11 Burst results for "Schwab Sharifi"

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Here & Now

"We will then set with the Afghans in Prague and talks talking to the Africans referring to the political parties. Political leaders, and if anyone from the African government sits on the negotiation table of intra-afghan talks, he or she will be sitting as an Afghan not representing the government, and perhaps one that is one of the reasons that the African government has called its own ledger in Kabul as you pointed out and the spring fighting season is underway. So as all of this times has yes, there is bloodshed still happening. What can you tell us about that? Yes. Speech as we speak. In fact, the over dozen a front lines hot both the Afrin government have on security forces backed by the Americans mostly air support on the Navan all engaged across the country. And as we speak at least on average a hundred day get killed them. This is the frontline. So it's the climax of the spring offensive on at the same time somehow in the last few months, the climax. Of efforts full making some sort of tangible progress towards peace, and it's hoped that at least in the long term or sometime this year, they will be some sort of a ceasefire across the country. That's the BBC Kabul bureau chief Schwab Sharifi, thanks for speaking. Thank you. The US government collects a lot of statistics. So do state governments city governments county governments and on. And on the problem is if you wanna use those desists to make a decision about some important policy. They're not all in one place. That's where former Microsoft CEO, Steve Balmer comes in. He's founded an organization called USA facts to put all the numbers together in one place, and they've just released their annual report in the latest in our series of conversations with leaders.

African government Kabul Steve Balmer Afrin government Schwab Sharifi Prague Navan Microsoft US bureau chief CEO hundred day
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:31 min | 2 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR and WB. You are I'm Peter Dowd. I'm Jeremy Hobson it's here. Now, it has been another contentious day on Capitol Hill today attorney general William bar faces questions from members of the Senate Judiciary committee. This is the first time he's been questioned in public by lawmakers since the release of the redacted Muller report today. Republican committee chairman Lindsey Graham declared the Muller investigation over and said he turned his attention to investigating the origins of the report Democrats have been grilling bar on its interpretation of obstruction of Justice. Let's bring NPR White House correspondent hammer Keith who's been following today's hearing. Hi, Tam high so Lindsey Graham asked for a number of questions today. Summarizing how he felt about the report and other issues. Let's take a listen to an extent clip here. You would support an effort back Congress working with ministration to harden our electoral infrastructure ES that one of the takeaways of the mullahs report. Yes. Do you share my concerns about the FIS a warrant process? Yes. D- share my concerns about the counterintelligence investigation. How was opening line was opened? Yes. You share my concerns that professional lack of professionalism in the Clinton Email investigation, something we should all look at. Yes. Well, they sound like they're on the same page of a lot of things there. Tam give us a sense of what Republicans first of all have been trying to today, not talk about the substance of the mullahs report. That's that's what they've been trying to do today. So Lindsey Graham within moments of the hearing starting was talking about Hillary Clinton and her emails Graham was reading text messages by between struck and page. These are people who if you follow the president's Twitter feed you've heard about a lot. They are Justice department and F B I official that officials that had relationship and texted a lot of mean things about President Trump, but they were all involved in investigation. So in short, if if it was something that could be talked about that was marginally related to the investigation or not at all in related to the investigation. Republicans were asking about it. Okay. And the attorney general was also. Talking today about something that's been in the news since last night, the four page summary that he gave of the Muller report and about the interactions that he had with Robert Muller. We learned last night that Muller sent a letter to bar after that summary saying that Mahler didn't feel the initial summary fully represented Muller's conclusions. Here's what bar had to say about that asked him. If he was suggesting that the March twenty four th letter was an accurate, and he said, no, but that the press reporting had been inaccurate. And that the press was reading too much into it. And I asked them specifically what his concern was. And he said that his concern focused on his explanation of why did not reach a conclusion on obstruction. And he wanted more put out on that issue. This is something that maybe we'll learn more about if Muller himself testifies on Capitol Hill, but tell us more about what bar had to say about it, right? Really felt like Muller is the missing man in the room. There were just a number of questions throughout this hearing. Where bar was asked. What Muller thought or bar was recounting? What Muller said to him? You know, the the real substance of it is a line from the letter that Moeller sent to bar essentially complaining that he had put out this this summary of the top line conclusions. The letter says that he felt that bar summary did not fully capture the context nature and substance of the offices work and conclusions bar for his part keeps saying well. It wasn't a summary. He had a number of contentious exchanges senators where he was like, no, it's not. A summary. It was just the verdict. It was the top line conclusions, and as for the the the larger summaries that Muller wanted to be released the actual summaries bar said once the mullahs report was handed over to me. It was mine. It was my baby. And I decided how I wanted it released. He felt he had to release some sort of top line conclusions because of the political moment and all of the speculation. But he didn't want to release it piece by piece. Okay. The Republicans control the Senate Judiciary committee, but there are Democrats asking questions as well today. Here's the ranking member Dianne Feinstein asking about the president's efforts to fire Robert Muller. And here's what bar set as the report indicates. It could also have been the case that what he that. He was primarily concerned about press reports and making it clear that he never outright directed the firing of Muller so in so in terms of the request asked. Again to memorialize. That fact, we do not think in this case that the government could show corrupt intent beyond a reasonable doubt. That'd be done again. The former White House counsel how Democrats react to that. And other things that bar was saying today, there were a lot of furrowed brows and a lot of disbelief in this case, and he made this argument several times bar was saying there's a distinction between calling for someone's firing and calling that they be removed because of conflicts because then they then Muller would have been replaced by someone else that was bars argument. It didn't seem like Democrats on the committee were buying that. And will we hear from bar tomorrow before the House Judiciary committee run by the Democrats? Do we know that remains a wide open question as far as we know the hearing is still on us for whether bar will actually appear at that hearing. There is still a big debate about how it will be conducted who will ask questions how many. He questions how long and for now. He has not agreed to show up here. White House correspondent, Tim key? Thank you. You're welcome. The sixth round of talks between the Taliban and the US peace on voi- to have ghanistan began today in cutter. But representatives from the Afghan government are not their president Ashraf Ghani is out on his own. He's holding a grand council meeting this week, a loyal Jirga with more than three thousand officials warlords and tribal chiefs trying to hammer out a common approach to ending the seventeen year war in Afghanistan. Joining us now is BBC couple bureau chief Schwab Cherie, he is in Kabul today and Schwab is for these talks and cutter between the US piece on in the Taliban. Remind us again, why isn't the Afghan government there from the very beginning? Since the peace talks in the last few months for the first time when Taliban agreed to set on negotiation table, this said no to government than not prepared to recognize. The Afghan government as government saying we were the government ousted by the Americans. And once the issue of the prisons and the exits of foreign troops from unsung assaulted, we will then set with Afghans still not prepared to set face with the African government. So this is the sixth round of talks with the United States on voi- and the Taliban. What progress have they made so far? The fifth round of talks longest almost took fifteen days starting late February to mid March discussing the issue of exit of foreign troops, including American troops from Coniston and the Americans demanding a guarantee from the Taliban that the African soil is not and will not be used against others. Those fifteen days of talks didn't end with a break through the end the said, okay, we suddenly time to discuss a draft agreements with our leaders of very detailed. It took almost two months now that the back on the table. It's hope that this time they will at least agree on some of these terms of the Taliban source told me today that they have discussed the details. The optimistic that this time. On the issue of that timetable off the exit of American and foreign troops from honest on. They would have a breakthrough with Americans. Okay. Now, technically the United States government backs, the Afghan president does Ghani feel betrayed that the US peace on voice talking to the Taliban without the government being involved. How does he feel about this? Well, somehow they did feel in even they express that through the on stones national security advisor to the president few months ago in in the US Botts full peace all sides, including on government appreciates the fact that this should become from is is the Taliban clearly say we have our issue with Americans in it's right to talk to the Americans about the exit of foreign troops. We will then set with the Afghans in Prague and talks talking to the avalon's referring to the political parties political politically. Leaders and if anyone from the African government sits on the negotiation table of intra-afghan Tokes, he or she will be sitting as an African not representing the government, and perhaps swan that is one of the reasons that the government has called its own way in Kabul as you pointed out and the spring fighting season is underway. So as all of this time has yes, there is bloodshed still happening. What can you tell us about that? Yes. Speech as we speak. In fact, they have over a dozen of frontlines. Hot both the African government on security forces backed by the Americans mostly air support on the tone of on on engaged across the country. And as we speak Cleese on average one hundred day get killed them. This is the front frontline. So it's the climax of the spring offensive on at the same time somehow in the last few months to climax of offense full making some sort of tangible progress towards peace, and it's hope that at least in the long term or sometime this year. They will be some sort of a ceasefire across the country. That's the BBC Hubble bureau chief Schwab Sharifi, thanks for speaking with us. Thank you. And you're listening to here now. Alabama. Lawmakers are considering an outright ban on abortion in defiance of US supreme court precedent this Bill criminalizes abortion. Basically, it's part of a strategy to get an abortion rights case before a conservative majority supreme court. Plus the latest on the attorney general's congressional testimony on the Miller report this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sharon Brody. The US attorney general is just fine before the Senate Judiciary committee today to discuss special counsel, Robert Muller's investigation of Russian interference in the twenty sixteen presidential campaign and related matters. William bar said he thinks if Muller felty should not make a decision to prosecute President Trump on obstruction of Justice. Then Muller should not have even investigated today. Florida lawmakers approved legislation that would allow more classroom teachers to carry guns in school and the Republican governors expected to sign it into law. This marks the latest response to last year's mass shooting in parkland that killed seventeen people British Prime Minister Theresa may today. Fire Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson may says compelling evidence produced an investigation implicates Williamson and leaks from a secret government meeting of Chinese telecoms firm while way, you're listening to here now. On the next fresh air. Help oligarchy kleptocrats and crooks..

Robert Muller Taliban Senate Judiciary committee president United States mullahs William bar African government Lindsey Graham attorney Democrats White House correspondent Afghan government Tam President Trump NPR Congress Kabul
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:02 min | 2 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the FOX Oakland dot com. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro. President. Trump took aim again today at one of his favorite targets his own intelligence team, quote, the intelligence people seem to be extremely passive and naive. He tweeted in a follow up moments later, perhaps intelligence should go back to school. The president was talking about Iran, and what dangers that country may pose and what provoked him was this testimony yesterday before the Senate intelligence committee from the leaders of the CIA the FBI the national security agency. And this man, I'm here today with these exceptional people who I had the privilege to work with in making sure that we can do everything we possibly can to bring the intelligence necessary to our policymakers to this committee and others that would be director of national intelligence, Dan Coats, and despite his very pleasant sounding tone there on subject after subject from Iran to North Korea to ISIS testimony from coats and other. The US intelligence leaders contradicted. The president's stated views and policy. Let's bring into the conversation. Someone who has spent a lot of time navigating between presidents and the spy agencies that serve them from White House counterterrorism chief Richard Clarke, hey, there, it's good to be with you. Good to have you with us. Now, we should acknowledge that remarkably this is not new for President Trump to publicly insult his own intelligence chiefs. But what did you make of this back and forth yesterday? And then and then again today. Well, part of it. I thought was quite good. We have the director of national intelligence who is a former Republican Senator, and who doesn't have a lot of background in intelligence. Some of us were concerned. He wouldn't do a good job, and he liked politicized intelligence. In fact, he's done the exact opposite. He's protected the professional intelligence analytical community and given them the cover to stand up and do their job independent of policymakers Android a good report which they publicly released yesterday. So that's to the plus to the negative is, of course, the president attacking his intelligence community publicly. Look I've been on both sides of this. I've been an intelligence analyst. Villa policymaker out in this. There's a natural give and take between the two, and if the system works one usually upsets the other, but to do it publicly. Just under cuts the entire intelligence community. The morale they're standing there's no value to having a public feud. Of the numerous disconnects on on Iran on North Korea on ISIS. Was there one that looked at you? Yeah. I would add the Russian election interference to that list. So a Russian election interference around with Korea. Isis there's language in the report that obviously the administration wouldn't like but on all of those issues except for North Korea. They're factual statements. They're not value judgments Iran is in compliance with the nuclear agreement. Russia did interfere in the two thousand sixteen election. Isis does still quote command thousands of fighters and maintain over a dozen networks. The only value judgment is when they say North Korea is unlikely the intelligence communities judgment to give up WMD that's their judgment based on a lot of expertise and presumably intelligence, the president disagrees with that fine. But why do we have to have him do that publicly? I doubt these actually read this report the way when disconnect that struck me watching unless I missed it. Neither coats nor anybody else up there testifying pointed to the situation on the US Mexico border as a national security threat. No, how do we will? Because it's not a national security threat. And it's not a crisis. It's the dog that didn't bark here. It's not in the report because it's really not a crime. Very quickly. You have direct experience of working for a president who chose a path of action at odds with what the intelligence might suggest you were in the White House in the run-up to nine eleven. Did you see parallels? No, not really what's disturbing. Here is this attack across the board on the intelligence community, and he's really not using intelligence to shape policy. Former White House counterterrorism chief Richard Clarke, we will leave it there. Thanks so much for taking the time. Thank you. The US is trying to negotiate a peace deal between the Taliban and the government of Afghanistan. They hope that an agreement between these two groups could open the door for American forces to leave the country after seventeen years of war. Many Afghans have strong feelings about this tribe. Sharifi has been getting reaction from people around the country. He's the BBC's Kabul bureau chief, welcome to all things considered. Thank you are a deal between the Taliban, and the Afghan government is still a long ways off. But do most people that you've talked with view this possibility with more excitement or fear mixed feelings, particularly in the cities, but in rural areas because in the last seventeen years a lot of people in rural areas have had to deal with the tweet nonstop conflict. There's a hope not a mixed feeling. There's a hope that no matter. What happens at return f a return of the Taliban means an end to current conflict. It's a bake achievements. For those people. On the ground level. And then compare that with the attitudes in cities like the capital, Kabul where you live. What is the attitude there towards the possibility of peace deal between the government and the Taliban in the northern city of Mysore? I talked to female painter who has a shop in the city, and she's worried that under the Taliban regime, women were not allowed to go out of their homes without being accompanied by a mayor, and even painting was forbidden under the Taliban's. So for her return of the Taliban with the same strategies and approached the had twenty is back with mean immediate loss of her profession. And as she puts it imprisoned in the homes, so overall there's a feeling people are trying to digest that maybe the tall one has also transformed and in the last eighteen years people hope that tall, but understand that there have been a lot of progress in terms of education and human rights overall say it's hope that it is a new Taliban with a new approach with an m standing new realities in Afghanistan. You know, people who were born after the US invasion are almost adults at this point. And so there are people who don't remember life under the Taliban. How realistic is it that a power sharing agreement that included the Taliban today would be more accommodating to minority and women's rights than Taliban rule was twenty years ago, the Taliban a lot of manpower the fighting forces on the ground on not the Taliban who of quieting twenty years ago. They're all sue the new generation we found that that they were more keen on taking selfies and filming people the mobile phones. In fact, a female colleague of mine, and I talk to the Taliban. He didn't seem to mind and talk to her her face. Her was not covered. Her face was not coverage. He had a makeup. And this is the first time after eighteen years people saw the Taliban on the streets of Kabul. So somehow this new. Generation of Taliban. They have also been affected. Technological progress as well as overall progress in Afghanistan in the past eighteen years, as you know, there have been talks before and they've never led to an agreement. Do people in Afghanistan think this time might be different when yes, and this is not because the Toubon series. It's more because this time the American sorry of the table. This more serious to take the talks to a more practical results, and all of that is sort of shattered by that mixed feelings of what kind of a dean what sort of a deal, the two sides would agree on? And what would it mean for conflict as well? As food what this country has a in the last eighteen years Schwab, Sharifi of the BBC speaking with us on Skype from Kabul. Thank you very much. Thank you, very.

Taliban President US North Korea Kabul Iran Afghanistan intelligence analyst Trump Isis Richard Clarke White House director ISIS NPR Ari Shapiro Dan Coats Korea Sharifi
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:48 min | 2 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"It's five O six. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro. President. Trump took aim again today at one of his favorite targets his own intelligence team, quote, the intelligence people seem to be extremely passive and naive. He tweeted in a follow up moments later, perhaps intelligence should go back to school. The president was talking about Iran, and what dangers that country may pose and what provoked him was this testimony yesterday before the Senate intelligence committee from the league. Leaders of the CIA the FBI the national security agency. And this man, I'm here today with these exceptional people who I had the privilege to work with in making sure that we can do everything we possibly can to bring the intelligence necessary to our policymakers to this committee and others that would be director of national intelligence, Dan Coats, and despite has very pleasant sounding tone there on subject after subject from Iran to North Korea to ISIS testimony from coats and other US intelligence leaders contradicted. The president's stated views and policy. Let's bring into the conversation. Someone who has spent a lot of time navigating between presidents and the spy agencies that serve them. Former White House counterterrorism chief Richard Clarke, hey there. It's good to be with you. Good to have you with us. Now, we should acknowledge that remarkably this is not new for President Trump to publicly insult his own intelligence chiefs. But what did you make of this back and forth yesterday? And then and then again today. Well, part of it. I thought was quite good. We have the director of national intelligence who is a former Republican Senator, and he doesn't have a lot of background in intelligence. Some of us were concerned. He wouldn't do good job. And he liked politicize intelligence. In fact, he's done the exact opposite. He's protected the professional intelligence analytical community and giving them the cover to stand up and do their job independent of policy makers Android, a good report which they publicly released yesterday. So that's to the plus to the negative is, of course, the president attacking his intelligence community publicly. Look I've been on both sides of this. I've been an intelligence analyst and villa policymaker out in this. There's a natural give and take between the two, and if the system works one usually upsets the other, but to do it publicly just under cuts the entire intelligence community the morale they're standing there's no value to having a public feud. Of the numerous disconnects on on Iran on North Korea on ISIS. Was there one that looked at you? Yeah. I would add the Russian election interference to that list. So Russian election interference Iran, North Korea. Isis there's language in the report that obviously the administration wouldn't like but on all of those issues except for North Korea. They're factual statements. They're not judgments Iran is in compliance with the nuclear agreement. Russia did interfere in the two thousand sixteen election. Isis does still quote command thousands of fighters and maintain over a dozen networks. The only value judgment is when they say North Korea is unlikely the intelligence communities judgment to give up WMD that's their judgment based on a lot of expertise and presumably intelligence, the president disagrees with that fine. But why do we have to have him do that publicly? I doubt these actually read this report. But with what when disconnect that struck me watching unless I missed it. Neither coats nor anybody else up there testifying pointed to the situation on the US Mexico border as an installed in the national security threat. No, how do we that? Because it's not a national security threat. And it's not a crisis. It's it's the dog that didn't bark here. It's not in the report because it's really not. Crisis very quickly. You have direct experience of working for a president who chose a path of action at odds with what the intelligence might suggest you were in the White House in the run-up to nine eleven. Did you see parallels? No, not really what's disturbing. Here is the tack across the board on the intelligence community, and he's really not using intelligence shape policy. Former White House counterterrorism chief Richard Clarke, we will leave it there. Thanks so much for taking the time. Thank you. The US is trying to negotiate a peace deal between the Taliban and the government of Afghanistan. They hope that an agreement between these two groups could open the door for American forces to leave the country after seventeen years of war, many Afghans have strong feelings about this Schwab Sharifi has been getting reaction from people around the country. He's the BBC's Kabul bureau chief, welcome to all things considered. Thank you a deal between the Taliban, and the Afghan government is still a long ways off. But do most people that you've talked with view this possibility with more excitement or fear are mixed feelings, particularly in the cities, but in rural areas because in the last seventeen years a lot of people in rural areas have had to deal with the tweet nonstop conflicts. There's hope. Hope not a mixed feeling. There's a hope that come no matter. What happens at return f a return of the Taliban means an end to current conflict. It's a bake achievements. For those people on the ground level. And then compare that with the attitudes in cities like the capital, Kabul. Where you what is the attitude there towards the possibility of a peace deal between the government and the Taliban in northern CD of Mysore? I talked to female painter who has a shop in the city, and she's worried that under the Taliban regime women were not allowed to go out of their homes without being accompanied by a male, and even painting was forbidden under the Taliban. So for her return of the Taliban with the same strategies and approached the had twenty is back with mean immediate loss of her profession, and as she puts it imprisoned in the. In their homes. So overall, a feeling people are trying to digest that maybe the Taliban has also transformed and in the last eighteen years, people hope that Taliban to stand that. There have been a lot of progress in terms of education and human rights overall say it's hoped that it is a new Taliban with a new approach with an m standing new realities in Afghanistan. You know, people who were born after the US invasion are almost adults at this point. And so there are people who don't remember life under the Taliban. How realistic is it that a power sharing agreement that included the Taliban today would be more accommodating to minority and women's rights than Taliban rule was twenty years ago, the Taliban a lot of manpower the fighting forces on the ground on not the Taliban who of quieting twenty years ago. They also the new generation we found that that they were more keen on taking south fees and filming people than mobile phones. In fact, a female colleague of mine, and I talked to this Taliban. He didn't seem to mind and talk to her her face was not covered. Her face was not covered she invented a makeup. And this is the first time after eighteen years people saw the Taliban on the streets of Kabul. So somehow this new. Generation of Taliban. They have also been affected. Technological progress as well as overall progress in Afghanistan in Austin eighteen years, as you know, there have been talks before and they've never led to an agreement. Do people in Afghanistan think this time might be different with? Yes. And this is not because the Toubon series. It's more because this time the American sorry off the table. Lists more serious to take the talks to a more practical results, and all of that is sort of shattered by that mixed feelings of what kind of what sort of a deal, the two sides would agree on. And what would it mean for conflict? What this country has achieved in the last eighteen years Schwab Sharieff of the BBC speaking with us on Skype from Kabul. Thank you very much. Thank you, very.

Taliban President US North Korea Kabul Iran intelligence analyst Afghanistan Trump Richard Clarke Isis director White House ISIS NPR Ari Shapiro Dan Coats CIA Mary Louise Kelley
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Here & Now

"So that still is important element on boasting of when security forces in frontlines fighting the Taliban when the first American bomb was dropped seventeen years ago, I know that you are sitting not too far in Kabul Afghanistan from where you are right now. Could you describe the country then under Taliban control and described the country now seventeen years back. The first American intervention started bomb, but I wasn't very far from where it hits on as we speak. Now the bombing continues and we didn't. Expect seventeen years bags that we will have many, many years ahead of us with fighting going on only last year. Four thousand bums were dropped Afghanistan and it said that only in the last six months it has tripled. So it shows how the shis kennel of violence and threaten insecurity that ordinary people living in rural areas of suffering from seventeen years back when the Taliban Rolling Stone including capital Kabul, it was a quiet Kabul. People were living with some feel of threats and intimidation of the Taliban. They may not be goals not allowed to school, but what we didn't have then and we have now is fear of far lives because of insecurity. They have. Their harsh rules, not very far from where I'm speaking this at the sports stadium we have people were executed, but what they had managed to ensure was security across the country. People were not worried that a fee leave. Our homes will be either killed by an explosion or will be kidnapped, or will will be shot at that fear is living with every single citizen in this five million city of Kabul on across the country. Just want fun of question they are. Is there any momentum toward peace talks with the Taliban? Is there any momentum toward safety? Yes, they all hope stove. American officials have started engaging approaching Talibans because they say, we want to talk with Americans, their heavy one them out. There's a special Representative of US foreign affairs ministry in Kabul right now, he's seeking contact with avance officials the Taliban on the countries in the region. So there's some herb that parallel to intensification of fighting and frontlines. They all some hopes that the Taliban may finally agree to set on the creation table. We had the first ever ceasefire for three days. In fact, Evan last four decades of of conflict of on stunt. Just a few months ago, the country had a bilateral Aldus short, three days cease fire. But that showed that on those sides, including Taliban fighters or exhausted of the conflict. And there is although very far but let Ray of hope that momentum peace talks will get further momentum. Thank you for speaking with us. Schwab Sharifi BBC Kabul bureau chief in Kabul Afghanistan. Thank you..

Taliban Kabul Afghanistan Ray Representative Evan bureau chief Talibans seventeen years three days four decades six months
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The booming can be heard in the background. Those people who believe in plotting and shedding blood of the ones who carry out attacks that put the lives of our people in danger. If they think that by carrying out rocket attacks are people will file good. They should think, again, I'll correspondent in Kabul. Schwab Sharifi told us what happened lease an eyewitness in the area counted. At least thirteen explosions believed to be more tap hating, very close vicinity of presidential palace and local police in the area told me a Salen manage to break into this very close vicinity of presidential palace using a mini Laurie. I firing mortar and then running into a building, opening fire on security forces as well as important. One secret service building. This was supposed to be a very secure area. How is it possible that they could get through this. Really is big question, particularly lost evening Afghan security forces Kabul security garrison announce they increased their presence in and around Kabul in order to secure Kabul during eight celebrations. And yet we see that an area that seemed to be the most important part of the capital could be subject to an unprecedented type of attack. In fact, we have had motor attacks around presidential palace only one or two attacks, but an organized over two dozen of mortar attacks tours presidential palace, and then followed by armed attacks has been unprecedented. It really at situation that Adam government had offered a conditional ceasefire offer to the Taliban people who are even the very first hours of eat or. Hoping it may be responded positively by the Taliban and then eat was marked by mortar attack on presidential palace, although the Taliban have not yet taken responsibility nor any other sows have said they were behind the attack. But it appears that that three days of feet will be turbulent across the country. Before I let you go, what do we know about numbers of casualties or arrests still is a huge smoke coming out of the building where sailors had broken into an interior ministry, say three attackers. All of them are killed by now. It's so far it's reported only four people have been wounded. No-one inside presidential compound has been harmed SWEB if speaking from Kabul bureau. Ninety five year old man who suspected of being a Nazi war criminal has been deported to Germany from the US. Yawkey police is alleged to have worked as a guard at a camp during the second World War Shali Geiger reports Yok has Pelley arrived in the US in one thousand nine hundred forty nine claiming he was a farmer from Poland decades later to merge that he was expected of working at the travel Niki camp where on a single day in one thousand nine hundred forty three around six thousand Jewish men. Women and children were shot dead in one of the largest single massacres of the holocaust paulie initially admitted his role in the Nazi regime. But later claimed his innocence in two thousand and four. A judge ordered his deportation, but police continue to live in New York because no country would take him in Jewish groups, held regular protests outside his home calling for his immediate removal. Now, more than seventy years. Since the end of the second World War he's. Been sent to Germany following extensive negotiations with the Lynn but hopes he could face Justice for his alleged crimes a pitch. We've been dashed as the authorities of said, they don't believe there is enough evidence to prosecute that was Charlotte, Gallagher today, Tuesday marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Soviet led, invasion of Czechoslovakia, a quarter of a million troops from five Warsaw Pact countries were sent by the Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev to crush what have become known as the Prague Spring. The liberalizing reforms carried out by Czechoslovak leader, Alexander Dubcek and as rob Cameron reports. Now from Prague many who lived through that period award that compulsory it's a beginning to forget it. For those of a certain generation. This Czechoslovak radio broadcast from.

Kabul Taliban Germany US Pelley Schwab Sharifi Prague Leonid Brezhnev Alexander Dubcek Laurie Prague Spring Czechoslovakia Adam government Yawkey Warsaw paulie Charlotte Poland Gallagher
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Has offered the Taliban ceasefire over a religious holiday Weber on gambling than on immortals one zero that in order for our countrymen to spend the days of Leedle other in a peaceful manner. Once again, we announced a ceasefire that will take effect on Monday and last until the anniversary of prophet Muhammad's birthday. This is provided that the Taliban preserves and respects it and announces it for any period. They agree upon. There's been no official response from the Taliban, the US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, welcome the move and called on the Taliban to participate. He said it was now time for peace wave Sharifi is in Kabul. He told me that after a big offensive by the Taliban in the central city of guns. -i this announcement had been widely anticipated the Taliban enough one government on tensely fighting. In fact, as we speak. At least they are over a dozen of hot frontlines. Taliban, fighting African government. Both sides have got their gains and losses and boosts is know that there's only one way to end this problem and that's political solution. So we are in the climax of in what they call. Here's some offensive and I've gone son has got an election ahead in October, so it will put the government huge ease. Even if the fighting holds for two months, stopping this very bloody conflict as well as allowing the government to implement this very important and vital parliamentary elections and Schwab. You took him out some pretty severe fighting going on right now. We hear much less about volunteer Afghanistan than we have over the past seventeen years. Also just put it in context for me of how it compares to what's happened in previous years. In fact, fighting intensified since two thousand fourteen win over hundred thousand international forces left of honest on and Avalon security forces took the lead in fighting the Taliban. Since then until now, there has been a struggle of power within both sides, the Taliban of fighting to show the strong enough and can challenge and fight that from government and under government forces office live fighting to justify. They are the forces to secure of on stuns peace and stability in the long run because even Muslim holiday Taliban is highly likely to respond positive, at least for. A ceasefire during three days of Muslim holiday, eat Muslim holiday. That's beyond that Taliban. It is less likely that Taliban may trigger a three month long ceasefire because this is almost the end of summer offensive and fighting Migo until autumn and drops down during winters. So these are the last few months of the that the Taliban confide before their fighters disseminates into warm places or go away from the frontline until spring offensive. Schwab Sharifi with me from Kabul as the flood water started to recede in the southern Indian state of character. A concerted effort is underway to get food to communities which have been cut off hundreds of thousands of people have been forced from their homes by the floods. The authorities say they're preparing to deal with possible outbreaks of water and airborne diseases in the temporary relief. Kemps more than three hundred and fifty people have been killed. Most of them in landslides. We'll hear from our correspondent on the ground in a moment. First, these men at a relief center told the BBC. What had happened to them. My house is completely gone. I was in the water for five days. Everything is gone. Man. Among my house is filled with water. There were big snakes. There is no electricity. The government is giving food and water. We've never seen flooding like this in our lifetime. My colleague, James kumarisami has been talking to the BBC's yogurt. My who was outside one of the relief centers in character. This is actually a school that's been converted into a relief camp, and that's pretty much what's happened across the stadium..

Taliban government Kabul Mike Pompeo BBC Muhammad Schwab Sharifi Weber US official Schwab James kumarisami Afghanistan seventeen years three month three days two months five days
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"And I thought one of the things that was incredibly striking about this instant was just how quickly armed officers were on the scene robots and our London correspondent the Afghan defense ministry says Taliban militants have taken over an army base in northern Ferrier province after two days of heavy fighting at least seventeen soldiers have been killed and fifteen wounded during the attack. His show up Sharifi local officials told the BBC the Taliban storm the base in March from different directions, killing in wounding, many of the hundred soldiers stationed there. The governor of Aaron active Lafayette told the BBC up to fifty soldiers had to surrender because they. They did not receive reinforcements five days ago. The Taliban attacked and captured parts of Grozny a strategically important cities. South of Kabul I've on security forces have since been trying to force the Taliban out on the government says it's now in control Schwab Sharifi reporting a year ago today after three days of torrential rain, there was an enormous mudslide just outside the capital of Sierra Leone Freetown more than one thousand people were killed, and many more were left homeless correspondent Omar for fodder has been funny out how those who survived the tragedy, a coping. Wrong. Forgiving, remembering those lifts behind the pain is still fresh. Malaita camera lost his wife, two children and dozens of other relatives, his back to pray for their souls. But all he could do was weep. Six o'clock. The film, my prayer and as a driver, I went to work, he was only later, but I was told about the slide returned to find that my house disappeared swallowed up by the mountain. I felt like my whole world ended after performing the seventh year rights to Telephone Co. from the central hospital, the my son is still alive. Life. This is melody sound Daniel learning to walk on crutches the live in an unfinished building, not far from the scene of the disaster Donyell survived, but by the skin of his teeth, the scars are all over his body. His left leg has been unprotected to the tie while is rights. Thai-born also broke, and it's still being mended his left arm is only hanging while the backhand is card. So is his back. He said in brand full. Recalls the names of fence used to play with who tied in the mudslide Daniel laments that he's no longer able to play like you're still. We days. I mean, my mom, she styles in border. We were home sleeping your bus at around six o'clock. My father worked for morning prayers. Then he left at this time. There was a heavy storm. Not long after I looked to my mum, we could not find her. I won't stick outside to look for. That was when I felt something lifting me up and crash landing me on a rock. I screamed calling for help. My leg and armor Burkan. This other like was smashed. This is not how it was born. I can no longer run around and play like other children. I don't feel happy about it, but I remain courageous. Did I..

Taliban Daniel BBC Sharifi Schwab Sharifi Afghan defense ministry Sierra Leone Freetown Kabul London Grozny Aaron Telephone Co. Lafayette Omar three days five days two days
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"In their blood lust. Metallised Jan mental blow metal, especially led a causing mainly neurological problems in the population. Many children are being affected. Clearly it certain that the problem for a long time has been mining activity aware be that minero. I'm in the bustling streets of Lima. Now. The minds ministry have not responded to my request an interview. So I've come to speak to pro government, MP Gilbert, Violeta Los here. No intolerance castles in. Certainly not true that in all cases, contaminated water comes from mining waste. There are many cases where it does, but that's because these are old mines. The majority of these old mines have either been closed already or on the process of being shut down the new mining projects. We haven't Peru in general of very careful about how worker is us. In our. Volkan the company that runs the mine instead of the Pasco said, it's confident that no contamination is coming from its operations is now majority owned by the Anglo Swiss company Glencore which said it's working with Vulcan to ensure it follows best practice standards. It's not certain that money is the cause of mental poisoning, but many here think it's why to the comprehensive study is carried out only when the source of contamination is known. Will it be possible to prevent more children like Shirley and yen getting ill. That report was by grace Livingston. And if you go to the BBC World Service Facebook page, you'll find video footage from in and around the city of set of the Pasco and you'll meet the families who featured in that report. Still to come in this podcast, how can the US reduce its enormous consumption of plastics, art of it is is education and making sure that people understand that nothing's disposable. Nothing really, truly is disposable. Reports from the Afghan city of Ghazni speak of the Taliban being largely in control of the four days of fighting. That's despite NATO saying that the Afghan government has regained control of the city. A health department official has told the BBC that more than one hundred people have been killed since Friday more than one hundred forty others wounded and the UN has warned that food supplies are running low. The BBC's Schwab Sharifi is in the Afghan capital. Kabul the fighting is still going on. It's very hard to verify who really controls the city of east at least know that it is still being contested. It's the fourth day that the city of nearly three hundred thousand were stranded. There is the battleground between the Taliban and Avalon security forces and from the us bombers backing have gone forces fighting the Taliban. They you humanitarian office expressed concern about such a. Humanitarian says they as people are stranded, the hospital con coke for the number of the wounded and it is very difficult to leave the city. Some of those people who attempted to leave or some who managed to reach a Kabul or the and cities told us that on the way they witnessed dead bodies and people cannot attend the wounded or dead because of the intensity of the situation in this very important strategic city of Khazni a you say, it's important strategically, how much concern is there amongst people in Afghanistan that it's taken so long to get the city back under control. People are really concerned. Imagine in a city you have school, you're going to work you as a generous going to a government department, and you don't know how fragile the situation as it very important city that people knew it make laps and now sadly it is a battleground. So people are really concerned why the government con protected citizens. Though those sharp Sharifi speaking from our bureau in Kabul. China has denied that there is any suppression of ethnic minorities, all violation of their religious beliefs in the name of counter-terrorism in its western Xinjiang region. It said it had taken action against what it called extremist and terrorist crimes. In accordance with law, Steven McDonnell reports the United Nations committee on the elimination of racial discrimination has heard evidence of political indoctrination camps for ethnic wig Muslims, but in a submission to the UN hearing the Chinese delegation denied any so called reeducation centers exist. However, the Chinese government did say that some locals involved in minor offenses of being sent to what it called training centers to assist in the rehabilitation. The delegation added that the Xinjiang region has been a victim of domestic terrorism. I was Steven McDonnell. Britain is a wealthy country. So why does it still have thousands. The people living on doorsteps and pavements. It's a question..

Taliban Kabul US BBC Pasco UN Steven McDonnell Xinjiang Lima Ghazni Afghan government Chinese government minds ministry Sharifi grace Livingston Vulcan Glencore Peru NATO
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Of the casualties are civilians and women and children are among the dead and wounded and this seems well from what we're hearing a early reports say that the suicide bomber on the second explosion was masquerading as a journalist can you tell us anything more about that according to kabul police this second bomber had disguised himself as a journalist because the area was cordoned of by the police so this second attacker had attempted to approach the target as close as possible yet we don't know whether the target was the journalists or the attack wanted to go further closer to the police and secret service days this is the latest in a string of deadly attacks of ghanistan just last week we had a nicest suicide bomber attacking a voter registration center in kabul killing sixty people wounding at least one hundred and thirty and again twenty two women in eight children were among the fatalities isis claiming responsibility for this one as well yes indeed this is the second attack in seven days that always has claimed overall across the country earlier this week the taliban announced the launch of the spring offensive and there has been several deadly attacks across the country in major cities as well as provinces so somehow this we has been very one of the most difficult weeks of the for the country schwab sharifi speaking to me from kabul and since that interview was recorded we have learned that bbc reporter armored shah was also killed in a separate attack on monday in the cost region.

taliban kabul reporter bbc armored shah seven days
"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"schwab sharifi" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Of the casualties are civilians and women and children are among the dead and wounded and this seems well from what we're hearing a early reports say that the suicide bomber on the second explosion was masquerading as a journalist can you tell us anything more about that according to kabul police this second bomber had disguised himself as a journalist because the area was cordoned of by the police so this second attacker had attempted to approach the target as close as possible yet we don't know whether the target was the journalists or the attack wanted to go further closer to the police and secret service days this is the latest in a string of deadly attacks of ghanistan just last week we had a nicest suicide bomber attacking a voter registration center in kabul killing sixty people wounding at least one hundred and thirty and again twenty two women in eight children were among the fatalities isis claiming responsibility for this one as well yes indeed this is the second attack in seven days that always has claimed overall across the country earlier this week the taliban announced the launch of the spring offensive and there has been several deadly attacks across the country in major cities as well as provinces so somehow this we has been very one of the most difficult weeks of the for the country schwab sharifi speaking to me from kabul and since that interview was recorded we have learned that bbc reporter armored shah was also killed in a separate attack on monday in the cost region.

taliban kabul reporter bbc armored shah seven days