35 Burst results for "Science Center"

Texas COVID Hospitalizations Increase as Delta Variant Spreads

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:34 sec | 7 months ago

Texas COVID Hospitalizations Increase as Delta Variant Spreads

"Pure water systems from the 19 Hospitalizations are increasing in Texas due to the delta variant from India, the India very experts faster and is more deadly, raising concerns for health experts in North Texas. It's probably a certainty that's going to come here. That's John Sims, director of you NT's Health Science Center safer. Their Texas, which is helping with the vaccine outreach. The variant has attributed to the first rise in Covid hospitalizations in Texas since mid April. The variant made up 2% of cases last week in Texas, Northwest region. Now up to 10% Sam says the COVID

John Sims Texas India Health Science Center North Texas Northwest SAM Covid
"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

06:05 min | 8 months ago

"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"The question, can we conquer? Any problem is is a compelling one because certainly from the perspective of so many of the problems that we face as humankind their problems that were created by humans, right? And so from that perspective, we should have the capacity to be able to solve it. But as you're doing that, this question of are you identifying the right problem to solve, right? I can think of so many examples of that where we dive in as a society towards one particular focal point. But it turns out that the real lever to make change is over here and birth. Any examples of that. But I'd say the other question is, who's involved in coming up with a Solutions, right? Who are you solving the problem for? And that I would say we have so much more work to do as a society to fulfill that obligation. That, when we're solving problems, it's solving problems for all and which problems are we prioritizing, right? I mean, in Cleveland, when you look at problems around LED right in paint and pipes, when you look at maternal and infant mortality in our African American Community here in Cleveland, it's dire. It's unacceptable, right? And so, we're actually asking ourselves this question in in the city of Cleveland right now because there's additional stimulus, money coming to the city and who is part of those conversations to say you know what choice mortality maternal death rate in Cleveland put them up top. There's so many other problems we could solve around Transportation around access. There's no shortage of problems that need to be solved but the challenge I would say. And and the one where I'm less optimistic is how quickly we will get better at prioritizing what we're solving. Yeah. That's really interesting. This is Wayne Parker with the stories here podcast. I'm Tom today to dr. Kirsten ellenbogen, who is the president and CEO of the amazing. Great Lakes Science Center in Cleveland here. So, when you spoke at the City Club of Cleveland, at least one time you, you talk about this being your dream job. So could you describe for us what a dream day is like at the center anyone in in a museum? CEO Position will tell, you know, day is the same. And so let me tackle a bit of why I'd say it is a dream job and it has a great deal to do with the community that I'm in the organization that was created, Cleveland is full of a lot of passionate people are, people want to have the hard conversations more so than other cities that I've been in and in particular, the willingness to roll up your sleeves and get things done. And it means that the kind of organization wage, Culture that I really believe in which is a all hands on deck. Roll up your sleeve, get it done. If it's one of our big free days, if it's a big event going on, or a big program, going on every single job description, at our organization, includes the expectation that you play a role in these big dates. It means when we have a holidays right, which are not the time when we get vacation, you know, if you're at a cultural attraction, holidays, tend to be your busiest days. So we get time off before and after that holiday, but around the holidays, you know, that list gets circled through the whole building and every single one of us is taking on Thursday to help out with a really oversized crowds, we get during those holiday periods. And that means that if, you know, you come in on one of your free days or on a holiday, the person that's doing the vacuum chamber demonstration over at the educational cart over there is likely our Director of Finance and the person who gave you your wristband. When you came in, might have been me. It's exciting to be in a computer. City where we can create that, organizational culture pretty easily. Another reason it's a dream job is there's so much more that Great Lakes Science Center can do in the community were extremely well. I mean that physically, right being part of Cleveland's Economic Development effort on the lakefront to really build up downtown, we finally reached the point of hitting 20,000 residents in downtown Cleveland. I know if you're in other cities, that sounds small, but there's been a huge growth in downtown residency, and, and that was a stated goal, a lot of organizations got behind it. You know, I chair this committee for the downtown Cleveland Indians, that brings together all the different groups working in downtown, to make sure we're coordinating in across projects. That was a concerted effort and the more that down town, population grows, that starts to shift. What Great Lakes science center is, right? We're not just a place for people to drive in and see or get on the school bus or take the RTA to the public transportation stuff. That's nearby. It also log Where a site where someone might be just walking their dog from home, right? Or stopping by to see a movie in the evening after dinner so I can give you so many examples but as Cleveland chefs, there's so many opportunities for Great Lakes Science Center to play a role on that. And most of all those hard questions, the ones we have talked about in in terms of really addressing racial disparities that is such an important place for us to be and we are welcome at that table and not every city thinks, broadly and is willing to include cultural attractions like Great Lakes Science Center in some of those conversations. And in Cleveland, you're usually one phone call away from the person you need to reach. This is very much a a small town from that perspective. So now what that is. To Kirsten ellenbogen, she is the president and CEO at the Great Lakes Science Center. In Cleveland has been so fun when our conversation ranged from strategic business plans to your upcoming trip into space wage And field trips and everything else. So we really do appreciate and want to extend our, thanks to you and your staff and your volunteers and your donors and the city officials, and everybody else that had made, the Great Lakes Science Center, such a special place, and it's been really fun to talk to you today and learn about that. But about also so much more in your insights on so many things. So thank you for everything. Thank you Wayne. It's been a treat to talk about it and I look forward to listening to more of your podcasts. Thank you for listening

Wayne Parker Cleveland today Kirsten ellenbogen Great Lakes Science Center Tom dr. City Club of one time one particular focal point one American Community African
"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

05:01 min | 8 months ago

"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"So we were already removing some exhibits off the floor that were kind of face and whole body kind of pieces and having an active discussion. And then I started to hear more and more from our European colleagues and our colleagues in Asia that their museums were shutting down. And that they were, you know, as CEOs that they were pulling off of meetings and saying, like, I'm going to be absent for a while because I have to figure out how to shut off Museum down. And so of course, we were hearing that weeks and even months before we were considering doing that in the US. So, you know, for us the hardest thing was how quickly to react Turned us into very close trackers of all of the coronavirus tracking in the US and in Ohio and particular. We are very aligned and supportive of our schools. So we were using that is one measure like where the school staying face-to-face, but we had many other factors to consider in the end we ended up closing March 12th and because we had been spending so many weeks preparing. We had been telling staff to move things, home to be prepared to work from home to be prepared to start virtual programming from home. And so we canceled our evening, programming on the 12th, shut down the building to staff really. And on the 13th, we launched curiosity Corner. Live are virtual programming, the very next day, because we had really been putting everything into place to be ready for it off protecting. How long it was going to last projecting. What it would look like to reopen, I would say probably reopening, was one of the scariest too strong of a word. But it was where we were moved. Anxious and unsure of how things would work. But for us, we reopen with camps because we have a strong clamour from parents who had to go to work and they count on us as a part of the support and keeping their kids engaged over the summer. And you know we've got hundreds of thousands of square feet at the science center and so we reopen for camps on June 1st because we knew he could really spread those camps across the entire building and create the kind of safety and distancing. And frankly the really clever integration of virtual programming. It's really interesting to hear. You talk about the challenges and how important it seems that one of the words that came to my mind is I looked at your work background in your education, one of the things that always came up was the word Innovation. Does that strike a chord with you? Sure, absolutely. We strive to be Innovative at Great Lakes Science Center. I don't know if Innovation is always what's guiding me but it's the let's take a step back. Let's figure out if we're asking the right questions cuz a lot of times Most Innovative things I've done, have because we started to ask different questions and the more you listen to the audience's, you're serving the more opportunity there is to take that step back and go, oh, wait a minute. Let's just the narrative that we need to have a different kind of conversation and the programming for eighth grade came out of some very compelling conversations of listening to our stem Workforce Packers in the community, right? And they're organized with these large Workforce Development, support groups, that work across manufacturers, engineering organizations, technology organizations, and their job working at retraining or training Workforce at a much older level. But we pull ourselves into those conversations and we start to hear things that really change how we're addressing educational programming or younger grades, which is really that identity formation that coming together as a person who's confident doing stem. So much of that, identity formation that happens in Middle School. Really, hm. Is everything that happens later on in life. And so listening to those conversations as they're thinking about challenges for adults, they're working with. Even the idea of problem solving is a perfect example of this as Educators, a lot of our staff assume that what we were diving into and focusing on, was problem solving. But instead, the more we listened to our Workforce Partners, we have so many International headquarters here right in Cleveland, but they said was problem, solvers are dime-a-dozen. If I know what the problem is, and I just need to bring someone in cinnamon front and say, like, figure that out. I have so many people, I can hire for that. What I cannot find is the person who can walk in, and look at this very messy system and say, oh, here's the problem, you need to solve. If you address this, it's going to make all this other stuff, work better and they said they can't find people to do that. Well, holy cow, right? That was a call to action for us and this was our Cleveland creates program years ago, but we shifted our curriculum on its head, both for exhibits and for Education Church, Programs to really step back and look at identifying problems not just solving problems. So identifying problems you've talked about and asking the right questions the way that you've approached things. Took us a broad spectrum. We've approached race, and you've approached climate change, you've approached all elements of science, given that approach. Is there any problem that we as a society we couldn't solve that? As can we conquered any problem? The question, can we conquer?

Ohio Asia March 12th June 1st US 12th hundreds of thousands of squar 13th one measure next day European one center
"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"I started a dip my toe into exhibits when I was at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago and that was pre-internet, right? And I was very frustrated when I woke Try to figure out. Okay, what do we know about doing this, right? We were creating an exhibit on Imaging and all the complexities of explaining Imaging, the human body to the public. You can imagine it was a very tough topic for us and I kept trying to figure out like, okay, but surely somebody knows like when you're trying to explain the different angles that you get in an MRI. For example, what's the research on that? And you couldn't just sit down at your laptop and well we didn't have it a laptop at that point. You can sit down at your desk and find that information and the more I started looking into it, the more I said, you know what, I really want to do a PhD, like I want to dive into this. I want to understand how people learn and the drive to really change, what counts, as learning the drive to make sure that science centers are properly valued in a community. As part of the education infrastructure. That path was that really at that moment, because there were so many things I could do an evaluation and research, but at a certain point being in the CEO role changes your ability to log. An impact on a community and say we're going to play this role you know we're going to make these kinds of connections. We are going to be a value in the education. Infrastructure in this community in a powerful way and this is the best way to do that. It seems that that has taken you in some unexpected directions at least unexpected to me. And I saw one of the Curiosity Corners that you did and you said that scientists says that there is really no such thing as race. Am I saying that correctly? Sure. So you're referencing a video. I did in response to the very necessary. Urgent and difficult conversations were having about the lack of equity, just horrifying murders that we've seen of around the nation. And one of the questions we ask ourselves as a science center is what's our role in that conversation and they're actually many rules, right? We work with every fifth sixth, seventh grader in Cleveland. We have the ninth grade of m, c squared stem Club. After school, we have a very particular role to play for supporting those children in Cleveland. Making sure that they feel safe, making sure that they see their role and value in the community, but she can be on that part of it is making sure that people understand, you know, we we hosted The Traveling exhibition, Body Worlds, RX really, during the spread of the pandemic, it opened when we open a public last June, after being closed for a couple of months and we just closed that last month, it's a wonderful exhibition but it's an entire Expedition on human body and health at the same time that in Cleveland we're looking at horrific racial inequities in health care and really looking at racism as a health care issue and we can't go in that exhibit and change everything in there to reflect that. But what we can do is change the entry and exit experience and that's what we did is to really put up what we've learned through grants with youth development program, with our local ideastream, public television station, this National Institute of law. Can't really do Vin to that racism as a health issue and we use that material and everything we had created for that to really get alert and change the language coming in and out of the exhibit. Yes we can talk about differences by the science shows that in fact the similarities across ethnicities from a biological standpoint are far more similar than any of that racially motivated thing was putting forward. It's really interesting for me to see your comments in that video cuz you tackle that issue directly. And I hadn't heard it associated with science before. So thank you for doing that. Of course 800-pound elephant or gorilla in the room is There's board of directors, with multiple International trustees serving alongside me and the strength of those organizations that gather us together as a four-year-old played a big role in making sure that many, if not most of us were prepared and thinking about it in advance, the funny thing is that in Northeast Ohio, we had actually been dealing with a bit of a flu Spike that January 8th February. So we were already removing

Chicago one Museum of Science and Industry
"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"And so when you think of field trip at Great Lakes Science Center, it's really changed over the past eight years to be a program. We are so proud of and our field trips with cmsd are probably, the ones that are most extraordinary. We work with the district to identify the actual content and curriculum area. They want us to focus on, it's usually connected issue with not just standards, but also testing coming up for those students and particularly areas where the teachers have said this stuff, we're less comfortable with. So we have an engineering design program, and it sucks, it's for every single sixth grade classroom in Cleveland, and they work on designing, wind turbine blades, they actually test them and then redesign those blades. So, really going through an engineering design process. We work with every seventh grade classroom and they are coming to the Science Center and making their own flashlights. And let me tell you, we just put a pile of wires batteries, switches off. Got a build a working flashlight, from that pile of material. And let me tell you the kids that the teachers walk in expecting to be most successful or not necessarily the ones that are most successful at it off with an important program, to see some students really flourish who have not been in a situation where they shine before and our eighth grade program is the newest. And and that is with every single eighth-grader getting closed. As we move out of piloting, the program we are working with them. On what what's data, what are data, variables coding internet-of-things blockchain databases and cybersecurity and suck. These content areas. I tell you most of the adults are run into don't know what they are. Nobody understands and cares about privacy security more than a teenager and getting an eighth grade. At a creative Peak and an ability to really say, let's dive in and understand this technology, we want them when they go off to college, to be able to sit down that first day flip open their lap book or whatever device you're using by that, sit elbow-to-elbow with another student and hold their own around Advanced Technologies. Every Cleveland student is capable of that the 8th grade they're here on Mondays in the fall when we close to the public and they're here for multiple days, they really take over the science center, they own it. They really have a feeling of ownership or the science center and over their capacity to do stem. I'm curious what you were, like at that age. And you, you went off to University of Chicago and then you went to Vanderbilt and you got your Ph.D there and were you, would you have considered yourself a nerd. You social where you both? What were you like in eighth grade? Well, I will tell you a seventh grade was definitely the peak of my awkward awful. Middle School years, eighth grade was saved. I finding a core group of friends that I'm still friends with them today and it's a good reminder of how much the social part of how we support our students is critical. I would have told you in eighth grade that needed to be a lawyer, I come from a big family, my grandfather was a lawyer. I like to argue I was pretty sure that's what I should do. I loved the science fairs. I did a lot with science. I just wasn't thinking about that as a career. I mean, I loved science. I built stuff in the basement. My mom had done a lot of chemistry so you know, she was very tolerant of random explosions in the house. But for some reason, like the job that was in front of me that, you know, you could be a teacher or a doctor and nurse a lawyer. So I was thinking about being a lawyer and that really lasted until sophomore year of high school. And I, I went to the great Cast Tech in Detroit. Wonderful, Detroit Catholic school and mrs. Benson tap me on the shoulder and said, you should really apply for this. They're hiring kids for these after school and summer, jobs to work at local labs and I said, well, I'm doing like the birth 8 club and the law program and she's like, no, no, no look at how much they're paying per hour for this job and it was a lot more than I was making at jeans and things at the time. Let me tell you, so I applied because the Boss look good. And boy, I tell you, it just sucked me in. I love working in a lab. So it sounds like if she had told her someone had told you that that moment that you were going to be doing what you're doing now, wage and the level of surprise on the scale of one to ten with ten. Being the most surprised sounds like you would have been pretty high on that scale very high. In fact, the Detroit Science Center was pretty fledgling at that point and I've got pulled into the science center world will still in high school because I was working at the Michigan Cancer Foundation. And that after school job, I competed in the science fair, and you can imagine if you're working in a lab for your job, I was able to do some wonderful things in the science fair. And one of the judges Corey Van fleet was president of the new Detroit Science Center. He walked up to me and he said, hey, John job like this way, you stand here and you talk about science, that's what I need song. I know you're working across the street from the science center at the Cancer Foundation. We could work out a schedule. So that you're doing some hours there, some hours at the science center cuz like, oh, that sounds cool. So really a lot of moments where people Pat me on the shoulder and I'm very, very grateful for that. Well, I love hearing those. It's kind of an origin story in a sense, right? Of what was the origin of this direction that you've taken? And then at what point in time? Did you think about this specifically the kind of work that you're doing now? Is there some later? Aha moment. Did you said, you know I really want to be in that field full time. It was a gradual development, I would say wage, I started out in the Detroit Science Center working in education and doing programs. I did a similar job at the Field museum over the summer when I was in college same thing. Capital Children's Museum page was an education for a number of years. I started a dip

Cleveland Great Lakes Science Center both today 8th grade University of Chicago Science Center Vanderbilt Mondays seventh grade first day eight years eighth single sixth grade classroom cmsd eighth grade single eighth-grader grade past
"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

02:50 min | 8 months ago

"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"Now, it is rumored definitely, and I have to think that, you know, our astronauts are can be looking forward to that. We also speak in a room. We have a one-to-one model of the old Gemini capsules, right? And it's part of all that we have in our Visitor Center, about astronauts Senator John, Glenn, and the amazing work that he's done and all the pride we have for him here in Ohio. So we have a model that you can actually hop in yourself and think about right more than 50 hours. He spent going around her that first flight. The Gemini capsules off. Believable and so are you an excited and interested viewer when those launches happen today? I am I love seeing them. I love that. We're back to having them more common and the changes in launching or you know, now we have Rockets returning to Earth, that's just such a change in a short amount of time. The Partnerships that NASA has been pulling into really shift the way we're taking humans into space, really exciting. So the center real moves from as it were moved from space to the ocean, I was curious about the Mather steamship, tell me what that's about she's she's more than six hundred feet long and is a vital part of Cleveland's history. Very much trapped in into our stem history around mining around iron around steel and just so, you know, there was a local non-profit that was carrying for that Great Lakes steamship for many years. And they were looking for a partner and, you know, we were in the right place and and again, I'd say it's a big prob. Us being rate on the lakefront getting people down to the lake front. So the steamship William G Mather is absolutely ours. We're we're not able to operate the steamship, you know, it's not as bad as having a page with the covid-19 in in place, but it gets pretty complicated to operate. Some of these historic vessels when we've got covered for Texans in, but it's a, it's a much beloved part of Cleveland's history, and we're honored to play the central role in keeping that alive. Good for you. And this is Wayne Parker with the stories here podcast. I'm talking to dr. Kirsten ellenbogen, who is the president and CEO wage, Great, Lakes Science Center. And boy if we talked about all the facets of the center we be here all day. I did want to ask who I'm going to give you two words and I'd love to hear. You're just the immediate reaction that you have off the top of your head when I say field trip. Sure. So when I moved to Cleveland in 2013 for this job, I met with our CEO wage Cleveland Metro School District really within my first month or so. And he sat me down and said, pretty frankly, you're not doing enough. And this is a real education leader, who said, Eric Gordon is his name will not accept the typical one-and-done field trip. And so when you think

Eric Gordon Earth Ohio Wayne Parker 2013 NASA Great Lakes Glenn two words Cleveland Senator first flight more than 50 hours Kirsten ellenbogen first month today Cleveland Metro School Distric Lakes Science Center more than six hundred feet Great,
"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

05:26 min | 8 months ago

"science center" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"Welcome to the stories here podcast. If I'm looking to pass on advice to parents or children, I, I think I would come back to our tag line, which is stay curious. And you can't overemphasize curiosity enough. And you can call this steam if you want, you can call curiosity and arts skill. You can call it an engineering skill it's just a skill that is so critical. That was dr. Kirsten ellenbogen president of the Great Lakes Science Center in downtown Cleveland Ohio on the shores of Lake Erie and this is the stories here podcast and I'm your host Wayne Parker. There are so many freaking stories in this episode. Thank you for listening. You're involved in so many different things in the city, including your rock and roll kind of person. Right? I'm honored to serve on the board of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. They're our next door, neighbors and their CEO serves on my board. That's awesome. And they were part of one of the hosts of the recent NFL draft, we all on North Club. Harbor the Cleveland Browns, The Rock Hall and Great Lakes Science Center together with the sports commission for our region. The Greater Cleveland sports commission. Just finished hosting. In fact, they are still moving out of the science center today, the 2021 NFL Draft. So the draft was actually at the science center also, well, we have seven acres on the lakefront. So it's hard to do something on the lakefront without being on our property in some way. So part of the NFL Fan Experience was on our property, some of that was also in the stadium itself and then our entire building was turned into the NFL draft Media Center. You catch this on the news afterwards after someone's drafted, they kind of walked through. It's actually called a carwash. So they walk from interview to interview to interview each of those little Studios was set up in our traveling exhibit, hall was dedicated to that and our entire second floor where we normally have our science, phenomena exhibits, we're cleared of exhibits. And instead became offices for all the media who have been moving in over the past couple of weeks off. So there's a connection between the NFL draft and science. Isn't that wonderful? And a great way to start our conversation. And another thing to mention is congratulations are in order. I think Center is a five-digit list for the national medal for Museum and Library services. And that's a really big deal, right? It is the biggest deal for us. I mean, serving our community where a very regionally focused organization and there's nothing more important to us and serving our community. There's really no greater honor for us, we're regionally focused non-profit. We are here to serve our community and so to get nominated for something and and to be in a finalist position for an honor, it is very specifically for how you're serving the community. That's the Pinnacle for us and we love this year. It's really focused on honoring organizations that have done a lot around emerging technology, big specialty of ours and the work we've done during the pandemic, so it's perfect. Well, I should also say it's May 5th. Happy National astronauts day if I got today, right? And that's a dog. And talking to you, because Center is the host for the NASA Glenn Visitor Center and you have an Apollo Command Module, right there, right? We do from a 1973 mission to Skylab right predating, the International Space Station and we had an astronaut, very near and dear to our hearts today. Really two astronauts featured in our programming. Not only Doug Wheelock Wheels as he's known who's done a lot of work now, it's Johnson and and with Glenn, our local Research Center, which is right in here in Cleveland, but also doctor guy Bluford, and he is an astronaut, he's from Pennsylvania, but he is lived in Cleveland since retiring from NASA just such an inspiration. First African American in space, he comes in and talks with students in the school at m, c squared stem that's located at Great. Lakes Science Center, he participates and so much programming for us. Just a real hero. So now the key question, if you knew it would be safe and you would come back all in one piece, would you go? That's such a good question. We're going to the moon and we are young. We're going to have the first woman and the first person of color walk on the surface of the Moon and sure if I could get a seat on that ride. Absolutely. I mean what a thrill, I would have to really hone my skills. My background is in neuroimmunology, which is probably going to be absolutely useless for a trip to the moon. We need some mineralogists flight, Engineers, all Specialties that are not mine, but what's going to be interesting is a NASA astronaut. Corps is really going to start to broaden and, and diversify in so many ways. Not just in who we see represented in the astronaut Corps but also in the different kinds of skills. As we look up to Mars and moving away from just a focus on the International Space Station, but going to the moon and going to, Mars really will shift who gets pulled in. It's exciting and we will link to it in the show notes, so that people haven't seen it. They will see a picture of the Apollo Command Module, that's there and your science center. And one of the things that they've seen photographs lately, are they've seen video lately of the launchers, They will notice there's a little difference in Comfort inside, they've given the astronauts a little more space. These days when you first saw that, did you note the difference from The Command Module? That's there at the center extraordinary and generally the shuttle system was a lot roomier. Certainly than the Apollo capsules. One of the fascinating things though is to look at how similar, Orion, you know, that'll take us to the moon and take us to Mars. That's so similar to the Apollo capsules. Now, it is rumored definitely,

Wayne Parker Lake Erie second floor Great Lakes Science Center 2021 NFL Draft Cleveland Browns five-digit dr. today Kirsten ellenbogen North Club seven acres Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and one NFL downtown Cleveland Ohio each NFL draft The Rock Hall Media Center
"science center" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:06 min | 8 months ago

"science center" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Three o'clock today, Marcie Romero University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center will talk about nurses and rock stars and patients. Are patients actually important in hospital. God, I hope so. All right, joining us now Elizabeth Jacobson. She is a poet laureate, and Gerry Uelmen, who is essentially half of actual contemporaries. He's half the axle. He's one wheel. Are our two wheels. He's the back wheels of actual contemporary and their old bread truck. We'll start with the smarter of the two. Elizabeth Jacobson, poet laureate, Elizabeth Welcome to the show. Oh, thank you so much. Richard. It's great to join you again. But I think Jerry's way. Uh, more brilliant than me. Okay, well, we'll see Jerry. It's a lot to live up to Melting and humility and embarrassment here, But yeah, All right. But you know what? Let's let's start with you about this project. Now it was. I mean, I got the You know, I got the project I was. You know, your partner in crime it Axl Matthew chased Daniel I think we talk about this on the air and I go scores you guys can come on whenever you want. Was it? You and Matthew was that Axl to started this project? No, actually, it was Elizabeth who received the what this incredible poet laureate, and she also got a green light, which she should tell you more about than us. She invited us to collaborate with her. Gotcha. And so I was just well that Yeah, Great. All right, Take it away. Elizabeth in here. And, Yeah, I just tell you the process and then Jerry can explain what's going on now with the two grades, exhibitions and then more to come. So the Academy of American Poets, which is a huge national organization for poets, Um, offers the fellowship for poets laureate around the country, and it's an application and you apply with the project. So it's $50,000 fellowship, and I contacted Matthew and Jerry and ask them if they'd be interested in working on a project with me, So we worked out some of the details for the application together. I submitted the application I received word April year ago that I received the fellowship. Oh, In fact, you do our project which was all designed prior to Cove. It, um, you know, with in light of covert and s, O. Matthew and Jerry and I got together and we we organized and We move forward. I will explain Briefly. What the project Itwas So what it is, it is was Project for high school. Students and I taught poetry workshops to the students. Ah, syriza poetry workshops. They wrote poems. We studied in the workshops, love poems and owed various poems, contemporary poems that I selected. For them to read prior to meeting with me, Then we talked about them. They did some generative exercises they wrote home. They worked on them with their teachers. The teachers were fabulous. Anyway, they produced these poems and then from the poems they extra Parts of the poem to print on T shirts. That's where David Sloan and youth work comes in. And by the way you quirks received a $10,000 in kind, matching grants from the Academy of American poets for their work on the project as well. Of the original plan was that I would go into the schools and teach the workshops and the students would go into the screen Printing studio Youthworks Mean with David Sloan and learn the whole process of screen printing, as well as meeting with Matthew and Jerry of Axel to learn the difference. Design techniques for the T shirts and so on, so none that was able to happen, Everybody. Everything had to be done online, and David Sloan graciously did all the printing in the studio himself. We have. What? What ended up. We have poems. We have amazing T shirts with designs and poems printed on the T shirts. We have a beautiful broadside collection that was printed with with the T shirt designs on really nice paper, and we have an anthology G that we publish actual published. That collects all the artwork and all the poems from the projects. No, I think I said that in one breath. Wow, Jerry didn't miss anything. Wow. Yeah, a little in Europe and watch you go. So, Jerry, before we get into this, David slow not available, Hey, was going to join us, But apparently he was a big part of this as well. Maybe we'll get he and in Matthew on later to talk about this project as well, Right. So before you go on, Jerry, where is where is all this work? Well, um, we wanted to have one place where it would be for the you know, to cover at least part of the national poetry month of April, and it's still up. It's at the rail yard Performance center right outside the dance studio. And it's Oh, gosh, I'm trying to remember It's like 40 ft. Long and, like six ft High, I'm everything. Everything that lives with just described the broad size the T shirts and you know the poetry and all that. Well, the poetry and all the image that the kids came up with. Okay. And so you can see it all there, um and what you're going to farmers market this weekend. Jacqueline. It's Saturday. Just cross The rebel road tracks and they're going to read the poems. Look at the imagery. It's pretty awesome. Those very same imagery that you're looking at. There was printed on the T shirts by David Gotcha. Um, you know, Unfortunately, this was going to be more, um Larger project in that the kids. Wrote the poetry after working with Elizabeth. And then we create, they would be able to go to Santa Fe, Youthworks. And learn how to actually do soak screening. Um, so that was part of what we had hoped to do, but covert kind of messed with that a little bit. David, as was said very graciously printed these on the T shirts and the kids each got a T shirt with their image on it the image that they designed to go with the poem. Um, so that's where the T shirts now are being warned by all the participants in in the In this project. They're not available there. You know the kid's got him? Yes. And then, uh, With all those images on, uh, all the poems and we wanted in the T shirts who wanted to have the kids. Take Photo portrait of themselves wearing the T shirts but once again covert kind of You know?.

Elizabeth Jacobson Gerry Uelmen David Sloan Richard Matthew $50,000 Daniel $10,000 David Europe 40 ft Jacqueline David Gotcha Jerry Elizabeth six ft Axl Matthew Academy of American Poets Axl Saturday
Tarrant County and UNT Health Science to Open More COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:35 sec | 10 months ago

Tarrant County and UNT Health Science to Open More COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

"County and the U. N. T Health Science Center Point open more vaccination sites here in the county. Katherine's airfields is in the U. N. T Health Science Center and Tarrant County have already established sites at the Stop, Six neighborhood and Saginaw with the bolt to provide better access to those in underserved communities. Sylvia Trent Adams, with the U. N T Health Science Center, says they're also planning 17 registration events. Registration is critical to make sure we can identify When In fact, things are planned for given day, and then for the extra capacity for walkin access. They also planned to open for new sights. Campbell in Zaire. W B A B NEWS Our

U. N. T Health Science Center Sylvia Trent Adams U. N T Health Science Center Tarrant County Katherine Saginaw Campbell Zaire
Los Angeles' California Science Center Makes Home Of Space Shuttle Endeavour Available For Weddings

Tim Conway Jr.

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles' California Science Center Makes Home Of Space Shuttle Endeavour Available For Weddings

"Me to the moon. Let me and spaced out has a different meaning in the era of covert 19. But for lovebirds you want a flight of fancy the California Science Center in L. A is willing to help. You can now get married in the hangar that houses the space shuttle endeavor. The Science Center says it wanted to help out couples who may be squeezed for venue availability because of the pandemic.

California Science Center Science Center
NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

"To the healthcare policy. Podcast i'm the host. David intra cosso with me today to discuss the climate crisis related health. Costs is dr. vj lemay climate and health scientists at the national resources. Defense council center. Dr lemay welcome to the program. Thank you dr maze by is of course posted on the podcast website on background. Twenty twenty set another global warming record this past year tight twenty sixteen as the hottest record year and strikingly warmer than twenty nineteen. For example average temperatures in some parts of the arctic last year were more than six degrees celsius higher than the twenty one thousand nine hundred eighty one to two thousand ten baseline average per no at twenty twenty seven. Us record with twenty two one billion dollar plus climate disasters. The previous record was sixteen and twenty seventeen toiling in some ninety. Five billion dollars in damages are more than double the forty one year average of forty five billion seventy events were linked to hurricanes and tropical storms concerning wildfires california suffered over ten million acres burned more than double the previous record set in twenty eighteen at four million acres adverse health effects caused by climate crisis. Events are on bounce well known for example in two thousand sixteen. The government published the impacts of climate change on human health in the us. And i recently cited lance and twenty twenty countdown on health report that concluded in part quote the world has already warned by one point. Two degrees celsius resulting in profound immediate and worsening health effects close quote nevertheless response. By thorough policymakers. Along with the health care industry remains far beyond inadequate. The best the recent congress recently concluded congress can do as produce a five hundred fifty page climate crisis report that drew no connection between the climate crisis and related effects. Imposed on medicare medicaid beneficiaries. Do likely in part to the fact. That neither med pack or mac. Pack independent gresham commissions given broad authority to address issues affecting. These programs has never addressed much less mentioned the climate crisis with me again to discuss climate crisis related. Health costs is the national resource. Defense counsels dr. vj lemay so at that As background vj. Let me begin by asking. If you can briefly describe the nrdc signed centers work shirt and. Thank you david for the invitation to speak with you and your listeners. I work at nbc. The natural resources defense council we are a profit organization working really to stay guard the earth. it's people plants animals and the natural systems on which we all rely. We combine the power of more than three million at rdc members across the country with the expertise of about seven hundred staffers that scientists like me but also lawyers policy advocates who are working together to protect clean air clean water and the natural systems on which we all depend so i work in the science center at entity see and science release the foundation of our work to protect people in the environment. We worked to understand environmental and human health problems working in interdisciplinary spaces in some of the work that we'll talk about today. In terms of connecting the dots between climate change in house is really the focus of my work. And i just have to say you know this period unprecedented on the scientific enterprise. It's more important than ever that we recognize the value that science brings to society and helping us to confront respond to some of these. Really urgent threats thank you. I appreciate that last point As we are well aware. Let me go to you recently. Published an article To your credit in health affairs Last month last month december issue was a theme issue on the climate crisis. I should say a health affairs polishes. Nineteen eighty-three had never previously addressed. Or excuse me. Nineteen one had never previously addressed this subject So again a -gratulations. Your article with your colleagues was titled estimating the cost of action and the economic benefits of addressing. The health harms of climate. Change But i wanna ask you specifically about that because you wrote in this essay quote unquote. There is currently a knowledge gap that must be addressed for more complete understanding of climate change related exposure response relationship. So explain to me what this knowledge gap is. Sure you know in your setup remarks. You mentioned the huge toll that climate and weather disasters inflicted on the united states last year. About ninety five billion dollars by the federal governments fresh estimate and well that's a staggering number as a health scientist. I'm an epidemiologist. I look at that figure and i wonder what's not included and the truth is that when our federal government is tracking the damage the climate change in reports like the billion dollar disaster list. It's actually not accounting for tremendous profound and sometimes irreversible damage to human house so there is a huge missing component. We think about the continuing and mounting costs of inaction on the climate crisis

Vj Lemay David Intra Defense Council Center Dr Lemay Dr Maze Natural Resources Defense Coun Gresham Commissions Given Broa Congress Arctic United States Lance RDC Medicare Drew
Rose Bowl moved from Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena to Dallas area for College Football Playoff

Morning Edition

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Rose Bowl moved from Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena to Dallas area for College Football Playoff

"Games in college football. The Rose Bowl will play outside of Pasadena, California for the first time since World War two Matchup between Notre Dame and Alabama today will be in Arlington, Texas. A change in venue comes because California would not allow in person Spectators at the game. Miranda Suarez of member station K R a reports The Rose Bowl isn't the first big sporting event to seek sanctuary in Arlington during the pandemic. Major League Baseball held the entire world Syria's there last year. University of North Texas Health Science Center epidemiology professor Rajesh Nandi warns these big events could easily become cove in 19 super spreaders. So if there is a large congregation off hands and if the collectively attend barbs in large numbers It's likely that that would give rise to an increase in new corporate cases and hospitalizations obviously follow, Nandy says with covert 19 numbers so bad in North Texas right now, there's no safe way to go to games. I'm

Miranda Suarez Arlington California University Of North Texas Heal Pasadena Rajesh Nandi Notre Dame Alabama Football Major League Texas Syria Baseball Nandy North Texas
Space Needle cancels New Year's Eve fireworks for 2021; will go virtual instead amid COVID-19

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Space Needle cancels New Year's Eve fireworks for 2021; will go virtual instead amid COVID-19

"No fireworks at the Space Needle for New Year's Eve. Another tradition put on hold by the pandemic, but come Oh Soo Romero tells us you could still celebrate with a light show Cove in 19 has caused the cancelation of all the New Year's Eve festivities at Seattle Center this year activities that MO pop, the Pacific Science Center and the annual fireworks, But Seattle Center's Deborah Doused says people can still bring in the new year with a digital show at midnight movie up in the warmth and comfort of their own homes, and, um, you know Sure in the New year's in front of their digital device or their TV screen and watch a really, really cool light show. She encourages people not to show up in person at the Space Needle on New Year's Eve. The only thing they'll see is it lit up in pink as T Mobile is still sponsoring the virtual New Year's Eve at

Soo Romero Mo Pop Deborah Doused Pacific Science Center Seattle Center
Rapid DNA tests expected to help Houston police with rising murder investigations

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Rapid DNA tests expected to help Houston police with rising murder investigations

"To help. Fight the increase in violent crime news. Eight sevens of vasquez tells us more about how it works. And how the city plans to use the new tool the houston forensic. Science center will soon be receiving a device capable of generating forensic results from things like fingernails and hair within a few hours. It currently takes at least twenty four hours to get a dna result while the new rapid dna. Tremaine cut that time down to about six hours or less the device will be used to quickly confirm and compare known. dna samples as well as analyze samples. That come from sizable pieces of evidence. Such as a pool of blood. The city has seen a sharp increase in violent crime this year in houston police department says this instrument can help identify potential suspects much faster. Lucille oscars in houston. The mexican american legal

Vasquez Science Center Houston Tremaine Police Department Lucille Oscars
What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 1 year ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
"science center" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Jackie Kallen and adds that if you're elderly or disabled, you should feel free to move to the front of the line. Anyone who has trouble standing Disabled, They can move right to the front of the line. It's a son. It's a sign of respect. Early voting continues through this week and starting next week, the hours will extend again closing at 10. PM Early Voting ends Friday, October 30th Travis County is keeping up its program to notify voters if their mail in ballots are rejected. Eric, like, um, has the story A federal appeals court says Texas does not have to immediately notify voters if their balance a rejected for mismatching signatures as they allowed the state to re implement the review process. Travis County is bucking that by continuing to let voters know if their ballots are rejected. That process is done by mail in Travis County Clerk Dan Today, Beauvoir tells cakes and that's a problem. I would rather we could find a way to contact them or, more swiftly, une email or some other way to get the word. Doubt it's unclear of Hays County to the South will let their voters cure rejected ballots in Austin. Eric like, um NewsRadio 1200 wook flu season is arriving is covert 19 cases are picking back up in some parts of the state University of North Texas Health Science Center officer and a professor and pediatrician pre Bui says researchers We're still trying to learn how being infected with both might affect people. We always worry about co infection right. There's certain things that can happen that are symptoms. That kind of happened with both, she says. Covert 19 might hit older people or people with other conditions harder. But the flu is tougher on kids five and under. So that makes precautions. More important. The Tampa Bay Rays in the Los Angeles Dodgers will play game one of the first every neutral sighted world Syriza Global I field in Arlington tonight. The Dodgers will be the home team and bat last in games one and two. And if necessary, six and seven There will be roughly 11,500 fans allowed in the stands for.

Travis County Dodgers Eric Jackie Kallen Bui Hays County flu Tampa Bay Rays University of North Texas Heal Texas Los Angeles Austin Dan Today Arlington Beauvoir officer professor
Interview with Carlos Rivero, Chief Data Officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Carlos Rivero, Chief Data Officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia

"Hello and welcome to the AI Today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. And I'm your host Ronald schmelzer Our Guest today is Carlos Rivera. Who is the chief data officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia off Carlos. Thank you so much for joining us on AI today Hey Ron. Thanks for having me. Yeah, welcome Carlos and thanks so much for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. Check your current role as Chief data officer. Fantastic Kathleen. So yes in my current role on the chief data officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia before that. I've been in that role since August of 2018. And before that I was a chief data officer and chief Enterprise architect or the Federal Transit Administration at the US Department of Transportation that was there for a little over two years as well. And then prior to that I was physical scientist with Genoa Fisheries down at the southeast Fisheries Science Center for about fifteen years. So I've been in public service right now going over nineteen years in both federal and state experience. Well, that's great. I think that provides a lot of real Nice diverse set of experience, you know from Fisheries to the federal government to state government. And I think that's part of reason why we love to have your participation that we had your participation at the data for a-week confirmation that ran from September 14th thru 18th 2020 was of course a virtual conferences everything as these days and we were focusing on the data side of AI and for our listeners who may be interested that content is actually still available so you can come and you can hear the panel that Carlos was on when we were focusing on some of the state and the local challenges for AI and data management. If you go to data, that's spelled like data package i c o n f. It's free so you can go on there and you can check all that content will be made available for many months. So you definitely should check it out and Carlos was on a panel really sharing some of the unique insights of applying a machine learning and also some of the interesting challenges of wrangling data at the state level. So maybe Carlos you for those who weren't Intense or maybe even to motivate folks to listen to the family. What are some of them? Sites that you have seen in terms of just the challenge of managing data and getting it to do some magical things like machine learning at the state level. Well, I mean really one of the most basic things is getting people involved in the process. And in fact has plays a key role in that obviously more, you know, as we kind of evolved in once a leveraged data as of CJ Cassat within the Commonwealth, we realize that the participation of individuals not just horizontal across the organization, but also a vertically through different levels of state government is critical for our ability to integrate those data assets in a meaningful way and when I talk about the vertical, how are the patients I'm talking about, you know data storage data custodians data owners executive sponsors being able to participate in the overall governance discussion because everyone has a role to play in our ability to leverage data as a CJ asset to be able to incorporate that into our data analytics to write better intelligence and within that, you know, a comes in machine learning and artificial intelligence briefing. Jane as much value and insight from the data assets than we currently have. Yes indeed. Go ahead Kelly. Yeah, definitely and kind of to follow up with that on this podcast. We talked a lot about Ai and data at the national level, but maybe you can dig a little bit deeper into what are some of the unique challenges around data at this point level because I know that you know in general there's a general data challenges, but then we can also talk about you know, there's differences between State versus local versus Federal. So the fun thing about state is that you get to play with all the businesses at one time, you know in the federal space like when I was no Fisheries, we're very focused on fisheries and Fisheries applications. Mind you, you know as a physical scientist. I really worked with a lot of different data sets. As I was really more in a fraction of those individual populations and their environments right and anthropogenic impact on those environments and how does that change the behavior of individuals within a species right? And so you have to look at the bigger picture and yep. Integrate data from a variety of different sources other Noah Services resolved as live in North Fisheries, but we also have satellite service. We have the ocean service. We have the weather service. So being able to bring in data assets from a variety of different Services different lines of business. If you will to give you a better picture of what's happening in an environment that's very unique like more often than not individuals within that particular industry. We only focus on the data that they collect they work with on a regular basis and not really look at the bigger picture of what other data assets they can bring in same thing for in Federal Transit right in Federal Transit. It was very limited in their you know, what their perspective was with regards to you know, what data asked us what we going to bring in to really understand what's happening out in the world. They're really focused on providing, you know grants of Transit agencies and authorities to make sure that people are able to get to use public transportation in the most effective way. So it's very very silent. But then when you talk about a state government, can you talk about you know being able to leverage data as an asset at that level you really talking about across all of the different page? Business whether it's education Transportation criminal justice, you know environment what-have-you Health, you know, all of those lines of business now come under your purview and you really have to start to understand. What are they unique perspectives and how can you engage those individuals within each of those lines of businesses to be able to see the value in integrating their data assets and making better data-driven decisions home from that integration. So from a state perspective you really start to get a better handle on the overall picture of what's happening out in the real world versus a very I don't want to use this term negative in my topic view of you know, what your assembly looks like and only that which Falls but then you're suddenly are you paying attention to but at the same time, I've also realize that you know data governance and use of data as an ass is really a fractal type of problem where it doesn't matter. What kind of scale you look at it. It's going to have the same patterns associated with some of the same issues that we dealt with at the federal level we deal with birth. Level we deal with at the local level because it's not a matter of our these issues different. It's just a scale at which we operate in that just kind of gives you a little bit of a difference in wage issue is but the reality is that it's very poor the majority of the issues we do with with regards to data governance and data sharing and leveraging data and analytics a machine learning really comes back to the process and the people aspect of the peace process technology interaction.

Chief Data Officer Carlos Rivera AI Fisheries Kathleen Mulch Virginia Scientist Federal Transit Administration Genoa Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Ce Ronald Schmelzer North Fisheries Cj Cassat Officer Us Department Of Transportatio Chief Enterprise Architect Jane Kelly
Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

BrainStuff

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

"I've known some dogs that are pretty smart I've also known some that worked. Bless him. But could wolves be smarter. Brain stuff. It's Christian Sager, my dogs, winchester and se blue they are real smart. So I was intrigued when I read a new study that said wolves are more intelligent in some ways than my dogs and all their canine friends whether you have a chocolate lab or a coon hound scientists believe that some modern dogs and wolves descended from a common ancestor between eleven thousand and thirty thousand years ago the new study which was published in the September twenty seventeen. Journal of scientific reports is by an international team of researchers at the wolf? Science Center. In Vienna Austria, they found domesticated dogs cannot make the connection between cause and effect wolves however, can they came to that conclusion by testing and comparing how the two species searched for food after giving them hints about where it was located researchers used fourteen dogs and twelve socialised wolves in their experiments. During the tests, the animals had to choose between two containers one with food. And one without the first thing researchers did was determined whether the animals could make sense of communicative clues by pointing and looking at the container with the food researchers. Next wanted to see how the dogs and wolves responded to behavioral cues the experimental pointed to the container with food, but did not make eye contact with the animals. Finely in the last experiment, the animals had to infer themselves which container had the hidden food using only causal clues like noises made. When the experimenters shook the container with the food both the wolves and the dogs did well on the communicative clue tests all found the hidden food both species however failed the behavioral cue portion without direct. I contact neither dog nor wolf could find the food during the last part of the test. However, only the wolves could make casual inferences as to where the food was located in other words the scientists said the wolves, not the pooches understood cause and effect. Study Author Michelle Lamp from the Netherlands reminded. US. However that the differences can be explained by the fact that wolves are more persistent to explore objects than. As, because dogs are conditioned to receive food from US whereas wolves have to find food themselves in nature. What shocked researchers was that the wolves were able to interpret direct eye to eye contact that understanding of communicative cues researchers said may have facilitated domestication. The study is unique also in that it used dogs that lived in both packs and with families, but the results of the dogs were independent of living conditions.

United States Christian Sager Vienna Austria Journal Of Scientific Science Center Michelle Lamp Netherlands
Should we trust our gut?

Tai Asks Why

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Should we trust our gut?

"My Gut is this big pile of intestines that digest my food I. Don't really know what to be trusted. They're they know that I get these feelings in my got like butterflies when nervous. Or. When I'm hungry like my struggle, I crank feel like squeezy. But like why is my gut able to make decisions like tell me what to do? That seems pretty crazy because I means it has a brain. And that that seems glad you know it's just like it's my intestines but like maybe there is a brain my gut. But at the same time, it's kind of farfetched and wacky. So I decided to take this theory to the park and see what live friends There's a break. In your stomach. Know. What what? Who had your brains in your head? I, think your brain makes. Everything you feel possible. There could be a brain because there wouldn't be space or else you'd have like a big lump on ever side. My feelings and anxieties and stresses they become from here. My God your stomach does not. It set when it's hungry I think there is some sort of connection Fram Magin by cells. As Like wow. You, know I think hires onto something. It is like really complicated and I did a little bit of research. Apparently, there are little creatures in our guts and they're called microbes are remember reading this one factoid from science center saying that all the microbes in your body where about a kilogram. That's crazy. These microbes, their apparently lake all over our body in there like inside US everywhere therefore supposed to trust our gots. Then does that mean that we have to trust all of the little microbes do the microbes have grain? Are they sent? And as was doing this research I saw the scientist called Dr Embry at Hyde. For My pc I studied the microbiome. So I decided to call her up what is microbiome so you can't see it because well, for one it's inside of you but for to they're invisible to the naked eye. So as all of the microbes that live in an on your body so that includes bacteria, viruses, fungi, some parasites, and it's not just the microbes, but it's the things that they do in your. Body. So the micro Byron or God is responsible for a lot of processes in our body. But I wanted to know do the collection of microbes form like a brain. Your Gut is full of neurons which are the same exact cells that are in your brain, and there's this amazing nerve called the Vegas nerve which connects your brain to your digestive tract and your brain can send signals directly to your gut. And your gut consensus directly back to your brain through this nerve, and they're always communicating talking to each other. And because of that, a lot of people like to call this system, the second brain in your gut but I think is probably more appropriate just to call it an extension of your nervous system. Does our gut brain have like a conscience? Sent you. We don't fully know the answer to that. Yet microbes live in your gut and they help affects this communication between your gut in your brain and people are wondering if maybe microbes have a mind of their own and if they do then maybe you know you could extrapolate a little bit and say, well, if the microbes have a mind of their own and they're affecting how my is talking to the brain, then maybe that could be the conscious aspect of it but we just don't know yet. What do you think the brain and the gut are communicating is the Gulping like We're able to process that pizza that you. A couple of hours ago now bring on more and they send it to your brain and then your brain tells you hey, I'm hungry. Grammar. Word is out. It's like. Well, that's definitely part of it but I, think it's just a little part of it. So have you ever I don't know you seem like a very good podcast or interviewer but maybe if you've ever gotten nervous before giving an interview or having to talk to somebody and maybe felt butterflies in your stomach, that is a result of your brain in your gut talking to each other. In addition to giving signals about whether or not, we should eat or whether we're hungry, there's a lot of emotional input as well at between your brain and your gut if you are stressed out or you're really sad about something, you'll notice that you're not quite as hungry It's really amazing. The ways that your brain and your gut can talk to each other. Yeah because like you know if you're sad then the guts like, oh, man, my partners bombed-out. No, I'm bummed up. Remember seeing my best friend at spirit of math new looked bummed out some. Oh Dude what happened and then he said, Oh, my hamstring. Then, he was just green me the whole time interest made meekly music ono. When he said. So. If my gut brain my head brain relic close friends. Do I make my head brain. Sad when I eat something, you know kinda nasty. Let me ask you a question. Have you ever eaten a food that you used to like and now you don't Wanna eat it at all ever again just thinking about it makes you feel sick no. Well, that's happened to me and it's happened to one of my best friends. She hates macaroni and cheese which I think is crazy but she just doesn't like it anymore because one time she ate it made her sick. And this has to do with really intricate and elegant way that your memories are formed. In how they make you react to certain situations and the gut brain axis has a very important role in that. So our eyes and our senses are tied to our head brain and those will help make us recognize the MAC and cheese. Right? Right. So the GUT brain needs to communicate with the head brain 'cause they head brain can recognize it. Yeah. So the next time, the food goes into your brain will say last time I. Am you system it told me this. So maybe just have bad memories associated with this, and then completely affects whether you want to eat that food or not. You know when like your own don't WanNa buy the candy bar or save money you're stuck with the indecision and then like if you're with like your parent or a friend, they'll just be like, Hey, do trust your gut Do you think that's like scientifically accurate? Any think scientist was actually like I am smart scientists. Your has brain trust. Your Gut because it has brain you know a lot of it has to do with this memory formation. Sometimes, we don't remember the memory, but our brain subconsciously remembers it and our gut awesome remembers it and so together, they are able to tell us that, hey, trust us on this point and you know make this decision versus that decision. When you say trust your gut do you think that's the brain thinking and then the message get sent to the got? Or do you just think it's the GOP itself? Your Gut doesn't come up with it on his own. Your brain sends a message Cheer Gut. You're just not aware of it, and then you're then response sends a message to your brain and you're aware of that one. and. Then you get that feeling from it and and you make your decision whatever it is that you decide you know sometimes people fight against their gut feeling. And they go with just their head brain half the time it works and halftime the time it doesn't does that mean? Do you think you should trust the got it self or the brain if you take one away, you break that whole. Cycle of communication, and then the messages you get are Gonna be different. They're not going to be full. You're going to be missing part of the story and so I really think it's both you have to trust both. and. Then if your gut brain is gone on your head brain is sad because he does never friend yeah. Exactly. Maybe, the gut brain is the head brains only friend and only possible friend. It's a very interesting way of putting it I liken. They've been with each other through. So many are Chitty half. Grumble grumble saying.

Scientist Fram Magin United States Byron Chitty Dr Embry GOP
How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

Outcomes Rocket

04:55 min | 1 year ago

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

"Welcome back to the outcomes, rockets, Sal Marquez is here today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Tony Manual Dr Tony. Manual is a practicing anesthesiologist and Austin Texas. He's a partner with the United States anesthesia partners central Texas and has been in practice since two thousand two. He's an assistant professor. In the Department of surgery and Peri, operative care at Bell Medical School Dr Manual received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt attended the University of Texas Health Science Center for medical. School, completed his residency in anesthesia at the University of North Carolina or Or. He was recognized as the outstanding resident and fellow cardiovascular anesthesia at Duke, university in two thousand seventeen. He received his masters in medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University and today he's playing. Multiple Roles as as he has in in his career and today we're going to be talking about physician innovation, and in particular how physicians can evolve their career to be greater contributors beyond the point of care and so. I WanNa thank you Tony for joining me today to have this very interesting discussion with you saw thanks so much great. Great to be owner podcasts, and I WANNA. Thank you for actually doing this podcast. Because for a lot of people like myself, it's been a great conduit to learn about what other people are doing, and what best practices that are out there, and it's an alternative to sort of the Journal Review articles that we have historically read and I've actually looked up several companies that you've had on and engaged with them. Really appreciate what you're doing I. Love that man now. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you've done that. That's the intention. Intention and so I appreciate you for doing that, so you know we are having a discussion. Folks Tony and I connected and said you know what the role of the physician is changing, and and so what I wanNA. Do today is just highlight how that's changing through the life of Dr Manual here and so you know I love for you Tony at to just kind of walk us through some of the work that you're doing and how it's changed from just practicing to actually doing more You know as we engage this. You know three five trillion dollar industry that call healthcare. Yeah, it's it's been an interesting journey for me and you know have to credit one of my anesthesia attending when I was in residency, his name's Dave mayor said Gimme, grapevine goes Tony You have to continually strives to maximize your career and Let's see well. What does that mean well? You definitely want to start trying to be the best clinician you can be once. You achieve that you should really look at you. Know becoming really strong in other areas, and I always took that to heart in so I think back to when I first started here in Austin I became the division chief of cardiovascular. Cardiovascular Anesthesia Rochester, saying I helped create division of cardiovascular. Because at that time we were Basically, everybody was doing it, and I fell coming out of myself. This'll be really better if we limited number of people at work in that space and you know put together some protocols and got the team together, and we saw some really good outcomes from that work and I fast forward to what I'm doing today, and that work has changed so much partly because I think every clinician you have to get educated, and I use a rudimentary tools back then, but in after getting that masters degree from Carnegie Mellon I really developed at toolkit that allows me to take on. On much more complex problems that we face and healthcare today. Yeah, that's so interesting, and so you have that entrepreneurial bug from the beginning right so you kind of re retooled the way that you guys approached cardiovascular anesthesia and I'm sure with with much improvements and outcomes, but then you've taken other steps to. You've been involved in startups, and now you're doing different roles. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah I worked my way of the medical staff leadership and ultimately became the president of medical staffing while that was a great experience after I graduated with my master's degree. The entrepreneur apart really was intriguing to me. In more important is the. The interface between the clinicians in technology and so The startup is called Dynamic Lights based here in Austin, and it's actually technology out of the University of Texas and They had great idea concept. Basically, it's how to noninvasive map blood flow during Sri will hand you an aneurysm surgery and uses what's called speckled laser technology and I was like honestly Craig. It's continuous. It's noninvasive, but they never really thought about the interaction. How you get it. It's dockers hands. How do you test it? And that was sort of my strength and so I, said well. Let's work together and figure this out and to date. You know we've incorporated. We're FDA approved, and we're. Ducking clinical trial and we're looking to partner with a couple of larger health tech firms,

Dr Tony Dr Tony Manual Peri Assistant Professor Carnegie Mellon University Austin Dr Manual Texas Austin Texas Sal Marquez Dynamic Lights Carnegie Mellon University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Health Sci Bell Medical School United States Department Of Surgery Vanderbilt Duke
"science center" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on WTVN

"The Science center has been closed since March 13th due to the pandemic, Researchers say more than three million Americans have now but infected with the Corona virus that causes Cove in 19. Officials at Johns Hopkins University reported the US cross the threshold this morning. It comes a day after the nation also set a record with more than 60,000 new cases reported in a single day yesterday. President Trump and White House officials have repeatedly claimed this week that the U. S. Has the lowest corona virus mortality rate in the world, but that claim is false. The mortality rate is the number of deaths from Cove in 19 relative to the overall population. And as of Tuesday, according to Johns Hopkins University, the U. S had the ninth worst mortality rate in the world. 39.82 deaths per 100,000 people. Karen Travers, ABC NEWS Washington, Nearly 131,000 people have died around the country. Many Americans still plan to stay home and spend less than they did before the pandemic, according to a new study from bankrate dot com. 45% of Americans say they expect to cut back on movie sports and concert tickets for the next few months once they become available. 44% surveyed say they plan to stay away from bars and 38% say they plan to cook more at home instead of going out. Retirement did not last very long for former Ohio State University president Dr Michael Drake. He has now been named president of the University of California System Radio, 6 10 W TV END SPORTS The TB team. The $1 million winner take all basketball tournament continues that nationwide arena and today Carmen's crew, the Buckeye Alum, 19 place. First game. I wish you great Evan Turner, who joined Joel is the GM and his feeling confident industry and have all of you know just how strange karma screw Place House of Pain and Illinois alumni team at four on ESPN Final practice rounds today for the Work Day Charity Open, which tees off in your field tomorrow. I will be followed by the memorial next week. The PGA announcing this year's writer Cup scheduled for Wisconsin in September, being postponed till next year. Matt McCoy is radio 6 10 W T via this news, A service of Legacy Retirement group. I'm Alison Wyatt,.

Johns Hopkins University Cove Dr Michael Drake President Trump Matt McCoy US bankrate Ohio State University Alison Wyatt Karen Travers Legacy Retirement group University of California Syste Place House of Pain president White House Evan Turner ABC PGA Wisconsin
The Cascadia Subduction Zone

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:32 min | 1 year ago

The Cascadia Subduction Zone

"Today we're going to look at the Cascadia subduction zone, and what could be a mega quake the Pacific northwest subduction zone earthquakes have occurred every three hundred fifty years since six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for earlier quakes come from core samples taken from the. The Ocean floor, and from rings counted in the Ghost forest that I'll talk about a little bit later. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions, Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet, massive coastal storms during nine, hundred and ninety, seven, Ninety, eight, washed away tons and tons of sand, revealing hundreds of stumps, the remnants of a Sitka spruce forced. It is through. Through a combination of carbon dating an accounting of rings that the data, the last Cascadia subduction zone or C. S. Z. quake took place. The Earth's surface is made up of seven major plates and many smaller ones. The smaller plates creator earthquakes for short durations of fourteen forty five seconds at may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place of. Of Water call faultlines between plates March Eleventh Twenty Eleven Japan experience a subduction zone. Quite that lasted more than four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale. It was a fourth, most powerful or quake in the world. Since modern recording began in nineteen, hundred shake created a Su- Nami, the reached a hundred and thirty three feet and mood six miles inland google. Google Japan's main island upon shoot, eight feet in shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches, this was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate finally to help put earthquakes in perspective, the long Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds the Great San Francisco earthquake of nineteen six was. was eight point six that lasted forty five seconds, but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point, one of the Richter scale based on data from Oregon see geographer Patrick Corcoran and Usgs Alaska, science center kiss, missing mysteries will now tour the predicted minute by minute impact of Cascadia. Subduction Zone earthquake on the Oregon coast after three hundred twelve. Twelve years to see S Z could no longer take the strain it ruptures at a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of its length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the south. West sliding over the Wanda Fuca plate, but remember we're talking about across more. More than fifty miles deep, the first movement sons pressure wave that soapy way that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour, it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit Oregon's cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later. It reaches Portland in fifty seconds his Seattle at nine point one is what seismologist call a full rip? Most cities can withstand a six point. Eight quake lasted about forty five seconds, but the difference between a forty second, and a four-minute quake has like the difference between a head on collision at four miles, an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes shaking continues, the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle it will have suffered from ground liquefication Berlin will collapse, and they'll be gas fires citywide after six. Six minutes people seeking high ground to avoid the soon. NAMI will be impeded by debris driving. We'll be an impossibility at eight minutes. Nami will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide, but a flash flood speed leading edge will only be inches, but will increase to forty feet as predicted that the cascadia subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake twenty eleven. Keep in mind the by the time you finish listening to this. There will have been earthquakes somewhere in the world. The Pacific

Cannon Beach Oregon Japan West Coast Portland Su- Nami Seattle Oregon San Francisco Google Pacific Plate Sitka Patrick Corcoran Wanda Fuca Washington California Mendocino California British Columbia Usgs Alaska
The Science of Happiness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:49 min | 1 year ago

The Science of Happiness

"This episode at this fraud moment in our history. We're bringing on a leading scientists to help us tackle one of the most pernicious misconceptions that humans have ever fostered. The, very roots of the word happiness reflect our assumption that happiness is something that happens to us rather than something that we can actually cultivate for ourselves HAP- ha. That's the same root of such words as hapless or haphazard, it implies luck. But again, happiness is actually a skill that we can cultivate. Emiliana. Simon Thomas Helps people learn this. Kill themselves. She got an online course called the science of happiness that has reached more than half a million people across the world. She's the science director of the Greater Good Science Center at UC, Berkeley and in this interview we discuss how to make ourselves happier through generosity, which is literally part of our biology. How the pleasure of caring for other people means we'll do it again. How empathy fatigue however is real, and then we debate a little bit the meaning of selfishness, and how we've got love wrong. Before we dive in I wanNA, flag that this is a conversation. We recorded late last year prior to the pandemic and the recent racial justice protests here in America, but the insights in this interview are as vital as ever so here we go with Emiliana Simon Thomas. Nice to meet you in person I don't know if you remember this, but when I was writing Timpson, happier I used to call you to make sure I was correct on my research on a few things I do remember that, but it was a long time ago and I'm glad I was able to be helpful. That was just going to say. My memory was that you were really helpful. It's always willing to hop on the phone, so thank you belatedly. You're quite welcome. It's a pleasure as a pleasure to have you on the show your parents were Buddhists while so my parents grew up in the Midwest and one of them came. Came from an Italian family and the other Irish family, and they were not Buddhists as young people, but I think they're sort of early life. Spiritual experience left something to be desired for them, and they wanted to see the world in a different way, and they. You know got in a car with their. You know minimal belongings and came to California and as young people here they found a community and that community where people for the Buddhist leaning and yes, so I grew up going to teachings to temples I. Remember kind of crawling all over my parents while they were sitting still and you know keeping this sorta serene demeanor. I remember China. Take the sweets off of the altar. I think that's a no no. And I heard that when you would throw tantrums over not getting enough desert, your parents would say life is suffering yeah. I don't know. The Buddha would've. Would've. Doors the usage of his signature phrase. I totally agree it's a little hard on a little kid, but you know I fought back and in a strange way it's fueled this lifelong quest for understanding like real happiness in life, so so what? HOW WOULD NOT GETTING ENOUGH DESERT? Play into understanding real happy you know I just didn't buy the notion that we had to always look through a lens of the potential for harm or disappointment or let down and I think that was the message I was getting the. Hey, you know I. Don't get enough. Dessert. I didn't get as much of a toy as someone else got. Or you know we don't have as nice of a house as someone else. Then even those people in their comforts are probably disappointed by various things in their lives and struggling in ways that I can't imagine I don't think. I picked all that up. Though I was like. No sometimes I feel great. You know sometimes I'm having so much fun I can't even like. Hold of myself and just laughter and excitement and I'm not suffering in those moments. How do you define compassion so to find compassion? When I was studying in the laboratory had to find it in an emotional way. It was a specific state. It was the experience that you have when you encounter suffering can be in person or even in your mind, you think about some suffering, and you feel the urge, and you have an intention to do something about it to help to alleviate the suffering that you encounter. That's the experience of compassion as an emotion, so that separates it from empathy, which is yeah, misses the action. Yeah, I mean empathy, I think of as kind of necessary, but not sufficient for compassion, and but the is really more simple, and it is our ability to resonate with each other and our ability to understand the meaning of a another person's emotional expressions, but if If, you only have empathy. You have a lot of other paths. You can go down. That are not compassion, right? You can feel distressed yourself. You can feel Oh, I'm overwhelmed. There's I'm upset in in in being confronted with the suffering, you can kind of suppress any emotional experience that you have. That is sort of mirrored from another person and sort of look apathetic. Kind of Mandra down the road towards compassion, and that means you're not really thinking about yourself anymore, right? You're not focused on the potential for something to threaten you or the extent to which your physical experience is recognizable or familiar as your own pain or suffering, but you sorta channel whatever whatever feeling you have into activating your care, nurturance systems right you're. You're actually orienting yourself as a care provider as a nurture rather than sort of frenetically worried about the possibility that something could go wrong in in your own right.

Emiliana Simon Thomas HAP Fraud Simon Thomas Midwest Timpson California Greater Good Science Center Director America China Berkeley Buddha
Solar Orbiter to pass through the tail of a comet

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Solar Orbiter to pass through the tail of a comet

"The European Space Agency says its solar orbiter pro will be passing to the tail of a comet soon site is planned to switch all the instruments early to conduct some bonus research launched in February so the orbiter's mission has been to capture the first pictures of the sounds of Lucy pulls the chance encounter with comment this wasn't planned but after being alerted by Britain's monologues space Science Center SO is switching the controls to gather data on the trail of dust and charged particles left by the comet similar Johns flybys through a comet's tail to be recorded just six times and only after the event

European Space Agency Lucy Britain Space Science Center
Solar probe to pass through comet's tail for 'bonus science'

War Room

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Solar probe to pass through comet's tail for 'bonus science'

"The European Space Agency says its solar orbiter probe will pass through the tail of a comet soon and scientists plan to switch on its instruments early to conduct what they call bonus science launched in February so the orbiter's mission has been to capture the first pictures of the sun's allusive polls the chance encounter with comment this wasn't planned but after being alerted by Britain's monologues space Science Center SO is switching the controls to gather data on the trail of dust and charged particles left by the comet similar chunks of flybys through a comic style to be recorded just six times and only after the event taking place the agency says chances like this part of the adventure of

European Space Agency Britain Space Science Center
Prediction

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Prediction

"Welcome to kids Smith and mystery your host kid crumb today. We're GONNA look at several events that were predicted. And of course we'll start with our current pandemic predicted seventeen years ago by science. If you still believe in science and is this a first well of course not you can look back. A hundred years to the nineteen eighteen. Banish flu epidemic tremendous number of similarities. Between on then. And what's going on now but we're going to leave that behind. Don't look at earthquakes. Also predicted are subduction zone. Earthquakes have occurred every three hundred and fifty years said six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for the earlier quakes or predictions comes from core samples taken from the ocean floor. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions are both Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet. Massive coastal storms during the nineteen ninety seven and ninety eight storms washed away tons of sand revealing hundreds of stumps the remnants of Sitka spruce forest. It is through a combination of carbon dating and counting of rings. That the date of the last cascade subduction zone or C. S. Z. Quake place the Earth. Surfaces made up of seven major plates in many smaller ones. The smaller place creator quakes for short durations of fourteen to forty five seconds it may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place at what is called the fault line between plates March Eleventh. Two Thousand Eleven Japanese experience subduction zone quite that lasted more than four minutes at a nine point one. On the Richter scale it was the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world since modern record taking began in nineteen hundred to shake created a soon nami that reached one hundred thirty three feet and move six miles inland. It moved Japan's main island of Honshu. Eight feet and shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches. This was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate Vialli to help put earthquakes in perspective the Loma Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds. The Great San Francisco earthquake of Nineteen. Six was eight point six and it lasted. Forty five seconds but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale based on data from Oregon. Siochana Oceana Graphic Person Patrick Corcoran and US GS is Alaska. Science Center true mysteries of the Pacific northwest will now who are predicted. Minute by minute. Impact of a Cascadia subduction zone earthquake on the Oregon coast get this after three hundred twelve years the CS is he could no longer take the strain. It ruptures a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the South West sliding over the one to Fuca plate. But remember we're talking about a crushed more than fifty miles deep. The first movement sends a pressure wave that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later it reaches Portland Oregon in fifty seconds at his Seattle at nine point one. It's what Size Malla. Just call a full rip. Most cities can withstand a six point eight quake last year forty five seconds. But the difference between a forty second and a four-minute quake is like the difference between a head on collision at four miles an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes. Shaking continues the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle will have suffered from ground. Liquefication building collapsed gas fires citywide after six minutes. People seeking high ground to avoid the SU- NAMI will be impeded by debris and driving will be almost impossible at eight minutes to Sonoma will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide but flash floods speed. The leading edge will only be inches but it will increase to forty feet is predicted that the cascade subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake of twenty eleven. Keep in mind that by the time you finish listening to this podcast. There will earthquake somewhere in the

Oregon Japan San Francisco Patrick Corcoran West Coast Portland Seattle Pacific Plate Vialli Cannon Beach Oregon Smith FLU Sonoma Fuca Plate California Science Center Size Malla Washington Alaska Loma Prieta
"science center" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Audiology associates when silence is not golden now another look at your exclusive W. CBM weather channel forecast yet another storm in the plains heads our way and that means some rain tomorrow and Friday but today we're dry sunny breezy cool fifty eighth grade in the afternoon tomorrow sixty four Friday were cloudy with showers sixty two the high Friday I'm meteorologist Terry Smith from the weather channel for talk radio six eighty WCBS currently at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore it's fifty three degrees and it's fifty four in Cambrils reporting a one oh six I'm Michael Phillip Ellie six eighty WCBS news you know that you would really have guaranteed lifetime income for Rob Roy for solutions at four ten two six six eleven twenty the Rush Limbaugh show starts now on talk radio six eighty WCBS am and sync your in protecting the EIB's Southern Command I am Rush Limbaugh America's real anchorman America's truth detector and a doctor of democracy all sentencing is I'm aware and everything out there all everything Mahar Rushey we are here at eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two if you want to be on the program look at that you know I I don't know whether to believe this or not is any of Michael Moore does all these these these these ludicrous movies he's out with a new salesman.

Terry Smith Maryland Science Center Baltimore Cambrils Rob Roy America Mahar Rushey Michael Moore salesman Michael Phillip Ellie Limbaugh
Finding Calm in Chaotic Times With Erin Pickney

Live Happy Now

10:08 min | 1 year ago

Finding Calm in Chaotic Times With Erin Pickney

"No question that we're experiencing a chaotic time right now and we've heard so many concerns from people who are worried about cove nineteen about the financial toll is already taking and what this means for the future where all learning how to manage this new normal to frankly doesn't feel normal at all. The good news is there are ways that we can find calm in the midst of this chaos and today we've invited Aaron. Pick me back to give tips on how to make the most of our current situation. Aaron is a Nashville based therapist specializing in recovery from anxiety and depression. And she's here to give a few suggestions on how we can decrease wearing Zaidi and increase our sense of wellbeing. Aaron welcome back to live happy. Now it's great. Have you on the show again thanks. It's great to be back. Well we have a lot to talk about today because as you talked earlier we didn't really expect me talking on the arrogant this soon. But there's a lot going on and a lot of things that people need some reassurance with and you are the person we need to talk about this all right happy to be. Obviously there's a lot of anxiety going on right now and I think one of the things I want to understand is what is causing us so much anxiety. I hear different things from different people as a therapist as a professional. What is it that you see causing us the most anxiety right now? You know. It's interesting because you would think more people were being super anxious about getting sick. Really what most people seem to be anxious about is being isolated or potentially having like a loss of work which could lead to a lot of really negative consequences for people said those kind of seemed to be more prevalent things that people are really anxious about as opposed to like the virus itself interesting and with that kind of anxiety and the fact that we are working from home most of us. We are feeling more isolated. Does that just feed the anxiety to be situation? No absolutely because you know when you're going into an office and you're talking people and you kinda get to have just general social time with people that kind of low humming society that some people live with goes down a little bit. They have other people to share their experiences with. And you just you're not stuck in your own head whereas when you're at home and especially if you happen to live alone and you're not reaching out to other people socially like it's just you and your thoughts and those thoughts can get really out of hand really quickly. Yeah and even people like right here in Nashville. I know we live in a building where they have shut down the gym downstairs and our cross fit. Jam is now closed so there goes at outlet for physical release so if people are in that situation what can they then do to kind of escape some of that anxiety because for like that's what I would do is like I'm GonNa go work out or I'm going to go do some yoga now? Just got more difficult to do that. Yeah wow so. I think the first thing is to try to work out at home if you can. There are a ton of great yoga videos online. I think Yoga with Adrian. One that's like super popular but there's a ton of 'em based on your particular preference in skill level. So you could do that. You can also just like dance. That is one of my personal favorites. It just sort of cranked up the music and dance and if you live in an apartment building and you don't want to make your neighbor's apartment here the music you can just throw on some headphones dance with it. Which is a great way. I also a big fan of singing. While dancing it's great cardio might disturb the neighbors if you're not great but it's also a fun thing to do and then depending on where you live so like over where you are. This may be harder my part of town. I can go for a walk and not come in contact with another person or at least not in close contact. So that's something we can still do. It's also possible to like some of the parks and things. Different places are closing down but you can drive out to a less populated area and go for a walk. Bear fat something that works for you. What are some other things that we can be doing? Then that will help us reduce some of this anxiety so I think kind of hearkening back to our last conversation really limiting social media in the news I've had to turn off notifications from the news stations on my phone which historically have never been an issue but right now. I'm getting a notification every time there's another positive test that's not helpful to me or my mental health and social media is just sort of running crazy with all kinds of really drastic things that maybe aren't realistic or not. What are happening in misinformation. That's out there. If you can choose to have your social media be healthy place. And you've only got healthy people. You're interacting with unhealthy foods that you're following that's great and if it's not then maybe reduced fat or cut it out for now. I know a lot of people though. They're kind of drawn to the news right now. Kind of like a bad car accident where it upsets them and it's disturbing for them to watch but they seem to not be able to stop and I'm originally the way that our society set up now we can watch twenty four seven on multiple stations and yes we can get completely inundated. So how do we balance that kind of a need to know with need to step away I think for me turn off notifications or even fully deleting apps on your phone and then having a check point in the day so I given the rapid nature that things are changing? You might check in the morning check in midday when you have lunch and then check in the evening to see so that you still have access to the important information as things change. But it's just not hunted new notifications as everything I know when are at home working. It's a lot harder. 'cause like doesn't have the TV on in the background right. But that's when I would recommend go into something like a net flicks era Hulu and just watching. There's all kinds of great. Tv shows that are perfect background TV to have running and just not have the news that constant thing you want to check in on it you just don't want it to be constantly checking in on you. I liked that because one thing we started doing and I'll be honest. I started doing this after the elections in two thousand sixteen. Is I no longer watch my news live I I record it and there are certain things I need to fast forward through or upset me and so that's something that I've found helpful right now? Is it's like okay. I WANNA get enough to know like I want this part of the story that tells me the facts of what's going on but I don't need the details. I don't need to know how many more people died in Italy today. You know look through that. And just get the overview. Yeah and another option is to do away with the new traditional sources altogether and look at the CDC website maybe your local health department. They'RE GONNA BE PROVIDING UPDATES at are important information for you to know without necessarily getting the. There's another confirmed case of coveted nineteen in Nashville or wherever you may live and so that is sort of helpful as well. That's fantastic and one thing that I found today. Greater Good Science Center had done an update of ten positive things that have come out of this so far and gave some brighter point that things discoveries were making or some recovery's that are happening that aren't being reported so much so that's interesting to like you can look for some new sources such as greater good or some of these more positive mindset places that are going to provide you with a little bit of uplifting information. Yes that's a great idea okay. So we've handled social media in the news. Got that conquered. What about the social distancing? What's here's the deal. We spend our whole time talking about. We need social connection. This is so important for us in our say. Now you gotta get away from people right so social distancing not social isolation. I think that the thing people jumped to his. Oh Gosh I can't have any contact with anyone who doesn't live in my house will know you can. There's a lot of creative ways to maintain contact with people while still maintaining a minimum of six to eight feet apart. Ideally are you going to go to dinner with somebody right now? We'll know probably not but can you face time in a friend to dinner you can. Can you play like my wife and I were talking the other day about playing Yahtzee with my mom's face time because it's a game that we can all play but we don't have to be in the same spot. There's lots of things like Jack Box. Tv that you can kinda set up using zoom or something like that with screen sharing that you can play with your whole family. So there's a lot of things that are out there and if you think about it from the perspective of we actually have a little bit more time when we're working from home because we're not commuting anymore and when we take our lunch break we literally walked to the kitchen going somewhere to eat so you actually have a little bit more time to reach out to people into get your work done and that's you can actually spend some more time like intentionally calling that friend that haven't talked to you in six months or spending some time facetime ing with your nieces and nephews. You don't get to see very often if we look at it as an opportunity of like okay so just because we can't see each other physically in the same space doesn't mean that we can't still interact. That's a really good point because this is could be a nice time to kind of rekindle some of that communication that gets lost in our busy busy day we end up not reaching out to that best friend from high school that we know we want to talk to. But it's like I'm just so busy I haven't done it the exactly and I'd seen one person posted something about like each day. Ask Quarter you grateful for who you contact. Today was the second thing. I thought that was really interesting that that it was I every day to make it intentional to contact someone different. Oh yes definitely. I've had a few people talk about doing not really a bucket list but kind of like a a list of people that they WANNA make sure they contact while this is happening and so they're sort of setting a pace for themselves with like okay so if this goes on for a month then that means I have thirty days so I have forty two people WANNA call. That means. I need to call every day. You know trying to make sure that they're getting through that process of okay. I'm going to reach out to all of these people and actually reestablished these relationships because I can right

Nashville Aaron Zaidi Hulu Social Isolation Italy Good Science Center CDC Jack Box
"science center" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"science center" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Well visitors have to stay away the rats will play the California Science Center has invited rats to run around in the museum workers there have taken the center's rats on a tour of the place letting them play inside exercise balls and check out the kelp forest exhibit an aquarium in Chicago has also allowed its penguins to have a little freedom during the closure

trump Chris Bernie Kerik Charlie Kirk Dr o LA county president vice president Rudy Giuliani
"science center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"science center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of BK a Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told senators privately he does not yet have the votes to block new witnesses and president Donald Trump impeachment trial that's according to a Republican familiar with a closed door meeting in GOP senators and granted anonymity to discuss that six forty seven now K. became new developments emerge in the fatal helicopter crash that killed basketball star Kobe Bryant and his daughter ABC's Alex stone has details to information today is at the corner shop is here in LA county you'd says that it has now recovered all nine of the bodies the the bodies and and the remains are are going out to what they call the forensic Science Center look to begin the work to positively identify the remains even though we all know who was on board nobody has been positively identified nobody's name has been put out by the corner or the sheriff's department I get a fine who was on board that work is beginning right now now that they have recovered those bodies and stone said that even though the helicopters black box was not required to be on board it still could have helped investigators figure out exactly what went wrong now they must rely on searching for small I pad which was believed to be mapping their choppers flight path yeah wasn't that required it to be on board a lot of smaller planes don't have them helicopters don't have them you would have been nice if it was on board that's why the NTSB initially said they didn't know if there was one on board it wasn't required but many do you put them on board this one didn't have one so they're gonna have to use whatever they can figure it out they are looking for an iPad that dead today say the pilot had it would have had some flight data on it we're trying to find an iPad Ian twisted burned metal that they remain that's going to be tough yeah as investigators continue to search that wreckage law enforcement officials along with investigators are describing the crash site as gruesome and difficult to sort through it has been gruesome I mean not only did the helicopter break apart I there's not very much less that of real substantial site within it burned and burned real ferocious lady and and pretty hot for a short amount of time so those who were inside finding the the bodies the remains that's tough that's why the remains have now been sent to the forensic Science Center that it's not your normal autopsy where they have somebody ID the body they're having to do forensics on these remains in and that's what they're working on right now and one of the more alarming developments reports of people just trying to access that crash site in order to grab a piece of the wreckage or even take a picture as we've been reporting here on KP K. the sheriff's office says it's still a major issue apparently but those individuals will be prosecuted that is an issue yeah people are trying to hike into it to get pictures to maybe take mementos but they're warning don't do that then the you'll be arrested that that the you will face consequences yeah that's ABC's Alex stone there reporting on the crash.

Mitch McConnell Senate president Donald Trump
"science center" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"science center" Discussed on PRI's The World

"American so-called civilized. People use to not divert to other country used to handle it in your own country. Patrick that's tough to hear especially when the whole act of recycling, as you say makes people feel like they're actually doing the right thing, what has to change to make this go right? And where does that change needs to happen? I will check change probably needs to happen, first and in western countries, but there is some good news coming out of that. Like China Malaysia has said, we're not taking any more of your dirty recycled plastic anymore. And if you send it here from places like America or Canada and we catch it. We're sending it back. Also, there is this convention signed by more than one hundred and eighty countries, that's all about rich countries dumping toxic waste on less wealthy countries will, they're now considering plastic to be toxic waste. And this is a convention that signed by everyone from Canada. France to the UK to North Korea. But the United States has yet to ratify it. So these are all the issues that come out after you've thrown that plastic bottle in the recycling bin but they're all. Also all of these scary issues that come up before the plastic bottle even gets made. Okay. So let's bring in Jamie Hopkins. Again, from the center for public integrity, Jamie. What's the problem on your end of the investigation? So I was looking at the other end of the cycle plastic manufacturing, which is in a boom in the US at the moment and the waste that can come from that. And what I started with was going on a neural hunt. Yet. That's what's a neural. Yes. A really funny name, it's actually another way of describing a plastic pellet. He's the products of plastic producers. What they're sending off to manufacturers to be turned into plastic bottles or bags or other items. So I went with jase tunnel. His what the university of Texas at Austin marine science center to an island in the Gulf Coast to look for hurdles it must have looked pretty odd because one couple of stopped asked what we were doing. Refined when this big one but these little ones are a little plastic pellets. That's the basis of everything plastic. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So they're, they're getting out to the environment. So we're trying to figure out where they're coming from. So we've got all in tears all over the Gulf of Mexico collecting numbers of. Okay. But what's the point of picking up these nerve cells jas tunnel is doing. He is picking them up, but mainly what he's doing is he's tracking them. In fact, he starts something called neural patrol and he's asking volunteers to this and scientists to, to go out when they're at beaches and bays. And look for ten minutes to see do they see any noodles and to count them to let him know. And nobody was tracking this in this region, and to as the numbers are coming in, when he's finding is that they're everywhere in places that are nowhere near plastics processing facilities in some cases curly, it's not great having these nurdles all around. But are they actually harmful will? So the problem with pallets is that they pose threats. That's when they get out into the environment, that's not where they're supposed to be. Nobody wants them to be there, including the producers since this is their product, but they do get out and the issue is that marine animals mistake them as food, birds and fish, for instance. And that's not good for them in some cases, these pellets ended up picking up dangerous bacteria or toxic chemicals. But even if they're fresh new, they don't have anything on them that filling up the stomachs of animals and making them feel full some animals of starved as a result. There's also this question that scientists are still investigating about what does it mean to have plastic, whether it's in pellet form or otherwise in the food chain. What does it mean for us as human beings? And we don't really know that yet. Jamie. I know you've also found out that the US is about to make a whole lot more plastic. I'm wondering why when there's this huge national conversation now about using less plastic. Yeah. It's, it's coming at sort of an ironic time..

Jamie Hopkins United States Canada China Malaysia jase tunnel Patrick university of Texas America Mexico Gulf Coast France Austin marine science center North Korea UK ten minutes
"science center" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"science center" Discussed on KOMO

"Preserve their communities. It's part of a week of action against displacement, taking place in Chinese communities across the US and Canada. Organizers say those areas, face gentrification and displacement, we are still here, and we are paying attention to what the city is allowing to happen here, and that we are paying attention to the. The growth and rapid increase of, of these luxury product projects that are being constructed in being planned for this neighborhood, organizers planned hold several events throughout the week demanding action from city officials after a long fight the montlake boulevard market in Seattle will close in just as the State Department of transportation. It's going to move in as part of the five twenty widening project, scum. Oh, Suzanne fon reports. The owner sold the beloved market for more than sixteen million dollars. Neighbors call it more than a grocery store. It's the heart of their community chopping here for thirty years for years, neighbors worried about whether the montlake boulevard market and gas station would have to be torn down. It sits on the southern edge of state route five twenty side to see it go. But I know that they got to build what they got a Bill to state route five twenty rebuild would meet an improve montlake boulevard. Interchange would also include a landscape live to serve as a park over the high. Highway and bike trails, and a new bus station would also be at it in Seattle, Suzanne Phan, KOMO news. Komo news time to thirty four. Aaa traffic every ten minutes on the force. Here's Tama Fulton. Southbound through Marysville is moving slowly between one hundred sixteenth street and highway five to nine highway two is slow and go westbound east, we writer road and Sultan, basin road through gold bar. That's going to add an extra ten minutes to your drive fire crews are still on the scene of a homeless encampment fire in Seattle blocking all the lanes of south Dearborn street in both directions between twelfth avenue south and reindeer avenue. South, you avoid that area for the time being in Puyallup were still watching a crush on eastbound highway five twelve just before ninth street, that's causing a bit of a slowdown from canyon road, a crush ROY on southbound highway five zero seven near two hundred ninety second street south is partially blocking the southbound lane. See when he was cautioned there an index. The earlier crash on highway two just east of index galena road has been cleared. Traffic it was being alternated in one lane around the scene with just a bit of a residual slow. Down left. This report sponsored by Pacific science center. It Seattle summer of space at PEC Cy with rocket launches interstellar virtual reality experiences planetarium shows and maximum moon adventure. More info at pack side dot org are next KOMO traffic at two forty four. Komo forecast now and we have mostly clear skies for the next little while. Here's Seth Wayne throughout western Washington. We're on our way to seeing a lot.

KOMO Seattle montlake Suzanne fon State Department of transporta US Suzanne Phan Tama Fulton ROY Canada Seth Wayne Marysville PEC Cy galena Puyallup Pacific science center writer Washington ten minutes
"science center" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"science center" Discussed on AP News

"The California science center has revealed an ambitious if somewhat lighthearted new exhibition called dogs a science tale. It's spent the last five years sniffing out the answers to hundreds of canine questions and now visitors will be able to see here. And of course, smell like a dog. One of the highlights of the exhibit is a replica of a fire hydrant next to a button that you can push to well, smell what dog smells nine similar stations. Allow people to see like a dog does their color. Vision is limited, but they pick up motion better than us determine what a person has just eaten by licking their hand. And hear sounds so subtle where completely oblivious to them the exhibit will travel to museums across the country after it closes in Los Angeles early. Next year, labrador retrievers are still the most popular US. Dog breed according to the latest data released by the American kennel club fans of labs which topped the list for the twenty eighth year in a row credit. The breeds amicable nature meant aptitude in many canine roles, including service dog hunters helper and patient family. Pat, the next most popular breeds on the list are German shepherds, golden, retrievers, French BULLDOGS and BULLDOGS rounding out the top ten are Beagles poodles rottweilers German short haired pointers and Yorkshire terriers at number nine the German short haired pointer notched its highest ranking since getting AKC recognition in nineteen thirty. Martin shorts men teaming up with another comedy legend for a live tour and short leads our birthday round up. He's on the road with Steve Martin Marty and I fly together we save a lot of money because Marty fits conveniently in the overhead bin Martin short sixty nine for Diana Ross's birthday. There's a special showing of her concert film of historic nineteen Eighty-three performance in central park where around a million people showed up and so did the rain..

Steve Martin Marty California science center BULLDOGS Los Angeles Diana Ross US American kennel club Pat Yorkshire five years
"science center" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"science center" Discussed on KOMO

"Cooling, but biologists aren't certain how that might affect endangered Puget Sound orcas. A new report from Noah found several signs of improving ocean conditions such as a slight increase in coho salmon last year. However, Chris Harvey with the northwest fisheries science center says that's not likely to help out our killer whales. Several years of poor growing conditions are consistent with lower than average returns of Chinook salmon to the Columbia River this year. Biologists also noted signs of unfavorable ocean conditions such as. Increasing reports of whale entanglements in fishing gear for the fifth straight year. Art Institute of Seattle students aren't just looking for new places to finish their education as the school shut down today. There are also waiting for financial aid money. They're already supposed to have there's thirteen million dollars in federal aid stipend still not paid the students like Daniel Vaughan. For rent credit card bills are late. I have children's have to pay for daycare. And makes it very tough already spent money on materials for final projects for this quarter. I don't know where that money Windsor. We're still going to get an art institute's parent company dream center, education holdings is in receivership, and according to federal court documents, the receiver says the money isn't missing. But it says dream center didn't have it when it entered receivership much of the money that was available went to payroll the receiver doesn't yet. Have what it calls a work around to get the money directly from the US department of education, but that might not be possible because the rules prevented from releasing that thirteen million dollars directly the schools have to pay the students and then get a reimbursement from the feds, which the receiver calls a chicken and egg debate. Ryan Harris, KOMO news with the clock change this weekend. Many of us might have a tough time getting a good night's sleep instead of taking a sleeping pill millions of people reach for the dietary supplement melatonin, but it's not without risks. Kamaz Denise Whitaker with what you need to know. I usually get about six hours asleep. Tonight, four to five hours five hours. A consumer reports survey finds eighty percent of adults in the us struggle with sleep at least once a week and each person has a unique way of dealing with it. I usually just lay there I toss and turn I get up and start cleaning up my house. I have trouble sleeping. I try to take melatonin melatonin is asleep hormone that is naturally produced by the body. It's also available as a popular supplement studies show, it can be helpful but only for some people under certain conditions. Your jet lag. If you have to work a night shift, or if you're getting older for people who are seventy or older, your body might not produce enough melatonin on its own, but many others also use melatonin is it safe. You should never take a dose of naloxone, and that's more than ten milligrams. And you should actually consider starting. If you wanna try melatonin at only about point two two point five milligrams taking more than what you're. Body naturally produces can cause drowsiness mental fatigue or even a physical slow down. The next day melatonin is not regulated by the same rules as prescription and over the counter drugs. That's come owes. Denise Whitaker reporting. Komo news time.

melatonin KOMO Denise Whitaker northwest fisheries science ce Columbia River Chris Harvey Daniel Vaughan US department of education Noah Art Institute of Seattle Kamaz us Ryan Harris naloxone thirteen million dollars five hours eighty percent six hours
"science center" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"science center" Discussed on KTOK

"To himself from his father's Bank account. He is facing charges of desecration of a corpse, forgery, embezzlement and neglect by caretaker K county. Murder. Suspect has finally been arrested more than five years after he allegedly stabbed and killed his ex wife. Katya case Beth Myers has details. A K county murder suspect. Wanted for allegedly stabbing. His ex-wife to death in front of their children has been arrested in Mexico. US marshals say a tip generated from the television show in pursuit with John Walsh. Led to Wednesday's arrest of thirty four year old Louis Octavio free us who had been on the run since August of two thousand thirteen is ex wife Janet Reno was a former Blackwell police officer when free as the ride back on US soil Thursday US marshals used the same handcuffs that were issued to rain by the Blackwell police department to take him into custody free us as currently in Dallas awaiting extradition back to Oklahoma almost thirty employees that oh you are getting pink slips as we hear from Katie okays Calvin. Right officials at the university of Oklahoma announced on Thursday, twenty eight employees will lose their jobs at the Norman and health sciences center campuses. University says a reduction expected to save the university. About two million dollars. Now, all the affected employees were notified and the officials say they'll be given sixty days of paid notification in advance of their final day. They'll also receive a separation program with funds to pay for insurance. Democratic Representative Ben Loring if Miami was a no vote in the house public safety committee when it came time to vote on a constitutional carry Bill. He's worried about eliminating training and background checks. Would it not be likely that most people simply won't get an STI license? No, I still see people getting an SEO essence Republican Representative Sean Roberts of hominy authored the Bill which would allow Oklahoma's over the age of twenty one to legally carry a firearm without first obtaining, a license. A similar Bill was vetoed last year by then governor Mary Fallon, the Bill passed by a vote of nine to two and is headed to the full house. Even after changes in state alcohol laws took effect last year. One Senate Bill would affect boat operators who. Serve beer too. Passengers example of that would be the the.

Murder Oklahoma Miami US Ben Loring Mexico Representative university of Oklahoma Louis Octavio Blackwell police department forgery embezzlement Norman and health sciences cen Katie okays Calvin Katya Janet Reno Senate John Walsh Mary Fallon