor and a podcast host. Who cares about science communication mostly around the area of biotechnology. So today we wanted to talk about something interesting. Radiation and radiation has many places in biology. Of course our resistance to it. The problems that can be caused from it as well as its use as a therapeutic agent used to induce genetic variability when we do plant breeding but has some deleterious downsides and they've represented barriers both for remediation of radioactive. Waste as well as if there's issues with the side effects of radiation therapies for cancer. So i was excited to learn about some work. That's happening. The innovative genomics institute out at the university of california berkeley. There's work that's gone. Underway under darpa funding to attempt to use gene editing to solve some of the problems associated with radiation exposure. Mostly in acute radiation sickness. and so. today we're going to talk to dr feodor urnov. He's a professor in molecular and cell biology department at the university of california berkeley as well as the director for translation technology at the innovative genomics institute associated with berkeley. So welcome to the podcast. Dr urnov thank you for having. This is really a pleasure. I was really excited to read about this. Because it seems like such a cool project that's long overdue and i can certainly understand arpaio's interest in this. I tried to frame a little bit of the problem ahead of time. But could you give me a better explanation of. What is the problem with acute radiation sickness. And where do we see it across. The bay from the berkeley campus is one of the best if not the best teaching hospital in america. Ucsf in the chair of radiation oncology. Dr mary fung has told me how frustrating it is to have. Her patients succumb to cancer of the abdomen and of the pelvis. Oh things like pancreatic liver you. Try a variant. Despite the fact that she has a powerful weapon to pure those cure is a big word and the weapon is radiation as you pointed out as all technologies radiation has had a positive side in the negative side the negative side. Of course we think about weapons. We think about radiation disasters such as mobile in in the ussr. Where i went grow was born and raised three mile island Shema but then on the positive side radiation is used to determine how our teeth are doing or our lungs are doing which is particularly timely given. What's happening right now. In our nation and has also a really really powerful medicine to cure cancer. The reason it's not more widely available is what's technically known as dose limiting city and in english. That means you cannot give enough of the cure before it side effects overpower its benefits. So in dr funk's practice the physician. So i'm regurgitating. What i learned from her and other had the honor to collaborate with. She has a patient with a with a major cancer of the abdomen. Or or the pelvic area she can irradiate the tumor and eradicated. The patients do not recover because tissues that are inevitably also effective so the gut and the bone. Marrow where are aquatic stem cells live are irreversibly damaged by the radiation itself. So the patients Die off either lethal diarrhea which cannot be stopped using anything

University Of California Berke Kevin Volta Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Feodor Urnov Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Urnov Berkeley Campus Dr Mary Fung Pancreatic Liver Cancer Darpa Arpaio Ucsf Cure Cancer Dr Funk America Diarrhea
Soccer Players Might Have More Emotional Outbursts With Audiences

All Things Considered

02:34 min | 9 months ago

Soccer Players Might Have More Emotional Outbursts With Audiences

"Players have had to adjust to matches without fans during this pandemic. But what impact does that have on how they play? NPR's Casey? Morale reports? Soccer matches have sounded a little quieter during the pandemic. Take this Major league soccer game from August. Orlando City midfielder Nani Moves toward goal shoots six beautifully Any scores. And while there's cheering, it's all from players. What's missing is the roar of the crowd. Meg Linnehan of the athletic attended a few of these so called ghost games in the National Women's Soccer League and says gameplay just felt different without the influence of fans when players air fighting for 50 50 ball right along the sidelines, and there's just usually there would be people right there. Yelling and trying to influence the outcome of that event. And instead, it's just kind of these two players really in their own little world and teammates yelling at them now to sports buffs who happened to be neuroscientists have taken a deeper look at whether empty stadiums influence players behaviors on the field. It was a good excuse to watch soccer and to reproach. The matches from the weekends. Michael Lightner and his colleague Fabio Richland of the University of Salzburg in Austria Rewatched 20 matches from their local team. Red Bull, Salzburg. 10 from before the pandemic, with fans and 10 from ghost games without them as they watched the catalog players, emotional behaviors, things like whether a player yelled at the ref after a call or shook his head after missing a big chance. Overall, they observed significantly fewer emotional outbursts during ghost games. Richland has a theory why the fence like an amplifier in certain situations. If there's a foul or something going on, and 20 or 30,000 people screaming, then, for sure you jump up and yell at your opponent, and you probably do this less or a little bit less if there are no fence there. In fact, the emotional outburst that did take place in Ghost games tended to be less confrontational than in games with fans in attendance. The scientists also think home field advantage could be smaller. Without those screaming fans. Here's Lightner. There seems to be something making the way teams perform significantly better without the home fence. They'll tackle that question. Next. The current work appears in the journal Humanities and Social Sciences Communications. And while they know their study just looked at one team in one league, both Lightner and Richland say they wouldn't be surprised if the same was seen in other soccer leagues around the world. Casey Morel NPR news

Orlando City Nani Moves Soccer Meg Linnehan National Women's Soccer League Michael Lightner Fabio Richland University Of Salzburg NPR Major League Casey Salzburg Austria Richland Lightner Humanities And Social Sciences Casey Morel Npr News
Soccer Players Might Have More Emotional Outbursts With Audiences

All Things Considered

02:33 min | 9 months ago

Soccer Players Might Have More Emotional Outbursts With Audiences

"Players have had have to adjust had to adjust to matches to matches without fans without fans during this during pandemic. this pandemic. But what But impact what impact does that have does on that how have on they how play? they play? NPR's Casey? NPR's Casey? Morale reports? Morale reports? Soccer matches Soccer matches have sounded have a sounded little quieter a little quieter during the pandemic. during the pandemic. Take this Major Take this league Major soccer league game soccer from game August. from August. Orlando Orlando City midfielder City midfielder Nani Moves Nani toward Moves goal toward goal shoots shoots six six beautifully beautifully Any scores. Any scores. And while there's And cheering, while there's cheering, it's all it's from all from players. players. What's missing What's is missing the is roar the of roar the crowd. of the crowd. Meg Linnehan Meg Linnehan of the athletic of the athletic attended a attended few of these a few so of called these so called ghost games ghost games in the National in the National Women's Soccer Women's League Soccer League and says and says gameplay gameplay just felt just different felt different without the influence without the influence of fans of fans when players when air players fighting air for fighting 50 for 50 50 ball 50 right ball along right the sidelines, along the sidelines, and there's just and there's usually just usually there would be people there would be right people there. right there. Yelling Yelling and and trying trying to influence to influence the outcome the of outcome that event. of that event. And instead, And instead, it's just kind it's of just kind these of two players these two players really in really their own in little their world own little and teammates world and teammates yelling at yelling them at now them to now sports to sports buffs who buffs happened who happened to be neuroscientists to be neuroscientists have taken have a deeper taken look a deeper at look whether empty at whether stadiums empty stadiums influence influence players behaviors players behaviors on the field. on the field. It was a good It excuse was a good excuse to watch soccer to watch and soccer to and reproach. to reproach. The matches The matches from the weekends. from the weekends. Michael Lightner Michael and Lightner his and colleague his colleague Fabio Richland Fabio Richland of the University of the University of Salzburg of Salzburg in Austria in Austria Rewatched Rewatched 20 20 matches matches from their local from team. their local team. Red Bull, Salzburg. Red Bull, Salzburg. 10 from 10 before from the pandemic, before the pandemic, with fans with fans and 10 and from 10 ghost from games ghost without games them without them as they watched as they watched the catalog the catalog players, players, emotional emotional behaviors, behaviors, things like things whether like a whether player yelled a player at yelled the ref at after the ref a after call a call or shook or his head shook after his head missing after a big missing chance. a big chance. Overall, Overall, they observed they observed significantly significantly fewer fewer emotional emotional outbursts outbursts during ghost during games. ghost games. Richland has Richland a theory has why a theory why the fence the fence like like an an amplifier amplifier in certain in situations. certain situations. If there's If a there's a foul or something foul or something going on, going and on, and 20 20 or 30,000 or 30,000 people screaming, people screaming, then, for sure then, for you jump sure you up jump and yell up at and yell your at opponent, your opponent, and you probably and do you probably this less do this less or a little or bit a less little bit less if there are if no fence there are no fence there. In there. fact, In fact, the emotional the emotional outburst outburst that did that take did place take place in Ghost in Ghost games tended games tended to be less to confrontational be less confrontational than in games than in with games fans with in fans attendance. in attendance. The scientists The scientists also think also home think field home advantage field advantage could be smaller. could be smaller. Without those Without screaming those fans. screaming fans. Here's Lightner. Here's Lightner. There seems There to seems be something to be something making making the the way teams way teams perform perform significantly significantly better better without without the home the home fence. fence. They'll tackle They'll that tackle question. that question. Next. Next. The current work The current appears work in appears the journal in the Humanities journal Humanities and Social and Sciences Social Sciences Communications. Communications. And while they And know while their they know study their just study looked just at looked one at team one in team one in league, one league, both Lightner both and Lightner Richland and Richland say say they wouldn't be they surprised wouldn't be surprised if the same if was the seen same was seen in other soccer in other leagues soccer leagues around the world. around the world. Casey Morel Casey

Soccer Orlando City Nani Moves Nani NPR Meg Linnehan Meg Linnehan National Women's Soccer Women' Casey Lightner Michael Lightner Michael Fabio Richland Fabio Richland University Of The University O Salzburg Austria Richland Orlando Humanities Journal Humanities Lightner Richland Casey Morel Casey
The art of science communication

Climate Cast

03:48 min | 11 months ago

The art of science communication

"Communication and art within science i'm npr. Chief meteorologist paul here with climate cats. It's a challenge to explain a complex science in a way. That's relevant to people's lives. That's why one of the world's biggest science organizations. The american geophysical union gives the climate communications prize as a top award every year. This year's winner is jennifer francis with the would well climate research center in massachusetts. She was nominated by minnesota climate scientists. John abraham with the university of saint thomas jennifer welcome to climate cast. Hi there thanks for having me jennifer. What does this award mean to you in the context of the importance of climate communication. Well it's of course. A huge huge honored to be recognized by my peers. My colleagues and i'm especially proud of the american physical union for creating this prize in the first place. Because i think the public really really wants to hear about the science now especially in these days of covert and climate change and all kinds of changes that are happening in the society to hear directly from the scientists themselves so i think it is even more important for us scientists to be able to explain the work that we're doing and that the public is paying for when you think about your fellow communicators. What skills do excellent climate communicators share. I think the best science communicators are able to take a very complicated but interesting topic and boil it down not dumb it down but boil it down so that they're talking to an audience and that audience is gonna come away with the most important information that whatever that science is saying And i think good communicators also are exciting. The people are want to hear them. And some of the best ones i think are able to impart that excitement to the audience about our audience. What communication tips do you have that. Maybe could help our listeners as they talk about climate change right so the listeners. I think are are really interested. Now we're finally getting traction with the public and with decision makers particularly when it comes to climate change and so my hope is that those listeners will will pay attention and maybe do some reading on their own and maybe cross reference and also. I think it's really important for the listeners. When they hear something that doesn't seem to make much sense to dig down a little bit and see where that information is coming from. Jennifer one of your areas of expertise is the arctic. And we've seen some dramatic sea ice and temperature shifts in the arctic this year. What specific trends are you watching in the arctic. And why are they important to all of us well. The arctic is changing just so fast and this year was an exclamation point on the trends that we've been watching as you say. The sea ice reached almost a new record this year. We're watching the arctic unfold in ways. We didn't expect to happen so quickly. There are many reasons why it matters to everyone for one thing. The rapid warming in the arctic is accelerating the melt of the greenland ice sheet which is raising sea levels. It's accelerating the faa of permafrost which is releasing more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and it's also disrupting weather patterns all down around the northern hemisphere so it affects all of us in many different ways woodward climate research center senior scientists jennifer francis. Thanks so much for your perspective on climate. Cast today my pleasure anytime.

Jennifer Francis Would Well Climate Research Ce University Of Saint Thomas Jennifer American Geophysical Union Arctic John Abraham Massachusetts Minnesota Jennifer Greenland FAA Woodward Climate Research Cent
Building an Email Newsletter Directly from Instagram with Steph Compton

GradBlogger

06:00 min | 1 year ago

Building an Email Newsletter Directly from Instagram with Steph Compton

"Welcome to episode number eighty one of the grab blogger podcast the song for helping academics change the world through online business helping you by give me the tools and tips to strategies. You need to build online business write a research experience around your background and your expertise and around change you want to make in the world owes. Dr. Chris cloning and Days episode were talking about building an email newsletter directly from Instagram and we're doing that with Steph Compton from Steph access on Instagram & Stef's, I access them on Twitter and we don't have a website to give at the moment which will actually be talked about in this podcast episode. So Steph, I want to say thank you for coming on the ground blogger podcast and sharing your your experience today. Yeah. I'm heading me. I'm excited to be here. I'm really excited to have you on niba from notes by niba who we had on episode 69 and 70 of the podcast recommended. I reach out to you just gave me your Instagram wage. So I went there got a link Tree on your profile I clicked on it first link is bold letters new and improved get my Weekly Newsletter plus Q&A. It's like well, okay that's forward and off. I love it. But then try clicking through the other links and there was no website cuz I want to learn more about you and what you do and then I was so intrigued that you had the newsletter and this Instagram following but website that I I had to sign up for your newsletter that point I got to figure out what's going on here and I was pretty pleasantly surprised me on the news later. It's a really well-written. You're very open with what you're dead. You're very helpful. You take Q&A in the newsletter, which is well let you describe the newsletter more detail, but there's a lot of cool things in there that I just was impressed about and thought that others could Implement a in their newsletter strategies, but may be I need to get you on to figure out what's going on with this no website and how do you start building newsletter without a website because we work with people all the time that you know have a website but aren't willing to start birth. Their newsletter it was I just intrigued by this whole setup. So I said I got to get stuff on the podcast. I appreciate you coming on. Yeah. Yeah, so in this episode and this is actually a two-part episode. If you're in Chicago and how to use Instagram the next episode next week's will have tips and strategies on how step uses Instagram to build a following there in this episode over and talk more about steps of background how she took Instagram a server newsletter has she monetized reference online and we'll follow up on what's the deal with this this website and can we see one coming in the future? So as always you can download tracks this episode at gravatar.com / 81 and just when you download that you can control that you can find what we're talking about here and then use that to implement your own business as well. So stuff just jump in I guess. Can you share some of your academic background to some of your your story how you got online? Yeah. Sure. So hello everyone. I am Steph so I'm actually a third-year PhD student wage. Virginia Tech currently I am in the department of human nutrition foods and exercise and I study a varying cancer metabolism so very much a basic background, but I got my start at a very small arts college called Emory and Henry College. That's where I did my bachelor's degree and got that in biology and then it came to Virginia Tech actually for my Master's and kind of switch lanes. So I actually did my Master's in community nutrition and dietetics. So I did a lot of like all across the research spectrum of doing like this basic plant genetic science and my undergrad moved into my Master's Degree, which was very much community-based and learning like dietetics and applications and and standards of care within Healthcare and then I kind of combined my two loves of both nutrition with Biology to pursue my PhD at Virginia Tech as well in the same department, but I switched gears to go more like cellular molecular track. So right now like I said, I'm a third-year PhD student. Hopefully we'll be doing my my name. Asian proposal pretty soon. So I'll actually be a PhD candidate hopefully within the next few months, but I'm also got an Instagram about almost two years ago. It'll be two years in December, I believe so I actually got on Instagram at the at the suggestion of science Sam which I'm sure some listeners may be familiar with science Sam is an amazing science communicator and Neuroscience. She's been doing a lot of information about covid-19 Ali and she's been a really great support system in a really great person to follow and kind of look up to and then the science communication community. So I had actually been talking to her for my personal account that I have and talking about like science communication and accessibility as well. So we're accessibility ties into my story is when I came to Virginia Tech. I actually I worked as a braille transcriber and a tactile Graphics designer and the accessible Technologies office at Virginia Tech. So what when I originally started my account, it was a combination of doing science computer. Station but also teaching people how to make their information more accessible. So I kind of started in that area and eventually kind of brought in more of my nutrition background as well. So actually educating people about nutrition in the science of nutrition because that's really where my expertise lies and then also at the same time talking to people like Health Care Providers and other science communicators and other people who use Instagram to Market and like get themselves out there and educate on how they can make their communication more accessible So within that as well, I also teach a class called Health counseling is currently averaging a text. So I kind of bring all of my different experiences and I have the nutrition that I'm actually doing I had the science and I'm doing every day in the lab. I have the accessibility that I've worked in before as well as my life experience being an educator in the classroom and online and my my account has really expanded throughout all of those different things. I always joke on my account that I'm super multi passionate and it's because I had These different areas. I really want to come together in my account. And so that's that's really how I started and where I've gone from there in the two years. I've had my account

Instagram Virginia Tech Steph Compton Twitter Dr. Chris Cloning Health Care Providers Chicago SAM ALI Henry College Emory
"science communication" Discussed on GradBlogger

GradBlogger

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on GradBlogger

"On instagram twitter I love it, and if you enjoy this episode, you can tag myself at grab blogger or tag. Notes by Niba on DOT, com. On twitter or Instagram I've also on TIKTOK. So maybe maybe someday I'll figure that out but. And tell us what your thoughts are on this episode. Tell us what you liked to vote and what ways are you finding funding, and what wears you generate revenue for your your online business or you communication efforts. So I say, thanks again Neva. I'm really four to chance to get again in the future and to see your business and your work and your communication and your videos Andrew Audio..

"science communication" Discussed on GradBlogger

GradBlogger

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on GradBlogger

"They have some really awesome stories, their stem advocacy institute again, story collider is pretty, cool. It's it's hard to like really put a finger because there's there's quite a lot out there and I think it helps just kind of narrowing it down by what you're interested in but the're medium in also what your target audiences. So there's ones that are like on podcast you know for example, there's a podcast that recently started just specifically as for resources for science communicators, and if you're interested in doing podcasts does an excellent place to start I love it. So you mentioned kind of funding and fellowships that's one sort of side of it. These sort of groups other is there more like traditional. Thing. Scholarship funding or you know what? We consider more house outlook for the the landscape science communication. Let's see there's things that are within like the local level like more like your university or within like a network that you university might belong to. But there's also some competitive applications like propeller ships like triple as a mass media fellowship is really popular their summer internships NASA has like a Whole series of internships for video print web given snapchat, and then there's also things that you can pay for. You know like communication certificate, graduate programs, conferences, the AAA conference there's a whole range of them and I think figuring out what level you're at so that you can accurately apply for thinks if you start applying for absolutely everything start drowning in applications, there's a link we can add to the. Bottom here but in my website, there's a tab for resources in in resources. There is a whole section for people who are interested in applying to like different scholarships, fellowships, internships, and you can browse through any of those C. which Winston, your needs including link to the note by Dot Com, resource pages there page there for anyone interested in looking at less because I can think that'd be pretty valuable for somebody. To. Go through. Three options and persona doing some a bit of a funny order. But we talked about brand deals we talked about advocacy groups and mentorship. And sort of. Investing in your feldman groups above more of the traditional fellowship and grant applications is there is the room here for things like..

NASA Winston
"science communication" Discussed on GradBlogger

GradBlogger

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on GradBlogger

"I think it's important. So funding or you know it's it's not just necessarily monetary could be mentorship. It also could be tech support it could be, and then on the brand you'll side there's things like products getting services and products and things that are also included in the deals there's more than just. Cash incentives although I would say that building a solid business on foundation is a great way to increase your site science communication efforts and that's something we've been doing pretty steady for last four years. Does safety signs by do I want to show his upset because there's other ways to go to especially as Science communication becomes I want to say more mainstream, but I don't even might have some opinions on on what that means is that mean anything I I may be saying it non quite the right way I'm not a I didn't come from a science communication background so. No you're good I mean you're definitely right. It's definitely grown I don't know if I had called mainstream but. Certainly with people realizing how important sciences, how important it is that people get the facts right? It's definitely become a more common term Amore thing that's like you know actively gives a lot of jobs being popped up here. There's a lot of investment into this area. Definitely say it's it's growing sure the reason I know it's. Becoming something mainstream is probably not it but the reason I know is that sometimes I go to events and explain to people what I do and if they have a SICOM decree. They start explaining to me how I'm doing wrong. And I'm a bit like it leaves me a little jaded sometimes 'cause 'cause. I'll open up my emails. I have an email here from a felon southern states who's asking some technical questions via email on a combustible dust whether or not safari explosion. Hazard. explained to them the the issues around potentially building up of hydrogen. That does get sweated inside of. Certain processing equipment. So explained homeless is way to him. He went back to his client. So you know not listening to out they are making some mistakes a to blow up their piece of processing equipment. So to me that means that I. had level engaging with the consultant and I was able to teach them at a level through what I call sites communication although the individual at the conference sending front, he doesn't call what I do science communication. And I just. Get to the right audience to to save that piece of equipment and nobody was injured thankfully in that isn't it? I? Mean this is the real world of what I'm doing industrial safety with my science communication everyone science communication looks different. I'm trying to stop things from blowing up and employs getting injured so. When when somebody tells me that because I don't have a degree in science communication I'm not doing it right or something yeah. It's. It's just it's BS. There's a lot of people trying to like get keep really like what isn't isn't communication and there's a huge like. Journalism. This isn't communication or like Oh. You're doing communication only TIKTOK. That's not real communication like I have a lot of thoughts on like tiktok being an APP but like you can't deny that it is communicating is doing something at the through communication..

Hazard. consultant
"science communication" Discussed on The Science Bloggers Podcast

The Science Bloggers Podcast

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on The Science Bloggers Podcast

"As climate change. I would argue actually and then in terms of another thing that I did actually wrote an an op-ed Ed for the Lansing State Journal which is a local publication here in Michigan. And the reason why is because I was condemning the actions of a nonprofit organization that was interested in burying Canada's high level nuclear waste along the shores of Lake Huron Around Sixteen hundred feet below sea level. Now while it sounds safe. Nobody's actually ever been able to successfully deal with their nuclear waste. And there are some initiatives that have made headway but maybe burying it next to a great lake is in the best idea for the local mid Michigan Ecology. So those are just some of the different things that I've done over the last year just to promote science activism. I think it's awesome that you're doing that. I think not many people realise from Taiwan Cold War ended hominy treaties. Were put in place to help reduce the number of nuclear weapons that we had in between the US and Soviet Union and then eventually Russia and in Offi forget out and in Omaha trees and place is going to stop anyone from GALENA nuclear weapons. And that's something we we need and you know. I think that the nuclear waste thing that doing well. I think that's really cool so walsum and what about Chelsea what. He is anything else you'd like to say to. I guess the last thing that I can say is that this year Emma Soosai is also doing another signs art exhibition and this is one that we are going to be expanding internationally so last year we had scientists and artists come together to create these art pieces and they were mainly from the mid Michigan area but this year since we are in a different kind of stay because there is a global pandemic going on we are also taking international contributions so last year our pieces were made by the people like from around here so what we did was. We don't need those pieces around the town so you can go to a restaurant and two different will. Whenever things are open you can go and you can see the artwork over there around the community and that's what we want to do again. Is the art pieces from this year. We want donate it across the community and across the state as well and people are already signed signing up to donate pieces to us. So they're going to send us science art pieces and we will donate them to schools and two different places where we can spread the word about science and especially science artists really do have an appreciation a knowledge of the work and they really do appreciate the spread of the word of an WanNa promote whatever their focus on like if it's like neuroscience or something so I'd like to say that anyone that's interested can go on misuse icon Dot Oregon. They can fill out the form over there if they've would like to do a science art piece for this and thanks for having us. That's awesome and yeah it was great having you to and you know they safe Healthy everything that's going on absolutely too and thank you again for having us on your show. Yeah and hopefully we can do this again sometime in the future. Yeah thanks thank you for joining me would Chelsea and Daniel and I hope you enjoyed this episode. Bichon to like subscribe or leave a comment wherever you listen to this episode. Anything to do goes a long way to supporting this channel. And I look forward to you joining me on the next episode when I talked to a near science communicator..

Michigan Lansing State Journal Lake Huron Chelsea Canada US Soviet Union Emma Soosai Taiwan Russia Omaha Daniel
"science communication" Discussed on The Science Bloggers Podcast

The Science Bloggers Podcast

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on The Science Bloggers Podcast

"A science files event where we released a beer and had our interviews. Come IN AND GIVE LITTLE. Flash TALKS ABOUT UPDATES on their research and it was also an opportunity for the public to actually challenge the scientists in an event that we called beat the scientists which is part of the beauty release and in doing so. The general audience was able to challenge the scientists at different arcade games and if they wind they were able to get some swag. Yeah that was a really fun event. Because we had it at a bar arcade so at the top people were talking about their science and drinking beer that scientists brewed and then at the bottom they were playing games. What SCIENTISTS WALL? So it's like doing a lot to engage with the public. M Tell them about what happens at Michigan state or any other graduate students. Who Do things like what to do like to have their own? Radio shows or blogs podcasts. Anything in our organization. Msu SICOM we have a variety of students we have undergraduate. We have graduate. Students and students are also like do. Phd Student and things like that. Everyone will pick basically what they want to focus on. For example again he was saying Emma. Soosai Com does science are writing speaking and advocacy engagement? And if you WANNA do one not the other you can do it outside of MSU SICOM. There are some things like science podcast for example there speaking science. There's also they're serving up science and everyone has something different that they focus on and for blogs there are a few different blogs for example our vice president of marketing has a blog called PR bites and are signs literature chairs one that runs Msu SICOM blog so last week we had something about mental health because one of our episodes actually was youth. Suicide Awareness and that interviewee contacted us and said that he wanted to write a piece about how on suicide rates are affected by the krona virus. The individual research projects took a little bit about your graduates to school studies. He wants to go. I do want to explain. Polina sure absolutely so. I gave a little hint at what I do earlier. When I provided that introduction but to expand on my research a little bit more my thesis is actually composed of two parts. First part is very rare isotope mass measurement of an isotope of silicon. Now isotopes are just different species of the same element and they differ by the number of neutrons and silicon. The one that I'm interested has twenty four protons and neutrons inside the nucleus. And the reason why we're interested in measuring the how much mass it has because allows us to constrain these interstellar explosions known as type one X ray bursts. They produce a lot of different nuclei. Whenever they're undergoing the thermonuclear explosion on the surface of a neutron star and by having these masses well understood we can reproduce through computer simulation the amount of light that is emitted by these explosions as a function of time. And then the other part of my thesis involves building a gas cell. That's to be filled with helium. And we'll be and we'll have an entrance window that is going to be made out of the material called Silicon night-ride and the purpose of it is to convert molecular ion beams into atomic ion beams. And then it'll be transported across the gas cell to the end where it will be extracted the use of an RF carpet which is a fancy way of saying it's just a bunch of electrodes at arranged in a circular fashion that transport ions really fast to an exit nozzle and by doing so. It'll help not only my mass measurement group it'll also be important for other groups at my laboratory that do things like measuring charge Radii of Nuclei or sending it to the re accelerator for nuclear astrophysics. Experiments okay sounds interesting. So what about you Chelsea like I said earlier biomedical engineer? And that's a field that it can be very broad. My topic of my thesis is particularly with Spina Bifida so Spina bifida occurs usually because a mother is diabetic or because the mother does not have the proper nutrition whenever She is developing the child. Within these first few weeks of development then nutrition can really be effective of the neural tube that is forming is basically the spine for a baby. And it's not closing properly without the proper nutrition so my research is looking at. How do nutrition affects the neural tube closure but we go a little bit deeper than that and we also look at pathways. The I'm looking at particularly is with iryh. One irony one has to do whenever the cell is stressed and if the proteins are not being folded properly in the endo plasma curriculum also known as the Er then the Er will go through that stress and this can just be really bad because whenever this is occurring then. The proteins aren't being folded properly. And I am looking in my research particularly at the extra solar matrix of this extra. Solar Matrix is composed of proteins such as he lasted in college. And Alaskan is like think of the stretchy part of the Matrix and Collagen is. What brings it back together and this is important particularly with the organ that. I'm looking at called the bladder. The bladder is something that we usually take for granted because if you drink a lot of water then you feel that pressure inside you go in. You're fine but not everyone can use the bathroom perfectly. Children that are born SPINA. Bifida him they have this neural tube defect. But it's in the lower area of their spine so whenever it's affecting lower area of their spine it's also affecting their bladder. And when they're born their bladder doesn't work properly so a lot of them have to have a tube stuck up them also knows a catheter. And that's how they have void their bladder for the rest of their life. And if you have a tube stuck up you for your whole life then your bladder isn't working properly and it gets even worse and worse. So I call Gemini lasted and the ratio of it ends up imbalanced so the bladders stretching in his saw coming back together the way how it should so another part of stress that I look at not only with the cells in a molecular aspect but is also a mechanical aspect. And we've even like three D. printed different devices that can stretch deselms and I look at all these different things. I look at the nutrients I look at how the cell stretch effects this and the extra solar matrix to see. How is that bladder really working? And how can we help it? Get back to how it should. And if the bladder ends up really now working malfunctioning than it affects the kidneys because the Kenyans are right before it and the kidneys filter. The you're into the water and then that's how a lot of the patients pass away because of kidney failure. I didn't know that about S- does destroyed would spina. Bifida was at who bought it before but I didn't know that there were so many problems associated with the condition. Hopefully you can find something you can do something. Yeah it's pretty sad because one thousand births in the United States are affected by this because mothers may not know that they're pregnant the first month and then it they're not taking that right amount of folic acid so a really affects the development then brutally something more can be done into the future. Yeah hopefully so. Only time that you've learned about science communication is. Is there anything that you'd like to pass on to people about why to do it wide so important beside talking a less Jorgen anyway? Absolutely science communication is really important. Because that's what helps science actually get disseminated for example at different conferences through posters or presentations. But it's also what helps provide motivation for funding from these different government agencies that are funding these different sized projects. If nobody's talking to the people about why they're scientists employer and how it has an impact on society. Then the funding's going to stop and and I think it's really important for people to practice that because it will make them better communicators whenever they're trying to talk about their research whether it's to their own family or to someone that's interested in a topic that has never met scientists before so people want to know about what's going on in these different science scenarios. It just takes the scientists to go out and be themselves and share what they're doing in their laboratories and to give people an idea of what their experiences are like and I think that's really enriching for the general public. I think you're you're very correct on that Daniel because when you look at it for the past few years especially in the. Us funding for science has been slashed to a really disturbing degree and now that we have a global pandemic Nari dealing with the SARS COV to outbreak around will be dealing with people who have to deal with Kovin nineteen on a daily basis. You see like the need for effective science communication does. It's hopefully going to leave to science funding debt. Politicians going to like put money into these things that we need so everyone needs to play their part and get that message out. Yeah I agree. It's not only a global pandemic that people need to be communicating signs but a definitely opens people's eyes because there are other things going on like more than just climate change like there things having to do with our water with our food with mental health. And this is really why. Danny I started the science files at MSU SICOM because we know that there are so many topics that people don't even realize have to do it. Science for example were coming out with an episode about how communities react to sexual assault. And how they can basically come together and do different policy reforms and have support how the community can support and people don't usually think of science with that but they don't realize that psychology and I think that if scientists communicated what they did more people would really realize that there are signs and everything and that it can be fun in many different ways. People usually think of science as older as part. It's textbook that it's something that they like allowing Zaidi when they think of him and they don't realize that it's so great because maybe it wasn't communicated to them properly. Yeah I think the aspect of it besides the anxiety that moves people feel when they take a science subject or sciences. Being communicated to them is that they feel they need to be scientist to understand that and I think one of the good things about science communication is that we can tell people know. You don't need to you know. Just just that's cooled as interesting and as all will become more and more technologically advanced. These issues sort of like come to the fore from so for a public is going to need to understand these issues to tackle future problems. And that's important Tell me about some of you policy efforts as a disclaimer. The work that I do at the laboratory has no relation to any of the activism efforts. I'm involved with with MSU SICOM. It's one thing to talk about science communication but it's a completely another animal to actually perform science communication Because there is a difference and as leaders of this organization we pride ourselves in being practitioners of science communication whether it's through the science files or through different political actions some of them include myself where I have. Rin A white paper.

MSU SICOM scientist United States Michigan Spina Bifida Msu Polina Phd Student Emma vice president of marketing Zaidi assault Jorgen Daniel
The Internet Has a Crush on Dr. Fauci

Reset

04:27 min | 1 year ago

The Internet Has a Crush on Dr. Fauci

"It just kind of started as a joke where we would send each other pictures of doctor and sort of try to comfort each other because we were all getting pretty stressed out. I don't know I just felt like some of the stuff we were sending. Each other in our group chat was really really good content. I guess we were like editing. Some of his photos and we had. I don't know we're just admiring him. We should put this out there and kind of see I felt that other people might feel similarly. In mid March the three scientists started a twitter account at FAO CI Fan. Almost every tweet is a photo of Dr Faucher sometimes overlaid with heart emojis and accompanied by a funny admiring comment. For instance are pinch tweet on our profile right now is just photo of Dr Fao. G says if you don't have a crush on this man do you even care about public health and that was just like some random thought I had and I was like that would be a good tweet. The twitter account immediately started wrecking followers. We would text each other constantly. Like Oh my God we made it to one hundred two hundred five hundred like we would text each other like so in shock. Oh Yeah we were shocked. I really didn't expect it to go anywhere at that was gonna be just between like the three of us but Yeah I just happened to end up this way. How many followers are you up to at this point right now? We have almost seventeen thousand. The speed with which this twitter account has gained ground to me indicates that this there's a much broader fandom surrounding Dr vouching than than just you know the science community I think so too. I mean. My mom has a crush on him though. She is a nurse so she's kind of tangentially related to the science community but yeah she just thinks he's the cutest thing so wait. I'm sorry I feel like I need to address this. Okay you share a crush with your mom right now. Yeah Dr Found Cheese that bringing you closer like is that Nice. Oh yeah if he's on the screen she'll scream at me Sarah doctor on TV. And she's she followed the twitter and she likes to look at it. She doesn't have twitter works so she gets confused. Some OF THE POST. But Yeah my mother for example. She is a housewife. And she's from Vietnam. She doesn't speak that much English but every time she sees him on. Tv She just says she really likes him. She likes his energy. She's like when I hear him talk. He brings out simple facts. It's easy to understand feel comfortable and I've had people like friends where I've never mentioned this twitter. But they've mentioned to me so they found or twitter organically and they say and I say oh I run. That's really my dad follows and he really enjoys it. That's true just to be clear. Do you guys think he's hot Low Key yeah I mean for an older guy for sure. Am I alone here guys? Is anyone else going to chime in back back me up? Yeah he's not. He's not bad looking well some of the pictures. It really conveys like his personality. If you've ever seen an interview with him or seen him talk at the podium. You're having the natural course of outbreak trying to peek at a high level. He's not like everybody else. He's not this STOIC. Okay we're reading off the facts. You know he really wants people to understand. And I think that that's something that really appealed to me. We also were looking at like older pictures of him and it really shows like throughout the well. Yeah we have a post where we said like glow up and we show a picture from when he was first. Appointed as director of NAIAD. Yeah of Naiad and then or more recent photo maybe ten or fifteen years ago and he looks great. I mean it's like identical. Almost we have so many photos of Dr Fao. G saved to our phones. You wouldn't believe it. Tiffany Sarah and Leeann say Dr Cheese appeal isn't just about his looks though for me the A thing in affection I have for is more like a because he's a fellow scientists and I really appreciate that and he's from NIH so I think comes from a special position in my heart for me personally. How about you tiffany. Oh no I agree. I think it's part of it. Is that we value science communication. And it's like he really brings to the and that adds so much to our crush. If you

Twitter Dr Fao Dr Faucher Leeann Naiad Fao Ci Fan Tiffany Sarah Dr Cheese Vietnam NIH Director
"science communication" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Listen to health officials during the corona virus epidemic. Eric ticket off explains that's according to a February survey from the University of Oregon. Which finds trust is high in doctors and in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ellen Peters Director of the Center for Science Communication Research at says respondents. Politics predicted their trust in politicians but not health officials even among conservatives. President trump was not the most trusted it turns out that among conservatives and liberals alike the most trusted where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as people's doctors in Oregon. There are three confirmed cases of novel. Corona virus according to authorities in the past week the trump administration has said it will tighten control over health officials messaging on the virus. An amendment will soon go out to principals in New Mexico's largest public school district. Reminding them about the districts policy on ice agents. The Albuquerque School district has the most kids in the state and its policy prohibits federal agents from coming onto the school campus. Unless they have a warrant Brendan Baca who manages the district's refugee and newcomer supports program. Says the memo follows a February statement from city. Officials referencing a recent surge in local arrest by ICE. It was in response to the activity that we've seen throughout the city. There has been about a tenfold increase in the number of detentions by ice in Albuquerque. I'm Roz Brown. Finally are Andrew Sears. Report says lawmakers Albany debate a proposed three percent increase in school funding educator. Say That community school. Show the best ways. Some of that money could be spent. York City has two hundred sixty seven community school serving one hundred thirty five thousand low income.

Albuquerque School district Centers for Disease Control Ellen Peters University of Oregon Brendan Baca trump Albuquerque Andrew Sears York City Eric Center for Science Communicati Roz Brown Oregon Director New Mexico President
"science communication" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Doctors and in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ellen Peters Director of the Center for Science Communication Research at you owe says respondents. Politics predicted their trust in politicians but not health officials even among conservatives. President trump was not the most trusted it turns out that among conservatives and liberals alike the most trusted where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention People's doctors in Oregon there are three confirmed cases of novel Corona Virus according to authorities in the past week the trump administration has said it will tighten control over health officials messaging on the virus and a metal assumed. Go out to principals New Mexico's largest public school district reminding them about the district's policy on ice agents. The Albuquerque School district has the most kids in the state and its policy prohibits federal agents from coming onto a school campus. Unless they have a warrant Brendan Baca who manages the district's refugee and newcomer supports program. Says the memo follows a February statement from city. Officials referencing recent surge in local arrest by ICE. It was in response to the activity that we've seen throughout the city. There has been about a tenfold increase in the number of detentions by ice in Albuquerque. I'm Roz Brown. Finally are Andrew Seriously ports lawmakers in Albany debating a proposed three percent increase in school funding. Educators say that Community School. Show the best ways. Some of that money could be spent. York City has two hundred sixty seven community school serving one hundred thirty five thousand.

Albuquerque School district Centers for Disease Control Centers for Disease Control an Community School Ellen Peters Brendan Baca trump Albuquerque Center for Science Communicati York City Roz Brown Director Oregon President New Mexico Albany
"science communication" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"science communication" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Listen to health officials during the corona virus epidemic. Eric Tikhonov explains that's according to a February survey from the University of Oregon. Which finds trust is high in doctors and in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ellen Peters Director of the Center for Science Communication Research AT SAYS RESPONDENTS. Politics predicted their trust in politicians but not health officials even among conservatives. President trump was not the most trusted it turns out that among conservatives and liberals alike the most trusted where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention People's doctors in Oregon. There are three confirmed cases of novel Corona Virus according to authorities in the past week the trump administration has said it will tighten control over health officials messaging on the virus and a medal will soon go out to principals. New Mexico's largest public school district. Reminding them about the district's policy on ice agents. The Albuquerque School district has the most kids in the state and its policy prohibits federal agents from coming onto a school campus. Unless they have a warrant Brendan Baca who manages the district's refugee and newcomer supports program. Says the memo follows a February statement from city. Officials referencing a recent surge in local arrests by ICE. It was in response to the activity that we've seen throughout the city. There has been about a tenfold increase in the number of detentions by ice in Albuquerque. I'm Roz Brown. Finally our address. Here's reports lawmakers in Albany. Debate a proposed three percent increase in school funding educators. Say That community school. Show the best ways. Some of that money could be spent. York City has two hundred sixty.

Albuquerque School district Centers for Disease Control Centers for Disease Control an Ellen Peters University of Oregon Eric Tikhonov Brendan Baca trump Albuquerque York City Center for Science Communicati Roz Brown Oregon Director New Mexico President Albany
"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"science communication" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"So today we're talking with Dr Kiki Sanford Kiki Science Communicator with over fifteen years of experience media science journalism and informal science education she received a Bachelor's degree in Wildlife Fisheries and conservation biology and a PhD in Europe geology from UC Davis before transitioning into a career focused on translating scientific research to various audiences and helping scientists in their communication efforts in Two Thousand Fifteen Dr Kiki founded broader impacts productions a boutique production agency dedicated to science storytelling additionally she founded produces and hosts that this weekend science podcast a weekly live show that covers a multitude of science topics in talk show format and he's also the VP the of Public Relations for Science Stock Nonprofit Science Communication Organisation. Welcome to the show Kiki thank you for having me on your show so can you tell search me and the listeners a little bit more yourself how did you get into science and a and how you came to do what you do today yes so Yeah the the introduction introduced all the things I kind of do but I currently have I feel like I've got a lot of pots that I'm constantly he's stirring where I've got you know my my podcast production pot and I'm I'm figuring out stories I want to talk about people I want to interview for for that endeavor and then I have my production company where I'm creating videos for scientists and writing scripts doing podcasts for other people so that's doing the work actual practice of science communication and beyond that is working for science talk and trying to help bring the growing community of science communicators together so all of it together are really speaks to my passion for science communication which I realized I had while I was in graduate school and that graduate school to me I loved doing science I studied urged brains it was really interesting work and I loved Wing It but during the process there was full of realizations for me about what my where my real passion lay and this is where I am today okay so so you got into Grad School Science per se was something that that that was a passion I guess From from before what turned you onto science in the first place so when I was young I think it's just a combination of a bunch of things I grew up out in the country my house my parents house was in the middle of one hundred acres of farmland and we raised chickens and my youth consisted of running through the fields chasing the dogs as they chase goals as my mom yelling at me in the summertime to come inside because the airplanes we're going to be flying over with spraying the insecticide over over the fields so there were all these little things that came together to you really give me an appreciation for the natural world and so- biology was the the area of my interest and along the way my dad was always very I guess in the way that he taught me and mentor me as as a parent was to be curious to ask questions to be able to support my opinions with evidence so he was he had a very saint scientific way of thinking and he may develop that as well and then I just had a number of really wonderful teachers you know like in high school when you're in the frog lab and teacher allows you to pop the frog frog eyeballs out and I said yes I dissect them and look deep clore deeply and and so there was a lot of that in in my childhood and that you know I grew up with three television channels there was no cable when I grew up and it all there was to watch on TV was maybe Electric Company and Sesame Street in the nature programs on the PBS Station that was that was it yeah so it seems like you had a you were born almost to be a naturalist like in nature you had your father inspired you to uncritically about things and clearly the bath seem to flow naturally from there and so you mentioned that during upc you caught this virus of science communication and was there a moment was there an event how did that come up where where did you get this this bug I think I always had a bug for communication so in addition to like to the the the natural world interest I I was always doing drama I was always I was in choir band I was always in a perform it is affirmative way at it in various ways and so that was always in me and then I did a Radio Show when I was an undergraduate in school and the show is just a radio show music show not science communication just music but it was is really in graduate school not my Undergrad it was graduate school when I started doing more presentations of my work started talking with people about my science going to conferences and then also teeing classes and you know that that transfer of information in and working with people to help them understand ideas it started to all come together and there was a point in graduate school where I was hanging out with my friends were drinking beer and talking about science nahles cool things in the news and we were like we should be on the radio Oh oh I know I know the program manager down at the radio station on campus I'll go talk to him so I went down to the radio station and instead of proposing a music program I proposed a Science Program also and they said yes and they said yes beginning of all of this okay and okay so you had a calling you found unopened or an open window in your Dovan I took it yeah and so I guess at that point I guess that's where the love of the media this type of media grew more but how did you marry that with you know keeping focused finishing your your degree and the and becoming Dr Kiki I felt like I was living a double life for a while honestly I would spend half of my time on the radio show and half of my time on graduate school studies even though they're both they were both about science the radio show was broad so I was looking at astro physics and chemistry and biology neuroscience environmental site you know all sciences was what stories are interesting and how can I tell the story in Can we talk about it and my graduate studies were so narrow yes they knew that narrowing in on that.

Science Communication Organisa Dr Kiki Sanford Dr Kiki UC Davis VP Europe one hundred acres fifteen years
"science communication" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"science communication" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"Some of our conversations have been digging into the science of carbon capture we're not going to do this much today we're gonna we're gonna you know so it's less of a learning curve it's more sort of the history of sort of science communication and the tools and devices and audiences behind it for the past twenty five years or so so brian go all right so what we're doing today we're setting up you know trying to figure out a way to build a new fun science foundation and you know that that happens in little bits all around somewhere between the classrooms and and you know going around online at khan academy or or core sarah and there's a huge wave of fun you know in an informal ways to access every every day like on youtube and instagram physics girl we mentioned earlier she already awesome there's all fucking love science and nat go and sap science all kinds of national geographic instagram feeds i tell everybody are some of the best things you can possibly anyone ever believe me and then you go my god they're incredible yeah well this is stuff that gets people hooked right little daily means right little daily bitesize reminders at scientists awesome in inspiring important in full of what are those things oh fat oh yes facts yes right which facts aren't cutting it which is super fucking clear so maybe pretty pictures will in storytelling has to be part of it and that's why folks phil here so attractive and meaningful and yes that's exactly how i meant it come out you don't sound like a creeping again i can't.

khan academy sarah brian youtube phil twenty five years
"science communication" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"science communication" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Basically a science communication book for the masses you know it was written as a conversation among three people and you know so that could explain the you know the whole idea of the heliocentric solar system says the tradition of popularizing science goes back a long way and i really recommend that everybody look up this youtube video it's called quantum chess and it's starring kiani reeves and paul rudd and they and paul rudd kiana reeves actually does all of their narration for it which is super random and then paul rudd plays quantum chess with stephen hawking in the video and it's funny it's so yeah it's like he has the best sense of humor in it so you can go to youtube and put like quantum chess stephen hawking or quantum chest paul rudd and you'll find the video really readily and yeah it's called stephen hawking faces paul radin epic chess match and it's to promote this quantum chess game that was developed through some work at caltech and some of the other cool stuff that they do in the institute for quantum information and matter but yeah it was i don't know really exciting that i was really close to a lot of the people that went into developing that and that he was so game to do something so just like silly and fun and funny study had a great sense of humor yeah like jesse it's a very recent oh it's called anyone can quantum.

kiani reeves paul rudd stephen hawking youtube caltech kiana reeves paul radin
"science communication" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"science communication" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"That the the consensus on climate change has been particularly identified with one half of the political spectrum at least in the united states but this is not to criticise conservatives because there are plenty of these issues were uh were apparently if you poll people liberals are more out of tune with the scientific consensus than conservatives are like a last time i saw more liberals were out of tune with the scientific consensus on vaccine safety namely that they are safe a than conservatives now uh we've already mentioned the the the world's science festival a panel that i attended uh and and you watched online and then you to listener can watch online oh including a link or embedded video of it in the landing page for this episode stuff away my dot com up at the title the discussion was science it a polarized world was moderated by author and journalist a john donne van uh and uh the the panelist included astrophysicist up france cordova physicist and world science festival cofounder brian green geneticist sir paul nurse and most notably the wanted the individual programmes spend the most time with her today yale law professor and science communication expert dan kahan he's the elizabeth k dollar professor of law and professor psychology at yale law school in his primary research interest are risk perception science communication in the application of decision science to law in policymaking yes oh so i was looking at some of his research in preparing for this episode and it's an interesting thing he's doing obviously he's not the only person doing it but trying to apply for example psychology psychological scientism to law so he publish things in the harvard law review that are saying hey you know judges should be aware that human brains tend to work like x y enzi right.

climate change united states physicist professor yale law school harvard law review john donne van cordova brian green dan kahan professor of law