35 Burst results for "Science Center"

"science center" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

05:12 min | 2 months ago

"science center" Discussed on Forever35

"So I wrote job descriptions for my boss and helped hire my boss. I was buying buckets and spoons for the staff who were going to be taking care of the animals. I made sure we had all the right permits and the licenses and kept track of how many animals do we have and where do we get them from? Where have we sent them, et cetera? And so I was there for 14 years and had some career progression through that. And ultimately, for the last 7, well, not counting the last ten months that I've been here at the San Diego zoo. For the last 7 years at the time I was at the science center, I was the director of husbandry, to overseeing the animal care side of things. And then went through that executive leadership program. Which was a program through the association of zoos and aquariums. Which is an international accrediting body for zoos and aquariums to really ensure the highest the gold standards for animal care, conservation, public education, et cetera. So went through that program and found myself here at the San Diego zoo. So in many ways, you know, it's a lateral move. It's kind of the same job that I was doing at the California science center, but I went from having 21 staff members to having about 275 staff members overseeing what do we have about 250 species at the science center to over 700 species here. And in many, many ways, it's a very, very similar similar role to scope is bigger, but I really, I really consider what if I describe what my job is, it's about taking care of the people who take care of the animals. The staff who work here are just the most expert people. They're so, so smart, and they're so good at what they do. And I just am here to

San Diego zoo association of zoos and aquari California science center
"science center" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

01:58 min | 4 months ago

"science center" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"Is a graduate of the University of Texas health science center dental school in San Antonio. He also maintains an integrative biological dental practice in marble falls, Texas, where he and his partners have treated patients from all 50 states and 24 countries, including, of course, yours truly, and even my wife, Allison. Doctor Candace Owens, not that Candace Owens, I know some of you are thinking that has practiced that not only Freeman and Owen since 2008. She obtained her undergraduate degree from McMurray university in Abilene, Texas, and her doctorate in dental surgery at UT health science center, San Antonio. Now each of their bios were really long. So I kept each of their extensive credentials to the bare minimum and the interest of time here, but just know that they are both highly educated and very well known and respected in this field. So you're in good hands. These two are just OGs when it comes to this style of dentistry, which to me is the optimal practice. Here's just a couple of the topics we discuss, but trust me, if you have a question about dental health, it's likely covered in the interview to follow. We discuss the legacy of how huggins the pioneer of biological dentistry and why his contribution to the field is so meaningful. What the establishment doesn't want you to know about the effects of mask wearing on your oral health. The danger is dental practice that dentists are risking their careers to warn you about. Mercury fillings and the proper way to remove them, why indigenous people have no need to remove their wisdom teeth and some tips on nutrition that makes that possible. What to do if your dentist suggests a root canal or extraction, the importance of biocompatible dental materials and the various types of implants, jawbone cavitations and how they can lead to other serious health issues. Why fluoride is horrible for your teeth, safe teeth, whitening, solutions for receding gums, smart hygiene practices, and why you might want to check for microbes under your gums and so much more.

Candace Owens University of Texas health sci McMurray university UT health science center San Antonio marble falls Texas Abilene Allison Freeman Owen huggins
"science center" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:21 min | 5 months ago

"science center" Discussed on WTOP

"15% on long fence Dex pavers and fences go to long fence dot com today and schedule your free in home estimate. It's ten 11. We've long known about the pay gap between men and women in the workforce, but now there's new insight into when and why that pay gap begins. The Wall Street Journal dug into education department data of 2015 and 2016 college grads who got federal student aid, and they found that disparities between male and female college grads appears within three years. One of the reporters who worked the story, Lauren Weber tells me there are a lot of subtle factors at play. We did come across cases where there was fairly clear discrimination, where it was very clear a woman doing the same job with sometimes stronger credentials than men in that role was being paid less. Unfortunately, we often couldn't tell those stories because those women didn't necessarily want to go on the record. One woman said to me, it would be career suicide for me to be in The Wall Street Journal talking about this situation. But among the factors that we were able to be much more explicit about, in some cases, it is choices on the part of men and women, which might come out differently. So for example, we looked at the University of Michigan law school, which had a big gap. Men, three years out from graduation, were making a $165,000 median women were at about a $120,000. Huge gap. What we found was that men were more likely to go into corporate law jobs, which pay high salaries. And women were likely to choose public interest, not exclusively, of course, but we found far more women went into jobs like public defenders or working for nonprofit legal organizations. When they said they were choosing passion over the paycheck. Some of the other factors we found were what you would probably call a confidence gap. So we wanted to look at a job where there weren't that many different kinds of things you could do with the credentials. So dentistry was one of the ones we looked at. You graduate with a DDS degree and you're pretty much practicing dentistry. So there should theoretically not be much difference between what men and women earn. But we looked at the graduates from the University of Texas health science center at San Antonio, where there was a gap of about a $140,000 median for men, a 103,000 for women. And what we found that men felt more confidence to open a practice straight out of graduation. Whereas women we spoke to, many of them said, you know, I didn't quite feel like I was ready to open my own practice. I wanted to do a residency for a year or in some cases they worked for another dentist as an associate dentist for a few years before opening their own practice, which is the more lucrative path. And were those women less qualified or were they truly less prepared than the men who went and opened their own practices? I don't think so. And I spoke to one of the female graduates who had become a dentistry professor and she said, my female students are amazing. It's just that they don't have as much confidence as the men. That is Wall Street Journal reporter Lauren Weber, coming up on WTO, the Nats game at Nats park with the reds in the bottom of the 9th right now. We'll get an update from Frank hanrahan. It's ten 13. Monet's Ventura are being IW local 26 for 19 year, same day in my life has been changed. I have

Lauren Weber Wall Street Journal University of Michigan law sch University of Texas health sci San Antonio Nats park Nats Frank hanrahan WTO reds Monet Ventura
"science center" Discussed on The Science of Happiness

The Science of Happiness

02:42 min | 6 months ago

"science center" Discussed on The Science of Happiness

"So to sum it all up, start slow, don't get too personal right away. Ask thought provoking questions, try to ask and answer questions between the two of you evenly so you both listen and you both are heard. And most importantly, make sure to be responsive by showing your listening, you understand, and you care. I think people like to know that we're interested in them in a deeper way. Very often people are just starving for your interests. There's nothing better you can give to somebody and I know this as a therapist than simply to listen. On our next episode, we explore different ways to relate to our own anxieties. Anxiety because it has nothing to do with the present moment. It's making us into mental time travelers into the future. When you think about anxiety of this information that you really need to pay attention to, you also realize that it means that you still hopeful about that future. I'm dacher keltner. Thank you for joining us on the science of happiness. You can find a list of these 36 questions and articles about the research behind it in our show notes. We also have a link to the episode of Kristen and Joel and his new audible series, romance road test, where they tried to practice. If you try out these 36 questions, or create your own, we'd love to hear about it. Email us at happiness pod at Berkeley dot EDU. Or use the hashtag happiness pod. We love hearing what you think about these practices and how these stories might have impacted you. Our executive producer of audio is shuka kalantari, our producer is Haley gray, sound designer is Jenny cataldo of a company studios. Our editor in chief is Jason marsh, and our associate producer is Elena Nielsen. The science of happiness is a co production of UC Berkeley's greater good science center and PRX. If you're listening to this show, then you're probably a fan of unique and interesting stories. I want to tell you about pocket. Pocket is a website and app that finds the most thought provoking articles from trusted sources and puts them all in one place. With pocket, you can save articles for later, or even have your list read aloud to you. They also have curated collections that are hand selected by pocket editors, or a pocket partner, like me. In fact, you can learn more about what we discussed in today's episode in the latest collection I created. Go to get pocket dot com slash PRX and check out the science of happiness, happiness breaks. From PRX.

keltner shuka kalantari Haley gray Jenny cataldo Jason marsh Elena Nielsen UC Berkeley's greater good sci Kristen Joel Berkeley
"science center" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:43 min | 7 months ago

"science center" Discussed on KOMO

"7. Science has returned to the Seattle center campus as Brian Gilbert chairs a long time attraction has reopened its doors. Originally built for the 1962 world's fair, its majestic pools and arches made it a centerpiece. Now the Pacific science center is reborn so to speak, after closing two years during the pandemic. It is very exciting. You know, over the past two years, we have been able to still serve the community with our digital programming and in person camps, but to welcome visitors back on our campus for a lot of the beloved experiences and some new experiences. It's a really exciting day. These are O'Neill as vice president of marketing and sales for the Pacific science center. She says a lot of your favorites are still there. So they're still the tropical butterfly house with over 300 butterflies flying around. So those have come back and are reemerging every day. So you can check out the poop and actually them emerging. In real life, there's also the planetarium and our laser dome. It's the world's largest dedicated laser dome. And we actually are excited to be offering three daytime laser shows with general admission. Wait, what about the dinosaurs, Lisa? The dinosaurs are indeed still there. So, you know, there are many people who during the pandemic, we absolutely heard a lot of folks who wanted to be able to see the dinosaurs. During the two year closure, some new things have been added to the attraction. One of the most exciting things that we've brought in is a water maze where you can really understand the water ecosystem as you sort of travel through this maze as a droplet. So it's a very fun engaging activity. We also have some augmented reality experiences to that will continue to build on and bring in some additional experiences. She says keeping the Pacific science center relevant 60 years after it first opened, is a top priority. As we continue to bring in more experiences and add to our current experiences, we are looking at the latest science and whether it's in our dinosaur exhibit, we have recent updates on the current source Rex and we are continually science is constantly changing. And so we are constantly asking those questions and sort of evaluating and knowing that it's a work in progress. So we are opening our doors, but as science, we are going to continue to evolve. Brian Calvert, northwest news radio. After waves and waves of

Pacific science center Brian Gilbert Seattle center Neill Lisa Rex Brian Calvert
"science center" Discussed on The Science of Happiness

The Science of Happiness

02:31 min | 7 months ago

"science center" Discussed on The Science of Happiness

"Been married for 29 years and known each other for 40, but taking this brief time to ask each other these 36 questions open us up. We kind of laughed at each other's responses. It led to other kinds of conversations and memories and made us think about what our relationship means right now. When we create and strengthen social ties, we get a feeling of reward. We feel getting us and excitement and even euphoria, which is activated when dopamine is released in our brain. Psychologist Arthur Aaron developed these 36 questions with his wife. And then took them to the lab. He did experiments with both couples and strangers asking these questions. And in this research, people felt more connected and more passionate love for their partners. A few tips, make sure to take turns. One of Arthur's studies showed that if one person answered the whole set of questions, and then the other person answered them afterwards, it didn't have the same positive effect as going back and forth. And change up the questions if you want. It's not the exact questions it matter, but rather starting from simple ones and then going deeper from there in order to build closeness. If you want to try this 36 questions practice on your own and want more suggestions for different questions you can ask, check out our show notes wherever you're listening to this podcast. You'll also find some tips there about how to do this practice on your own, as well as more about the research behind why it's so effective for increasing closeness. I'm dacher keltner, thanks for joining us on our happiness break. We'll be back next week with another episode of the science of happiness. Happiness break is a production of UC Berkeley's greater good science center and PRX. Thanks for taking a break with us today. If you're listening to this show, then you're probably a fan of unique and interesting stories. I want to tell you about pocket. Pocket is a website and app that finds the most thought provoking articles from trusted sources and puts them all in one place. With pocket, you can save articles for later, or even have your list read aloud to you. They also have curated collections that are hand selected by pocket editors, or a pocket partner, like me. In fact, you can learn more about what we discussed in today's episode in the latest collection I created. Go to get pocket dot com slash PRX and check out the science of happiness, happiness breaks. From PRX..

Arthur Aaron UC Berkeley's greater good sci Arthur keltner
"science center" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

01:31 min | 9 months ago

"science center" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"EAA young eagles program. He was chairman for a number of years. And he's on many other aviation related things. He commanded operations smile in 2010. That was the volunteer medical and supply airlift for Haitian victims of the earthquake. So congratulations to Harrison Ford on that. I bet that's going to be quite a ceremony. Max Prescott, he's with the Northern California at aero club, right? Yes. This isn't his club. No, it's a different one. Yeah, so the events at the California science center, which is just down the road for me. If I'm in town, I really looking forward to I'm going to try and find out how to get there. I'm also kind of happy to see that they are recognizing Harrison Ford for all the positive things that he's done because it seems like recently passed 5 years. He's been in the news for doing some not so great aviation stuff. But it seems like a mistake or two along the way. Override all the positives that you have the runway incursions? Yeah. Yeah. That's a good point, Brian. Yeah. Note him for those positive things that he's done because there have been a lot of them. They're certainly have, yeah, yeah. All right, thanks for listening to the airplane geeks podcast. We really appreciate it. Again, our guest this episode was and hood, author of fly girl, a memoir..

EAA young eagles Max Prescott aero club Harrison Ford California science center Northern California earthquake Brian hood
"science center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:46 min | 10 months ago

"science center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Bread and butter of their business is environmentally destructive And then they talk about something that they're doing that's environmentally positive Usually in those cases what their spending on this environmental activity is a tiny tiny fraction of their overall budget Yeah that's the magnified minority We're spending millions on renewables but they're spending tens of billions on fossil fuels Amy westerfeld reported elsewhere in the show that freedom of speech is often viewed as sacrosanct We all know that and has been used by fossil fuel companies as cover for their misinformation campaigns What are the bigger implications of that in terms of free speech It really depends on the specific situation But generally speaking my policy on my approach is the antidote to bad speech is more speech or good speech And that is kind of the principle that informs building public resilience against misinformation So helping people to see through these false arguments from fossil fuel companies or other sources of misinformation You work with Facebook to help them combat misinformation What does that work look like particularly in the climate realm So Facebook launched the climate science center and initially the climate science center was just about providing authoritative reliable accurate facts about climate change And this was done in response to a lot of criticism that he received about letting misinformation spread on their platform And a lot of people were critical that this was not enough including myself I didn't have any association with them at the time So I was quite laughing saying producing facts while living misinformation spread was lack poisoning someone and then giving them a pamphlet of that vegetables But to their credit they always recognize that just producing the climate science center was the first step and they intend to gradually ratchet up their ambition and proactiveness in taking on current misinformation So their next step was to work with myself and two other climate communication researchers tiny Liza witz and Sandra Vander Linden And we went through the process of looking at the most common myths about climate change and then we advise them on how to write debacles about them It's important when you're debunking misinformation not just to explain the facts although that's crucially important but also to explain the technique used to distort the facts So in fact myth fallacy fact is a general structure that we recommend for debugging misinformation And they use them So we produce those with them debunking the most common myths of that climate change Since then it's been an ongoing collaboration and it's still looking at other ways To use their platform the canon misinformation It's been slow Slower than I would have liked but there has been incremental progress Misinformation is a really complicated problem It involves psychology culture technology science whole range of different factors and we need to be throwing a lot of different tools out of John cook Thanks for sharing your insights on how to identify misinformation and how to respond to the misinformation Thanks Greg It was great to talk to you This is climate one Coming up the implications of podcasts not being regulated the same way as other types of media Every person who's.

climate science center Amy westerfeld Facebook Liza witz Sandra Vander Linden John cook Greg
"science center" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 10 months ago

"science center" Discussed on WTOP

"You're listening to WTO pneumo 1123 now a man is recovering this morning after he was rushed to the hospital because he was bitten by his deadly pet snake in African pit viper He had to be treated with anti venom infusions over the weekend that were from the national zoo in the Virginia aquarium and marine science center People who have venomous snakes that are not indigenous to Virginia that makes it really difficult for us at the hospitals That's because hospitals don't typically have anti venom treatments on hand for non native snakes Chris holstead director of the blue ridge poison center which wasn't involved in this case says they'd have to reach out to a zoo for the treatment and that takes extra time when the clock is ticking Sooner you can get treatment anti venom in the better He says these snakes can cause tissue and muscle damage and even death He also warns not to use any home remedies immediately call 9-1-1 Shana stewman WTO P news By the way owning that particular snake in Virginia is illegal President Biden looks to have the wealthiest Americans pay more in taxes The president is proposing American households worth more than a $100 million pay a minimum tax of 20% It would apply to the top 100th of 1% of households with half the expected revenue coming from those worth a $1 billion or more The White House claims the so called billionaire minimum income tax would reduce the deficit by $360 billion over the next ten years That CBS correspondent Sarah.

Virginia aquarium and marine s Chris holstead blue ridge poison center national zoo WTO Shana stewman Virginia President Biden White House CBS Sarah
"science center" Discussed on The Science of Happiness

The Science of Happiness

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on The Science of Happiness

"Back to the science of happiness. I'm emiliana Simon Thomas, the science director at the greater good science center here at UC Berkeley, and I'm filling in for dacre kelton. Today we've been exploring how the practice of gratitude can support people with really demanding jobs. Burnout rates and healthcare have always been high and COVID-19 has only intensified things. How can we prevent burnout? How can we reduce burnout both at the individual level and implementing changes of the institutional level? What is the evidence have to say? Because this is becoming an even greater problem and hopefully more and more people are going to be paying attention to it. Catherine adair is a researcher at the duke center for healthcare safety and quality. She and our colleagues compared the effects of different gratitude practices on the well-being of healthcare providers. We are very interested to see which tools are making a statistically significant impact on people. First, they all filled out a survey measuring aspects of their mental health. So emotional exhaustion, happiness, depression symptoms, and thriving and recovery, these two aspects of resilience, then they zeroed in on three exercises for enhancing gratitude. One called looking forward. We text them a link. They go in and they enter something that they're looking forward to at various times in the future. Then the three good things practice. We sent them a text message in the evening every night for two weeks where they clicked on the link, and then simply entered three good things that happened that day. And finally, writing someone a gratitude letter. They wrote their 5 to 7 minute long gratitude letter. And then we checked in with them a week later. People chose one of these exercises to try, and then they filled out the same mental health survey afterwards. We found significant improvements in depression symptoms, gains and optimism, and improvements in their thriving and recovery aspects of resilience, people's moods improved, they felt better about the future and a little more okay during difficult moments, and there were better at bouncing back after feeling down. Of all the gratitude exercises, the three good things practice had especially good results. And we saw improvements in emotional exhaustion, happiness, depression symptoms, as well as recovery. So we're pretty excited that even a tool that takes only two to 5 minutes a night for a couple of weeks seems to have an impact potentially 12 months later. In healthcare, we often see this badge of honor culture where people feel like in order to demonstrate their commitment, they have to work crazy long hours and sacrifice their personal life. And unfortunately, we know from the data that tends to lead to burnout and burnout predicts patient safety errors. And so we need to shift this culture to one that supports well-being. To making it safe for our colleagues to go home to recharge to take breaks, make sure they're staffing. Make sure that they're the resources needed for folks to do the amazing work that they're capable of. You can check out the gratitude practice for nurses toolkit at gratitude.

emiliana Simon Thomas greater good science center UC Berkeley dacre kelton Catherine adair duke center for healthcare saf depression symptoms depression
"science center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Was House speaker Nancy Pelosi at an event this week focused on gender We come here Ready to take on the challenge to meet the moment And you hear the same thing in one on one conversations like when I spoke with transportation secretary Pete Buttigieg yesterday It's been really encouraging to see how warmly I've been received and how warmly I think the U.S. is being received By a lot of countries that really missed us these last few years And recognize the importance of the U.S. not just being around but being in a leadership position So our diplomats from other countries just being diplomatic or do people here really think the Biden administration is doing enough to lead the world away from the brink of catastrophe I decided to ask some folks We went to the Glasgow science center which has been converted to what's known as the green zone It's a place for civil society groups activists and corporations to gather demonstrate and set up displays As far as I can tell America is a bipolar actor with two forces and each take turns driving and they're going in different directions James silverman is a 26 year old londoner who works in sustainable development The world looks America like what it is going on Make a decision and stick with it please Is there anything you think this administration could do that would be persuasive It's difficult because it's not a single administration job no matter what this administration does how do I know the next one's going to hold any of it So that's one critique that the U.S. is unpredictable Policy may do.

Pete Buttigieg U.S. Biden administration Glasgow science center Nancy Pelosi James silverman
"science center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A day And the Bloomberg business act This is Bloomberg radio Now a global news update Police in New Mexico say actor Alec Baldwin was told the prop gun he was using onset was safe The New York Times reports an affidavit shows an assistant director grabbed a prop gun and yelled cold gun meaning it was supposed to indicate the gun didn't have any live rounds The assistant director was unaware of any live rounds in the prop gun The federal government says there are nearly 200 U.S. citizens in Afghanistan who want to leave the country Reports CNN reports that's what the State Department told congressional staff on Thursday noting it has stayed in contact with more than 360 U.S. citizens there The number is higher than what the Biden administration estimated during the military withdrawal from the war torn country Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in August the number of Americans in Afghanistan who want to leave was likely closer to 100 Doctor Anthony Fauci says it's recommended to stick with the same vaccine when getting a booster speaking to CNN Fauci noted it just makes sense to go with what you originally received but he mentioned circumstances may change for some people and mixing and matching is also fine A ship off the Olympic Peninsula dropped about 40 shipping containers into the Pacific Ocean Friday reportedly in heavy seas the U.S. coast guard says the ship was inbound and dropped the containers about 43 miles off the coast of Washington state Abortion providers in Texas who are suing to stop the state's new abortion law are eager to argue their case before the Supreme Court Now that a November 1st date has been set mark here on with the center for reproductive rights says a lot is on the line because this goes beyond the abortion debate If a state like Texas can invade federal court review any state could prohibit the exercise of any fundamental constitutional right U.S. attorney general Merrick Garland called the Texas abortion law a scheme to nullify the constitution I'm Brian schuck The South Carolina law enforcement division is releasing the 9-1-1 tapes from the day a prominent lawyer was allegedly shot Scott kimbler reports Alex Murdoch faces charges of insurance fraud stemming from an alleged shooting in early September during that incident he was the person who called 9-1-1 Let us now release those tapes I got a flat tire And I stopped somebody to help me and when I turned my back they tried to shoot me Murdock told the operator he was injured I can't drive And I'm bleeding a lot Burdock is also facing charges of theft from an insurance settlement and being investigated for alleged theft from his own law firm President Biden's job approval rating remains underwater in a new national poll Gallup has Biden at 42% That's down 14 points since June It was between 54 and 57% from January through June the economy continues to struggle with supply chain issues related to the ongoing COVID pandemic Work is being started on a science innovation campus in Jersey City that will be home to science and technology companies Scott Pringle has more Oh this is a 30 acre site next to the liberty science center Officials say the goal is to grow science and technology companies and reimagine public school science education What's called side tech city will include a liberty science center high school residential housing for innovators scientists and stem students there's an events Plaza labs and research areas Residents will have an opportunity to test new high-tech products in their homes before they go elsewhere Governor Murphy was on hand for a groundbreaking ceremony A middle Georgia man is accused of spending thousands in COVID relief funds on a collector's card prosecutors say the Dublin suspect made up information about a small business before he was sent $85,000 to help make it through the pandemic He allegedly spent $57,000 of that on a Pokémon card instead I'm Brian shook Now this Bloomberg sports update the Houston Astros headed to the World Series for the third time in 5 years after yet another pitching gem beating the Boston Red Sox 5 nothing in game 6 of the American League championship series used in one of the final three games of the best of 7 series to clinch it two nights after a lefty from eld is through 8 shutout innings Rookie right hander Luis Garcia nearly as good giving up just one hit over 5 plus He left after he gave Hernandez and a two round triple in the 6th Kyle Tucker put the game away for Houston a three run opposite field Homer in the bottom of the 8th 5 eastern pitchers combined to stop Boston on just two hits The Los Angeles Dodgers get bad news They've had to scratch Max Scherzer for the start tonight in game 6 of the national league championship series reportedly with a tired arm the braves lead that series three games to two Wins for the next and the nets on the road the next made a franchise record 24 three pointers and raising their record two defeating the Orlando Magic one 21 to 96 set a Nixon double figures led by Julius Randle who had 21 points and ten rebounds Meanwhile it was the triple double for Kevin Durant 29 points 15 rebounds and 12 assists James Harden scored 20 and the nets close out a 16 to one run to come from behind to beat the 76ers one 14 to one O 9 Another exciting week of college football on tap is what we gate ruled through Fourth ranked Alabama will be at home when it hosts Tennessee second ranked Oklahoma will look to keep rolling as a visits Kansas Third ranked Cincinnati will also be on the road for a battle against navy and 9th ranked Oklahoma state will look to be up for the challenge on the road against Iowa state And we have no training football on Bloomberg 11 three O The 5 and one fighting Irish ranked number 13 in the country will be hosting the USC Trojans The pregame show on Bloomberg 11 three O gets underway at 6 30 kick off at 7 30 With a Bloomberg.

"science center" Discussed on Newcomers: Star Wars, with Lauren Lapkus & Nicole Byer

Newcomers: Star Wars, with Lauren Lapkus & Nicole Byer

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on Newcomers: Star Wars, with Lauren Lapkus & Nicole Byer

"What is his name to brixton on this like flatbed truck as they blow up the whole like Fucking science center so like everyone dies in there right. Yeah they do a good job of being whatever. Everyone's a bad guy in here so if you don't care collapses yeah. They're like dicks in these movies. Now everyone in. Here's a piece of shit so when our heroes leave it's okay to watch the personnel violence every character that there are all kinds of annoying waiters. So you're okay with them. Sued then hobbes's like i know where we can go. I haven't been there in twenty years and nobody wants me some. So sam sam samoa do i say it. I say it wrong. I don't know. I think we i think a lot of white people say are non samoan. Say samoa and i think he's really over enunciating so i think he's trying to let us know. How does he say it. Samo samo Yeah sam our okay to visit jona his brother mechanic. And he's like he punches him jonah punches right in the face when he sees him yeah and weirdly state them has that bet where he's going to punch from right in the face. Why do we need that. Why did we did not need to hear the who fucking cares. So then jones like all right. I'll help you fix this piece of machinery..

Fucking science center sam sam samoa dicks hobbes Samo samo samoa jona jonah jones
"science center" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Can't be long with it because it simply won't work at panel Yes and i also. I also learned working on my first series for marvel that it will also really annoy The artist and the and the letter if you have too much tax them And especially comics today. If you if you look back at you know Especially the the kind of Stanley jack kirby comics in the sixties. There was text all over. The page comics are much Have much less text Now than they did in the mid twentieth century so You know you you have to learn how to To really limit your your word usage you also have to When when you start working with a particular artist on a regular basis you also start to think about whether it's this artist good at what is artists. Do really well. That i can. I can take advantage of and used to to really further the story or the sense of character or whatever it is that i wanna punch in particular scene So there's there's definitely a very different set of tools to play with. I've only ever done anything like it. Once for a exhibit at the scotch and science center. I used to work in there. We had an artist. Didn't we had this little comic story. And i wrote the script for it and even in that little debt. I thought well this is. This is different from what i'm used to you. Know if you know any Big comic people are out there and they're looking for a writer. I am available just mention them. So let's go onto your creative process and we're gonna talk about the peculiarities. So maybe before we started start on the process side. Tell me a little bit about the peculiarities. Whatever you want to say as to what it's about without giving away something. Don't get away okay. So the novel is set at the very end of the nineteenth century and it is a sentence moment where in actuality there was a mentioned in a previous book the twelfth and champion there was a revival of interest in the supernatural in the early nineteenth century and there was another revival at the end of the nineteenth century..

Stanley jack kirby scotch and science center
Texas COVID Hospitalizations Increase as Delta Variant Spreads

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Texas COVID Hospitalizations Increase as Delta Variant Spreads

"Pure water systems from the 19 Hospitalizations are increasing in Texas due to the delta variant from India, the India very experts faster and is more deadly, raising concerns for health experts in North Texas. It's probably a certainty that's going to come here. That's John Sims, director of you NT's Health Science Center safer. Their Texas, which is helping with the vaccine outreach. The variant has attributed to the first rise in Covid hospitalizations in Texas since mid April. The variant made up 2% of cases last week in Texas, Northwest region. Now up to 10% Sam says the COVID

John Sims Texas India Health Science Center North Texas Northwest SAM Covid
"science center" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Three o'clock today, Marcie Romero University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center will talk about nurses and rock stars and patients. Are patients actually important in hospital. God, I hope so. All right, joining us now Elizabeth Jacobson. She is a poet laureate, and Gerry Uelmen, who is essentially half of actual contemporaries. He's half the axle. He's one wheel. Are our two wheels. He's the back wheels of actual contemporary and their old bread truck. We'll start with the smarter of the two. Elizabeth Jacobson, poet laureate, Elizabeth Welcome to the show. Oh, thank you so much. Richard. It's great to join you again. But I think Jerry's way. Uh, more brilliant than me. Okay, well, we'll see Jerry. It's a lot to live up to Melting and humility and embarrassment here, But yeah, All right. But you know what? Let's let's start with you about this project. Now it was. I mean, I got the You know, I got the project I was. You know, your partner in crime it Axl Matthew chased Daniel I think we talk about this on the air and I go scores you guys can come on whenever you want. Was it? You and Matthew was that Axl to started this project? No, actually, it was Elizabeth who received the what this incredible poet laureate, and she also got a green light, which she should tell you more about than us. She invited us to collaborate with her. Gotcha. And so I was just well that Yeah, Great. All right, Take it away. Elizabeth in here. And, Yeah, I just tell you the process and then Jerry can explain what's going on now with the two grades, exhibitions and then more to come. So the Academy of American Poets, which is a huge national organization for poets, Um, offers the fellowship for poets laureate around the country, and it's an application and you apply with the project. So it's $50,000 fellowship, and I contacted Matthew and Jerry and ask them if they'd be interested in working on a project with me, So we worked out some of the details for the application together. I submitted the application I received word April year ago that I received the fellowship. Oh, In fact, you do our project which was all designed prior to Cove. It, um, you know, with in light of covert and s, O. Matthew and Jerry and I got together and we we organized and We move forward. I will explain Briefly. What the project Itwas So what it is, it is was Project for high school. Students and I taught poetry workshops to the students. Ah, syriza poetry workshops. They wrote poems. We studied in the workshops, love poems and owed various poems, contemporary poems that I selected. For them to read prior to meeting with me, Then we talked about them. They did some generative exercises they wrote home. They worked on them with their teachers. The teachers were fabulous. Anyway, they produced these poems and then from the poems they extra Parts of the poem to print on T shirts. That's where David Sloan and youth work comes in. And by the way you quirks received a $10,000 in kind, matching grants from the Academy of American poets for their work on the project as well. Of the original plan was that I would go into the schools and teach the workshops and the students would go into the screen Printing studio Youthworks Mean with David Sloan and learn the whole process of screen printing, as well as meeting with Matthew and Jerry of Axel to learn the difference. Design techniques for the T shirts and so on, so none that was able to happen, Everybody. Everything had to be done online, and David Sloan graciously did all the printing in the studio himself. We have. What? What ended up. We have poems. We have amazing T shirts with designs and poems printed on the T shirts. We have a beautiful broadside collection that was printed with with the T shirt designs on really nice paper, and we have an anthology G that we publish actual published. That collects all the artwork and all the poems from the projects. No, I think I said that in one breath. Wow, Jerry didn't miss anything. Wow. Yeah, a little in Europe and watch you go. So, Jerry, before we get into this, David slow not available, Hey, was going to join us, But apparently he was a big part of this as well. Maybe we'll get he and in Matthew on later to talk about this project as well, Right. So before you go on, Jerry, where is where is all this work? Well, um, we wanted to have one place where it would be for the you know, to cover at least part of the national poetry month of April, and it's still up. It's at the rail yard Performance center right outside the dance studio. And it's Oh, gosh, I'm trying to remember It's like 40 ft. Long and, like six ft High, I'm everything. Everything that lives with just described the broad size the T shirts and you know the poetry and all that. Well, the poetry and all the image that the kids came up with. Okay. And so you can see it all there, um and what you're going to farmers market this weekend. Jacqueline. It's Saturday. Just cross The rebel road tracks and they're going to read the poems. Look at the imagery. It's pretty awesome. Those very same imagery that you're looking at. There was printed on the T shirts by David Gotcha. Um, you know, Unfortunately, this was going to be more, um Larger project in that the kids. Wrote the poetry after working with Elizabeth. And then we create, they would be able to go to Santa Fe, Youthworks. And learn how to actually do soak screening. Um, so that was part of what we had hoped to do, but covert kind of messed with that a little bit. David, as was said very graciously printed these on the T shirts and the kids each got a T shirt with their image on it the image that they designed to go with the poem. Um, so that's where the T shirts now are being warned by all the participants in in the In this project. They're not available there. You know the kid's got him? Yes. And then, uh, With all those images on, uh, all the poems and we wanted in the T shirts who wanted to have the kids. Take Photo portrait of themselves wearing the T shirts but once again covert kind of You know?.

Elizabeth Jacobson Gerry Uelmen David Sloan Richard Matthew $50,000 Daniel $10,000 David Europe 40 ft Jacqueline David Gotcha Jerry Elizabeth six ft Axl Matthew Academy of American Poets Axl Saturday
Tarrant County and UNT Health Science to Open More COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Tarrant County and UNT Health Science to Open More COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

"County and the U. N. T Health Science Center Point open more vaccination sites here in the county. Katherine's airfields is in the U. N. T Health Science Center and Tarrant County have already established sites at the Stop, Six neighborhood and Saginaw with the bolt to provide better access to those in underserved communities. Sylvia Trent Adams, with the U. N T Health Science Center, says they're also planning 17 registration events. Registration is critical to make sure we can identify When In fact, things are planned for given day, and then for the extra capacity for walkin access. They also planned to open for new sights. Campbell in Zaire. W B A B NEWS Our

U. N. T Health Science Center Sylvia Trent Adams U. N T Health Science Center Tarrant County Katherine Saginaw Campbell Zaire
Los Angeles' California Science Center Makes Home Of Space Shuttle Endeavour Available For Weddings

Tim Conway Jr.

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Los Angeles' California Science Center Makes Home Of Space Shuttle Endeavour Available For Weddings

"Me to the moon. Let me and spaced out has a different meaning in the era of covert 19. But for lovebirds you want a flight of fancy the California Science Center in L. A is willing to help. You can now get married in the hangar that houses the space shuttle endeavor. The Science Center says it wanted to help out couples who may be squeezed for venue availability because of the pandemic.

California Science Center Science Center
"science center" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"science center" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

"All of the details into a big pot and stirred up. We're not going to understand what the earth is or how the earth works we have to be looking at the interactions between the different parts in order to be able to understand its function and our role in absolutely. And how can recognizing the earth system as an intangible global common without borders as proposed by the common whom of humanity. Help us to better address the issues facing our global community. Well the way. I look at it our ancestors. When they stopped their nomadic life and got a permanent address they probably started out by dumping their waste products wherever they were produced by taking whatever they thought they needed from nature dame to eat or trees to burn and get energy and then they realize hey. This isn't working. We're getting sick from polluted water and we're running out of game. We have to make some rules. We have to manage our relationship with the local environment and then we realized when we got to be even more people that it wasn't enough to do it locally if we want clean air and water here in denmark where i live. We can't let the polls in the germans and swedes throw all their rubbish in the air and water so we made regional rules about how we manage our relationship to the world around us. What climate change and the biodiversity crisis and even the corona crisis are showing us is. We need to manage our relationship with the environment at the global level. I don't have a global government which makes it a challenge but it doesn't make it impossible and we're in a phase now. I think where we are attempting different strategies for developing governance to roles that can be used in order to be able to do this management or to set up a guidelines with this management definitely with the intangible global comments without borders concept that's been proposed by the common home of humanity it goes to show with climate change for example. Climate change does not recognize any borders. So it's really important that we recognize the earth system and the global commons as something that connects all of us. Were all a part of it. Yeah absolutely in order to be able to manage this. We're going to have to make changes all the way through our society that includes in our understanding of of governance and how we deal with the global commons. All right and there you have it. We need a green revolution. The earth's resources are limited and we need to change how we deal with our global commons climate change the biodiversity crisis and the cove in nineteen pandemic show us. We need to manage our relationship with the environment at the global level the planetary boundaries framework is essential in tackling some of the planet's greatest challenges and achieving the un's sustainable development goals. That is all for today. And thank you for joining us for this episode of common home conversations. Beyond and seventy five please subscribe share in. Be sure to tune in on february twenty fourth to continue the conversation. With our special guest maria antonia tigray director of latin america the global network for the study of human rights and the environment and visit us at www dot the planetary press dot com for more episodes in the latest news in sustainability climate change and the environment..

denmark february twenty fourth maria antonia tigray corona crisis today earth germans swedes seventy five www dot the planetary dot com biodiversity crisis latin america pandemic press nineteen
"science center" Discussed on The Morning Fix by 510k Cafe

The Morning Fix by 510k Cafe

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"science center" Discussed on The Morning Fix by 510k Cafe

"Thank you both for having me on this awesome platform to talk about a variety of things in my. My background is is quite unique. I'm a metaxas. Kitto raise in south texas and went to undergraduate school at the mccombs honor. Spring for business. I had a unique insight into case based learning in addition to my pre medical studies than so i combine that background and went to medical school at the university of texas health science center in san antonio. I was very fortunate there to work at the veteran's hospital work on vision rehabilitation and it was particularly lucky to work at the active military hospital. There formerly brooke army medical center and work with burn patients whose to or Injuries from iad's during operation iraqi freedom and enduring freedom and unburned around eyelids and got to head unique interests into eyelids as the vision rehabilitation from the outside. The ice standpoint you know was was something very important for those soldiers who had gotten hurt so that was my first sort of entry point into reconstruction surgery on the island. Which obviously you know you go into medical school. you're not thinking. Hey i want to be an islet surgeon but it was very very unique and very satisfying. So that was my first exposure to occupy surgery at furthered. My training by doing rotations at hospitals across the country in san francisco. Miami the ended up in in oklahoma city. The dvd eye institute which is very highly rated ophthalmology residency program and we were very high volume institution and focused on intraocular surgery eyelid surgery or surgery. Cosmetic surgery in just really kind of fall fashion. I matched to two year. Eyelid facial cosmetic and reconstructive fellowship at the medical college wisconsin under the direction of the steam. Dr jerry harris who was editor of the ophthalmic lactic plastic and reconstructive journal reconstructive surgery journal as well as president of our occupies exciting spent two years. Really just taking you know. Call almost every other day taking care of trauma reconstruction and really kind of owning my skills to be a super specialist as they call it. During that training..

Kitto mccombs honor university of texas health sci south texas brooke army medical center iad dvd eye institute san antonio Dr jerry harris oklahoma city ophthalmic lactic plastic and Miami san francisco wisconsin
NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:35 min | 2 years ago

NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

"To the healthcare policy. Podcast i'm the host. David intra cosso with me today to discuss the climate crisis related health. Costs is dr. vj lemay climate and health scientists at the national resources. Defense council center. Dr lemay welcome to the program. Thank you dr maze by is of course posted on the podcast website on background. Twenty twenty set another global warming record this past year tight twenty sixteen as the hottest record year and strikingly warmer than twenty nineteen. For example average temperatures in some parts of the arctic last year were more than six degrees celsius higher than the twenty one thousand nine hundred eighty one to two thousand ten baseline average per no at twenty twenty seven. Us record with twenty two one billion dollar plus climate disasters. The previous record was sixteen and twenty seventeen toiling in some ninety. Five billion dollars in damages are more than double the forty one year average of forty five billion seventy events were linked to hurricanes and tropical storms concerning wildfires california suffered over ten million acres burned more than double the previous record set in twenty eighteen at four million acres adverse health effects caused by climate crisis. Events are on bounce well known for example in two thousand sixteen. The government published the impacts of climate change on human health in the us. And i recently cited lance and twenty twenty countdown on health report that concluded in part quote the world has already warned by one point. Two degrees celsius resulting in profound immediate and worsening health effects close quote nevertheless response. By thorough policymakers. Along with the health care industry remains far beyond inadequate. The best the recent congress recently concluded congress can do as produce a five hundred fifty page climate crisis report that drew no connection between the climate crisis and related effects. Imposed on medicare medicaid beneficiaries. Do likely in part to the fact. That neither med pack or mac. Pack independent gresham commissions given broad authority to address issues affecting. These programs has never addressed much less mentioned the climate crisis with me again to discuss climate crisis related. Health costs is the national resource. Defense counsels dr. vj lemay so at that As background vj. Let me begin by asking. If you can briefly describe the nrdc signed centers work shirt and. Thank you david for the invitation to speak with you and your listeners. I work at nbc. The natural resources defense council we are a profit organization working really to stay guard the earth. it's people plants animals and the natural systems on which we all rely. We combine the power of more than three million at rdc members across the country with the expertise of about seven hundred staffers that scientists like me but also lawyers policy advocates who are working together to protect clean air clean water and the natural systems on which we all depend so i work in the science center at entity see and science release the foundation of our work to protect people in the environment. We worked to understand environmental and human health problems working in interdisciplinary spaces in some of the work that we'll talk about today. In terms of connecting the dots between climate change in house is really the focus of my work. And i just have to say you know this period unprecedented on the scientific enterprise. It's more important than ever that we recognize the value that science brings to society and helping us to confront respond to some of these. Really urgent threats thank you. I appreciate that last point As we are well aware. Let me go to you recently. Published an article To your credit in health affairs Last month last month december issue was a theme issue on the climate crisis. I should say a health affairs polishes. Nineteen eighty-three had never previously addressed. Or excuse me. Nineteen one had never previously addressed this subject So again a -gratulations. Your article with your colleagues was titled estimating the cost of action and the economic benefits of addressing. The health harms of climate. Change But i wanna ask you specifically about that because you wrote in this essay quote unquote. There is currently a knowledge gap that must be addressed for more complete understanding of climate change related exposure response relationship. So explain to me what this knowledge gap is. Sure you know in your setup remarks. You mentioned the huge toll that climate and weather disasters inflicted on the united states last year. About ninety five billion dollars by the federal governments fresh estimate and well that's a staggering number as a health scientist. I'm an epidemiologist. I look at that figure and i wonder what's not included and the truth is that when our federal government is tracking the damage the climate change in reports like the billion dollar disaster list. It's actually not accounting for tremendous profound and sometimes irreversible damage to human house so there is a huge missing component. We think about the continuing and mounting costs of inaction on the climate crisis

Vj Lemay David Intra Defense Council Center Dr Lemay Dr Maze Natural Resources Defense Coun Gresham Commissions Given Broa Congress Arctic United States Lance RDC Medicare Drew
Rose Bowl moved from Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena to Dallas area for College Football Playoff

Morning Edition

01:06 min | 2 years ago

Rose Bowl moved from Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena to Dallas area for College Football Playoff

"Games in college football. The Rose Bowl will play outside of Pasadena, California for the first time since World War two Matchup between Notre Dame and Alabama today will be in Arlington, Texas. A change in venue comes because California would not allow in person Spectators at the game. Miranda Suarez of member station K R a reports The Rose Bowl isn't the first big sporting event to seek sanctuary in Arlington during the pandemic. Major League Baseball held the entire world Syria's there last year. University of North Texas Health Science Center epidemiology professor Rajesh Nandi warns these big events could easily become cove in 19 super spreaders. So if there is a large congregation off hands and if the collectively attend barbs in large numbers It's likely that that would give rise to an increase in new corporate cases and hospitalizations obviously follow, Nandy says with covert 19 numbers so bad in North Texas right now, there's no safe way to go to games. I'm

Miranda Suarez Arlington California University Of North Texas Heal Pasadena Rajesh Nandi Notre Dame Alabama Football Major League Texas Syria Baseball Nandy North Texas
Space Needle cancels New Year's Eve fireworks for 2021; will go virtual instead amid COVID-19

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Space Needle cancels New Year's Eve fireworks for 2021; will go virtual instead amid COVID-19

"No fireworks at the Space Needle for New Year's Eve. Another tradition put on hold by the pandemic, but come Oh Soo Romero tells us you could still celebrate with a light show Cove in 19 has caused the cancelation of all the New Year's Eve festivities at Seattle Center this year activities that MO pop, the Pacific Science Center and the annual fireworks, But Seattle Center's Deborah Doused says people can still bring in the new year with a digital show at midnight movie up in the warmth and comfort of their own homes, and, um, you know Sure in the New year's in front of their digital device or their TV screen and watch a really, really cool light show. She encourages people not to show up in person at the Space Needle on New Year's Eve. The only thing they'll see is it lit up in pink as T Mobile is still sponsoring the virtual New Year's Eve at

Soo Romero Mo Pop Deborah Doused Pacific Science Center Seattle Center
Rapid DNA tests expected to help Houston police with rising murder investigations

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Rapid DNA tests expected to help Houston police with rising murder investigations

"To help. Fight the increase in violent crime news. Eight sevens of vasquez tells us more about how it works. And how the city plans to use the new tool the houston forensic. Science center will soon be receiving a device capable of generating forensic results from things like fingernails and hair within a few hours. It currently takes at least twenty four hours to get a dna result while the new rapid dna. Tremaine cut that time down to about six hours or less the device will be used to quickly confirm and compare known. dna samples as well as analyze samples. That come from sizable pieces of evidence. Such as a pool of blood. The city has seen a sharp increase in violent crime this year in houston police department says this instrument can help identify potential suspects much faster. Lucille oscars in houston. The mexican american legal

Vasquez Science Center Houston Tremaine Police Department Lucille Oscars
What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 2 years ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
Interview with Carlos Rivero, Chief Data Officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:25 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Carlos Rivero, Chief Data Officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia

"Hello and welcome to the AI Today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. And I'm your host Ronald schmelzer Our Guest today is Carlos Rivera. Who is the chief data officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia off Carlos. Thank you so much for joining us on AI today Hey Ron. Thanks for having me. Yeah, welcome Carlos and thanks so much for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. Check your current role as Chief data officer. Fantastic Kathleen. So yes in my current role on the chief data officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia before that. I've been in that role since August of 2018. And before that I was a chief data officer and chief Enterprise architect or the Federal Transit Administration at the US Department of Transportation that was there for a little over two years as well. And then prior to that I was physical scientist with Genoa Fisheries down at the southeast Fisheries Science Center for about fifteen years. So I've been in public service right now going over nineteen years in both federal and state experience. Well, that's great. I think that provides a lot of real Nice diverse set of experience, you know from Fisheries to the federal government to state government. And I think that's part of reason why we love to have your participation that we had your participation at the data for a-week confirmation that ran from September 14th thru 18th 2020 was of course a virtual conferences everything as these days and we were focusing on the data side of AI and for our listeners who may be interested that content is actually still available so you can come and you can hear the panel that Carlos was on when we were focusing on some of the state and the local challenges for AI and data management. If you go to data, that's spelled like data package i c o n f. It's free so you can go on there and you can check all that content will be made available for many months. So you definitely should check it out and Carlos was on a panel really sharing some of the unique insights of applying a machine learning and also some of the interesting challenges of wrangling data at the state level. So maybe Carlos you for those who weren't Intense or maybe even to motivate folks to listen to the family. What are some of them? Sites that you have seen in terms of just the challenge of managing data and getting it to do some magical things like machine learning at the state level. Well, I mean really one of the most basic things is getting people involved in the process. And in fact has plays a key role in that obviously more, you know, as we kind of evolved in once a leveraged data as of CJ Cassat within the Commonwealth, we realize that the participation of individuals not just horizontal across the organization, but also a vertically through different levels of state government is critical for our ability to integrate those data assets in a meaningful way and when I talk about the vertical, how are the patients I'm talking about, you know data storage data custodians data owners executive sponsors being able to participate in the overall governance discussion because everyone has a role to play in our ability to leverage data as a CJ asset to be able to incorporate that into our data analytics to write better intelligence and within that, you know, a comes in machine learning and artificial intelligence briefing. Jane as much value and insight from the data assets than we currently have. Yes indeed. Go ahead Kelly. Yeah, definitely and kind of to follow up with that on this podcast. We talked a lot about Ai and data at the national level, but maybe you can dig a little bit deeper into what are some of the unique challenges around data at this point level because I know that you know in general there's a general data challenges, but then we can also talk about you know, there's differences between State versus local versus Federal. So the fun thing about state is that you get to play with all the businesses at one time, you know in the federal space like when I was no Fisheries, we're very focused on fisheries and Fisheries applications. Mind you, you know as a physical scientist. I really worked with a lot of different data sets. As I was really more in a fraction of those individual populations and their environments right and anthropogenic impact on those environments and how does that change the behavior of individuals within a species right? And so you have to look at the bigger picture and yep. Integrate data from a variety of different sources other Noah Services resolved as live in North Fisheries, but we also have satellite service. We have the ocean service. We have the weather service. So being able to bring in data assets from a variety of different Services different lines of business. If you will to give you a better picture of what's happening in an environment that's very unique like more often than not individuals within that particular industry. We only focus on the data that they collect they work with on a regular basis and not really look at the bigger picture of what other data assets they can bring in same thing for in Federal Transit right in Federal Transit. It was very limited in their you know, what their perspective was with regards to you know, what data asked us what we going to bring in to really understand what's happening out in the world. They're really focused on providing, you know grants of Transit agencies and authorities to make sure that people are able to get to use public transportation in the most effective way. So it's very very silent. But then when you talk about a state government, can you talk about you know being able to leverage data as an asset at that level you really talking about across all of the different page? Business whether it's education Transportation criminal justice, you know environment what-have-you Health, you know, all of those lines of business now come under your purview and you really have to start to understand. What are they unique perspectives and how can you engage those individuals within each of those lines of businesses to be able to see the value in integrating their data assets and making better data-driven decisions home from that integration. So from a state perspective you really start to get a better handle on the overall picture of what's happening out in the real world versus a very I don't want to use this term negative in my topic view of you know, what your assembly looks like and only that which Falls but then you're suddenly are you paying attention to but at the same time, I've also realize that you know data governance and use of data as an ass is really a fractal type of problem where it doesn't matter. What kind of scale you look at it. It's going to have the same patterns associated with some of the same issues that we dealt with at the federal level we deal with birth. Level we deal with at the local level because it's not a matter of our these issues different. It's just a scale at which we operate in that just kind of gives you a little bit of a difference in wage issue is but the reality is that it's very poor the majority of the issues we do with with regards to data governance and data sharing and leveraging data and analytics a machine learning really comes back to the process and the people aspect of the peace process technology interaction.

Chief Data Officer Carlos Rivera AI Fisheries Kathleen Mulch Virginia Scientist Federal Transit Administration Genoa Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Ce Ronald Schmelzer North Fisheries Cj Cassat Officer Us Department Of Transportatio Chief Enterprise Architect Jane Kelly
Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

BrainStuff

03:18 min | 2 years ago

Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

"I've known some dogs that are pretty smart I've also known some that worked. Bless him. But could wolves be smarter. Brain stuff. It's Christian Sager, my dogs, winchester and se blue they are real smart. So I was intrigued when I read a new study that said wolves are more intelligent in some ways than my dogs and all their canine friends whether you have a chocolate lab or a coon hound scientists believe that some modern dogs and wolves descended from a common ancestor between eleven thousand and thirty thousand years ago the new study which was published in the September twenty seventeen. Journal of scientific reports is by an international team of researchers at the wolf? Science Center. In Vienna Austria, they found domesticated dogs cannot make the connection between cause and effect wolves however, can they came to that conclusion by testing and comparing how the two species searched for food after giving them hints about where it was located researchers used fourteen dogs and twelve socialised wolves in their experiments. During the tests, the animals had to choose between two containers one with food. And one without the first thing researchers did was determined whether the animals could make sense of communicative clues by pointing and looking at the container with the food researchers. Next wanted to see how the dogs and wolves responded to behavioral cues the experimental pointed to the container with food, but did not make eye contact with the animals. Finely in the last experiment, the animals had to infer themselves which container had the hidden food using only causal clues like noises made. When the experimenters shook the container with the food both the wolves and the dogs did well on the communicative clue tests all found the hidden food both species however failed the behavioral cue portion without direct. I contact neither dog nor wolf could find the food during the last part of the test. However, only the wolves could make casual inferences as to where the food was located in other words the scientists said the wolves, not the pooches understood cause and effect. Study Author Michelle Lamp from the Netherlands reminded. US. However that the differences can be explained by the fact that wolves are more persistent to explore objects than. As, because dogs are conditioned to receive food from US whereas wolves have to find food themselves in nature. What shocked researchers was that the wolves were able to interpret direct eye to eye contact that understanding of communicative cues researchers said may have facilitated domestication. The study is unique also in that it used dogs that lived in both packs and with families, but the results of the dogs were independent of living conditions.

United States Christian Sager Vienna Austria Journal Of Scientific Science Center Michelle Lamp Netherlands
Should we trust our gut?

Tai Asks Why

08:53 min | 2 years ago

Should we trust our gut?

"My Gut is this big pile of intestines that digest my food I. Don't really know what to be trusted. They're they know that I get these feelings in my got like butterflies when nervous. Or. When I'm hungry like my struggle, I crank feel like squeezy. But like why is my gut able to make decisions like tell me what to do? That seems pretty crazy because I means it has a brain. And that that seems glad you know it's just like it's my intestines but like maybe there is a brain my gut. But at the same time, it's kind of farfetched and wacky. So I decided to take this theory to the park and see what live friends There's a break. In your stomach. Know. What what? Who had your brains in your head? I, think your brain makes. Everything you feel possible. There could be a brain because there wouldn't be space or else you'd have like a big lump on ever side. My feelings and anxieties and stresses they become from here. My God your stomach does not. It set when it's hungry I think there is some sort of connection Fram Magin by cells. As Like wow. You, know I think hires onto something. It is like really complicated and I did a little bit of research. Apparently, there are little creatures in our guts and they're called microbes are remember reading this one factoid from science center saying that all the microbes in your body where about a kilogram. That's crazy. These microbes, their apparently lake all over our body in there like inside US everywhere therefore supposed to trust our gots. Then does that mean that we have to trust all of the little microbes do the microbes have grain? Are they sent? And as was doing this research I saw the scientist called Dr Embry at Hyde. For My pc I studied the microbiome. So I decided to call her up what is microbiome so you can't see it because well, for one it's inside of you but for to they're invisible to the naked eye. So as all of the microbes that live in an on your body so that includes bacteria, viruses, fungi, some parasites, and it's not just the microbes, but it's the things that they do in your. Body. So the micro Byron or God is responsible for a lot of processes in our body. But I wanted to know do the collection of microbes form like a brain. Your Gut is full of neurons which are the same exact cells that are in your brain, and there's this amazing nerve called the Vegas nerve which connects your brain to your digestive tract and your brain can send signals directly to your gut. And your gut consensus directly back to your brain through this nerve, and they're always communicating talking to each other. And because of that, a lot of people like to call this system, the second brain in your gut but I think is probably more appropriate just to call it an extension of your nervous system. Does our gut brain have like a conscience? Sent you. We don't fully know the answer to that. Yet microbes live in your gut and they help affects this communication between your gut in your brain and people are wondering if maybe microbes have a mind of their own and if they do then maybe you know you could extrapolate a little bit and say, well, if the microbes have a mind of their own and they're affecting how my is talking to the brain, then maybe that could be the conscious aspect of it but we just don't know yet. What do you think the brain and the gut are communicating is the Gulping like We're able to process that pizza that you. A couple of hours ago now bring on more and they send it to your brain and then your brain tells you hey, I'm hungry. Grammar. Word is out. It's like. Well, that's definitely part of it but I, think it's just a little part of it. So have you ever I don't know you seem like a very good podcast or interviewer but maybe if you've ever gotten nervous before giving an interview or having to talk to somebody and maybe felt butterflies in your stomach, that is a result of your brain in your gut talking to each other. In addition to giving signals about whether or not, we should eat or whether we're hungry, there's a lot of emotional input as well at between your brain and your gut if you are stressed out or you're really sad about something, you'll notice that you're not quite as hungry It's really amazing. The ways that your brain and your gut can talk to each other. Yeah because like you know if you're sad then the guts like, oh, man, my partners bombed-out. No, I'm bummed up. Remember seeing my best friend at spirit of math new looked bummed out some. Oh Dude what happened and then he said, Oh, my hamstring. Then, he was just green me the whole time interest made meekly music ono. When he said. So. If my gut brain my head brain relic close friends. Do I make my head brain. Sad when I eat something, you know kinda nasty. Let me ask you a question. Have you ever eaten a food that you used to like and now you don't Wanna eat it at all ever again just thinking about it makes you feel sick no. Well, that's happened to me and it's happened to one of my best friends. She hates macaroni and cheese which I think is crazy but she just doesn't like it anymore because one time she ate it made her sick. And this has to do with really intricate and elegant way that your memories are formed. In how they make you react to certain situations and the gut brain axis has a very important role in that. So our eyes and our senses are tied to our head brain and those will help make us recognize the MAC and cheese. Right? Right. So the GUT brain needs to communicate with the head brain 'cause they head brain can recognize it. Yeah. So the next time, the food goes into your brain will say last time I. Am you system it told me this. So maybe just have bad memories associated with this, and then completely affects whether you want to eat that food or not. You know when like your own don't WanNa buy the candy bar or save money you're stuck with the indecision and then like if you're with like your parent or a friend, they'll just be like, Hey, do trust your gut Do you think that's like scientifically accurate? Any think scientist was actually like I am smart scientists. Your has brain trust. Your Gut because it has brain you know a lot of it has to do with this memory formation. Sometimes, we don't remember the memory, but our brain subconsciously remembers it and our gut awesome remembers it and so together, they are able to tell us that, hey, trust us on this point and you know make this decision versus that decision. When you say trust your gut do you think that's the brain thinking and then the message get sent to the got? Or do you just think it's the GOP itself? Your Gut doesn't come up with it on his own. Your brain sends a message Cheer Gut. You're just not aware of it, and then you're then response sends a message to your brain and you're aware of that one. and. Then you get that feeling from it and and you make your decision whatever it is that you decide you know sometimes people fight against their gut feeling. And they go with just their head brain half the time it works and halftime the time it doesn't does that mean? Do you think you should trust the got it self or the brain if you take one away, you break that whole. Cycle of communication, and then the messages you get are Gonna be different. They're not going to be full. You're going to be missing part of the story and so I really think it's both you have to trust both. and. Then if your gut brain is gone on your head brain is sad because he does never friend yeah. Exactly. Maybe, the gut brain is the head brains only friend and only possible friend. It's a very interesting way of putting it I liken. They've been with each other through. So many are Chitty half. Grumble grumble saying.

Scientist Fram Magin United States Byron Chitty Dr Embry GOP
How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

Outcomes Rocket

04:55 min | 2 years ago

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

"Welcome back to the outcomes, rockets, Sal Marquez is here today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Tony Manual Dr Tony. Manual is a practicing anesthesiologist and Austin Texas. He's a partner with the United States anesthesia partners central Texas and has been in practice since two thousand two. He's an assistant professor. In the Department of surgery and Peri, operative care at Bell Medical School Dr Manual received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt attended the University of Texas Health Science Center for medical. School, completed his residency in anesthesia at the University of North Carolina or Or. He was recognized as the outstanding resident and fellow cardiovascular anesthesia at Duke, university in two thousand seventeen. He received his masters in medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University and today he's playing. Multiple Roles as as he has in in his career and today we're going to be talking about physician innovation, and in particular how physicians can evolve their career to be greater contributors beyond the point of care and so. I WanNa thank you Tony for joining me today to have this very interesting discussion with you saw thanks so much great. Great to be owner podcasts, and I WANNA. Thank you for actually doing this podcast. Because for a lot of people like myself, it's been a great conduit to learn about what other people are doing, and what best practices that are out there, and it's an alternative to sort of the Journal Review articles that we have historically read and I've actually looked up several companies that you've had on and engaged with them. Really appreciate what you're doing I. Love that man now. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you've done that. That's the intention. Intention and so I appreciate you for doing that, so you know we are having a discussion. Folks Tony and I connected and said you know what the role of the physician is changing, and and so what I wanNA. Do today is just highlight how that's changing through the life of Dr Manual here and so you know I love for you Tony at to just kind of walk us through some of the work that you're doing and how it's changed from just practicing to actually doing more You know as we engage this. You know three five trillion dollar industry that call healthcare. Yeah, it's it's been an interesting journey for me and you know have to credit one of my anesthesia attending when I was in residency, his name's Dave mayor said Gimme, grapevine goes Tony You have to continually strives to maximize your career and Let's see well. What does that mean well? You definitely want to start trying to be the best clinician you can be once. You achieve that you should really look at you. Know becoming really strong in other areas, and I always took that to heart in so I think back to when I first started here in Austin I became the division chief of cardiovascular. Cardiovascular Anesthesia Rochester, saying I helped create division of cardiovascular. Because at that time we were Basically, everybody was doing it, and I fell coming out of myself. This'll be really better if we limited number of people at work in that space and you know put together some protocols and got the team together, and we saw some really good outcomes from that work and I fast forward to what I'm doing today, and that work has changed so much partly because I think every clinician you have to get educated, and I use a rudimentary tools back then, but in after getting that masters degree from Carnegie Mellon I really developed at toolkit that allows me to take on. On much more complex problems that we face and healthcare today. Yeah, that's so interesting, and so you have that entrepreneurial bug from the beginning right so you kind of re retooled the way that you guys approached cardiovascular anesthesia and I'm sure with with much improvements and outcomes, but then you've taken other steps to. You've been involved in startups, and now you're doing different roles. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah I worked my way of the medical staff leadership and ultimately became the president of medical staffing while that was a great experience after I graduated with my master's degree. The entrepreneur apart really was intriguing to me. In more important is the. The interface between the clinicians in technology and so The startup is called Dynamic Lights based here in Austin, and it's actually technology out of the University of Texas and They had great idea concept. Basically, it's how to noninvasive map blood flow during Sri will hand you an aneurysm surgery and uses what's called speckled laser technology and I was like honestly Craig. It's continuous. It's noninvasive, but they never really thought about the interaction. How you get it. It's dockers hands. How do you test it? And that was sort of my strength and so I, said well. Let's work together and figure this out and to date. You know we've incorporated. We're FDA approved, and we're. Ducking clinical trial and we're looking to partner with a couple of larger health tech firms,

Dr Tony Dr Tony Manual Peri Assistant Professor Carnegie Mellon University Austin Dr Manual Texas Austin Texas Sal Marquez Dynamic Lights Carnegie Mellon University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Health Sci Bell Medical School United States Department Of Surgery Vanderbilt Duke
The Cascadia Subduction Zone

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:32 min | 2 years ago

The Cascadia Subduction Zone

"Today we're going to look at the Cascadia subduction zone, and what could be a mega quake the Pacific northwest subduction zone earthquakes have occurred every three hundred fifty years since six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for earlier quakes come from core samples taken from the. The Ocean floor, and from rings counted in the Ghost forest that I'll talk about a little bit later. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions, Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet, massive coastal storms during nine, hundred and ninety, seven, Ninety, eight, washed away tons and tons of sand, revealing hundreds of stumps, the remnants of a Sitka spruce forced. It is through. Through a combination of carbon dating an accounting of rings that the data, the last Cascadia subduction zone or C. S. Z. quake took place. The Earth's surface is made up of seven major plates and many smaller ones. The smaller plates creator earthquakes for short durations of fourteen forty five seconds at may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place of. Of Water call faultlines between plates March Eleventh Twenty Eleven Japan experience a subduction zone. Quite that lasted more than four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale. It was a fourth, most powerful or quake in the world. Since modern recording began in nineteen, hundred shake created a Su- Nami, the reached a hundred and thirty three feet and mood six miles inland google. Google Japan's main island upon shoot, eight feet in shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches, this was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate finally to help put earthquakes in perspective, the long Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds the Great San Francisco earthquake of nineteen six was. was eight point six that lasted forty five seconds, but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point, one of the Richter scale based on data from Oregon see geographer Patrick Corcoran and Usgs Alaska, science center kiss, missing mysteries will now tour the predicted minute by minute impact of Cascadia. Subduction Zone earthquake on the Oregon coast after three hundred twelve. Twelve years to see S Z could no longer take the strain it ruptures at a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of its length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the south. West sliding over the Wanda Fuca plate, but remember we're talking about across more. More than fifty miles deep, the first movement sons pressure wave that soapy way that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour, it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit Oregon's cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later. It reaches Portland in fifty seconds his Seattle at nine point one is what seismologist call a full rip? Most cities can withstand a six point. Eight quake lasted about forty five seconds, but the difference between a forty second, and a four-minute quake has like the difference between a head on collision at four miles, an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes shaking continues, the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle it will have suffered from ground liquefication Berlin will collapse, and they'll be gas fires citywide after six. Six minutes people seeking high ground to avoid the soon. NAMI will be impeded by debris driving. We'll be an impossibility at eight minutes. Nami will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide, but a flash flood speed leading edge will only be inches, but will increase to forty feet as predicted that the cascadia subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake twenty eleven. Keep in mind the by the time you finish listening to this. There will have been earthquakes somewhere in the world. The Pacific

Cannon Beach Oregon Japan West Coast Portland Su- Nami Seattle Oregon San Francisco Google Pacific Plate Sitka Patrick Corcoran Wanda Fuca Washington California Mendocino California British Columbia Usgs Alaska
The Science of Happiness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:49 min | 2 years ago

The Science of Happiness

"This episode at this fraud moment in our history. We're bringing on a leading scientists to help us tackle one of the most pernicious misconceptions that humans have ever fostered. The, very roots of the word happiness reflect our assumption that happiness is something that happens to us rather than something that we can actually cultivate for ourselves HAP- ha. That's the same root of such words as hapless or haphazard, it implies luck. But again, happiness is actually a skill that we can cultivate. Emiliana. Simon Thomas Helps people learn this. Kill themselves. She got an online course called the science of happiness that has reached more than half a million people across the world. She's the science director of the Greater Good Science Center at UC, Berkeley and in this interview we discuss how to make ourselves happier through generosity, which is literally part of our biology. How the pleasure of caring for other people means we'll do it again. How empathy fatigue however is real, and then we debate a little bit the meaning of selfishness, and how we've got love wrong. Before we dive in I wanNA, flag that this is a conversation. We recorded late last year prior to the pandemic and the recent racial justice protests here in America, but the insights in this interview are as vital as ever so here we go with Emiliana Simon Thomas. Nice to meet you in person I don't know if you remember this, but when I was writing Timpson, happier I used to call you to make sure I was correct on my research on a few things I do remember that, but it was a long time ago and I'm glad I was able to be helpful. That was just going to say. My memory was that you were really helpful. It's always willing to hop on the phone, so thank you belatedly. You're quite welcome. It's a pleasure as a pleasure to have you on the show your parents were Buddhists while so my parents grew up in the Midwest and one of them came. Came from an Italian family and the other Irish family, and they were not Buddhists as young people, but I think they're sort of early life. Spiritual experience left something to be desired for them, and they wanted to see the world in a different way, and they. You know got in a car with their. You know minimal belongings and came to California and as young people here they found a community and that community where people for the Buddhist leaning and yes, so I grew up going to teachings to temples I. Remember kind of crawling all over my parents while they were sitting still and you know keeping this sorta serene demeanor. I remember China. Take the sweets off of the altar. I think that's a no no. And I heard that when you would throw tantrums over not getting enough desert, your parents would say life is suffering yeah. I don't know. The Buddha would've. Would've. Doors the usage of his signature phrase. I totally agree it's a little hard on a little kid, but you know I fought back and in a strange way it's fueled this lifelong quest for understanding like real happiness in life, so so what? HOW WOULD NOT GETTING ENOUGH DESERT? Play into understanding real happy you know I just didn't buy the notion that we had to always look through a lens of the potential for harm or disappointment or let down and I think that was the message I was getting the. Hey, you know I. Don't get enough. Dessert. I didn't get as much of a toy as someone else got. Or you know we don't have as nice of a house as someone else. Then even those people in their comforts are probably disappointed by various things in their lives and struggling in ways that I can't imagine I don't think. I picked all that up. Though I was like. No sometimes I feel great. You know sometimes I'm having so much fun I can't even like. Hold of myself and just laughter and excitement and I'm not suffering in those moments. How do you define compassion so to find compassion? When I was studying in the laboratory had to find it in an emotional way. It was a specific state. It was the experience that you have when you encounter suffering can be in person or even in your mind, you think about some suffering, and you feel the urge, and you have an intention to do something about it to help to alleviate the suffering that you encounter. That's the experience of compassion as an emotion, so that separates it from empathy, which is yeah, misses the action. Yeah, I mean empathy, I think of as kind of necessary, but not sufficient for compassion, and but the is really more simple, and it is our ability to resonate with each other and our ability to understand the meaning of a another person's emotional expressions, but if If, you only have empathy. You have a lot of other paths. You can go down. That are not compassion, right? You can feel distressed yourself. You can feel Oh, I'm overwhelmed. There's I'm upset in in in being confronted with the suffering, you can kind of suppress any emotional experience that you have. That is sort of mirrored from another person and sort of look apathetic. Kind of Mandra down the road towards compassion, and that means you're not really thinking about yourself anymore, right? You're not focused on the potential for something to threaten you or the extent to which your physical experience is recognizable or familiar as your own pain or suffering, but you sorta channel whatever whatever feeling you have into activating your care, nurturance systems right you're. You're actually orienting yourself as a care provider as a nurture rather than sort of frenetically worried about the possibility that something could go wrong in in your own right.

Emiliana Simon Thomas HAP Fraud Simon Thomas Midwest Timpson California Greater Good Science Center Director America China Berkeley Buddha
Solar Orbiter to pass through the tail of a comet

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Solar Orbiter to pass through the tail of a comet

"The European Space Agency says its solar orbiter pro will be passing to the tail of a comet soon site is planned to switch all the instruments early to conduct some bonus research launched in February so the orbiter's mission has been to capture the first pictures of the sounds of Lucy pulls the chance encounter with comment this wasn't planned but after being alerted by Britain's monologues space Science Center SO is switching the controls to gather data on the trail of dust and charged particles left by the comet similar Johns flybys through a comet's tail to be recorded just six times and only after the event

European Space Agency Lucy Britain Space Science Center
Solar probe to pass through comet's tail for 'bonus science'

War Room

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Solar probe to pass through comet's tail for 'bonus science'

"The European Space Agency says its solar orbiter probe will pass through the tail of a comet soon and scientists plan to switch on its instruments early to conduct what they call bonus science launched in February so the orbiter's mission has been to capture the first pictures of the sun's allusive polls the chance encounter with comment this wasn't planned but after being alerted by Britain's monologues space Science Center SO is switching the controls to gather data on the trail of dust and charged particles left by the comet similar chunks of flybys through a comic style to be recorded just six times and only after the event taking place the agency says chances like this part of the adventure of

European Space Agency Britain Space Science Center
Prediction

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Prediction

"Welcome to kids Smith and mystery your host kid crumb today. We're GONNA look at several events that were predicted. And of course we'll start with our current pandemic predicted seventeen years ago by science. If you still believe in science and is this a first well of course not you can look back. A hundred years to the nineteen eighteen. Banish flu epidemic tremendous number of similarities. Between on then. And what's going on now but we're going to leave that behind. Don't look at earthquakes. Also predicted are subduction zone. Earthquakes have occurred every three hundred and fifty years said six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for the earlier quakes or predictions comes from core samples taken from the ocean floor. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions are both Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet. Massive coastal storms during the nineteen ninety seven and ninety eight storms washed away tons of sand revealing hundreds of stumps the remnants of Sitka spruce forest. It is through a combination of carbon dating and counting of rings. That the date of the last cascade subduction zone or C. S. Z. Quake place the Earth. Surfaces made up of seven major plates in many smaller ones. The smaller place creator quakes for short durations of fourteen to forty five seconds it may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place at what is called the fault line between plates March Eleventh. Two Thousand Eleven Japanese experience subduction zone quite that lasted more than four minutes at a nine point one. On the Richter scale it was the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world since modern record taking began in nineteen hundred to shake created a soon nami that reached one hundred thirty three feet and move six miles inland. It moved Japan's main island of Honshu. Eight feet and shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches. This was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate Vialli to help put earthquakes in perspective the Loma Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds. The Great San Francisco earthquake of Nineteen. Six was eight point six and it lasted. Forty five seconds but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale based on data from Oregon. Siochana Oceana Graphic Person Patrick Corcoran and US GS is Alaska. Science Center true mysteries of the Pacific northwest will now who are predicted. Minute by minute. Impact of a Cascadia subduction zone earthquake on the Oregon coast get this after three hundred twelve years the CS is he could no longer take the strain. It ruptures a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the South West sliding over the one to Fuca plate. But remember we're talking about a crushed more than fifty miles deep. The first movement sends a pressure wave that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later it reaches Portland Oregon in fifty seconds at his Seattle at nine point one. It's what Size Malla. Just call a full rip. Most cities can withstand a six point eight quake last year forty five seconds. But the difference between a forty second and a four-minute quake is like the difference between a head on collision at four miles an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes. Shaking continues the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle will have suffered from ground. Liquefication building collapsed gas fires citywide after six minutes. People seeking high ground to avoid the SU- NAMI will be impeded by debris and driving will be almost impossible at eight minutes to Sonoma will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide but flash floods speed. The leading edge will only be inches but it will increase to forty feet is predicted that the cascade subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake of twenty eleven. Keep in mind that by the time you finish listening to this podcast. There will earthquake somewhere in the

Oregon Japan San Francisco Patrick Corcoran West Coast Portland Seattle Pacific Plate Vialli Cannon Beach Oregon Smith FLU Sonoma Fuca Plate California Science Center Size Malla Washington Alaska Loma Prieta
Finding Calm in Chaotic Times With Erin Pickney

Live Happy Now

10:08 min | 3 years ago

Finding Calm in Chaotic Times With Erin Pickney

"No question that we're experiencing a chaotic time right now and we've heard so many concerns from people who are worried about cove nineteen about the financial toll is already taking and what this means for the future where all learning how to manage this new normal to frankly doesn't feel normal at all. The good news is there are ways that we can find calm in the midst of this chaos and today we've invited Aaron. Pick me back to give tips on how to make the most of our current situation. Aaron is a Nashville based therapist specializing in recovery from anxiety and depression. And she's here to give a few suggestions on how we can decrease wearing Zaidi and increase our sense of wellbeing. Aaron welcome back to live happy. Now it's great. Have you on the show again thanks. It's great to be back. Well we have a lot to talk about today because as you talked earlier we didn't really expect me talking on the arrogant this soon. But there's a lot going on and a lot of things that people need some reassurance with and you are the person we need to talk about this all right happy to be. Obviously there's a lot of anxiety going on right now and I think one of the things I want to understand is what is causing us so much anxiety. I hear different things from different people as a therapist as a professional. What is it that you see causing us the most anxiety right now? You know. It's interesting because you would think more people were being super anxious about getting sick. Really what most people seem to be anxious about is being isolated or potentially having like a loss of work which could lead to a lot of really negative consequences for people said those kind of seemed to be more prevalent things that people are really anxious about as opposed to like the virus itself interesting and with that kind of anxiety and the fact that we are working from home most of us. We are feeling more isolated. Does that just feed the anxiety to be situation? No absolutely because you know when you're going into an office and you're talking people and you kinda get to have just general social time with people that kind of low humming society that some people live with goes down a little bit. They have other people to share their experiences with. And you just you're not stuck in your own head whereas when you're at home and especially if you happen to live alone and you're not reaching out to other people socially like it's just you and your thoughts and those thoughts can get really out of hand really quickly. Yeah and even people like right here in Nashville. I know we live in a building where they have shut down the gym downstairs and our cross fit. Jam is now closed so there goes at outlet for physical release so if people are in that situation what can they then do to kind of escape some of that anxiety because for like that's what I would do is like I'm GonNa go work out or I'm going to go do some yoga now? Just got more difficult to do that. Yeah wow so. I think the first thing is to try to work out at home if you can. There are a ton of great yoga videos online. I think Yoga with Adrian. One that's like super popular but there's a ton of 'em based on your particular preference in skill level. So you could do that. You can also just like dance. That is one of my personal favorites. It just sort of cranked up the music and dance and if you live in an apartment building and you don't want to make your neighbor's apartment here the music you can just throw on some headphones dance with it. Which is a great way. I also a big fan of singing. While dancing it's great cardio might disturb the neighbors if you're not great but it's also a fun thing to do and then depending on where you live so like over where you are. This may be harder my part of town. I can go for a walk and not come in contact with another person or at least not in close contact. So that's something we can still do. It's also possible to like some of the parks and things. Different places are closing down but you can drive out to a less populated area and go for a walk. Bear fat something that works for you. What are some other things that we can be doing? Then that will help us reduce some of this anxiety so I think kind of hearkening back to our last conversation really limiting social media in the news I've had to turn off notifications from the news stations on my phone which historically have never been an issue but right now. I'm getting a notification every time there's another positive test that's not helpful to me or my mental health and social media is just sort of running crazy with all kinds of really drastic things that maybe aren't realistic or not. What are happening in misinformation. That's out there. If you can choose to have your social media be healthy place. And you've only got healthy people. You're interacting with unhealthy foods that you're following that's great and if it's not then maybe reduced fat or cut it out for now. I know a lot of people though. They're kind of drawn to the news right now. Kind of like a bad car accident where it upsets them and it's disturbing for them to watch but they seem to not be able to stop and I'm originally the way that our society set up now we can watch twenty four seven on multiple stations and yes we can get completely inundated. So how do we balance that kind of a need to know with need to step away I think for me turn off notifications or even fully deleting apps on your phone and then having a check point in the day so I given the rapid nature that things are changing? You might check in the morning check in midday when you have lunch and then check in the evening to see so that you still have access to the important information as things change. But it's just not hunted new notifications as everything I know when are at home working. It's a lot harder. 'cause like doesn't have the TV on in the background right. But that's when I would recommend go into something like a net flicks era Hulu and just watching. There's all kinds of great. Tv shows that are perfect background TV to have running and just not have the news that constant thing you want to check in on it you just don't want it to be constantly checking in on you. I liked that because one thing we started doing and I'll be honest. I started doing this after the elections in two thousand sixteen. Is I no longer watch my news live I I record it and there are certain things I need to fast forward through or upset me and so that's something that I've found helpful right now? Is it's like okay. I WANNA get enough to know like I want this part of the story that tells me the facts of what's going on but I don't need the details. I don't need to know how many more people died in Italy today. You know look through that. And just get the overview. Yeah and another option is to do away with the new traditional sources altogether and look at the CDC website maybe your local health department. They'RE GONNA BE PROVIDING UPDATES at are important information for you to know without necessarily getting the. There's another confirmed case of coveted nineteen in Nashville or wherever you may live and so that is sort of helpful as well. That's fantastic and one thing that I found today. Greater Good Science Center had done an update of ten positive things that have come out of this so far and gave some brighter point that things discoveries were making or some recovery's that are happening that aren't being reported so much so that's interesting to like you can look for some new sources such as greater good or some of these more positive mindset places that are going to provide you with a little bit of uplifting information. Yes that's a great idea okay. So we've handled social media in the news. Got that conquered. What about the social distancing? What's here's the deal. We spend our whole time talking about. We need social connection. This is so important for us in our say. Now you gotta get away from people right so social distancing not social isolation. I think that the thing people jumped to his. Oh Gosh I can't have any contact with anyone who doesn't live in my house will know you can. There's a lot of creative ways to maintain contact with people while still maintaining a minimum of six to eight feet apart. Ideally are you going to go to dinner with somebody right now? We'll know probably not but can you face time in a friend to dinner you can. Can you play like my wife and I were talking the other day about playing Yahtzee with my mom's face time because it's a game that we can all play but we don't have to be in the same spot. There's lots of things like Jack Box. Tv that you can kinda set up using zoom or something like that with screen sharing that you can play with your whole family. So there's a lot of things that are out there and if you think about it from the perspective of we actually have a little bit more time when we're working from home because we're not commuting anymore and when we take our lunch break we literally walked to the kitchen going somewhere to eat so you actually have a little bit more time to reach out to people into get your work done and that's you can actually spend some more time like intentionally calling that friend that haven't talked to you in six months or spending some time facetime ing with your nieces and nephews. You don't get to see very often if we look at it as an opportunity of like okay so just because we can't see each other physically in the same space doesn't mean that we can't still interact. That's a really good point because this is could be a nice time to kind of rekindle some of that communication that gets lost in our busy busy day we end up not reaching out to that best friend from high school that we know we want to talk to. But it's like I'm just so busy I haven't done it the exactly and I'd seen one person posted something about like each day. Ask Quarter you grateful for who you contact. Today was the second thing. I thought that was really interesting that that it was I every day to make it intentional to contact someone different. Oh yes definitely. I've had a few people talk about doing not really a bucket list but kind of like a a list of people that they WANNA make sure they contact while this is happening and so they're sort of setting a pace for themselves with like okay so if this goes on for a month then that means I have thirty days so I have forty two people WANNA call. That means. I need to call every day. You know trying to make sure that they're getting through that process of okay. I'm going to reach out to all of these people and actually reestablished these relationships because I can right

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