31 Burst results for "Schwarz"

Clark Stanley: The Rattlesnake King

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:24 min | Last month

Clark Stanley: The Rattlesnake King

"Oil is an actual product that is created from chinese water snakes also known as irabu snakes. It's been used as a traditional chinese remedy for centuries chinese water. Snakes live in ponds and rice paddies. They're slightly venomous snakes under a meter that feed on fish and infineon's the snake oil which is derived from the water. Snakes is very high in the omega. Three fatty acid known as epa snake oil was and is considered by many people to be effective in relieving the pain of ailments such as arthritis bursitis and sore muscles. A modern study found that oil from chinese water. Snakes actually allowed mice to perform better on cognitive tests. Take for that what you will. The chinese workers began to share their remedy with american workers who are working on the railroad and the product began to grow in popularity as the demand for snake. Oil grew people began to figure out ways to meet that demand. Enter into the story. One clark stanley. The self proclaimed rattlesnake king stanley wanted to meet the new demand for snake oil so he created a product known as clark stanley. Snake oil intimate. Just knowing that the word snake was in the title he began using rattlesnakes for the product however a rattlesnake is not a water snake and they have totally different fat profiles eventually however he totally abandoned. The idea of putting rattlesnake oil in the product altogether for twenty four years stanley traveled around the country. Touting the medicinal benefits of his snake oil intimate he created a massive show that he toured with positioning himself Frontiers mun while creating an elaborate backstory. He sold the product at western shows around the country. He claimed that the recipe for his snake oil lyneham. It came from a hoppy medicine. Man the hoppy did not have anything resembling snake oil and at no point. Did he ever mention the chinese origins of the product. Moreover stanley made claims about the product which went far beyond with your original chinese snake. Oil was used for stanley claim that it would cure. Rheumatism sciatica lumbago a sore throat. Frost-bites tooth aches and many other ailments in one famous demonstration at the eighteen ninety. Three chicago world's fair he's supposedly the product in front of a live crowd science writer. Joe schwarz wrote quote stanley. Reach into a sack plucked out a snake slit it open and plunged it into boiling water when the fat rose to the top. He skimmed it off and used it on the spot to create stanley snake. Oil ligament that was immediately snapped up the throng that had gathered to watch the spectacle

Clark Stanley Arthritis Bursitis King Stanley Infineon Stanley EPA Rheumatism Sciatica Joe Schwarz Chicago
"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

04:14 min | Last month

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"So our priority right now is training keillor's training therapist training people to be able to provide generational healing work with crm and also just as important to encourage and support those healers and those therapists in doing their own work. Because you can't do this work unless with other people must you've done it for yourself. So that's what we're really looking to do is to get the are mountains of the world you have to take sierra training basic trainings. I that if you stay in it then you learn all of this more higher level. More advanced work. So that's you know this we're doing we're trying to train therapists were trying to heal therapists. Were trying to get a large group of people who you know. Take one hundred therapists that know how to do this. Spread them all over the world. Each therapist doing healing groups of people hundreds of people it's going to have the ripple effect sooner or later where it will have a really significant impact to hopefully. But you need a lot of people to be able to do this. You know. I can't do this myself and ten other people can't do it. We need lots of them So that's kind of our goal right now it's like we need to put the infrastructure in place so that's funding for this kind of thing funding for Training therapists and healers in you know third world countries in places where there isn't there aren't any resources To be able to get this out there everywhere it needs to be so that this kind of work can start happening in all the different corners of the globe so training therapist. I'm training trainers to train other therapists And obviously to literally set up programs in which we can get this work to to a bigger scale so if someone is interested. I've put the link in the show notes. I think you do need to be a registered therapist already. Is that rightly sir. I'm you know technically. We're because there's always these you know. Earthbound third dimensional liability issues..

keillor
"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

04:49 min | Last month

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"To save the planet and to perpetuate and propel the evolution of the consciousness of human beings which will save the human race. We need to be able to do the generational work that will access the origins. The sources in the roots of the original splits the original separations from self from culture from lineage. From family from all the different things that that create this really severe division between us individuals and the problem globally. So for me we. We have to do the generational work because we can't just stick with the individual work number one. It will be here forever. I mean we don't have that much time on earth to to save us to save the planet to in in a way that will allow for you know the ascended human being to have somewhere to live and to live in harmony. Were trying to remember. That state of harmony can't do it unless we're doing generational healing at a global scale so to me it's it's an imperative. It's an imperative to do this way. While the individual healing has a ripple effect. So if you heal somebody in this time line it will ripple back through the lineages by virtue of the mechanism of of healing. That is somewhat mysterious. How how does healing something here. He'll something back then and vice versa. How does it. he'll are descendants. weren't even born yet. We're not sure. I mean rachel yehuda is doing all the up genetic research there's other genetic researchers trying to find out how this works but it's just crucial that we do it on this scale one to one is not enough. Small groups is not enough to change the trajectory of what's happening and to change the collective imprints that people are carrying in addition to their own individual lineage imprint. So it's just really important thing to be able to get back to the origins of these splits the origins of these dissociation from from from cell phone from sources from lineage and from humanity and from consciousness speechless lisa. I mean the the potential of this work is is that thank you actually speaking that out a naming it so us doing this work if someone's listening and interest is like how can someone do this work or how can how can this spread in a way. This sustainable well. That's what i'm working on right now. in the crm community the comprehensive resource model community meaning myself the trainers the consultants in the organization Or working really hard to develop and build this aspect of the comprehensive resource model work. Because it's it's actually a just a regular trauma processing model as well so there's a lot of us who have dedicated and committed to this big mission. It's a mission to get this kind of healing to a global scale and we are literally in the planning stages on how to take what we know works one on one or with small groups into the huge collective internationally so right now i mean people might organization. Even there's lots of people outside my organization who have the same mission and ironically finding each other. it's that universal flow that universal intelligence. That realizes there is now time and space and an opening for all of us to come together all of us who have the same mission and work together to figure out a way to get this healing out there to scale so. There's a bunch of us doing that. And i have a nonprofit foundation That is meant to facilitate this particular mission of healing to scale We also are doing on a on a more micro level. Obviously we're trying to train more therapists or goal is to train as many therapists as possible to do this kind of work. All over the world and to help those therapists do their own generational healing in order so to allow them to be clear to be clear and clean and able to step into everything that needs done for this kind of work..

rachel yehuda lisa
"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

04:26 min | Last month

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"The victimizations that created the need to become perpetrators as well as the failed rescue attempts to mitigate perpetration and the actual activities of choosing a choice point of becoming a perpetrator either individually within huge corporations within governmental system That really is has a huge impact on on the collective. So if we're not doing generational work. Were missing the opportunity to track and deconstruct. How did this pattern of perpetration that includes victimization and rescuer failed rescue attempts how has that impacted manifested an influenced. What's going on right now. So if we don't do the generational work and we only work with overt observable perpetration behaviors in this time line. Were missing this entire opportunity to transform perpetration energy into resources because once you clear what created the need for perpetration and the guilt shame conscious conscience and you know emotions that go along with the realization. That one turned away from self turned away from source when they chose to to engage in perpetration one. We need to If we don't remember that if we don't remember all of the elements and aspects of the creation consequences of perpetrator lifetimes and self states and energies. Then we're missing the opportunity to move that shift that that trauma into something that becomes.

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

02:34 min | Last month

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"I died alone kind of death. The bottom line is regardless of what the circumstances are. There's of course. Zillion different circumstances of deaths in the lineages. What we're looking for is the death truth. Which is the thought. The belief the state of truth in the individual the moment before they die they die with it. They died with this truth on the tip of their tongue. And when you find that in the generational work literally ninety nine percent of the time you can draw the thread connecting that death truth and the trauma of that deaths to what is manifesting in this time line in a clients day-to-day life or in their. You know mental health issues or their psychiatric symptoms that are an absolute direct reflection of the holding of that death truth and once you can clear and process that death trauma and the circumstances and and the context of how the death occurred in the context of the death truth once that is cleared and reprocessed and remembered and reconsolidated in the emotional memory systems of the person in this time. Line it can. It has the potential to shift completely the symptoms on the belief systems the addictions etc etc that are manifesting in the client in this time line as a result of holding this old death truth. It's all unconscious. There's i haven't run into anybody where there's a conscious connection to this between these things Before we do the work but it's significant so for instance. I'm just going to give you a really quick example. So and there's i mean there's lots of them. We we find death truths all the time when working generational but this is an easy one. So for instance You have someone who since the time they could talk or walk was absolutely obsessed with being in the military this. This is a person who did not grow up in a military family in fact grew up in a family of pacifists and for whatever reason literally from the time this person.

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

04:26 min | Last month

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"Down effect.

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

03:05 min | Last month

"schwarz" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"Wisdom for the arc of womanhood with me your host melanie swamp a big warm. Welcome lisa to the sacred wind. Podcast thank you. Thank you for having me. Flip an honor so today. We're gonna be talking about generational healing starters off. Can you describe to us. An less than what is meant by generational healing. What what does that include. What did it not include well. Generational healing is when we work across timelines across lineages in order to access and remember the traumas as well as the resources that have been forgotten in the maternal lineage. The putt ternal lineage the spiritual lineage and for people who are open or have a belief system that resonates with the past life experiences and we are able to transcend time and space in the way that the work is done so that the root the source the origin of symptoms addictions medical conditions relationship problems. you know kind of split from self split from source can be identified in accessed where it first began. What we experience here in. This timeline often has its roots sources and origins in one or more of these lineages and while we can work on it in the current timeline. The timeline that we live in oftentimes things won't completely clear. an end. person can't fully heal because the origin of where these patterns and templates and belief systems and trauma responses. These death truths where they started is in the lineages anywhere from one hundred years to thousands of years ago. And so. that's what we're looking to do. Obviously there isn't a at least for crm. We do not have a research base to statistically. Prove what we're doing. But there are a hundred therapists using crm to do generational work and anecdotally and consistently across those therapists. They're finding the same thing. Which is if you find the trauma in the lineages. The origin of the symptoms. That are showing up in this timeline. In you work on it back there in the ancestoral lineages and clear these original traumas that it does have a trickle..

melanie swamp lisa
Grubauer Signs Six-Year, $35.5 Million Contract With Kraken

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:18 sec | Last month

Grubauer Signs Six-Year, $35.5 Million Contract With Kraken

"Hit the free agent market and the expansion Seattle cracking quickly swooped in to sign him. Six years. 35 a half million dollar deal group, Our expected to share time with former Florida goalie Chris Triggered sports at 10 40 after the hour. Bill Schwarz Comeau News Over the years you've

Chris Triggered Seattle Bill Schwarz Florida
Looking Into Crisis Pregnancy Centers With Writer Maya Kroth

Stuff Mom Never Told You

02:37 min | 2 months ago

Looking Into Crisis Pregnancy Centers With Writer Maya Kroth

"Start with the basics. What are crisis. Pregnancy centers yeah crisis. Pregnancy centers are also sometimes called pregnancy resource centers. These are centers that are run by faith based groups That basically exist to talk women out of having an abortion from the outside. They might look like a traditional women's health clinic some of them even have innocuous names like the women's clinic But when you get in there you see a lot of christian literature in the lobby so these centers often masquerade is traditional women's health care clinics. But when you dig a little deeper you realize that's not what they are a lot of times. They open up right across the street from a planned. Parenthood although in states like georgia where there are so few abortion clinics They'll just open up anywhere that you might find women who might be considering an abortion college campuses that kind of thing I know that A while back on oliver did a piece of them and they kind of focused a little bit on the vans like they'll move around in vans and park outside. Oh yeah there's one that. I think parks out front of a church in hateful. Oh yeah. I tried to go and catch it. But it wasn't. It wasn't keeping regular hours. They're really regularly available in like a lot of suburban areas found. Because i as i worked in the facts and other worked with state government stuff and in the state of georgia. They kind of leaned towards faith based faith-based evidence base of resources and there are a lot almost per county i think and it's readily available as an access resource for most in age girls. Yeah they're definitely much more prevalent in georgia than planned parenthood for example or any other kind of traditional women's health clinic that provides abortion services. Yeah and that's a good segue into my next question. Which is do you have any numbers around this. Yeah there's actually one of the researchers. I interviewed for my piece. Is this woman named andreas schwarz andrew. Bird from the university of georgia. She's put together a map of crisis. Pregnancy centers across the united states in an effort to sort of help women identify. Is this a crisis pregnancy center or is this a traditional medical clinic where i'm gonna find sort of more unbiased medical information And the numbers that she came up with were somewhere around twenty five hundred crisis pregnancy centers in the united states and just for some perspective. That's about three times the number of abortion clinics in the country so they're outnumbering abortion clinics three to one in places like georgia. It's more like ten to

Georgia Oliver Andreas Schwarz Andrew University Of Georgia United States
What Is the Immigrant Paradox?

BrainStuff

06:31 min | 10 months ago

What Is the Immigrant Paradox?

"For over a century. America has been described as a melting pot in which immigrants from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds slowly simmered together melding into an all americans do but is that really the way it works or even how it should work is total assimilation. The only way to be an american and is it healthy for individuals to abandon their cultural heritage in whole or in part an order to adopt the customs of their new home. We spoke with sess schwartz a professor of public health sciences at the university of miami. Who that it's time to shelve the melting pot metaphor schwartz studies acculturation which is the process by which a person's cultural sense of self changes. As when you move to a new country or are raised an immigrant home and the effects of acculturation on physical and mental health it turns out that assimilation is only one type of acculturation and that fully simulated americans have some of the worst health outcomes. Immigrant families are actually most likely to thrive in america if they embrace aspects of both their native culture and their doctor land public health. Researchers like schwartz. Call it the immigrant paradox. He said there's a whole literature that suggests that foreign born americans are doing better than us. Born individuals on many different health indicators heart health weight and obesity diet depression anxiety substance. Use you name it. So what are the alternatives to assimilation. There's an old joke. That's well known in europe. What do you call a person who speaks two languages bilingual. What do you call person. Who only speaks one. Language american schwartz said in the united states unlike a lot of countries in the world. We actively discourage people from having multiple cultural identities we just want people to be american even the fact that we equate acculturation and simulation says a lot about our culture and how we think people should behave however it is important to note that acculturation is a two way. Street is cuban and tori behavior based on immigrants race or ethnicity by the receiving country can make it much harder for immigrants to achieve healthy by cultural integration traditionally. There's been an assumption that the acculturation process in the united states ran in a straight line at one end of the spectrum stood the recently arrived immigrant still carrying around the language traditions and customs of the so called old country but as the immigrant moved along the line over time did slowly discard their foreignness. As they gradually acquired language and customs of america but starting in the nineteen eighties researchers began to question the straight line assimilation assumption. Psychologist john berry came up with a pioneering model that showed four different responses or strategies including assimilation. The emigrants used to navigate life in their new home. So i got a simulation but that being that you're willing to discard your culture of origin and fully identify with the new culture. The sort of opposite is separation. Wherein you hold onto your original culture at all cost and don't want to adopt the new culture then there's marginalization in which you don't identify with either your heritage culture or the new one. It's a rare situation and finally there's integration sometimes called them you want to maintain a strong connection with your heritage culture while interacting with enquiring traits from the new culture according to schwarz there's strong evidence that the assimilation strategy is bad for your health. The worst psychological effects of assimilation are felt by second generation americans children of immigrants who were either born in america or raised here from a young age second generation. Kids are sometimes so eager to fit in that. They turn their backs on their parents. Customs and traditions entirely schwartz explained. They basically reject their families culture and that tends to produce pretty negative results higher rates of anxiety and depression substance abuse and worst family relationships. The best psychological and health outcomes on the other hand are achieved by individuals who embrace by cultural ism. A balanced integration of their heritage and received cultures short says that people who are able to comfortably blended their native and acquired cultures. Have quote much better outcomes. In terms of higher self-esteem lower depression lowering zaidi and better family relationships immigrants who learned to successfully habit to cultural worlds are the same people who drive the immigrant paradox in americans born outside the us achieve at significantly better physical and mental health outcomes compared to their native born or assimilated neighbors. But why is this diet is one simple explanation says schwartz because immigrant families are more likely to prepare home cooked meals than the typical american family which tends to eat out a lot and consume more processed foods but there are also significant psychological factors at play the most important has to do with the values of american culture versus just about everybody else. Schwartz said the. Us consistently ranks as the most individualistic country in the world. Were more self. Reliant and less reliant on other people in basically any other country on the planet so most people who come here from other places are more collectivist than we are. Let's break that down. What does collectivism look like. As a cultural value it stresses the importance of family above all else. It places an emphasis on the greater good and doing what's best for the community. Not just yourself and it's a less competitive way to look at the world. Schwartz says that cultural values the promote close knit families and selfless service can protect against a lot of the mental health issues. That plague many americans. He said there's a reason why we have so much anxiety. Because we're so highly individualistic and competitive. We have to compete against other people for everything. And if you can't keep up there's less of a support system ready and waiting to help you in this country when we talk about helping other people. Some people want to shout socialism. I think that's one of the issues that we have.

Schwartz United States Sess Schwartz Depression Anxiety Substance University Of Miami John Berry Depression Substance Abuse Obesity Schwarz Europe Zaidi Depression
Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

AdExchanger Talks

05:28 min | 11 months ago

Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

"Our Hawaiian is chief strategy officer and CO founder triple lift. An eight year old programmatic advertising technology company triple lift has developed at products that have a closer match to the look feel and voice. But. Wide Range of media types and environments sounds like native. That's what they do They also support video in ot advertising and have other initiatives as well. Excited to have Arianna talk about some of that I reached out to our because I think he has a unique. Perspective on. Programmatic advertising at the current state of digital advertising overall that sometimes runs against the the larger narrative which is, which can be a negative narrative at times. So I'm looking forward to chatting him with him about that as well. Ari Welcome. Thank you so much act I'm delighted and honored to be here. Great to have you here Let's have a minute on you I. You got into start up stuff like right out of college. Is that right? Yeah. Even actually in college I. Ran My first startup analysis seventeen years old where I was really fortunate to be at a school that took entrepreneurship really seriously in fact, I I majored in entrepreneurship which is hard to believe as even a thing. And there were local businesses on my campus. I was able to as able to buy one into one of them. That did local shipping and storage, and so I got sort of taste in above that is still with me to this day building businesses from the ground up and just trying to make customer super happy. And we're your parents entrepreneurs have how did you get this bug? Yeah. So my parents are also entrepreneurs preneurs They started something on the order a dozen different companies. Many of them, not successful. And so I got to sort of see that growing up what I think is really important. It's like being around that failure from a young age and not having any stigma towards it was really impactful for me because. It shows that it's okay. As long as You keep trying my parents certainly keep trying in in some of them. Worked out okay and so I was fortunate to be in the sort of like environment where starting businesses was normal and expected in my parents very much supported me even at very young age when I tell them, this is what I want to do with my life I want to be an entrepreneur. And did they. Actively, encourage you was a kind of A. Son You're going to be startup founder. Yeah. It wasn't like you know. Jewish boy, and so the first inclination was to be neurosurgeon button when I got a D. on my first bio exam I think entrepreneurship became the clear path and it's funny because I was just going through things of my childhood from home and apparently when I was four years old, we went to FAO Schwarz he'll toy store and they printed. Out A car said Arlo an entrepreneur and so I think clearly there was there was maybe some program going on from a young age that that this was a path that they would like to see me go down and I've been very fortunate to be able to do it. I think it's like one of the most wonderful things that's happened because Entrepreneurship for many isn't considered a path at all like when you go to college or when you're young that isn't a thing that you think about you often think about professions that have a very clear path. And Entrepreneurship is not a clear path. So I would I try and do now in my clinical free time is I'm help other spying entrepreneurs. With their path towards entrepreneurship because I think, it's one of the most wonderful fans. That's Kinda funny. Hey honey sign's kind of a poor student. Push them towards the Internet. Yeah. That's where he belongs. No, that's great and Tacos through these couple of jobs you had before founding triple, you were head of business, development, oyster dot, com what was that all about? So Dot Com was a hotel review site that was subsequently acquired by trip advisor and a really beautiful idea which is people spend a lot of money on vacations and the worst thing that can happen is you get there and the hotel is not what you expected or paid for. And so the idea was to send a undercover reporters to full real expose on what the hotel is actually like with real unadulterated unedited photos and Iran monetization there. So this was a really crazy experience where they were publisher and I was twenty years old. They brought me on to make money from ads and I didn't know anything about online advertising. I just graduated college. And it was still the middle of the recession. and. So what I what I did is basically called up at that time it was ad networks. And I asked to speak with the product folks and I would just pepper them with hours of questions about how their technology worked, how the relationships of publishers and advertisers work. Essentially, I was able to learn from them how the industry worked at that time. There wasn't the wealth of knowledge of the sort of add exchanger dot com, a publications that we have today, and so one of the only way to learn about it was from other people and I was able to learn basically from the partnerships in vendors use are the publisher side and so. I started on the publisher cited from there I went to APP nexus. which became clear because when I was at one of the things I was doing all the time was you know in my lunch breaks I would log into DSP and start changing the line nine of prioritization across the different campaigns and ad networks I was working with. So I, was looking at who is paying me the that day and I would tweak the waterfall

Publisher Advertising Technology Dot Com Arianna Chief Strategy Officer Co Founder Fao Schwarz Founder Arlo Iran Advisor
NASCAR Cup Playoff At Texas Still On Hold Because Of Rain in Dallas

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:13 sec | 11 months ago

NASCAR Cup Playoff At Texas Still On Hold Because Of Rain in Dallas

"Round of eight Cup playoff race at Texas Motor Speedway. They will try to hit the green light again tomorrow. Sports a 10 and 40. After the hour, Bill Schwarz come o new coming up traffic and weather on Comeau and then a closer

Texas Motor Speedway Bill Schwarz Comeau
"schwarz" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

The Knife Junkie Podcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"schwarz" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

"Message, seven, two, four, four, six, six, four, four, eight, seven, or email Bob Bob the knife junkie dot com. Give us any thoughts feedback on this interview. Interview the podcast etcetera, and if you would like to help,.

"schwarz" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"schwarz" Discussed on KOMO

"Bill Schwarz, Come on in. Come on news time. 1 11 I'm Jeff Pooja here in the middle of 20 minutes of nonstop news in Israel. Covert 19 appears to have Somewhat a corruption indictment and three elections could not turn public opinion against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. It's been more than a decade since we've seen thousands and thousands of young Israelis protest here in the streets of Jerusalem, denouncing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his government. These protests growing by the day Israelis outraged by Netanyahu's corruption indictment, joining forces with those who say he's financially abandoned them in the wake of covert 19 the vibe. Silence Also growing, some police assaulted protesters and journalists with no provocation. Some protesters attacked police. Nearly three dozen were arrested. Giordano Miller ABC NEWS Jerusalem A big reward for big time hackers. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski tells us why the U. S. Is looking for two Ukrainian nationals are Tim Rodchenko and Alexander Arian co hacked into Edgar, the Securities and Exchange Commission system that companies use to make public filings. The U. S Secret Service and the State Department offered a $2 million reward for information that leads to the two Ukrainian nationals who are accused of stealing thousands of filings containing confidential business information. That they've been sold on the black market. This is the first time the Secret Service has offered money to the global public for help catching fugitives charged with manipulating the financial system. Aaron Carter SKI ABC NEWS NEW YORK, Meanwhile, Ukraine's president is being credited with resolving a hostage situation in an unusual way It started when a man with guns and explosives took 13 people hostage on a bus Tuesday evening in the city of Looks. The effort to defuse the situation went all the way to President Vladimir Zelinsky, who spoke to the suspect by phone. The president agreed to the hostage takers demand to post a social media message about a 2005 animal rights film called Earthlings Narrated by walking Phoenix. Zelinsky did so, posting a six second message on Facebook. The hostage drama eventually came to an end. That's Bill's him for reporting. Ah US Armed service looks North Louie Martinez reports from Washington. The Air Force's unveiled a new comprehensive strategy focusing on its operations in the Arctic. This is the region experiences, warming temperatures and interesting available natural resource is from Russia and China. A new strategy focuses on vigilance in the region, projecting power. They're working with allies and preparing for Arctic operations. Why's the airforce craft of this new strategy now? Before Secretary Barbara Barrett said. It's because of Russia's presence in the Arctic and the need to update infrastructure that dates back to the Cold War. General John remain the head of the space force, said the Arctic is helpful to his service because it offers a great location to control American satellites in polar orbits. Martinez ABC NEWS Washington.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netany President Vladimir Zelinsky U. S Secret Service Aaron Carter Israel Arctic Jerusalem president Bill Schwarz Louie Martinez ABC Russia Secretary Barbara Barrett Jeff Pooja Air Force Giordano Miller Securities and Exchange Commis Facebook NEW YORK
Kansas City Chiefs, Pro Bowler Chris Jones agree to four-year extension ahead of franchise-tag deadline

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Kansas City Chiefs, Pro Bowler Chris Jones agree to four-year extension ahead of franchise-tag deadline

"Kansas City Chiefs have reached a four year contract with defensive tackle Chris Jones worth an estimated $80 million. Casey had just extended quarterback Patrick Mahomes, 10 years at 500 million. Sports updates a 10 and 40 after the hour Bill Schwarz come own is

Kansas City Chiefs Bill Schwarz Chris Jones Patrick Mahomes Casey
Dallas - Texas Dog Confirmed To Be Infected With  Virus That Causes COVID-19

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas - Texas Dog Confirmed To Be Infected With Virus That Causes COVID-19

"Nor Texas Dog has tested positive for Cove. In 19 The Texas Animal Health Commission announced in a statement that the Fort Worth area dog was confirmed to have the virus that causes Cove in 19 A dog was tested by a private vet as a precaution after its owners were confirmed to have Cove in 19. State veterinarian Dr Andy Schwarz says there is no known evidence that pets can transmit the virus, but they can catch it. His advice is that pets be restricted from contact with persons with the Corona

Cove Texas Dog Texas Animal Health Commission Dr Andy Schwarz Fort Worth
Court orders defiant Michigan barber to close his shop

Frank Beckmann

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Court orders defiant Michigan barber to close his shop

"The Michigan court of appeals ordered the trial court today to issue a preliminary injunction against the barber seventy seven year old girl Mankey from Wausau he has been ordered to quote immediately cease all operations that's from the Michigan court of appeals the the child was he cut a judge Matthew Stewart refused issue that preliminary injunction because he said there's no threat here from my missed making who does you know he's got the mask on what he's doing is hair cutting as he's done for sixty years and basically they've they've shut down his business from Lansing the the governor and her her friend the Attorney General the the cold fury at a rate the Michigan department of health and Human Services appealed the case welcome to appeal the case I mean really you think the Carl Mann ki is is leading to sub spread of the virus here is that what you're saying they appealed the case to a three judge panel of the court of appeals will guess what they just issued a ruling and the ruled two to one reversing the trial court in other words are going against Mister Mackey the majority opinion was signed where there's more just wait the majority opinion was signed by judge Stephen Morello you know who judge Stephen Burrell I was I'm I'm guessing you don't he is he's a man who was the former chair of the Saginaw county Democrat park a former chair of the Democratic Party and he was the judge who issued the the lead the majority opinion wrote that the administration's executive power easily encompasses the closing of the fed ex barber shop those once the governor declared a public health emergency the legislature determined that it was up to the department to issue orders protecting the public health majority opinion said accordingly in order to challenge the exercise of that authority apparently he had to present evidence that appellant overstepped the statutory boundaries Appel E. failed to present any evidence to rebut the department's conclusion that operation the shop posed a serious public health danger what about what about the fact that he did supposedly a danger in the first place have you taken the other point of view that he didn't prove that he's not posing a danger well we shouldn't approve me that he's posing a danger I'm just asking but you get a couple grand home appointees on this court they join together and go to the one the the other judges Brock Schwarz or Schwarz celeb sorry an appointee of Rick Snyder he wrote his own opinion Thursday and he concurred with Perot in part and dissented in part but Parolo again the former democratic county party chair in Saginaw voted along with his fellow Grandhomme appointee A. B. rogaine Krause and they teamed up and and shut down the ship the barber once again you believe it I mean you're spending all this time in court and using money to shut down a barber but there's never been any any evidence whatsoever that the man has posed a health threat to anyone will flock to his store he said the you know the problem is he's had the support of some groups that the governor wants to label as violent militia groups are gonna shoot everybody that's which he and the Attorney General or try to tell us anybody really good condition they they've knoll no concept of what the second amendment stands for I'm just I'm

Wausau Michigan Court Of Appeals
Have More Video Conversations - Reuben Swartz

Daily Sales Tips

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Have More Video Conversations - Reuben Swartz

"I Reuben Schwarz founder of member in the serum for people who ate selling and host and chief nursing on the sales for nerds. Podcast here to talk to you about having more conversations and specifically having more video conversations email social media texting all this stuff. It's kind of like the fast food of human interaction. It's fast it's cheap it's convenient but it's really not very nourishing and it's one thing if we use those tools to set up real conversations. It's another thing if we consider them replacements for actual conversation so both from a business perspective pipeline perspective and just from a human psychology perspective. We need to be having conversations with people. That's what we do. That's how we exist. It's one thing in quote Unquote Normal Times. Maybe we do a bunch e mailing and texting and then we get together with people now. That corona is forcing us to socially distance ourselves from folks. We want to use technology to overcome that so by all means pick up the phone a phone call is exponentially more interesting communicates exponentially more information than e mail a taxed some kind of interaction on social media. But what I really encourage you to do is video. Call people whether it's through zoom or skype or facetime or whatever. Actually seeing people is important especially when we're Kinda shut in right now and I'm actually going so far as to force myself to record this as a video which Scott always likes people to do. But I don't WanNa do that because I don't want to see myself on video right just like everybody else but it's really what we need to be doing because we're supposed to be seeing people not just talking to them one thing to have the phone call when we can also see them at some other time or we just got out of a meeting with them we call him back the next day but if we're not seeing people for weeks or months that's going to cause a bunch of problems. Psychologically were supposed to see people we care about and also from a perspective. It's a lot harder to build trust without actually seeing people. So there's a million tutorials out there on how to set up your office for video calling. I'm not gonNA reiterate that if you need a quick very amateurish one you can go to memory dot com and see a video that I posted about my setup but you can tell it's not the worse set up in the world but it's certainly not professional level but the point is it's good enough to interact with people and it's good enough that I shouldn't stop interacting with people while I try to get the setup to be fancier now the next thing is we just WanNa have a lot of conversations. That's what we should be doing. And if you're a sales person who has fifty conversations day already make sure you keep that up. Tried to do it over video. If you're the kind of person like I was who would have a couple of conversations today think that was a lot. It can actually be so much easier than you think. If you have just a handful of conversations each one has a lot of pressure to make it harder awkward or etc and that reinforces itself in a vicious cycle. If you have a lot of conversations it takes all the pressure off each one. Yes we want to be professional. We WanNA show up. We want to close the deals that we need to close. We want to help the clients that we need to help but sometimes calls are going to go wrong. Sometimes they're going to get rescheduled sometimes deals go south in ways that we don't control no matter what if we have a healthy pipeline not just of quote unquote deals but of conversations? That stuff will will play out and it will be fine. We don't have a lot of pressure we don't have to act like we're trying to avoid getting a set of steak knives or getting fired. We're just there to help folks especially now block off time in your calendar to be calling people if you've got prescheduled calls obviously that's great but otherwise just go through the people that you want to talk to and of course that's prospects clients partners those urgent calls and hopefully we're making those but I know from my own experience from packing a lot of other people. Sometimes those things fall off the plate to and then it's also the interesting people that we want to talk to especially now right. Parents COUSINS FRIENDS SPOUSES. Who are stuck somewhere else. Have those conversations and if possible have him over video? Make sure also that you're talking to the interesting people that you like talking to that give you energy and business will come from. This may not come from this call or that call but over time. Business will come in a way that lets you relax and just focus on having an interaction. Human interaction with people as opposed to got close close. I've got a close now. The one thing I do want to mention about video people tend to know you know. Keep your eye level and try to look at the light and so on but tip from Vanessa van Edwards on sales for nerds. She's brilliant by the way. Check her out. Try to make it more like a face to face interaction where you can see. Someone's hands especially in sales hands are all about trust. We are programmed as humans to be a little suspicious when we can't see someone else's hands and if you're doing this and try to have a conversation that's not how we have conversations. We have conversations actually further back but we should at least be able to see what someone's doing with their hands that's going to help with trust render sleep and if you do get in a situation where you're doing a video call and then you share documents and screens and so on. Make sure that you don't just close the meeting down after that. Go back to the face to face video though same way you would if you were huddling over documents in person before you wrap up. And as the enforcer said only connect this is the best tool. We've got right now. Don't be scared of the video. Make time to actually connect with folks over video.

Reuben Schwarz Founder Corona Scott Vanessa Van Edwards
"schwarz" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"To you by the Schwarz laser eye center did you always get a waking correct distance reading an astigmatism schedule your free lacie valuation with the experts in short plays right center visit team I dot dot com that's team I doc dot com deterred engage your edits our high today one hundred thirteen that is the the excessive heat warning it starts at eleven o'clock today and tomorrow so I have one fourteen ensures that it will continue through tomorrow as well fact that doesn't expire till eight PM tomorrow clear skies tonight with an overnight low of eighty five degrees your weather is brought to you by a Howard air whether replace repair coal powered air take a look at your money from the K. T. A. R. business center the flame is going out in an iconic Scott still restaurant after twenty two years serving up fondue the melting pot near Hayden in via Dave interest says it's closing its doors for good on September thirtieth restaurant was unable to reach a mutually beneficial lease agreement with the landlord however they do say they are interested in opening up re opening I should say a third location here in the valley that is I like that place even though I'm I'm lactose intolerant nothing like melted cheese and just dipping everything in the house yeah right now is down sixty eight to the S. and P. five hundred down thirteen the nasdaq down twenty five for more money news visit the business center at K. T. A. R. R. dot com and coming up next voice some some bad news for Martha make Sally but is it good news for mark Kelly the presumed opponent you'll have next year in the race to maybe change the make up of the entire U. S. Senate that's next on Arizona's morning news the.

K. T. A. R. business center Scott Martha Sally Senate Arizona Schwarz Howard Dave K. T. A. R. mark Kelly eighty five degrees twenty two years
"schwarz" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on Overdue

"Beats when necessary. Plus these are books you should have read by now. Doc who's there? Oh, so is Andrew their first pace one path that. Hey. I have a podcast I love to tell you about do you haven't sire now. I'm sorry, we don't eat any, but it's like do you know what, how cast it? Imagine aimed or closing noise in your Bonk, you've got mail. Gregg, welcome to overdo. It's a podcast about the books, you've been meaning to read my name's Andrew and that skit felt thirty. Yeah. I've been I've been knocking law doors lately. We had a local election here in Philadelphia. I got involved like you do. We're gonna talk about drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz and just a little bit. I had someone come and was thankful to talk to me about politics because I was not trying to sell them power or cable the other day, man. There's so many people who come to my house is trying to sell me cable power power cable. It's most mostly power. It's always. And as with many customer service interactions, you just have to find like this secret phrase that gets them to go away and mine, Severi firmly say the power company that we already use, and that were happy and goodbye. So little life from me to you thing. I was thinking about talking about is I was at a wedding good. Okay. I'm done. There were bartenders there for an hour, and then I turned around and the bartenders were gone, and people were just serving themselves streaks. They only had to have the bartenders there for the first hour. So all of a sudden all the cups got big and all the drinks got bad. We're you tipping each other. No, there was no tipping. Only destruction. If you'd had any of these drinks, you would not tit for him. You know, who was respond? No one was responsible just muscle boys. Trunk muscle boys at this wedding, serving everybody very strong drinks. So we both had eventful weekends. Yeah. You know. And we're, we're coming up on another eventful weekend. So we're recording this in the middle week feels kind of weird, but we're gonna get through it together, you know not not. He's there can use your phone. What happened to you? My car is stolen. It's really what I learned when I was learning how to canvas was to speak in terrifyingly, helping sentences. It really leaves room for the other person to talk. But it stops them from getting anything like out and across to you, so it's really good. It's a good way to meet your neighbors. I highly recommend it. Yeah. Untilring improv. Yeah. It's true. So we talk about a book every week. One of us reads it tells the other person about it was you read, I read drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz. It was a patriotic recommendation for us by Jennifer. Thank you, Jennifer, you can go to patriot dot com slash.

Christina Schwarz Andrew Severi Ruth Jennifer Gregg Philadelphia
"schwarz" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"Let me stand on their piano. Okay. But bought that Pano from FAO Schwarz godson for. To hard. I was like toil. Always wanted since hours little, and obviously we couldn't afford it. 'cause it was FAO Schwarz. Like my mom's you could play with it in the store. So when are the money to be able to buy our body from our godson, and of course, on best friend hated me for it. He is. Family. Beautiful. Awesome. Right. It isn't new interpretation of it. Which is pretty good. Right. Yeah. So it's a new ideas inspired so mice to the original. And it's his own thing. I do believe that they are such thing as a regional thought. Sometimes I think about the sometimes I think about the quote, and I think in a spiritual sense. Maybe there's no original thought because there's like a pool I think of like a pool of information that's being channeled. So maybe in that sense. Like everything comes from God, you know, you start getting hippie dippy. Like, it's not originally yours. It's a collective thought. And it's just a matter of who scoops it I in a way, but then we think of it in a human lens like how could you say? There is no original thought when you have someone like Steve Jobs who came up with the frigging iphone and the ipod, and laptops, you know, like all the technological advances. I mean, there are a lot of gurus even going the spiritual side Yonaha feel about Osho's Matic as he is. I've read listen to tons of podcast try to gain understanding like where did he get these thoughts? From was he studying under someone a tutor or a mental or maybe the other Gu's above him now older that he that kinda helped formulate his thoughts. Yeah. Like he has to have oh gee regional guru. Really? But. They might take you. But you know, I got curious because I think that is the part of this conversation that interest me the most when you see the people that have influenced you ever wonder who influence them? Like think try to trace that. Because that's something. I've always done try to trace like I'm trying to think of like prints, for example. Right. He's someone that. I always was like, wow, it a supernova. There was no one that looked like him knowing that dress. I came his little butt sheets coming out the back of the pants or the chaps that whatever his heels and how he was in drowsiness and the the songs being like, funk and soul. Iraq in punk in just a mixture of everything. But then you think of people before him like James Brown, and you can see elements James Brown in him. You can see what's his name to the the high heel shoe legit. What's his name the funk do that be Howard's? Clint George Clinton. I see George Clinton, you know. And all so is that something that you do where you try to research your favorites? And who influenced them before them into custody? Six nine even though he'll a lot of people money. He oh, George Clinton some money right now them color journalism braids shit. Yeah. That we he stole from George Clinton pay him his money. Thank you. Go ahead. Feel like Mr. Ponto like when you hear these new artists come out, and nobody really says like who the influences are anymore like every now and then you'll get somebody. So true. I feel like it used to be exciting. 'cause you used to see an artist here and artists like Levin artists and think it was cool when they were finally tell you like, oh, you know, the inspiration from here and there and you're like, oh, yeah. And then it puts you in closer to like who you wanna see them work with or people that you would like to watch them like give a pale minds to one day stuff like that. Well, I think people and obviously against week for everyone. But I've noticed that people are afraid to admit that they've been influenced by other people because they feel that it's going to take away from how the viewed or how their work is perceived not get especially when you have these copyright conversations. You might feel a little bit anxious admitting like what you took from this or extracted from that. But honestly, I always find a really impressive..

Clint George Clinton FAO Schwarz Pano James Brown Steve Jobs Yonaha Levin Iraq Mr. Ponto Matic Howard one day
"schwarz" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Business wars daily is brought to you by the podcast the growth show each week. They explore inspiring stories that get to the heart of how people grow a business an idea or movement. Stay tuned at the end of this episode here a little more about this fascinating new show. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on Thursday, December sixth. Oh, the nostalgia. The toy store to end all toy stores. FAO Schwarz is back after closing its flagship New York store suddenly three years ago due to rising rents its owners have opened up a new flagship store in New York City at Rockefeller Center, and for some it's as if Santa Claus himself has shown up in the flesh walk into the Manhattan shop and you'll see the famous piano on the floor the same one that Tom Hanks danced on in the movie big. And of course, FAO's famous toy soldiers everywhere when it comes to business. The return of FAO Schwarz is both smart and predictable since this holiday season. There's a billion dollar gap in the toy market following the toys, R us, bankruptcy, and who wouldn't wanna fill that. But says the New York Times, this is not your childhoods FAO Schwarz. It's private equity owners are mostly opening. Small pop up stores within other retailers. That's the same strategy Jeffries toy box, the reincarnated toys R us is using popping up small shops. In supermarkets the point is to avoid expensive real estate leases and bringing in too much inventory as FAO had done before. Some critics though are calling the reincarnated company a shell of its former self and some toy manufacturers are angry FAO wants the toy makers to put their products on store shelves, but the company will only pay vendors for the toys that actually sell rather than buying inventory outright from vendors to toymakers. It looks like FAO wants the prophets, but none of the risk and some are refusing to participate the variety of inventory could pale compared to the old days. This new retailer won't be the wildly imaginative candy store of a toy company that fan. Came to expect still FAO's owners aren't without an appreciation for the wonder. Enjoy the old toy store inspired. And they claim they want employees to bring a sense of theater to their jobs applicants for jobs ranging from cashier to technologist had to audition at an Upper West side theater. Here's hoping the winners will bring some of the old magic back to the new FAO Schwarz. Brome wondering this business daily? We hope you're having a fun filled week. We are, but it'll be a whole lot more fun when we know more about you, please. Visit one dot com slash survey and answer a few questions widget. Thanks. I'm David Brown. See you tomorrow. You know, it's never been easier to start a business, but it's never been harder to grow that business. I want to tell you about a great new podcast called the growth show, which is created by hub spot. They make free and paid tools that help you grow your business each week on the growth show. They explored the inspiring stories behind how people grow a business an idea or a movement. You'll learn about the challenges entrepreneur space in starting a company and you'll hear about some of the most interesting topics in business like social media marketing, the future of bots and the rise of subscription services. They also have some amazing guests on their show like Allie Weiss of glossier and Joe dessino creator of Spartan race, the growth show is chock full of great stories. Amazing guests and helpful advice. Subscribe to the growth show today on tunein Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you listen.

FAO Schwarz FAO New York City New York Times David Brown Spotify Rockefeller Center Tom Hanks Jeffries Upper West Manhattan Allie Weiss Brome Joe dessino glossier billion dollar
A Toy Story: FAO Schwarz Returns

Business Wars Daily

04:26 min | 3 years ago

A Toy Story: FAO Schwarz Returns

"Business wars daily is brought to you by the podcast the growth show each week. They explore inspiring stories that get to the heart of how people grow a business an idea or movement. Stay tuned at the end of this episode here a little more about this fascinating new show. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on Thursday, December sixth. Oh, the nostalgia. The toy store to end all toy stores. FAO Schwarz is back after closing its flagship New York store suddenly three years ago due to rising rents its owners have opened up a new flagship store in New York City at Rockefeller Center, and for some it's as if Santa Claus himself has shown up in the flesh walk into the Manhattan shop and you'll see the famous piano on the floor the same one that Tom Hanks danced on in the movie big. And of course, FAO's famous toy soldiers everywhere when it comes to business. The return of FAO Schwarz is both smart and predictable since this holiday season. There's a billion dollar gap in the toy market following the toys, R us, bankruptcy, and who wouldn't wanna fill that. But says the New York Times, this is not your childhoods FAO Schwarz. It's private equity owners are mostly opening. Small pop up stores within other retailers. That's the same strategy Jeffries toy box, the reincarnated toys R us is using popping up small shops. In supermarkets the point is to avoid expensive real estate leases and bringing in too much inventory as FAO had done before. Some critics though are calling the reincarnated company a shell of its former self and some toy manufacturers are angry FAO wants the toy makers to put their products on store shelves, but the company will only pay vendors for the toys that actually sell rather than buying inventory outright from vendors to toymakers. It looks like FAO wants the prophets, but none of the risk and some are refusing to participate the variety of inventory could pale compared to the old days. This new retailer won't be the wildly imaginative candy store of a toy company that fan. Came to expect still FAO's owners aren't without an appreciation for the wonder. Enjoy the old toy store inspired. And they claim they want employees to bring a sense of theater to their jobs applicants for jobs ranging from cashier to technologist had to audition at an Upper West side theater. Here's hoping the winners will bring some of the old magic back to the new FAO Schwarz. Brome wondering this business daily? We hope you're having a fun filled week. We are, but it'll be a whole lot more fun when we know more about you, please. Visit one dot com slash survey and answer a few questions widget. Thanks. I'm David Brown. See you tomorrow. You know, it's never been easier to start a business, but it's never been harder to grow that business. I want to tell you about a great new podcast called the growth show, which is created by hub spot. They make free and paid tools that help you grow your business each week on the growth show. They explored the inspiring stories behind how people grow a business an idea or a movement. You'll learn about the challenges entrepreneur space in starting a company and you'll hear about some of the most interesting topics in business like social media marketing, the future of bots and the rise of subscription services. They also have some amazing guests on their show like Allie Weiss of glossier and Joe dessino creator of Spartan race, the growth show is chock full of great stories. Amazing guests and helpful advice. Subscribe to the growth show today on tunein Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you listen.

Fao Schwarz FAO New York City New York Times David Brown Spotify Rockefeller Center Tom Hanks Jeffries Upper West Manhattan Allie Weiss Brome Joe Dessino Glossier Billion Dollar
FAO Schwarz, Manhattan And New York discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:18 sec | 3 years ago

FAO Schwarz, Manhattan And New York discussed on WBZ Midday News

"Some bankrupt retailers. Go away, even fewer return FAO Schwarz closed. Its Boston store fifteen years ago in this iconic Manhattan store three years ago, but the toy store reopened in New York today, complete with the dance on piano and clock tower. That were familiar sights in the old

Fao Schwarz Manhattan New York Boston Fifteen Years Three Years
FAO Schwarz, iconic toy store, opening anew in Manhattan

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

FAO Schwarz, iconic toy store, opening anew in Manhattan

"That race three years ago. FAO Schwarz closed its iconic toy store on New York's Fifth Avenue now the store is back in a different location Rockefeller Center. The stores still has many of the extravagant playthings that made it legend, including the huge keyboard. Tom Hanks danced on in the nineteen Eighty-eight movie big. And while the stores still has some big ticket items such as a child size Mercedes-Benz for twenty four. Four thousand dollars. FAO Schwarz also says it has items as low as ten dollars like what a key

Fao Schwarz Tom Hanks Rockefeller Center New York Four Thousand Dollars Ten Dollars Three Years
"schwarz" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"But if we imagine our ancient ancestors who relied on the sun, I certain amount of time per day, and they expected it and it was and then they expected the moon to be doing certain thing. And then suddenly it was dark in the middle of the day. It was like really scary. So for a long time, a clips is we're actually like kind of doomsday by energy to them. And it was only in the twentieth century that we were able to disconnect that apocalyptic feel. How did you get into this work? Have you always been like drawn to like space, and those you know, like I feel like the astrological world and just being curious about that. Or did you have kind of a a moment in time that really like pulled you to this work. So, you know, it's kind of a chicken and egg situation when I was born my uncle who was an amazing astrologer who you know, as a passion project. He was a lawyer in his day job. He helped related chart for me by hand and send it to my mom and prophesized on all of these things that I was going to do including have an interest in astrology. However, he himself was an astrologer. So obviously, he's like, oh, she's going to be one of my, but he passed away when I was three. So I never had a chance to talk to him directly about what he saw. And what he was thinking. But when astrology came back into my life and twenty thirteen when I started an astrology dating at. It was almost like a no brainer in such a strange way. Whereas like, I guess this is kind of quirky. But it just feels so natural to me. And at that time is when I also started to understand the complexities of my own chart more knowing and growing up as Leo sun, which yeah, I'm the goal, and I like to be on stage, and I enjoy attention bubble, blah. But like is just a factor and a small component of the well of emotions that I feel inside. And it definitely didn't explain why I'm crying all the time why I'm so sensitive and then when I found out I was a Pisces moon. It just made so much sense that oh shit. Yeah. We're out pudding one thing. But our internal experience could be completely totally different. And that was ultimately what drew me in? And then hooked me on it. Yeah. The moon sign has been like really interesting to dig into it explains. A lot because like, you know, if you're into astrology even just a little bit, and you know, your son sign you're like well. Yeah, I am organized and kind of anal and driven and whatever. And then like such a big part of me was like, no, I'm not not really Burgo. Why guy you know, what? I mean. Like, I like to make people think I'm Virgo like like, those qualities, but the moon sign really like spoke to me and gave me a lot of comfort and permission to kind of like be myself, and that way, and like kind of love not the flaws, but just things that like weren't quite like aligning with my quote, unquote, sun sign, you know. Yeah. I mean, I think that that's the experience that I have personally had in a lot of my clients have and my peers in astrology is when astrology grants you permission. You know, it allows you to see that we are very complex beings with lots. And lots of things going on simultaneously. Not one thing is making the other invalid, right? All of them are working harmoniously together to create the beautiful essence and individuality of all of us. And I like to think of it sort of as those gears in the old FAO Schwarz Schwarz clock where they're all like moving at their own rhythm. But they're all part of this same mechanism, right? And that's how our planets in our charts or working together, and how the planets in the sky or helping eliminate things at different times. And so what was also going onto wasn't was mercury retrograde or margins. Retrograde is still retrograde as three retro graders at six six retrograde retrograde mean so retrograde is actually an optical illusion. It means going backwards planets don't actually go backwards, but it's it's an optical illusion. As if when you are driving on the freeway, and you're going at. At the same speed as a car, but it looks like the car is going backwards..

Retrograde FAO Schwarz Schwarz
"schwarz" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Center Christmas tree stands. So this is about as prime New York location as you can imagine. It will be an advertisement from the brand. And you know, as shoppers or Instagram ING their way through the store, I think they're hoping that that will create buzz. For the rest of FAO will. Now they're building a store in China. There are going to be doing pop ups and various things in stores in New York and around the country, and they probably will open other retail locations around the world. So I think this is basically an effort to recreate the FAO brand and have people think of FAO a certain way. And then probably then think about it as a place they will go to their shopping needs. I think an interesting question here is, is still a very high end toy store. So it was not, you know, toys r. us was a mass market toy store. FAO was high end. I don't know. You know, with all the buzz, they create, you know, we'll shoppers be going FAO as much in the way that they did to toys r. us when Toya's or us was a mass market store. I don't know if people will go to FAO, you know, given that a lot of their purchases, that would be hundred dollars up by it's hard to say how that will play out. But I think that what they're using his doing, taking the New York store, making it sort of about a brand position and using that to leverage. How they grow their business throughout the world that's Wall Street Journal reporter, Charles Passey, joining us in our studio to talk about the relaunch of FAO Schwarz, Charles. Thanks so much for joining us a pleasure. And that's what's news I'm Ameri for totally in New York for the Wall Street Journal. Enjoy the what's news podcast. Then try the what's news newsletter, sign up at WSJ dot com. Slash newsletters that's WSJ dot com. Slash newsletters..

FAO New York Wall Street Journal FAO Schwarz China Toya Charles Passey reporter hundred dollars
"schwarz" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"All right we're back so robert take us into the mind of carl schwarz shield all right so karl schwarz sealed was a german physicist dennis strana mer he lived only eighteen seventy three through nineteen sixteen now he died in the war yeah now he he and i should say that should put that he did he died of illness but he did still very much die during the the the first for world war and he calculated the possibility of an einsteinian darkstar he did this while he was in the in the service i believe yeah yeah often it's described as being in the trenches i think oh is that real well we like the the roam the room it's a romantic idea right the idea that we have someone that's in a literal pit and they're in a it's a time in in world history that is that feels like a pit a time of total war encompassing the earth and it seeming like we not we might be able to climb back out of it and here this this gentleman is contemplating the black hole yes world war one is changing the social fabric of europe and much of the world e schwartz shield here is changing the fabric of space time yeah and as he schwartz shorts field was a very impressive dude though he was again he only lived to be forty two years of age but during his short life he made practical in theoretical contributions to astronomy and he used a general relativity equations to demonstrate celestial bodies within enough mass would have an escape velocity beyond the speed of light i should also point out that again even though he died at the age of forty two he had his first theoretical physics paper published at the age of sixteen yeah he you get the impression that like your when you read about him you're sort of in the presence of one of those rain yeah so yeah he he was experimenting with different types of geometry for understanding the behavior of massive objects like stars and part of what he.

karl schwarz robert carl schwarz physicist dennis strana europe forty two years
Cleveland Cavaliers PG George Hill back in for Game 7 against Indiana Pacers

The Jim Rome Show M

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Cleveland Cavaliers PG George Hill back in for Game 7 against Indiana Pacers

"Flay eater schwarz there's nothing like a game seven sports we have that today in the nba playoffs they cavaliers set to host the pacers calf's head coach tyron lou trying to keep his defending eastern conference champs motivated just make sure everybody's lose today the one thing about the negativity i mean we played the season now to have home court we've got game seven on our home floor are great fans so i'm very excited i think the guys are up for the challenge and it was one game last night was a bad game for us but still you one gang and we got game seven and nine home floor cavs guard george hill returns today after missing three games with back spasms.

Schwarz Tyron Lou Cavs NBA Pacers George Hill
"schwarz" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on The Young Turks

"They are never should have been a special counsel appointed because there was no probable cause for believing that there was any crime collusion or otherwise or obstruction of justice so stated by harvard law professor alan dershowitz okay now he's dershowitz didn't write it like that they're schwarz's now a total rightwing zealot especially on the issue of foreign policy so he's like oh yeah harvard law professor is on my side oh okay you have neoconservative of you know rightwinger on your side big surprise anyway of course dershowitz at least would be smart enough not to misspell council and trump to the three times that's okay you know sometimes he gets carried away and his tweets it's not really okays the president obama had made those errors like all we know what it was firmative action that got him don't columbia and harvard law we knew it right and they'd ask for transcripts which is what donald trump did i'd love to see donald trump's transcripts really you went to warton and you pass those classes you got good enough grades at formulas transferring to warton now your daddy got you in your idiot you don't know how you have no idea how to spell anyway he the other eightieth surround them all mr president oh you gotta misspelling there you misspelled weather in that case okay so they put out a new version of it and let's look at the new version now the weather no no no that's not go to the graphic seventyone.

special counsel professor alan dershowitz schwarz obama donald trump president harvard warton
"schwarz" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"schwarz" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"Across the street from fao schwarz and unlike wow america's a great place and those are so my early memories i remember come in america my uh my dad would do business throughout the day and my mom would take my sister and i was in the middle of it was really bad winter in in new york it was a know ninety seventy eight i was talking to me about this and they said yeah i remember that winter mama take my sister and i to go shopping we had nothing else to do so we go to macy's or something and as a kid boring as all hell prejudice member i love the color orange and so i gotta snoop e hat gloves and scarf that was orange uh and white i think but again i was like wow america's great so i my spaces with america were always great until the hostage crisis happened when we move to marin county by the northern california and that's when we would get picked on for being iran in even though we had nothing to do with us crisis the older kids would pick on you and call you a f an iranianbacked them um so that's when i started i think was the first time i noted in our i really realized that being iranian is not good in america now i was listening the other day cheer i don't remember the name it it's it's the album as recorded in stockholm in that opens with a really just probably about twenty minutes of you talking about you know the nationalities of people in the audience and kind of trying to bring everybody together and that's all sort of a prelude to talking about what it means to be middle eastern uh in the world today especially like in the west and i found that just a fascinating way to approach and i'm wondering you talk a lot about in the and that special that your travels and stuff like that.

fao schwarz america new york macy california us stockholm marin county iran twenty minutes