23 Burst results for "Schuman"

"schuman" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

01:47 min | 10 months ago

"schuman" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"We love hearing from you. Also if you'd like to reach out to us to suggest the topic you're more than welcome To dms on instagram at trust underscore podcast order. Of course mls iheartmedia dot com. Thank you ask. Always to our producers kc grim ali fry and everyone else that iheart video that makes the show.

"schuman" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:46 min | 10 months ago

"schuman" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Is how people want address. How do we make a beautiful. An am i actually on normal. Mali's website the other day looking. And i think she's one person that is doing that right now She has a lot of like some of her stretch on sambas lls that are in tweed like tweed prince or or or motifs inhering bones. And she's doing some really really interesting stuff. She's even incorporated some of those Pattern motifs into her classic sleeping bag coats so that was really fun but honestly i completely attest to exactly what you just said. Because i had a doctor's appointment yesterday. So i live in brooklyn and my doctors in the city so i got all dressed up and i put on a little catsuit and i put on like a corduroy ever lane dress. That wasn't too tight. But then i was like. Oh what do. I have that matches this and i put on like platform boots you know and then i threw on this vivienne westwood really tailored wool coat over it and by the time i got home a few hours later i was like what is going on and i was like so. I don't like a leather backpack. And i was just like i felt like i had just been carrying all this weight on my body around all day. In really in the scope of things the ensemble. That i was wearing yesterday was what i would have considered a more comfortable on some in the past. It's just that exactly what you just said. It's it's the last eight months of you know right now. I'm wearing vintage embroidered mexican dress. This is what. I walk around in the house all day with no shoes on so things things are changing like. Imagine you know when you look at like old vogue magazines from like the seventies and those kind of jakarta nips and you know those beautiful kind of modern muddled kind of colors and things in the cowl necks. And all of that like you know the seventies which was great with nets and imagine how great that would be done in new kind of applications and the premodern myths in modern ways of doing that with the modern kind of technology that we have. I think there's a lot of things that we could pull from the past. He'll like even you all those jackets in the eighties. Shorter jackets that you would buy it at the mall. A merry go round and places like that and and can be redone in a way like right now. I think you know some of these. They're nice but they're kind of boring you know. They don't have much going on with them. That's very interesting. So i do think we're at. Were writing this breaking point where there will be a whole new wave of designers that. See these pieces now. The hoodie pants in a whole new way. We're not even thinking about yes. It's going to be pretty exciting. I think i think to do not accept say That's just too casual. It's not dressing. that's not fashion. Is do not believe in the ability of creative people to take that and say i can make that beautiful. And that's the way it's always been people said that about when people start wearing golf clothes more everyday wear or any of the examples. Chanel made her dresses out of knitwear. That was basically of his underwear out of jersey. So it's always happens. We're just now have a major major break right now you'll I think it's gonna be great like we do kind of have fashion at a low point right now. When i was going to the shows you know. I was going to shows right until the the pandemic broke and And it was getting a little bored. You felt.

Mali vivienne westwood brooklyn jakarta Chanel golf
"schuman" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

02:32 min | 10 months ago

"schuman" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"And it literally just took off from two thousand five. It just was a runaway train. I was hard to rain. This episode is brought to you by kiko. The holidays fill our hearts with wonder for kids from one to ninety two. There's no gift more wonderful than the joy of curiosity discovery. And that's exactly. What kiwi co delivers each month. Kiwi sends hands on science art and geography projects right to the doorstep of the world's leading specialists and creativity and exploration kids so if your holiday shopping for a young innovator in your life give them a kiko subscription and watch them soar. Unfortunately kiko doesn't deliver via chimney yet but with kiko. The magic of opening a holiday gift doesn't stop for the holidays. Just choose a crate for their age and interests slipped a monthly plan and in two days their first crate will be on the way whether seeing the robot walk their rocket launch or they're painting hung on the wall these magical moments inspire a lifetime of funding learning each kiwi co creek comes with everything needed to get started right away with different crates for kids of all ages. Kiko offers something for every kid or kid at heart on your list and there's no commitment so you can pause or cancel anytime get fifty percent off your first month plus free shipping on any crate line with code. Iheart akiko dot com. That's fifty percent off. Your first one. At k. I w i c o com promo code. Iheart if you're looking for more great reporting about design fashion and culture you should check out a new podcast called invoke. The nineteen ninety s covering a conic decade invoke the nineteen nineties a new audio docu series that revisits a pivotal moments in the ninety s culture. Through the lens of fashion from slip dresses with army boots to colorful tracksuits and minimal pantsuits vogue experts and star gas highlight the stories and fashion history. That reflected this new era of connectivity. He oh here. From calvin klein donna. Karen marc jacobs isaac mizrahi and many many more as they share their memories and commentary on how the decade was on mike any other presented by winter and hosted by hamish bowles. This podcast examines. How the ninety s sparked a cultural fusion that continues to shape our world today which you know we love on dressed and why. No one is exempt from fashion so listen subscribed to invoke the nineteen nineties. Wherever you get your podcasts..

Interview with Daniel Shoeman

Plant Strong

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Daniel Shoeman

"I'm sitting here with a gentleman named Daniel Schuman pronounce that crackling corrector, Daniel Shuman and actually Ganal reached out to me several months ago after hearing the plan strong podcast. Because he had a friend who was suffering from I believe it was some krones or else right of colitis and you were wondering if I if I had any advice or recommendations and I and I sent you a a whole protocol. It was based on a woman out of Columbus Ohio doctor Dr Pam Popper and did anything ever come of that. So you know one thing I've learned in this whole journey of mine is that I can't change people I could try my best I try to present as much information as I can. It's much. That's backed up by science. Ultimately. It was up to my friends who make decision I think. Obviously. He's in his own journey and he's going to have to figure things out and unfortunately I haven't been too successful within thus far. But I, believe in laying the groundwork at least and hopefully giving him some of the tools to come to his own decision one day and maybe See, some relief that he can get because he really is suffering a tremendous amount and the and you. You mentioned a little earlier that. So you you've had some phenomenal success and we'll get into kind of your story and your journey. But when you had that kind of success, you WANNA scream it from the mountaintops eight and. Because it seems so obvious that Oh my gosh I mean this is going to cure everything that ails you. And yet, people tend to push back a little bit right and so what have you found is kind of the smartest tactic as far as with friends, family co workers, and trying to impress US lifestyle upon them. So I think the biggest thing that is an individual canoe is to lead by example to show, and it's pretty obvious anyone who's seen me who's followed me the last couple of years has seen a tremendous improvement in my life in every aspect of it and if they can see. Especially, someone who knew me well, beforehand, they knew I was not a fitness guy I was not someone who Generally worked very hard on himself. especially when it came to nutrition health fitness and if they can see that someone like me can do something like this and the positive impact, it's had on every aspect of my life. Medically. Socially emotionally, my relationship, my children, my relationship with my wife, my intimacy it's really an unbelievable. Thing to see and. I think was a little bit guilty in the beginning of being a little bit maybe to gung-ho and trying to because as you said, it does seem so obvious it seems that there's so much science. This. Isn't just a fad this the way I see it. Hopefully learning throughout my whole life and I not I'm not a scientist. I'm not a doctor. I'm not gonNA pretend that I have all the answers to everything. But it seems pretty clear to me that this is something real and I know you've seen it. I've seen it so many times with people who have. Not, only prevented diseases but reversed it and have regained their lives and have become empowered to do something and to really change their lives in the people's lives around them. So. Yeah. Just being that example showing people this is something to do you know when people talk to you about protein and you know that's a sure you get that all the time where's your protein come from when you're eating a plant based? Diet. And if I could lead by example, say, Hey, look protein deficient you're not could show the my numbers from when I get blood work at the doctor's office. And that's that's where I'm at right now I was just trying to be that example China show hey, this is an alternative I'm not going to. Have the Hubris to tell you, I know all the answers to everything but this is at least an alternative if you WANNA go down. So many of the popular roots these days. This is a way to do it mindful way to do it. Really. Isn't I don't think it's not difficult honestly at the end of the day and. Just, it's possible as an alternative. So let's let's talk about that for a SEC. So you said you don't think it's that difficult what? Let's. Let's discuss your journey a little bit show. Where were you not mistaken? You started this journey into how April two thousand seventeen is that right? That makes it able to thousand seventeen I was twenty nine years old what inspired it? So I mean. It's a good question I. I was obese most of my life morbidly obese most of my life and every day was really a struggle was there's a lot of discomfort when that big you know my my biggest I was about three hundred and fifty five pounds. Not Comfortable way to live. So right off the bat, just being that big I don't believe I was ever complacent with a something that let me ask you this. So you say it wasn't comfortable being that big. What are some of the things that somebody that is? Three fifty and what are you? Like six, one, a non five ten okay. Okay. So three fifty, five, five, ten, what are some of the things that are uncomfortable almost everything just being in public being taking the train in on a normal day squeezing next to people you know at its most extreme I went on a family vacation to universal studios in the in Florida and I was very excited to go in this Harry Potter I. They have their this isn't in big castle. We waited online and get to the ride and we go to sit down and the harness won't close on me substitute big to fit in the.

Krones Daniel Schuman Dr Pam Popper Daniel Shuman Big Castle Columbus Ohio United States Universal Studios Scientist China Ganal SEC Harry Potter Florida
"schuman" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"schuman" Discussed on Truth Be Told

"That bothered me for probably months afterwards. I'm like law hour. We're GONNA know were successful and I just I'm really I was grinding on that question. Really just cut me up short and so what happened was I had a been for the past probably five years. I've been studying trans humanism current so I started digging through all also a brief pause to hug right now so is the hugs on. We'll get back to the interview here. It's all part of the conference folks that you get that live feel old different. I think it's great and so I I. I saw that this That people were writing about what. What a success how they would know if trench humanism was successful but what the world would look like translate minutes and was successful and I started reading their documents and it it it truly deeply inspired me to thank to start thinking that way like what our culture look like? If if x subconscious Schuman's and extra conscious civilization was successful. Yeah and so. I'm writing a book about that right now. So that's an and really contrasting. The two insane you know this is what a transhumance civilizations going to look like. We're all moving into it right now. We're all some are more aware than others but it's happening the rollouts going on but like what if this rollout went on. And what if this. What if they're really not that different? And what do we have to you offer to. Maybe for example I just wrote a book. Recently how extra conscious Schuman's guide our speech fearing future inner spirit time and what that book was about. was that how much the space sector needs. EXA conscious humans. I mean if you're going to go into space would you like somebody with you head missing time sure. Would you like somebody with you. That was telepathic. And can talk of the computers. Went Down would would you want somebody that knew how to dissolve their body and re embody it. Of course nobody would ever think of this. But that's brilliant. Of course you so I kind kind of go through in the book just kind of moved through all these briefly but then what I do is I can. Textual is the institute into space sector sector and talk about three primary ways that that we could influenced space sector and why they need us. The stuff that you think about is so so amazing. Who would it's incredible that you think of these things? I really appreciate that you think about those things. I appreciate your inbox about spreading the word and thanks for coming in on truth be told and sharing that with us. I appreciate this. This is Catherine for Tony. Sweet truth be told here at the twenty nine thousand nine. UFO Congress sealer awesome awesome Zack..

Schuman Catherine Tony
How a Toronto ob-gyn gamed the system and put his patients lives at risk

The Big Story

11:35 min | 2 years ago

How a Toronto ob-gyn gamed the system and put his patients lives at risk

"The maternity ward of a Toronto on a hospital one Saturday in two thousand sixteen babies are being born at an alarming rate faster than they should have been and the short-staffed prove nurses skidding worried something was up but nobody raised any concerns. These were after all patients of highly respected O._B._G._Y._N.. Doctor Paul shoo-in who's on call at North York General Hospital. Most weekends wasn't until two nurses found evidence of wrongdoing and report it. The doctor Schuman's misdeeds were revealed and he lost his medical license. This is a story of greed ethical. Neglect disrespect of women and of a medical establishment tried to block this very story from being told and I'm filled in for Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story Michael List wrote about oh Dr Xuan in an article published in the August issue of Toronto. Life is incredible reporting has shocked city. Thank you so much for joining US Michael. Oh It's supposed to be here so I read this the story with a pit in my stomach. I'm a woman in Toronto who has had a baby in a hospital in Toronto fairly recently and I know I'm not the only one who read your story and was just horrified fight but but let's start at the beginning who is Dr Paul Schwen and what how does he regarded as a doctor in the city so hall shoe and was you you know by all accounts for thirty years <hes> one of the city's most respected O._B._G._Y._N.'s. He was also a gynecologic oncologist. What sort of unusual about about that is that most gynecological oncologists once they once they sort of go down that road they I was told about ninety percent of them? Give up their obstetric practice but not delivering babies is awesome because they're dealing with cancer patient exactly but she decided to keep his obstetric practice. Since the late nineteen eighty s he worked at the North York General Hospital he also taught at the university city of Toronto. I spoke to a number of his colleagues. All of whom said that you know he was widely admired in the community until just a few years ago when when nurses at his hospital started to notice something odd about the way he was delivering babies there were often large numbers of women coming in and in Labor on the weekend more so than on a weekday or at least not necessarily more so but just didn't in sort of in unusually high numbers they all his his patience or yeah so he would he would take call on Saturdays and so this is sort of fishy that the same day he's taking call a lot of his his patients are coming in to deliver and they were in a kind of labor. That's called precipitous labor. What does that mean so it means the contractions are coming to quickly lasting too long? Sometimes we'll get a condition called hyperstimulation of the uterus. This is what those what that is is a sort of very common sign of having been induced but the nurses would look look at these patients charts and they would see that there was no indication for for induction that they hadn't been induced they would ask the patients themselves and and they would say no no. I wasn't induced what it turned out is that he Dr Shulin was also seeing many of these patients at his clinic the morning that they were later coming in in Labor this this is very odd and then what happened not once not twice but three times nurses who were tending to these patients found the dissolved remnants of of a of a powdery pill in their vaginas and again there is no indication should be a record of any medication given to you <hes> and as as a patient you should know about it right and neither of those things happened which means that that whatever this pill was it was given to these women without their consent without notifying them and it probably had something to do with why they were coming in in these large numbers and in precipitous Labor so what happened was that the third time that this pill was found docile tested it and it triggered an investigation to what was going on why why were Schuman's patients sort of arriving at the hospital hospital like this wh what was going on and what they found was that this pill was a drug called Misoprostol and missed Oprah Saul was originally developed as an ulcer medication medication and like lots of medications it was found to have these other effects that that they hadn't designed it for and and those effects include when given when it's given to a pregnant woman it softens the Cervix Cervix and can cause contractions <hes> the product induction method right sure. I mean yeah except the only thing is that using it for that purpose is against North York General Hospital. Oh policy it is used sometimes as <hes> usually as like sort of half the recipe of pharmacological abortion right an abortion pill. That's right but if you I use it on a woman who intends to deliver her baby in his term there are terrible side effects it can cause the death of the baby and it can cause the death of the mother and so you know there's a black box label warning on it that it isn't to be used for that purpose and he actually admitted that he was doing it for a long time and not only was he doing it. He had trained and another doctor to do it and he said something like why don't you why don't you go after him. So I do WanNa rewind a little bit though and just get give us a sense of sort of how and why why this happened if he had said he'd been doing a long time is there are there early signs of when these misdeeds began to occur that maybe were found later so shoe and would later. I admit that he had been doing this for years. Is the way that you know the the the problem with a sort of <hes> with misdeeds like Schuman's is that there's very very little evidence right because it's not in the it's not in the chart. It's nothing told to the patient. The only way that You can find the pill in the patient and collected so we we don't actually know how long shoe and has been doing it for except by his own admission that it had been for years. Another question is sort of like you know your question is why like why why would why would he be doing this. There are sort of two explanations the the explanation that shoe and gave is that he was doing these these women a favor <hes> that he was trying to get around the hospital is the way that he later put it to his sort of interlocutors around the red tape of the hospital when she called called it and certainly a lot of patients and the Canadian health care system. You know sometimes you're frustrated. That things aren't happening as quickly as you would like them to happen you wait around and that's what he sort of said you know like sometimes we book someone you know. Either you know either it could be you know could be cancelled. It would have to be rescheduled. It's a big pain in the butt. You know there's like this whole sort of <hes> sluggish bureaucracy up to deal with this is a way to sort of get around it but what his <hes> lead investigator in the culture physicians and surgeons later said is that he can't rule out pecuniary Mary reasons for having done it. What do you mean by that so he's suggesting that he could that could have been doing it for the money and you're like even when I was reporting the straps Sorta like wait ah like in a socialized medical world? How can you do something like this for money well so shoe and took call on Saturdays hit looks like he was doing this on the weekend and what we what we later found out through documents at the show for one of the years that we <hes> that we have information on this <hes> two thousand fifteen to two thousand sixteen shoe and delivered almost most seven hundred babies a year at North General Hospital which is more than any other doctor there but what's really odd is that forty seven percent of the babies were born on the weekend? She wants boss at North York. General Neural <hes> had sort of told you that Hsun was only allowed to do fifty deliveries a month and that's partly sort of it's it's it's part of safety issue. When it's it's also impart part sort of budgetary issues but shoot isn't paid from from that budget right like doctors in doctors around the country they are sort of like high-powered freelancers right bill for service right so they get a fee for service? So if you do x you can bill you can build the you know the the provincial health insurance for having done it. It's not just a matter of volume though that's true right. If you deliver more babies you can you can charge more for having done it but in the there's a there's a strange range of incentive <hes> built into when it makes sense for an O._B._G._Y._N.. Deliver a baby. If you deliver a baby in Ontario on a weekday weekday you can charge four hundred dollars but if you deliver that same baby on a weekend you can charge over seven hundred dollars. It's about two hundred and fifty bucks more so that's the reason why you know or at least according to his his medical investigator <hes> he couldn't rule out that shoe and was doing this on Saturdays <hes> when he took call so that he could deliver those babies for a higher rate then he could if he was delivering them on on a weekday so money aside I've another major problem with with his conduct seems would be informed patient consent and another example which also shocked me had to do with evolve ectomy. Is that what it's called what what happened there so this is not even necessarily delivering babies that he was sort of blowing past patient consent on it was other matters to what was going on there so this this was this was a <hes> an issue with his <hes> oncology practice. What happened was that when we were investigating the story we we asked the culture physicians and surgeons for the evidence that was entered hurt against you in in the in the what resulted in the loss of his license and two of those documents that were released to us worth the previous complaints that were lodged against chewing and have an and were found to be credible? What's odd is that those were not available to to the public right? It used to be that that when <unk> something from the Complaints Committee at the was found to be credit credible and resulted in ruling against a doctor that that would not be released to you so if you want to know so if your doctor had any problems with something like consent you couldn't know right so so what happened with this woman was had was that <hes> she had this rare malignancy called paget's disease and it sort of manifests as as little sort of a sort of lesions on on the Volva and so she went to Dr Soon Dr Shulan said listen we need to partial vol back to me and she was really nervous as you as you can imagine right excuse me and so so this this is what you need to do. We need to do the surgery so she said I mean okay. If you think that's what's Best I'll I'll book it. How many of us have been like okay? Let Dr Nells Bass Drink. You're going to say right like argue with your doctor right so medical professional acted right sure so she said Okay and then she said listen. If you want more information you can go home and Google paget's disease and so she did and she looked it up and she found that in some cases aces it could be treated with a cream so she came back and she said listen. I you know I I read. We can just use a cream. That's what I want Chu and said that's not going to help for your <hes> for your version of of paget's disease so you need to have the surgery and more than that even though the surgery was a month out if she canceled it she would have two hundred bucks cancellation flation view a month in advance a month and she said well I mean I you know I don't WanNa pay the cancellation fee. My doctor says I should do it so we'll do it. So when you woke up from the surgery she found that not only had it been this per show victim that they talk talked about but he also cut off her clitoris that to me was my job was on the floor. I was like you know is that her her fault for not asking more like about that the other thing to stop me in the story. was you know and there's no proof of this at all. There's no way of knowing for sure but like if he had had male You have been so cavalier with his decision. Making with the lack of

North York General Hospital Toronto Schuman Paget Doctor Paul Investigator North General Hospital Michael List Jordan Heath Rawlings North York Dr Shulin Dr Paul Schwen Dr Xuan General Neural Dr Nells CHU Ontario Misoprostol Complaints Committee
NBA Trade Deadline Roundup: All the action you need to know

After Hours With Amy Lawrence

05:53 min | 2 years ago

NBA Trade Deadline Roundup: All the action you need to know

"Now, it was a little bit quiet as well in the I would say the the two hour range before the NBA trade deadline. I was procrastinating finishing my column, of course, what else is new. And so I was looking at Twitter and refreshing and try to figure out whether or not any moves had been made. And it was eerie. It was really eerie at that point. But there was a flurry of activity right before the deadline. So in that final hour Nico mirror attached to the bucks. So they bolster their three point shooting Marcus, Saul who was very close to landing in Charlotte. Instead ends up with Toronto. If you missed my conversation with Greg Brady some morning show host on the fan five ninety. Well, we talked to him. Let me just let me just summarize my conversation with Craig Brady I asked him so with the change at head coach. And and of course, bringing in Kuwait Leonard in the off season Marta rose, and is gone now Yoenis Vallon Schuman's valid out Marcus all is in. How much has changed with the culture? This is very earnest question. Right. How much has changed with the culture of the raptors the season his response. Well, LeBron has gone. So a lot has changed. Okay. So maybe maybe the raptors are overcompensate, and maybe they're not. But I think if you look big picture Eastern Conference while we're talking about it. The fact that it's the Sixers who make the move for Tobias Harris. It's Mark assaulted the raptors at its Nico mirror attached to the bucks. These three moves are all for the here. And now they're for the present there about winning that conference. Now, I know the Celtics didn't make a move. Their lineup is got a lotta pieces that they're still trying to make sure they can get all on the same page, but no glaring weaknesses in the case of the Celtics. So you got those four teams, but the three that make the moves are about winning now. Whereas in the Western Conference monitor move here and there nothing super serious. Most of the teams as the dust settles on this trade deadline. Most of the teams. Are about positioning themselves for the future whether through shedding cap space, no shedding shedding cap commitments and making cap space. Aiming is what happens when you talk to fasten a Friday morning and get excited and also shedding, unwanted or bad contracts. So that's the idea for most of the teams in the NBA. And I mentioned this stat. I got it for Matt Moore NBA insider for the action network who joined us on our last show the possibility is there for forty percent of the NBA to be in free agency in a few months forty percent. And we're talking about massive names now. Kevin Durant could be part of that conversation, or he could not Klay Thompson could be part of that conversation or he could not. Jimmy, Butler, probably going to be part of that conversation. So there there's some ebbs and flows there as well. Where you don't exactly know, which guys will sign contracts to stay where they are in which guys will actually hit free agency. But generally, the big names wanna be wooed. They want wanna be booed. And so there's a lot of potential for the balance of power to shift in the off season at it. I think it's pretty obvious. When you look at the NBA in his trade deadline that most of the moves that were made were not about. Now, they're about down the road. A handful of these teams in the east because the east is I don't want to say, it's a wide open. But there are a few teams there that you feel like it wouldn't be a huge surprise if they ended up winning the conference and getting to the NBA finals. Everybody gets a trophy. It's after hours with Amy Lawrence on CBS sports radio. You know, what that actually makes me think of the whole winning and losing the trade deadline. So you in the east or all? Where for the most part the rest of you want wall. So coming up, we're going to talk a little more about the night in the NBA. Because even though the Lakers did not get Anthony Davis. And I think you look back now, and you realize the pelicans were screwing with them. They weren't actually interested in making a deal with the Lakers. They just wanted to see how much they could get it. As it turns out, even with the extra picks and five bodies, they weren't going to make that deal. They didn't want to make that deal. What they wanted to see is how much the Lakers were willing to offer. And now how can we spin that forward into a potential offer for the Lakers in the off season? But also, how can we use that to get packages from say the Celtics or if he was serious about the buck side of the clippers. So we're talking about really just using that desire that desire to bring an Anthony Davis against them. The pelicans will play Davis the rest of the way. So at least we have that question answered. But what about the Lakers the damage has been done? I get that the moves were made. But the fact that LeBron and Magic Johnson LeBron's agent were willing to literally slice and dice the locker room and ship half of his teammates out. That's not something that you get over quickly. It's not. And so the deadline may be passed. But the drama remains. Although a buzzer beater, sometimes it can help make

NBA Lakers Raptors Celtics Lebron Anthony Davis Nico Twitter Charlotte Greg Brady Craig Brady Toronto Marcus Kevin Durant Tobias Harris Klay Thompson Saul Kuwait
Cars of the Future: Are We Ready?

The Naked Scientists

02:24 min | 2 years ago

Cars of the Future: Are We Ready?

"Is all very well for human. You can just use commonsense. And say, I'm not instant governs college, I'm outside on the street if we ought to have Thomas vehicles on the road in the mainstream. I'm guessing robot doesn't really have that kind of commonsense. Thus right right now today, people building these systems have they can pick a path, right? They can either build robots that don't trust the world and that being lied to. And maybe go against the rules, sometimes or decide to do their thing that might be a dangerous path to go along. Oh, we make the senses and the technology that the robots rely on much more liable and make them tell the truth and often this is a key thing companies doing the software change that we make GPS receivers we prevent the piss receive from the lying to the rest of the system. So we give an error estimate. That's true. And we improve the accuracy as well. And so that increase in integrity is what's really? Portent for tournaments vehicles. So they don't mind being told an inaccurate measurements. As long as told that it has a large error on it. The big problem is if you pass some measurements to an autonomous platform, which has a very small error. But in fact was a rung measurements. So high integrity senses water needed to ensure that the feature Thomas bagels are as good as we are. So he managed to successfully navigate box-office, even though you're GPS got bust. I mean, we obviously knew we were going how come Sutton off be made more. So the good news is three important changes. That are coming that will make GPS much better for both Schuman's and for the coming robots as well. So the first one is simply that the more subtle. It's throw in the sky, the better, the performance, you get and we all cool Sutton GPS. Sometimes casually GPS is the American system, there's a Russian system Chinese system and European system and the future the might be a British system after Brexit. So they'll be hundreds of satellites in the sky that will help the second important change coming is that the satellites do improve over the decades have new technologies in them. And there's a new signal light that is rolling out at the moment and the fundamental performance of that new signal type. Is about ten times higher the more. We get today. So up on a mountain, you'll get thirty

Thomas Sutton Schuman Brexit
"schuman" Discussed on Pioneers of Good

Pioneers of Good

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on Pioneers of Good

"And then I decided to transition that company to regulate law firm went through the theory of array requirements mind Schuman's in place, an started trading as you'll send out the beginning of July last year prompted you to change from consulting to be regulated for. I was always really really busy with a consultant the consultant had really good work really get clients. But it can be quite lively working as a consultant also quite restrictive tickly because not regulated by the Cereso. You can't many ham the flexibility to go out on get the clients that you want to get the work that you really want to do fight decided that a veteran approach would be to build my aim team. We could then go out to speak to the clients that we want to work full and find the wet type of weather that we want to do. I think having wet in private practice before ways past week do things a little bit better. Yeah. The rest is history. Really? We go going. Yes. Interesting because the traditional films that just new accounting illegal at it seems that they haven't changed a lot recently in quite a few years that your son's in Q saying that you're different that you really transparency as well on you have to sort of breath of fresh air is a consumer to your practices to have that offend absolutely. I think. Cetinje some of the bigger no fans. I think they they are of its second away. I think given the size. It's is more difficult for them to respond to changing client moms. But I think as a small business it much easier to be able to do that we can be much more. She with all kinds won't we can deliver a cooling leaving. So if.

consultant Schuman private practice Cereso
"schuman" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Make every episode standalone friendly, but since emotion is a topic. I've been covering since episode ten I may not have succeeded. The book the neuroscience of emotion. In has two goals to provide an overview of the current science of emotion and to propose a framework for studying emotion across species and disciplines, I focused on the first go, even though the second was more important because I think those of you who are working in the field should read the book. There are three key ideas that I want to mention today one. There is no particular brain region devoted to any specific emotion. The Meg does not the center of fear. Instead current research is focusing on how various parts of the brain interact to create a motion number two. The book contains an excellent discussion have how the problems of functional M R I are being addressed. This is important because I've been critical of this method in the past number three. They argue that animals do have emotions and the study of animals as well Schuman's is important because there are two. Tools that can be used in animals that can't be used in humans. So that's it for twelve annual review episode. I hope you will go back and listen to any episodes that you missed the announcements that I embedded in the show will be included in the episode show notes at brain science podcast dot com. If you aren't already subscribed to our free newsletter. I encourage you to do..

Schuman
Backstreet Boys' singer Nick Carter will not be charged in sex case

Mac and Gaydos

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

Backstreet Boys' singer Nick Carter will not be charged in sex case

"Backstreet boys is off the hook when it comes to rape charges. Actually boy. Nick Carter was publicly accused of rape last November by Melissa Schuman. Who was a member of the pop group dream? She says Carter raped her in two thousand three when she was eighteen Carter claims their relationship was consensual. She filed a police report in February. Now, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office is weighed in saying it won't pursue the case. Because it's too old the statute of limitations expired in two thousand thirteen the news comes as Carter just revealed on social media that his wife suffered a miscarriage. They have a two year old

Nick Carter Keira Bergman Rape Attorney Purdue Pharma John Clark Eiji Mark Burnett Jim Sharpe Phoenix Police Melissa Schuman Jamie West Los Angeles County Purdue Physical Dependence Iggy Jason Nathanson First Degree Murder Elliot Hollywood
Prosecutors reviewing rape claim against Backstreet Boy Nick Carter

Gary and Shannon

02:51 min | 3 years ago

Prosecutors reviewing rape claim against Backstreet Boy Nick Carter

"AM six forty more stimulating. Talk Amy, king with the new firefighters in corona have saved houses from brushfire, they got dangerously close mandatory. Evacuations were ordered for more, than a dozen. Neighborhood streets yesterday. Those orders have all. Been lifted, the fire burned about thirty acres crews contained it with help from three helicopters in two air tankers containment, was last measured at twenty five percent one of the backstreet boys has been accused of sex Assault the DA's office has confirmed its reviewing a case against Nick Carter presented by the Santa Monica police department on, Tuesday now, back in February singer Melissa Schuman filed a police report saying she had been sexually assaulted, in the early two thousands by Carter at an apartment in Santa Monica Shuman, was eighteen at the time in a member. Of the, pop group dream now it's not clear if this. Is the case. Being reviewed by the DA's office. Carter denied the accusation saying everything. Was consensual Kris Ankarlo KFI news department of defense agency has begun trying to identify Korean war soldiers in the remains returned from North Korea the agency's leader Kelly McCague spoke yesterday at a. Pentagon briefing understandably reactions, from the families of the seventy seven hundred still missing from the. Korean war is palpable because this is an opportunity for more of them, to get long-sought answers it's expected to take months or even. Years to complete forensic analysis China has announced. Another sixty billion dollars in possible tariffs on American products Chinese officials. Said yesterday America should be level headed and correct its attitude. On tariffs US announced this week it's considering putting tariffs on China at twenty five percent instead of ten percent if. The, US follows through China, says it will respond with sixty billion in new tariffs on American goods like coffee Honey and industrial chemicals a dolphin stampede has been spotted. Off the Orange County coast a stampede happens when a large group of fast. Moving dolphins leaps out of the water some whale watchers spotted the part of several hundred dolphins yesterday near Dana point southern California has the greatest density of dolphins per-square mile in the world traffic from your helpful socal Honda traffic center crash in Arcadia on. The to ten on the t ten westbound coming up on the, two Linda has one of the middle lanes blocked there that stretch to the Teton backed up from mountain checking out the socal Honda traffic cameras through their less feel. Is five southbound stop and go conditions from Las villas boulevard off. Into downtown LA the northbound side really heavy as well from the tens Split. All the way up to Los villas downtown LA the ten westbound Santa Monica freeway it's heavy on. In pockets from the five all the way, through mid city LA eastbound side just a little bit slowing through their k. find the, sky helps get you there faster Rosie return after an accident people are emotional and. Confused so what happens when people call attorney sweet James bergener John James t. Will always pick up the phone even if it's two AM a lot of times people are hurt and in pain, and, they don't know. What to do so even if it's a.

Nick Carter China DA Santa Monica Melissa Schuman Santa Monica Shuman LA Honda Brushfire AMY Corona United States Las Villas Orange County Assault Pentagon Kris Ankarlo Teton North Korea
"schuman" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"I thought i wanna go about factory something topic what inspired that from this this loyal visitor he just been announced that i would sing a song cycle by shuman in the console and i'm opening the person in sweden and know also that'd be some art on the wolves on the restaurant of the console about he didn't approve that boss on so i don't to community so that's what turned turned on the and the lgbt community this was there was going to be some features around that right including the schumann what was the schuman that you were planning to sing or i guess performance vishwanathan was probably won't live and about a woman talking about the love for her man and now our thinking about but you were changing it's lightly just made some small rations but not much but because i still have my love for my mom so the picks kits me perfectly and so what what was it about this that this man objected to he said that he what pride parade and just wanted to vomit on hit what's so fed up with people like me and thought that we would just stay in our homes and go out and public that's what said good heavens and but but he started off it seemed promising the beginning didn't it i mean he was talking about how lovely evening then the wind was delicious what did he say the beginning of it about that in the beginning of like oh you had this on the wind was perfect and the service was supposed so everything is very good if it wasn't aren't and this music and presumably these people yeah me when you saw this got it what was your first reaction.

shuman sweden schumann schuman
"schuman" Discussed on Lovett or Leave It

Lovett or Leave It

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on Lovett or Leave It

"At least every teacher is a superhero you know who's a superhero a doctor working that late shifts i want laser beams that of a gay person bucket i all right i don't what james baldwin all right i don't want schuman capote give me a bucket break trenchant writing is not the superpower that gonna put people in the seats at a friday night at their melting blacks one of them a run real passing punch people two thousand eighteen needs to be gay my marker is way down mayor tubs i'll be on strike attribute bear with why superhero bosnian army's those busted bills uh we had a fun time tonight i wanna thank you have to leave it there are guys we have to i want to thank our amazing panel brave fantastic and informative discussion guys give it up for a lease year garza mayor michael jenny yang and the city of sacramento it who fighting lady birds bhagwad were coming out how the night is the new the london and pathetic by two david pogue.

bosnian army michael jenny yang david pogue james baldwin schuman garza sacramento london
"schuman" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Or took schuman his poached who band playing a track he called ghettos swingers your beautiful to me he began playing jazz in berlin clubs illegally because the nazis considered it too generous his mother was jewish but he wasn't arrested into 1943 when he was deported to derision start and conscripted into the ghetto swing has banned to perform for ss officers wearing brand new dark suits they featured briefly in a propaganda film in 1944 designed to show how well jews were being treated immediately after the filming the musicians were stripped of their suits and sent to auschwitz where all but three perished schuman survived because a guard who is charged with sorting at new arrivals recognized him from berlin's jazz scene he played to the inmates and the ss hangman as they tattooed new arrivals the human he later said is a peculiar creation unpredictable and merciless what we saw in those days was unbearable and yet we bore it for the sake of our survival we played music in hell for years he wouldn't speak about his experiences until persuaded that it was his duty to bear witness to alleged generation after the war he went on playing with his own band and others and was one of the first german musicians to introduce the electric guitar he was still performing into his 80s when he was recorded playing this the potential of jazz club in burden the voice of cook assume has died at the age of ninety three and that's all from us for now but an updated version of the global news podcast will be available for you to download later if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics covered in it you can send us an email the addresses global podcast bbc dug co dot uk amelio until next time goodbye.

schuman berlin cook
"schuman" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Or took schuman his poached who band playing a track he called ghettos swingers your beautiful to me he began playing jazz in berlin clubs illegally because the nazis considered it too generous his mother was jewish but he wasn't arrested into 1943 when he was deported to derision start and conscripted into the ghetto swing has banned to perform for ss officers wearing brand new dark suits they featured briefly in a propaganda film in 1944 designed to show how well jews were being treated immediately after the filming the musicians were stripped of their suits and sent to auschwitz where all but three perished schuman survived because a guard who is charged with sorting at new arrivals recognized him from berlin's jazz scene he played to the inmates and the ss hangman as they tattooed new arrivals the human he later said is a peculiar creation unpredictable and merciless what we saw in those days was unbearable and yet we bore it for the sake of our survival we played music in hell for years he wouldn't speak about his experiences until persuaded that it was his duty to bear witness to alleged generation after the war he went on playing with his own band and others and was one of the first german musicians to introduce the electric guitar he was still performing into his 80s when he was recorded playing this the potential of jazz club in burden the voice of cook assume has died at the age of ninety three and that's all from us for now but an updated version of the global news podcast will be available for you to download later if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics covered in it you can send us an email the addresses global podcast bbc dug co dot uk amelio until next time goodbye.

schuman berlin cook
"schuman" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"The technical side of things is not steered by uh the the move the money that goes into the sponsorship goes to promoting in on the marketing side but on the technical side of things any what he can contrary anybody can go to the get hub repo create issues that can create pull requests and they can become a ones they demonstrated in active involvement in our interested they can become part of the technical steering committee regardless like there is no pay for play the goes on in this organizations eyeing those are the aspects of it that make it open for me nice i liked the way the speck is palestine kit hub and is just right they're easy to understand easy to read easy to contribute to it's a really good use of a yeah i mean it it's it's the watering hole right were everybody comes to when it comes for for for tax stuff so yes sir so what are the kinds of things that you would decorate arrest service with that would be compliant in in and then we'll take it from there just slowly give me some examples of what what kinds of stuff is in their why eightyear you're looking to be able to take advantage of the tooling geico system that has been built around i mean no developers were really really enjoys riding documentation further apia ira but you're kinda haft it so part of the role of an open api description is providing that structure deserve describing the semantics the api describing the data models that are past backwards and forwards and being able to anato those with schuman readable descriptions and then there's tooling that will then take the api description the minimalistic api description and generate really nice h tml documentation that also has these kind of nice features like the tr.

palestine geico schuman
"schuman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:44 min | 4 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"No emme only emme woo this is an article by jaunty phd and mary france phd of the wyoming institute of technology schuman studies division the abstract state radio frequency identification rfid chips have been used extensively in wildlife ecology and conservation to identify and track individual specimens in a population is been nut unknown however how often raf id chips have been implanted in human populations for the tracking and identification of individuals this study analyzes the premise of rfid chip in three geographically discreet populations and found that i'm average thus populations in the usa on average one in three individuals carried it rfid chip interestingly there was a strong correlation with our if i'd egypt presence and prevalent dental work the populations three discreet hot human population is defined by geographical location or assessed for the presence of raf id chips.

mary france phd usa wyoming institute of technolog egypt
"schuman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:44 min | 4 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"No emme only emme woo this is an article by jaunty phd and mary france phd of the wyoming institute of technology schuman studies division the abstract state radio frequency identification rfid chips have been used extensively in wildlife ecology and conservation to identify and track individual specimens in a population is been nut unknown however how often raf id chips have been implanted in human populations for the tracking and identification of individuals this study analyzes the premise of rfid chip in three geographically discreet populations and found that i'm average thus populations in the usa on average one in three individuals carried it rfid chip interestingly there was a strong correlation with our if i'd egypt presence and prevalent dental work the populations three discreet hot human population is defined by geographical location or assessed for the presence of raf id chips.

mary france phd usa wyoming institute of technolog egypt
"schuman" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"To a significant degree to those medals and toxins in the body had their own electromagnetic signature there also throwing off the frequency in the body you know stress his showing off the frequency in the body and so what you have to do is you you know you'd have to do a comprehensive approach which includes oh you know low things that you're doing that you advocate things like you're al tones you so our our sound frequency therapy and then also things like maybe metal detox program uh some simple things like taking precautions in terms of protecting yourself from electromagnetic fields slide you sleep the cell phone next your bed you have a digital arm clogged up it's off of huge field yoder's and things that you can do were in pre toxic world from a lot of in a lot of ways and we have to take a comprehensive approach to stay in good health there's a couple things that i came across over the last twenty five years of of exploring the stop even before i really was as focuses i am now and one of them is i read a book by robert backer electromagnetism in life i think it was called and after that i went out and i bought a schuman resonance generator end of four listeners the schuman resonance is one of those resin frequencies that happens when we have lightning and there's lighting on the planet and it creates a reverberation between the upper atmosphere and the earth than it's around seven point eight and so my house has always had a predominant schuman residents because the cells in your body attune themselves about as if timing signal and these are things that are just missing from our awareness yet this is proven that like we know this is this is all permanent and that's why when you go into nature you feel good because you are receiving the natural frequencies that come off of the earth which includes like the schuman resonance in other frequencies so do you know what we're doing with our sound frequency has kind of taking somebody back to the same stayed in terms of what their ginning in nature and so we have evolved over you know we've only been living in like houses and we've only had you know for a.

yoder robert backer schuman twenty five years
"schuman" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"We didn't do anything with it and that that recording that vocal is just the demo like we've really didn't i saying that song you noticed in an afternoon with both be you know like yeah i mean it's just so funny how you can over think things court in general i in whatever you do yeah so we had the song and again i i knew it was special to me and it was so authentic to the kind of music in the kind of artists that i wanted to be vocally and just there's the track is so bayer and i raw that yet hiree raw and i played some music busby and i'd played some music for a couple of just tastes makers in town xm spotify the operee empty through five songs and there are a lot of uptempo in every little thing played and jr schuman who runs siriusxm the highway he was like i wanna make that my highway find in three days and i was like okay i don't have any promotion on anything to do like a kind of was mad yeah who pistole cycle your ruining i wanted to wait till january i have to do anything because i was like it's the holidays nobody cares like i have a chance he a powered and everybody was kinda like no no no no no don't do it don't do it and he was like you i want to do it and so aside men not ruin people get that opportunity to be highway fine race is i was like well here i go i'm just gonna blow another chance so hingis gave it to him and i went in and was you know you like what the worst that could have been done that guy here we go it was that are like all right whatever i guess i'll just check this off the list of things that won't work i mean a genuine the hall that way and and united i sit fries yeah i mean it was quarry z because i was coming off of touring so much with the josh habit band right that i knew like oh home girls going to have to like.

jr schuman hingis three days
"schuman" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"Who they are schuman beads and the things they been through that drove them to make the choices that they made in have the understanding of the world that they have from their vantage point there hasn't been one time in my life were having gained tolerance on it doesn't mean that i necessarily agree with them but tolerance is so important to make that congruence between how you feel about some one and the words come out your mouth as ones who have tolerance and understanding on trust is a lot were easier to go yeah you actually talked about getting people to come faster to crimes ride like you can't really like hammer that out of people you have attitude understand the point of view absolutely i do this with cops unite when i do the training for law enforcement i generally will start out with a room on say's fifty or sixty law enforcement officials i say how many of you all out there have ever gotten someone who confess in all their hands go up as if course says it in so why did they confessed you than the puzzles silence kind of happens i said well it's this is easy let let's think about is it because you sat across the table in you judged what they did ores because you sat across a table and you sought to understand who they were the choices they made and then you start understand what was important than their priorities that they have and then what you did was did you not make yourself a resource for those options and priorities is limit as they might be whether it's a reduced sentence whether it's still at family and friends know and they're all shaken not in her head justin agreement nice idea so why do we do anything else would anyone else in our lives you know it's really simple so if you can do it with a criminal so he can inspire him to confess when it's not even in his best interests all because you did judge them and probably he surrounded by people in their lives at do judge them and you were resource for their prosperity is limited as it might be.

law enforcement justin
"schuman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"schuman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"I had the scripts i took it to a few producers my friend jason schuman and then we took it to bruce cohen the improves our american beauty in milk and two great producers we took it to 'financiers immediately someone wanted wanted it but then once we had a financier doesn't mean they just gave me a blank check it was we had to go get talon attached and play that whole game and that took some time but it came together i mean it raid came together in a few years and let's talk about that process because in the in the meantime you are writing many movies you created empire you you directed on empire i assume in a way not only because you were dying to direct but also in preparation to get this movie going and to learn what to do yeah i mean i've been wanting direct for several years now and i viewed when empire when to got picked up which i never believed it was gonna get shot and then i never believers get picked up so then when it got picked up um i thought oh i could threaten episode empire like that could be great that could be a great way to direct for the first time and then and then it the and then i was i got an episode and went really well and then they offered me four more for the next season so it was it turned into this amazing way to start directing and i ended up uh i didn't directs the fourseason too but i directed two of them and then they had me direct pickup scenes whenever they had to pick up stuff i was sort of the the cleanup guy on empire which sort of funny since had only been directing tribes of the television but nonetheless i became that so it was it just was this amazing experience to get a lot of experienced directing before i went and made this movie in i shot the movie and twenty six days and i never could have done that had i not directed those empire episodes it would have been a disaster.

jason schuman bruce cohen twenty six days milk