35 Burst results for "Schubert"

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:55 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"I have a great day, you guys. You too. For calling times and topics, follow the show on Twitter at doctor brew podcast that's DR DR EW podcast. The music for today's episode can be found on the swing and sounds of the Dr. Drew podcast. Now available on iTunes. And while you're there, don't forget to rate the show. The Dr. Drew podcast as a corolla digital production and is produced by Chris locksmith and Gary Smith. For more information, go to Dr. Drew dot com. All conversation and information exchange during the participation in the doctor brew podcast is intended for educational and entertainment purposes only. Do not confuse this with treatment or medical advice or direction. Nothing on these podcasts, supplements, or supersede the relationship and direction of your medical caretakers, although Dr. Drew is a licensed position with specialty board certifications by the American board of internal medicine and the American board of addiction medicine. He's not functioning as a physician in this environment. The same applies to any professionals who may appear on the podcast or Dr. Drew dot com. Stream the biggest movies and TV shows for free on Pluto TV. Watch movies like Titanic and GI Joe the rise of cobra. Plus TV shows like CSI and Star Trek The Next Generation, starting this month, check out the 24/7 Stargate channel exclusively on Pluto TV. Plus hundreds of channels and thousands of movies and TV shows, absolutely free. Download the free Pluto TV app on your favorite streaming device and start watching today. Your next success begins with university of Maryland global campus, with no application fees if you apply by May 31st. There has never been a better time to focus on your future. Offers 100% online and hybrid courses, personalized advising, affordable tuition, and more than 90° specialization and certificate programs in numerous career relevant fields, put yourself on the path to succeed again, apply by May 31st and pay no application fee. Learn more at UMG dot EDU slash podcast, certified to operate by chev..

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"What do they attack you on? In other words, if you're interested in you're interested in prisoning drugs, yeah. She wants to criminalize homelessness. Yeah, yeah, criminalize homelessness. She wants to be the same thing. Mass incarceration, which should be really understood me and saw what we do every day in our courtroom and in our community. That's really weird. We really actually want to get people help. I'd be thrilled if I was out of a job, but we're never going to be out of a job. But we have to still hold people accountable. We commit a violent crime. You need to go. I can't tell you how many people I treated that were motivated by the criminal justice system. And successfully treated. And finally, and they may sometimes serve a little time, some of them did whatever. The judges were very appropriate with people who were actually doing well and regaining their life and being properly treated. And so I'm interested in human motivation. And you motivate people with a carrot and a stick. And you do not let people with a brain disease that prevents them from seeing. You ever heard the term anosognosia? It's originally invented coined by a guy named babinski, the famous babinski sign in regards to people with a right middle cerebral artery stroke, where the whole left side of their body is out, sensory and motor wise, they have hemiplegia. And they're not aware of it. They have a complete ignorance of everything left, not just their body, but everything left sided in the world. Like if you have them write a clock, they'll put all the numbers on the right side. Left just doesn't. It's called anosognosia. And it's agnosia is a feature of serious mental illness. It comes under other acronyms like denial or lack of insight. But when it gets severe when they're really sick, it's biological. They can't, they can't see what's happening to them. Much like a dementia patient can't see what's happened to them. And when you have anesthesia, you have an obligation. An ethical moral obligation to help people, because in that state of anesthesia, they will die. Or they will kill somebody, or they will do something awful, because it's in the nature of the illness. And how intervening for anesthetic nausea and dementia versus anesthesia in advanced addiction or serious schizophrenia or something. And the crazy thing of all, the craziest thing of all Emory is that the dementia patient who I intervene upon, I can't alter the course of that illness. That person is going to get worse. I can keep them safe with their behaviors, but I can't. Schizophrenia, if I intervene early, they can be restored. And if I, if it goes later, they're done. Same thing with addiction. Both disorders damage the brain irreversibly over time. So us not intervening early, actually doesn't just keep them not safe, but it also allows them to deteriorate into much more advanced and irreversible illnesses. That is unthinkable. No other countries do that. I don't know why we do that. It's too much. But anyway, there we are. Good times. There we are. When is it 24 that the vote is up? Oh no, it's 22. It's in June, but actually the ballots come out may 9th this year, so. People will be voting in May, but get out the vote. There's an insight here. There's an insight here going. And so we're working very hard on this. Well, I wish you best of luck. I don't. Who are you up against? I'm up against the guy that's the current appointed guy that's his name is rob bonta. He's like gascon and San Francisco DA and there's two guys at two Republicans out of Los Angeles County as well. Or better or worse, I'm the only woman in the race. I'm happy to be that. Are people understanding that gascon and his buddies are at the core of this problem? Drawing things? Yeah, are they people? Yeah. I mean, there's recalls going on there. So I think people in people need to understand, obviously, I think it's very important people understand that the current appointed AG is the same ideology as gascon and Bodine. Hey, let me ask this. I've always wanted this. Why don't the assistant ADs and the underlings under the AD am I using that with DA? I'm sorry. Under the DA. Do they become more vocal during electoral times or do they risk losing their jobs if they speak out against their boss? Because I always wonder, I feel bad for them. What do they think? And they are silent. This year is, well, LA county, the DAs are unionized. They've come out very vocally. They sued him to do his job, and they've come out to support the recall, which many of us support, obviously. And then, but in San Francisco, the prosecutors are not unionized, so they are at wills. So yeah, I would predict they're probably scared to death. They're going to get fired if they say anything. And some happen, can't early on. So I can understand it. It's a scary. They go into this profession to help people and if you speak ill against your boss, they're worried they're going to get fired. Again, disgusting. All right, well, look for Anne Marie schubert on the ballot coming up in the spring, early summer. And anything else you'd like to point out or say before we sign out? Just thanks for your time, and I appreciate it. I am. I'm the real deal. That's what I say. It's a lot of fun. I hope people see that. Anne Marie for AG dot com at schubert for AG. I know a lot of you are not in California, so this isn't directly affecting you. But you hear Adam and I complaining.

gascon dementia babinski cerebral artery stroke anesthesia rob bonta Emory schizophrenia nausea Schizophrenia LA county San Francisco Los Angeles County Bodine AG Anne Marie schubert schubert for AG Anne Marie California Adam
"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:16 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"So we're evolving. There's a lot of private companies out there that are developing these tools that can do that. But I've always looked at it. Listen, the sooner we identify someone that's responsible for crime, the sooner we prevent it, and the sooner we eliminate people that are not responsible for crime, right? So whatever we can do on that regard, it's just going to be a better for everybody, really. Yeah. The bad guy. Absolutely. Let's go back to politics for just a few more minutes. Well, maybe before the politics, I'm curious about the unemployment fraud scandal. I feel like we have stuff like that popping up all over the place as the government hands out money. It's just sort of just like with a giant hose. Is there a way to prevent that? Is there a lot more to be done in terms of collecting the funds that have been misappropriated? Where are we at? Well, there's the fact that that happens and it happens from prison sometimes. It's so astonishing to the average citizen. Yeah, I don't think there's at least in my opinion. I don't think we'll ever see a case of this magnitude where the taxpayer dollars were ripped off to the I mean, listen, we're talking about 20 to $30 billion. In California, which, by the way, the money has to, as far as I understand, it has to be paid back at some point, so that cost is going to be it's not like the criminals are going to offer to give back. The money they spent on the Maserati, right? Right. So, you know, there might be, as I say, pennies on the dollar that's recovered from the people that were actually charging and prosecuting. But the reason why in large part why it happened in the first place was because our government system did not have it set up that what we call cross match, meaning you go to prison that you should be able to say, oh, you shouldn't get unemployment because you're doing 20 years to life in prison. So we didn't have that system whereas like 30 plus states in the country did. So that was the biggest, as we said, that the door was wide open for people to walk into. Now, do I think we've made progress a 100%? I think when we kind of exposed it all, the exposed it, you know, I think the EDD department moved at lightning speed because of the obviously massive impact. There's always going to be thieves. That's just the nature of the world. Well, that's right. That's where I wanted to go next, exactly. It occurs to me and I've been noticing this particularly during the pandemic and things. Is that I feel like politicians and certainly politicians of a certain stripe have seemingly, I don't know if it's just a perception or if this is in fact the case, seemingly no understanding of the basics of human motivation and the reality of human behavior. Like total denial about that. And what is that? What are we doing with people that don't understand how humans work and are creating the carrots and the sticks in our society that helps humans be their best? I think it almost comes back to prop 47, you know, the promises were made that, you know, we're going to reduce theft and drug crimes and we're going to get people to help they need. Well, we really haven't done that. We've created, I mean, there's two types of people under prop 47. There's the addicts that are stealing to support their habit and then there's just the thieves, right? You're going to steal steel steel and they're going to go sell it to other people. I mean, look what happened at the trains in LA and all that. And everything else. So to me, it's just it is politics. It's people that just don't want to hold people accountable. They have, they've made decisions based on audiology rather than reality and practicality. Okay, so that's always goes bad for humans, right? Whenever ideology rules, humans suffer. I mean, that's just look at history. That's just everywhere. I mean, you can have an ideology, but you got to face reality here. I think I always think of ideologies as a utopian and divorce from reality. And at least that's where I see it. And I'd say it operating out there in the world. And the unwillingness to accept how humans work. It's really, it's mystifying. It really is mystifying it. And I understand that they may have their own motivational structures around, as you said, they're well funded, or they're socially reinforced for it, or something. But the fact that the legislative bodies that are supposed to be thinking about these things come to that same place without any regard for the impact on human behavior. Taking their heels when the opposite is happening, people dig in their heels. I mean, look at this, the theft. Yeah. I mean, there are people trying to dig in your heels saying, oh no, theft is down theft is down. It's not down. Not being reported anymore. Yeah, it's ridiculous. I mean, it's just an absurd position to take. We all see it. You walk in a drugstore, you will see it. Even just everything behind the plastic, you know, you can't get it, anything you want to buy. Why do you think that is? Do you think the drug stores the CBS enjoys challenging their patrons that they might walk out before they get the help to get behind the plastic? Again, human behavior. What do you think CVS is up to? Do you think they're just trying to prevent you from buying the deodorant or you think those safeguards in place? To prevent somebody from stealing the error, which is it, everybody, but all right, whatever. I get very, I get very frustrated and I find myself always feeling a certain amount of disgust. And discussed is a very weird emotion. It's one of the, it's very hard to sit with it. And it's very motivating. It motivates you to move away. And unfortunately, I feel helpless and hopeless in regard because I've been thinking and talking about these things for so many years. That might discuss just at this point it just has me just not wanting to talk about it anymore. Because I think we're at a tipping point. I don't think there's any, I mean, listen, my whole campaign is about the chaos we have in California. And that's part of the theme, which is true. But for me, it's like, we're at a tipping point in this state. We have to make a decision on how do we want to raise our children and our grandchildren. And is this really humane, the way that we are, what we're seeing? I don't know if I trust the electorate in that the fact that they put Newsom back in his position was so shocking to me, at least that they did it with such enthusiasm. That was a shock to my system. And I literally have PTSD from that. Now I'm expecting anything. What's the next shock going to be? That was startling to me. You're happy with what this guy's doing. Good audio, but wow, that fact that you did that just because the guy has a D after his name, I guess, or I don't know what motivate you, or maybe the fear of the other guys that we're running. I don't know what it was. But to do that with that degree of ease was just a shock to my system. So I worry that for folks like you that are trying to get the electorate's ear and make real change in a positive direction that really helps us in California. I mean, and when you get attacked, what's the sort of source of the attack?.

EDD department California LA CVS CBS Newsom PTSD
"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:26 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"To do with it. We used to solve the Golden State killer. That was just another kind of next step to use the technology, the DNA science then use it in a way that, you know, we use a genealogy site to identify potential relatives. Yeah, and that's the sort of exploding area right now where people are starting to learn about their familial historical past, and it's not oftentimes what they thought it was. We are mammals after. But I want to talk a little bit about the forensic DNA if you wouldn't mind. And I worry that juries and the public and even my listeners see it as sort of just so. Like a DNA's president, DNA is not present. And it really isn't a just so science per se. And I wonder if you could give them a little primer of some of those nuances, particularly something you brought up a couple of minutes ago was the population dynamics of DNA. I wonder if you could just give them a little primer I mean, so I think it always first comes down to is what is the item of evidence that you got the DNA from? So one of the first cold cases we did in Sacramento was a rate murder of an Asian woman who was 7 months pregnant and abducted and horribly sexually assault and killed. So the DNA in the case involved semen, the risk of sounding graphic. So kind of hard for the bad guy to claim, you know, that's a mistake, okay? So but then when you have, let's say you have, I don't know, a fingerprint on a window, and then you get DNA off the fingerprint or something like that. There are opportunities for someone to leave their V and a behind innocently, where they're not actually. Responsible. And so you have to always be mindful of what is the particular piece of them as a hair, you know, we're gotten to the point now. We're touched DNA is much more capable of getting DNA from that. So somebody leaves their fingerprints. And so, you know, we've had to have not, you know, they touch a glass or they touch something. But then it does come down to statistic to some extent, but the world of forensic DNA has advanced to the point. I remember when I first started, they were just doing the human genome project. I think now it's all done. And now we just don't know what to make of it. Now there's so many genetic markers that are used in the forensic world that, you know, apps and identical twins, if you have sufficient markers that you can get a DNA profile from, then you're not likely to be finding anything else. That piece open to scrutiny in the court because that's a particularly technical piece that I imagine that I'm just thinking back to the Barry shek days that he would sort of assail. The statistics on that. You always have to provide weight to the evidence. So there's that statistical component will always be there. But that's where, you know, when you say that, you know, one out of 500 quintillion people might have the same DNA. It's like, okay, we don't have that many worlds that exist. Right. So that's where. And then it comes down to, you know, like I said, what is the evidence and then what's the rest of the evidence in the case? Is there some reason why, you know, sometimes you get these guys that are charged with a rate murder and they're going to say, well, at the beginning, I didn't, I never met that woman before. And then all of a sudden by the time it goes to trial. Oh yeah, we had a relationship. I just didn't want to tell anybody and somebody else must have killed her. So it's always a way to explain away. The evidence sometimes as opposed to. No, I get it. That's the courtroom, right? Or somebody saying, they planted that glass with my fingerprints on it. She had it in for me. But what is the statistical limit before which something is not a strong piece of evidence in terms of the probability of the match? One in a million, one in 20 million. Where do your head fit in on that? Well, I think it comes back to I'm a give you an example. First DNA case I didn't Sacramento was a kidnap sexual assault of a 5 year old little girl. And this is in, I did the trial in around 99, and then the crime happened a couple of years earlier. Early days of DNA. And I think the stats were something like one in 9 million or one in 10 million. So the likelihood that somebody else left this DNA other than the guy that's charged, you'd find one out of 10 million people. Then you add in the things like, well, he's from this area, and he matches the description, although the weight of the evidence, the power of the DNA now is so overwhelmingly powerful in terms of statistics. The only limitation might be if the DNA is degraded or, you know, it's been sitting there for a long time. It's an old case and you get what's called a partial profile. But then again, you know, it's like, what's the like? I mean, you got all these things that happen together. She describes this guy as a white guy with brown hair and he's got a big nose and all these things and all of a sudden the DNA matches the white guy with brown hair and a big nose. That was kind of the combination of the circumstantial evidence that goes together. It is kind of interesting though. Humans are extremely poor at assessing probabilities. And the difference between one and ten to the 7th versus one in ten to the 16th. You're not going to bring that up in court. It's one in 10 million. So likely it happened, as opposed to one in ten quintillion, as you said, which is a lot better evidence. Really kind of interesting area. Are there things tools you need that science is trying to give you or can't give you? In other words, I wish we could do you have a wish list of things that you wish was more had greater certitude to it or less probabilistic kind of a, you know what I mean? Things that would make sense. I think that, you know, the latest tool which was used to solve the Golden State killer is the use of what's called SNPs. It stands for single nucleotide polymorphism. It's basically gives you way more data than the traditional forensic stuff. And so let's say, instead of looking at 25 places on the DNA, which is what a lot of the crime labs are doing, this allows you to look at 700 places. That's why genealogy can be very powerful. So I think we haven't gotten to that point where that's just an automatic in the forensic world..

Barry shek Sacramento
"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:13 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Okay, so all interesting stuff. So DNA is really my thing. Your thing, yeah. It is my thing. And where did you go to college and law school? I'm just curious. I went to graduated undergrad from saint Mary's college in the Bay Area, then I went to USF law school. My first DNA case was in mid 90s. I was working at Bay Area DA's office and was right when DNA first kind of came into the courtroom. I was a young prosecutor, a very serious rape case, and it was, it was a big deal. Yeah. So I kind of realized the value of DNA at the time on the ability to find the truth. Did you have any biological training in your undergraduate years? No, you know, I wasn't my dad was a doctor. He was an orthopedic, but I kind of, when I went to law school, I say this, and I only went because I figured I can't deal with blood, so I'm going to go to law school and try to get a decent job. And then halfway through school, I realized, oh my God, I love this stuff called public safety. And I just found my niche. But what was interesting, my first DNA hearing I was probably in my maybe about 30 years old. And I had to call a renowned doctor from UC San Francisco that was, I can't remember his name, but he was he testified about DNA. And the use of DNA in the forensic capacity in the medical capacity, what's called PCR and all this stuff, how it was applied to medicine, and that we should now be able to, as he used to say, arose as a roses arose, DNA is DNA is DNA, whether it's in the courtroom or whether it's actually in the healthcare profession. So I learned a lot at that time about how 23 chromosomes and everything and how we replicate it and how we can copy it now. All that stuff. And are you saying you studied it then a lot? Or that that case touched. I studied not in college, but when I got that case, I immersed myself in reading scientific journals, reading transcripts of people that experts in the field of DNA to learn it. It wasn't just about the science. It was about what we call population genetics, which is the statistical aspect of it. It's like, okay, so this DNA matches this guy, but what is the likelihood somebody else might have that same DNA? Right. And what interests me, frankly, at this point, more than your relationship with forensics and DNA is the historical context in which you came to that. I'm imagining that there was a huge, I don't know if shadow is the right word, but there was certainly energy in two areas in the 90s. I'm chuckling because when I say it, you're going to probably laugh too. One was HIV and aids. It was a major, major factor in us taking this brand new illness and coming up with a causative agent, treatments in the course of 8 years. It was unprecedented in the history of medicine. And people were like, what took so long? I was like, you understand, it took a thousand years to figure out syphilis. A thousand years. We did this in 8 years, and we have good treatments now. It was insane. It was so, so amazing. But genetics were at the center of all that. Or at least molecular biology, as we called it at the time. And at the same time, the O. J. Simpson trial. Where people were being exposed to these ideas and confused by them, frankly. I wonder if you I think it'd be interesting for this audience. If you could take us back, did you have impressions of what was going on in the courtroom at times? What was the guy named Barry oh, Barry Shaq? Very Shaq and all his maneuvering. It was confusing to me as a biologist, what he was up to. So what did you take away from all that? Well, I mean, I have the hindsight of having seen the actual evidence in that case. Which was, in my opinion, pretty overwhelming in terms of the DNA that was involved. Yeah. So set aside what the verdict was. You know, it was the world's first introduction. Many of those people that testified, I've had its witness had its witnesses later. I remember doctor Robin cotton, who was from Selma, and one of the defense attorneys was pretty well known from Sacramento and I did a lot of cases with him. I think part of it is that, you know, it took a while for the world to understand what this was, how it worked, and, you know, as years progressed, I remember having cases where they came back in 20 minutes and convicted the guy and they're like, we know this stuff. We don't, you know, it took a while for people to understand. And then you started to see people being exonerated with the same tool. And which is what we should do. If it's there to find identify people, it should also be there to exonerate people. So once, you know, it took probably ten years maybe of enough hearings and all those kinds of things. And then probably enough CSI shows and Law & Order and all that for people to realize, oh, this is actually a really good tool. And now we've evolved over time. Now look what we were able to do with it. We used to solve the Golden State killer. That was just another kind of next step to use the technology, the DNA science.

USF law school Bay Area DA saint Mary Bay Area Barry Shaq San Francisco O. J. Simpson syphilis Robin cotton HIV aids Shaq Barry Selma Sacramento
"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:12 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

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"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"So that's that. Well, our Friends did better help. That's right. People don't often realize that physical symptoms headache, teeth grinding, that kind of stuff can be a sign of stress, emotional difficulties. I've been referring people, Friends, family, and patients to better help. Better help, of course, is customized online therapy that offers video phone, even live chat sessions with your therapist. You don't have to see anyone on camera. If you don't want to. It's much more affordable than in person therapy and you can match with a therapist in under 48 hours. And of course, don't worry about stigma, people have resistance to going to see therapists, but in the state of electronic media and people are getting used to it in the days of COVID. You don't even have your camera if you don't want to. That's right. Give it a try. And see if online therapy can help lower your stress. This podcast is sponsored by better help. And the Dr. Drew podcast listeners get 10% off their first month at better help dot com slash drew that is BE, TT, ER, HELP dot com slash drew. Pendulum glucose control is the first and only medical probiotic clinically shown to help manage type two diabetes when taken, of course, with medication. That's right, over time, people with type two diabetes lose their gut bacteria that help them digest fiber and manage blood glucose levels. For those with type two diabetes, diet and exercise alone may not be sufficient to manage it. Of course, medication is very.

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:11 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And we're just summarily families up there sobbing. I have resources. I have a doctor ready to go. I have a bed for my loved one. I can't get him her off the street. Help me create a legislation that will do that. Let's reconsider LPS. And he brilliantly sort of painted the history of LPS, which is nefarious and disturbing, and again, lanterman himself went to his grave guilty over having championed that through. He felt it was one of the worst legislations. And the legislature is heartless. Tells people just to get out, get out of here. It's not a uncommon thing. That's disgusting to me. It really is just disturbing on a level that just, I don't know what to do with it. Well, we see the same thing on crimes that involve laws that bills, I should say, on public safety. We've had to bring the wives of murdered people to come to come to the legislature to say, really, you're going to let this guy out after 20 years when the judge said he's going to never get out. So there's just a lot of disheartening word that you feel like they get two minutes, right, to tell their story. And then they're disregarded. Well, let's talk a little bit about child abuse, which is something that you have been interested in. And let me just frame this conversation by saying, I have seen the fallout of childhood sexual abuse. Well, childhood abuse of all times, and by the way, for me, it's a broad category of adverse childhood experiences. It includes divorce. Absolutely. Includes divorce. Domestic abuse and aggression in the home and violence and a dad in jail, by the way, is ACE. But recently, and so anyway, so I am extremely concerned about this. And I always, by the way, say that in my world, I ran a large dark treatment program in a psychiatric hospital. Where we had a reputation of taking care of the recalcitrant poly diagnosed patients. And in my world, if you came to see me, there was a 100% probability of childhood abuse overt. Physical abuse was an object, sexual abuse, abandonment, neglect. Chaos with drug addiction in the home that kind of stuff. But childhood so angry, I am not, I have no illusions about what this is and the consequences. The one area of philosophical concern for me is that I'm framing this up in a way that I hope we can have this conversation a very civil way because I don't want people to accuse us of things. So I'm setting it up carefully. Which is that I did a radio show where every night we talked to children that were being abused or had just been a physical sexually abused in particular, the old show love light sexual abuse was rampant and all of our callers. And I knew that the child that I was sitting there talking to and by childhood consider under 18. That that child had a significant probability of becoming a perpetrator if they were not properly treated. And so the perpetrators that we see today are the children whose who are hearts were being torn apart for ten or 15 years prior. So there's a weird philosophical sort of conundrum in all this. So the conundrum is how aggressive to be with the perpetrators. Well, some perpetrators that are sociopaths need to be, frankly, I wouldn't be disturbed by the death sentence for those people. They exist for sure. But a lot of them are people that feel terrible about their impulses and do everything they can to curtail them, contain them, obfuscate them in other directions. There's a lot of that out there. And so the question becomes, and you want to have, I'm sure you agree. You want to have consequences severe enough that no one really contemplates acting out these impulses. But by the same token, we live in this time of all this electronic media stuff. And please don't misunderstand me. This is delicate territory and I don't know the answer to it. But when the current Supreme Court nominee starts talking about having a graduated scale, at least for certain kinds of exposure to certain kinds of material, I'm a little bit sympathetic to it. And it makes me feel bad. I'm actually feeling like am I right in that? Should it just be all off with their heads or should there be a graduate? I'm just curious on your sort of position on this. Well, did I frame this? Did I frame it well that I framed this conversation? No, no, I mean, I think there's no question that people that typically, when somebody becomes a child molester, it's because they have suffered the trauma themselves, right? But I have once they go as far as touching a human, all bets are off. To me, it's like a drug addict who commits a terrible violent crime. Sorry. I have no patience through their drug addiction anymore. Now it's a criminal justice system. Period. And but if somebody is trying to curtail their impulses by looking at something and then accidentally shipboard pours down on them and where they can't stop looking or something, there's no science there to say that's not a decent strategy for them to get to the point where they don't touch somebody. So I don't know. I don't know what to do with that. Obviously, the fact that that stuff is produced is the horror. The fact that somebody makes, but there's already millions and millions of stuff out there. Images. So I don't know. I don't know what to do with this. Help me. Well, I think, I mean, I think for me, we have to acknowledge that somebody that's looking at child pornography has something wrong. They've got it. They're wired wrong. And they have to deal with whatever it is that causes them to be attracted to children. Yes. And so like in our system in the state system, at least, you know, it depends on your age. It depends on how, you know, how much you have, what it is. So we do we do graduated stuff here, in a sense. Well, I think so. I mean, sometimes if you have California. Yeah, if you have large amounts of child support, it might go to the federal prosecutors. But in California, if you have child support, you're automatically going to prison, no. It depends on the circumstances. So I'm not trying to say we're soft on those types of crimes. We have to always look at the individual and how they came to this place. What's their background, all that stuff? Yeah. But for God's sake, we got to treat them. We don't turn that visualization into action. And we had to be fair, see the field of treating somebody at that stage is I'm not sure there's enough science to even say we can treat them successfully or what percentage we can treat successfully. And there may be a not me. There's a lot of harm avoidance out there in the world. There may be a group that starts saying, no, no, no, them looking at these images is how we prevent them. From moving on. It's like the whole harm reduction. Exactly. Exactly. I'm not advocating. I'm just saying that will come up. But be that as it may, you're actually making me feel better because I thought, God, am I instincts off? I just heard the way the federal hearings were going, and I thought, this is making me uncomfortable. This is not a black and white kind of issue. It is a much more nuanced, much more challenging topic than they were making it, which of course that was all political maneuvering and stuff I get it. But you're reassuring me that.

lanterman legislature Supreme Court California
"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And you've got and you've got a governor going, oh, what's going on here? I don't understand what this is. Oh, governor, you don't understand what this is? Then we are in big trouble. It's really solid. It is something. And so it's for me, I'm not running for AG other than any other reason. I love the state. We are the most beautiful state in the country. Both were ethnically diverse, where geographically diverse, and yet we got people that are, you know, a cocktail conversations are talking about violent crime, homelessness, and where are you going to move to? And that's not the, that's not where we should be. And it's not the way we should raise our kids. Oh, my kids are can't wait to get out of here. They're disgusted with it, and they're in their 20s. And they're like, this is not a state. I can live in for multiple reasons, not just how decayed it is, but also the cost of living and the quality of life. Everything gone. I think one thing, it seems to me as AG, there might be an opportunity or, I don't know, maybe let me not frame it that way. I would like to see us reopen lanterman petrus short. Lanterman himself went to his grave, having felt that this was one of the gravest errors in California history. And yet all of the mandates for holding people against their will were really fashioned after LPS here in this state. Isn't it time to get more in tuned with what's medically appropriate? And reopen LPS and and conservatorships, even though ships have a bad name, thank you to Britney Spears dad. But what I kept saying is, okay, Britney wants to get off conservatorship. Fine. She deserves a chance. And here's one of the reasons I think so. I can walk across the street and find somebody that needs a conservatorship more than her. I can't get that guy a conservatorship. What's wrong with this date? So LPS conservatorship. What about looking at those two things again? It might help the sickest amongst those that are out wandering the streets. 100% agree. There was a study that came out at the end of last year, was called grading the states on how do we do in California versus other states. And we got a D minus on our psychiatric laws because we don't like on 51 50, you know, we have the most we don't allow family members. To allow somebody to be treated in voluntarily. Don't we think that they are probably the best ones to see that our siblings are family members are kind of circling the drain on drug addiction, mental health. They are the ones. They're the most desperate. Sent them up to Sacramento and they've been told to scram. Totally get out of here. Yes. Who are you to say? Right, so, you know, we have to be willing to step in. I mean, listen, people that are at that state when they are seriously drug addicted mentally ill are not capable of making those decisions. And in my view, we have to get to the point where we say we're going to mandate treatment. And there is no political will from some of these activists to do that. What is that? I don't understand. None of them have any experience treating sick patients. So why is anyone listening to them number one? But number two, what's the issue? What's wrong with helping people that are going to die if you don't help them? I don't understand. And by the way, no physicians, and where is the American psychiatric association? Why aren't any physicians on any of these committees that are making decisions about people with brain disorders? I think if you look at some of the local politics, if it's whether it's San Francisco or some of the urban cities, you know, there's so much activists that are controlling the narrative and many of these weird, but why? Where is that energy coming from? It doesn't make sense. It doesn't really a lot of funding. I guess it's funny. If you keep funding the demise of people and the service of people and you don't and you just let them use drugs openly and these open air drug scenes, then you can keep funding those organizations. And I think it's most folks. It's just, you know, your average citizen, if you're walking down the street and some of these communities are like, this is not humane to let these folks die in the gutters. Well, you know, and I didn't mean to object to any sort of drug replacement therapies, even if you're giving the parent patient heroin. So long as you're doing something active to motivate that person towards health. Again, I have no philosophical anything other than helping the patients, getting them through is getting them out of it. It's all I did for years and to see them all dying and being unhelped. It's so glaring to somebody that worked in that field for a long time. The other thing to switch gears a little bit on you, I always say. And by the way, I'm not in favor of everybody's mandated treatment. I'm in favor of a carrot and a stick and holding people who are so ill that they really can't make decisions for themselves. And I would point to dementia patients. So if I have a patient with bipolar disorder and drug addiction who's wandering around the streets, flailing their arms walking in traffic doesn't know the day or the day, disorganized about who they are, can't think straight. Whatever. And if that is due to dementia and I don't treat that patient, I could be guilty of a crime, not just malpractice. But if it's bipolar or schizophrenia, you're not allowed to go near them. Why is one brain disorder protected and the other brain disorder if I don't help? I'm criminally accountable. Isn't that weird? It's been politicized. Again. I think it's happened. Yeah, that's not about the medicine, as always. I'll refer to everybody the case a in our prosecution. COVID-19. But anyway, and lockdowns. And in a school masking and masking into the age of 5 and all these things that don't have any medical basis for them. Anyway, here we are. Never thought I'd be here in my career. So prop 47 prop 57 AB one O 5, or one O 9, is it? Yeah, one O 9. That was the beginning. Yeah. We actually went up there on blanking. Same. And we went up there with a bill to try to reopen LPS and empower families to have some say, like you're saying in this..

lanterman petrus Lanterman AG California Britney Spears Britney American psychiatric associati Sacramento dementia San Francisco bipolar disorder schizophrenia
"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:31 min | 3 months ago

"schubert" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"People that support us here. I do not forget to check out doctor TV. We do a streaming show there. A lot of interesting people coming through more day and day type stuff as well. So do check it out. And don't forget the Instagram Dr. Drew Pinsky. Today are the pleasure of interviewing and Marie schubert, Sacramento district attorney. Her website is Anne Marie for AG, attorney general, California, and Marie and E, Marie MRI four AG dot com. And also Twitter at schubert for AG. She is known for the successful prosecution of Golden State killer, second story rapist. California unemployment fraud, which I'm sort of interested in. And Marie, welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it very much. So I want to first give you the chance to give me your sort of political platform. In other words, why should we vote for you? Out of politics, I am. I thought AG was an appointed position in this state. It is not evidently. It's not. It's an elected position. The current person in a position rob onto was appointed by governor Newsom a little over a year ago, close to a year ago. So, I mean, let me just kind of tell you who I am. First of all, I'm not a politician, probably like you. I'm just a career prosecutor. I've been in the business for 31 years. I absolutely love my profession. I grew up in the trenches, spent majority of my career in violent crying, prosecuting child abuse, sexual assault, homicide cases. My passion has and always will be cool cases. So the Golden State killer is obviously one of the pinnacles of that. But I've had many, many others that I could probably spend a few hours talking about and including ones where we've exonerated people with DNA. So I ran for DA in Sacramento in 2015 and I was very grateful to have great support. One, one again in 2018, and then about a year, maybe a year and a half ago, several of my colleagues just as we've watched the demise of public safety in California and the quality of life for all of California's. Several of my colleagues who are DAs across California some from conservative county, some from more liberal counties. Said you ought to run for AG and just my little backstory. I'm an independent. I'm not I'm a no party preference kind of gal. I was a Republican. I'm not a political person. That's what my dad registered as. I always voted on a good citizen. But I'm a prosecutor, I believe, in a balanced system, I believe in accountability. I also believe in rehabilitation a 100% and but I've also watched the demise of the laws. I mean, you know, I know you know this Dr. Drew, we can drive around and you can see the demise of our state under the overpasses in our parkways in the parks. It is a humanitarian crisis that we're facing. And there are some folks, as you know, out there that want to say it's simply a public health issue, what we're seeing with drug addiction, mental health. It's not. It's a public safety issue as well. It's blend. Let's go dig into that a little bit right away. So it is a blend. It is both. The reason the reason we have a public health issue is the laws prevent us from helping these people who are so ill. They just prevent it. And so it's a deny that mix is insane. It all, for me, harkens back to the community mental health act of 1962 or 63, which was president Kennedy's last signature he put to a document before going to his fateful journey to Dallas. And the principles of that document were to undo the state healthcare systems, which were deemed to be draconian awful, horrible. A 150 years of development was undone with the stroke of a pen. In the name of the directors the national student mental health at the time had this bizarre notion, we had three psychoanalysts in that position over about 30 years. None of them had ever treated anybody with serious mental illness. All of them took the Foucault collie in position that mental illness was caused by institutions, which is so drastically insane. And they dismantled all the state healthcare systems in the name of community mental health centers, which were abject failures and finally closed by president Reagan in the 80s because they weren't serving anyone. And so here we are. The disgorged all those patients to the streets, the nursing homes and the prisons. And since then, further efforts to undermine any ability to do anything with those folks that we're now in nursing homes in the prisons, now we can't do anything anywhere with them and they just die on the street. So there we are. The short strokes. It's a combination of those kinds of actions, but it's also a combination of things like prop 47. I mean, I'm sure you're very familiar with it. I was elected in the summer of 2014. So I wasn't the DA yet, but I was on a phone call in the fall because that's when that ballot initiative was on the ballot. And I was trying to implore people. This is not a good idea. Yeah. This is going to result in massive theft, you know, only enabling drug addiction, prosecutors are going to lose the tools of drug courts, all those things that matter. And I believe it was the biggest con job in California history, the way it was written. And the promises that were made, and now that's one of many, but there's many bad public policies, but we're in this predicament in large part because as I say a tsunami of bad things. They are legislative bad things, though, can you do anything as an AG? Oh yeah. I mean, I mean, first of all, you know, even in my elected DA role, I take a pretty assertive role in legislative advocacy. But as the AG, I would do the same thing. I mean, the problem with 47 is that we can't fix it without really going back to the ballot box. There's no political will in our legislature to fix it. It's, you know, it's always tends to be a 5 to two vote against anything that's actually going to fix things that we're recognizing or not working. So as the AG, I have every intention to try to step into that, it's not just about enabling drug addiction. We have serial theft, it's rampant, right? I mean, I know you were down in LA. I mean, I got to look at that. The railroad cars and what's happening in the stores and you got citizens now tackling thieves..

California AG Marie schubert Marie MRI four AG Dr. Drew schubert for AG governor Newsom Marie Sacramento conservative county Anne Marie rob Twitter president Reagan Kennedy Dallas legislature LA
2 minors dead, 8 wounded in shooting at Pittsburgh party

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

2 minors dead, 8 wounded in shooting at Pittsburgh party

"I I I I shooting shooting shooting shooting out out out out of of of of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh party party party party over over over over the the the the weekend weekend weekend weekend has has has has left left left left two two two two teens teens teens teens dead dead dead dead police police police police say say say say shots shots shots shots fired fired fired fired at at at at a a a a house house house house party party party party in in in in Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh early early early early Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday killed killed killed killed two two two two seventeen seventeen seventeen seventeen year year year year olds olds olds olds and and and and wounded wounded wounded wounded at at at at least least least least eight eight eight eight other other other other people people people people Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh police police police police chief chief chief chief Scott Scott Scott Scott Schubert Schubert Schubert Schubert says says says says hundreds hundreds hundreds hundreds of of of of people people people people the the the the vast vast vast vast majority majority majority majority of of of of them them them them minors minors minors minors had had had had gathered gathered gathered gathered at at at at the the the the short short short short term term term term rental rental rental rental property property property property when when when when some some some some kind kind kind kind of of of of altercation altercation altercation altercation happened happened happened happened and and and and shots shots shots shots were were were were fired fired fired fired shortly shortly shortly shortly after after after after midnight midnight midnight midnight Schubert Schubert Schubert Schubert adds adds adds adds there there there there was was was was gunfire gunfire gunfire gunfire both both both both inside inside inside inside and and and and outside outside outside outside the the the the rental rental rental rental home home home home and and and and potentially potentially potentially potentially back back back back and and and and forth forth forth forth he he he he added added added added bullet bullet bullet bullet casings casings casings casings found found found found at at at at the the the the scene scene scene scene indicated indicated indicated indicated handguns handguns handguns handguns and and and and one one one one rifle rifle rifle rifle were were were were use use use use no no no no arrests arrests arrests arrests were were were were immediately immediately immediately immediately made made made made I'm I'm I'm I'm Shelley Shelley Shelley Shelley Adler Adler Adler Adler

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsbur House House House House Party Scott Scott Scott Scott Schube Schubert Schubert Schubert Sch Shelley Shelley Adler Adler
Shootings around the country over the weekend in SC, Pittsburgh

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Shootings around the country over the weekend in SC, Pittsburgh

"Over over over over the the the the weekend weekend weekend weekend several several several several shootings shootings shootings shootings around around around around the the the the country country country country some some some some ending ending ending ending in in in in death death death death others others others others injury injury injury injury in in in in Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh just just just just after after after after midnight midnight midnight midnight Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday police police police police say say say say two two two two miners miners miners miners were were were were killed killed killed killed at at at at a a a a house house house house party party party party inside inside inside inside an an an an Airbnb Airbnb Airbnb Airbnb at at at at least least least least eight eight eight eight more more more more being being being being treated treated treated treated for for for for gunshot gunshot gunshot gunshot wounds wounds wounds wounds and and and and others others others others injured injured injured injured trying trying trying trying to to to to get get get get away away away away hope hope hope hope you you you you have have have have a a a a holiday holiday holiday holiday when when when when your your your your child child child child was was was was involved involved involved involved in in in in some some some some something something something something dramatic dramatic dramatic dramatic like like like like this this this this I I I I chief chief chief chief Scott Scott Scott Scott Schubert Schubert Schubert Schubert says says says says handguns handguns handguns handguns and and and and a a a a rifle rifle rifle rifle were were were were used used used used in in in in there there there there were were were were multiple multiple multiple multiple shooters shooters shooters shooters shotspotter shotspotter shotspotter shotspotter scheming scheming scheming scheming for for for for over over over over ninety ninety ninety ninety rounds rounds rounds rounds audio audio audio audio courtesy courtesy courtesy courtesy W. W. W. W. T. T. T. T. A. A. A. A. ET ET ET ET around around around around the the the the same same same same time time time time in in in in South South South South Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina a a a a shooting shooting shooting shooting at at at at a a a a Hampden Hampden Hampden Hampden county county county county nightclub nightclub nightclub nightclub left left left left at at at at least least least least nine nine nine nine people people people people injured injured injured injured then then then then during during during during the the the the day day day day in in in in Columbia Columbia Columbia Columbia South South South South Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina chaos chaos chaos chaos at at at at a a a a mall mall mall mall nine nine nine nine people people people people shot shot shot shot five five five five injured injured injured injured trying trying trying trying to to to to flee flee flee flee the the the the scene scene scene scene police police police police say say say say no no no no one one one one died died died died and and and and a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty two two two two year year year year old old old old is is is is under under under under arrest arrest arrest arrest I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Pittsburgh House House House House Party Scott Scott Scott Scott Schube South South South South Caroli Carolina W. W. W. W. T. T. T. T. A. A. Hampden Hampden Hampden Hampde Columbia Scene Scene Scene Scene Police Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker
Throwback: Mayor Craig Shubert Demands School Board Resigns

Mark Levin

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Throwback: Mayor Craig Shubert Demands School Board Resigns

"I don't know about you but I know I remember this clip of audio from a while back of a mayor Craig schubert he shows up at a school board meeting back in September of 2021 And he basically tells all the school board members look I just found out what you people are doing And you better resign or get charged Listen to this It has come to my attention That your educators are distributing essentially what is child pornography In the classroom I've spoken to a judge this evening She's already confirmed that So I'm going to give you a simple choice We either choose to resign from this board of education Or you will be charged Thank you I'd be clapping for this mayor too man That's the kind of mayor I wish I had I wish I had a mayor like Craig schubert a governor like Ron DeSantis because this is so

Craig Schubert Ron Desantis
Sacramento Suspect Released From Prison Before Shooting

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Sacramento Suspect Released From Prison Before Shooting

"From Sacramento, back to the rundown. The suspect in the Sacramento mass shooting was out of prison, despite receiving a ten year term. That's right, it happened again. The board of parole urged Martin remaining custody, but he won his release, the subject of a plea by Sacramento county district attorney Anne Marie schubert's office, went unheeded, and the board of parole let him out. Way to go, California, 6 people are dead, four others in critical condition.

Sacramento Anne Marie Schubert Sacramento County Martin California
Germany: Big on Production, Short on Wisdom

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:34 min | 7 months ago

Germany: Big on Production, Short on Wisdom

"Right now, among the many, many changes in my life in the last two years and it's startling to me that I've had them. Really thought I understood a lot about life and I did. But even more now, now I want you to know when somebody says something unless it's factually obviously incorrect. But something that the establishment in any field finds heretical, I take the person seriously. This is not what I did in the past. Any subject, especially in the medical field. The corruption of the medical institutions that I have seen in the last year and a half, two years. Has been mind boggling. The medical establishment essentially was wrong in every way. I'll go back a moment to Germany giving people they have a word I don't know the German word energy poverty or energy poor. So you know I have a statement. One of my guidelines in life, Germany is always wrong. I was thinking about this in light of the Germans have almost a monopoly on the greatest music ever written. I mean, it's an astonishing that one group has produced. I mean, think about it. But Beethoven schubert schumann handel. Who did I forget of the great haydn oh my God my own beloved beloved haydn. I mean, who is missing from the German list? Tchaikovsky, and who is a great argument. But it's amazing. And on technology, if I see something as made in Germany, I just buy it. I know it will be superb. But on wisdom, there are no more nuclear reactors in Germany. Because Angela Merkel is afraid of nuclear power. Back in a moment. The Dennis

Germany Beethoven Schubert Schumann Ha Tchaikovsky Angela Merkel Dennis
Larry O'Connor: Bette Midler Is Representative of What the Entertainment Elite Think of You

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 8 months ago

Larry O'Connor: Bette Midler Is Representative of What the Entertainment Elite Think of You

"I want to reiterate Before I got into this I've been doing talk radio and writing Andrew breitbart Andrew breitbart the late great Andrew wiper I can't believe as of next year as of this February March 1st it will be ten years since he died all too suddenly in all too soon and all too early But he discovered me He brought me into this world Before I started writing for Andrew at his websites and before I started doing streaming talk radio on his websites and then eventually talk radio here in the real world on real radio We are listening to me now I was in the entertainment business I was in the theater business Broadway theater I worked for the schubert organization which owned 17 Broadway theaters I worked for the theaters in New York I worked for the theaters in Los Angeles the Los Angeles schubert I was the manager of it That's how I came across Andrew Andrew breitbart So I know Bette Midler I've worked with people very similar to Bette Midler This is not uncommon This is really for the most part what they think of you But so I understand the business I understand Broadway So I know who the people of West Virginia are Let me just be clear here When a west virginian saves their money for their dream vacation to New York to see the biggest most exhilarating exciting city in America New York City They're the ones who buy a ticket to see a revival of hello Dolly They're not going to see Hamilton they're not going to see you know one of the artsy experimental theater pieces that's edgy and cutting edge No you're from West Virginia You're going to Broadway It's like okay what are your choices You want to see phantom of the opera Sure Great choice Great musical love fan of the opera You want to say an old look there's a revival of hello Dolly oh hello Dolly Remember the movie with Barbra Streisand Hello diet Midler is playing Dolly Levi Let's go see that That's who goes to see the revival of hello Dolly with Bette Midler Last time she was on Broadway that was her

Andrew Breitbart Andrew Wiper Theater Business Broadway Thea Schubert Organization Bette Midler Andrew Andrew Breitbart Los Angeles Andrew New York West Virginia New York City Hamilton America Dolly Levi Barbra Streisand Midler Dolly
"schubert" Discussed on The Chip Race

The Chip Race

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"schubert" Discussed on The Chip Race

"If it was oil money you might punt off necessarily every time but you might be more tempted to make the wrong move without so much responsibility for the peoples financial wellbeing. Yeah one other point. I would say that too. Is that sometimes when you're staking people. Are you bought a piece of if it's a big tournament. They might not have a problem with concentrating. Because it means a lot to them for eric can become an issue. I do know people say they're playing a one k and they've sold half and now they're engaged because it's a big tournament but let's illusory courses their stock so now instead of having five hundred in equity they only have a hundred equity. Roughly i- hobson people who will just punt in that situation going while meter out of this tournament aren't getting back into it. But i'm not gonna sit here and grind this short stack patiently. That's something i definitely would never do like no matter. How short sector him. Play the absolute best. I can irrespective of whether i'm staked or not but it is kind of understandable if somebody's equity is so tiny tournament and they have to just sit there and keep folding that they might decide to end this or i'm going to have a stock were playing but you know if you're playing with people's money you have a responsibility to sort of respect and give it your all yet while said darah okay. Well that concludes our chat about selling action. Thank you very much to paul seton for allowing this switch of the role really appreciate it. Thanks guys that was great. Well thank you. Paul paul will of course be back with us on the next episode when we will be talking about that aspect of his gamble online article staking a subject. Which darren i do know quite a bit about and have quite mixed feelings on. If you'd like to read that article you can do so by going to the poker section of gamble online darko. We're joined now by poker player. And former twitch streamers she is also a wonderful singer known to many as pooh dog. Melissa she is melissa schubert melissa. Welcome thank you hello. You are relatively new poker. You've been playing seriously for round. Two years as i said you were twitch streamers i want to ask you about why you quit streaming later because i'm also a recovering twitter but i still the thing that sean through on your streams on your social media still is your self deprecating sense of humor joked about what fish you were. You've made fun of the fact that you used to stream defy viewers at were there any key moments as a player and as a streamer. Where sudenly you felt. Oh and not fish anymore or oh people do actually want to watch me onto it. Well i think while i was streaming on twitch i was still largely a fish but it's actually funny i was looking last night at Database i found one of my first tournaments. I've ever played which was july of two thousand nineteen. And i really want to make a video reviewing it because it is just insane. Just limping every hand in staff. So i actually looking back realized i was completely starting from square one and i didn't think i was so i think i realized people wanted to watch me. I guess like the first month streamed for a cr. I got a lot of viewers that one month and the stream was going pretty well. And i think it would have continued to go well but i decided More for me. In terms of what i find fulfilling in poker and i think it may be one day i might return to streaming when i.

darah okay paul seton Paul paul hobson melissa schubert melissa eric darko darren Melissa sean twitter
Selling Action in Poker Tournaments

The Chip Race

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Selling Action in Poker Tournaments

"Well the first question is quite easy in just goes back to what you were saying. You start it's taking probably between twenty two thousand seventeen. But i wonder if you can each remember. The first time are sold at auction at your feelings were about doing so is there any doubt was something he just flew into confidence. The first time i ever sold action. I do remember it was for my i d. I wasn't really ruled. Free petits at the time but one of the top poker players in our run me up and said he was interested in buying a big piece indie potato so i ended up setting fifty percent of myself and turning it into rosary modest by international. It was more common the time but it was fairly new back then. Seemed to be most What that was a poker player looking to have a sweat. Apart from the fact that he was playing the event himself it was very ad hoc like that people have already any idea of what the correct markups should be. So yeah. I think that was two thousand nine. Roughly yeah when i look back i would say that it was definitely an online event and it was probably relatively small cleaning things where you know you might satellite into. Ns tops or w coup or something like that online. And then it's sorta seemed prudent to maybe twelve and then maybe salad trumka's well. I remember the first proper Was twelve and a half percent to a couple of friends. When i qualified for the full series in two thousand and nine i had my way from the twenty five dollars. Satellite to a to k package and in my mind that was trying to cover the cost to go to the live events. I thought it'd be smart. 'cause i wasn't old at the time i was right in growing your mode when it used to play forty five months and this was for chefs and yeah went very well and i ended up having to my friends. grams for those small pieces was a fifteen hundred events. I think i only settled about two hundred bucks worth but the pin a good purchase by them. I didn't begrudge it to them. Because they were kind of people who i used to do. A lot of swapping with back when i lived in the states and played

Trumka
"schubert" Discussed on Hey Moms in Business

Hey Moms in Business

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"schubert" Discussed on Hey Moms in Business

"I think that just shows.

"schubert" Discussed on Hey Moms in Business

Hey Moms in Business

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"schubert" Discussed on Hey Moms in Business

"Antonio fazio is an industry powerhouse. Who has overseen forty thousand home sold and nine billion in production and kristin cantrell is one of the nation's most accomplished waiters helping thousands of abatements killed their businesses. They are passionate about designating encouraging and empowering bombs in real estate our next episode starts now. Hey you guys welcome to moms in real estate. This is kristin cantrell. And i'm angela fazio. Today's guest is super dynamic. Her name is ashley schubert and she is a mom of five children. She's a three time author and one of her books is called raising a business with babies. I got that wrong. You're going to help me with that So we're really excited to talk with her. She's got very young children a very successful brokerage which is called flourish which is amazing. Since that's the name of our favorite speaking event that we do with women So ashley welcome and tell us a little bit about yourself. Thank you guys so much for having me. I think what you're doing to inspire moms in real estate is just amazing and thank you for doing it. I feel like we're on the same journey to encourage moms that we can. We can do it all and we can do it all well. That's thank you your money. My name's ashley Like she said. I do have three book. South of first one called raising a business and babies The second one is a devotional thirty days to shine. And the third one is a standalone book called overrated and so those greer all available on amazon and Help you will love them. a little bit more about me. I've been a real estate for about nine years. I took my real estate exam when i was forty week. Pregnant thankfully. I passed that pretty quickly and got started So i had to do it before. I went into labor so I started a team. A couple of years after being solo agent and then in twenty nineteen started a brokerage called porsche. Real estate group here in oklahoma Along with doing real estate. I've had five babies so the whole time. I've been in the business i've been having children. And so you know they provide me with lots of laughs stories and struggles Along the way I'm also a speaker and author and a podcast host. So i hope the podcast called business and baby so that's me in a nutshell so your oldest is nine. Do i remember that correctly. She'll be nine in november. You know i only girl you know. I remember that because the math size for nine years. You have either been pregnant or breastfeeding. They mentioned that. So yes. I was pregnant with her years ago. Yeah like a rockstar. And so many love because that will make so hard for me to a hard number and i hope this is not tmi but like in nine years. I've had like two periods. Oh my.

kristin cantrell Antonio fazio angela fazio ashley schubert ashley Like ashley greer amazon porsche oklahoma
What Cops Are Doing With Your DNA

Slate's If Then

01:57 min | 1 year ago

What Cops Are Doing With Your DNA

"Morning. Everybody for those. That don't know my name. Is anne marie schubert. I'm the district attorney of sacramento county. I remember watching this press conference. Susan was april of two thousand eighteen. The da came out to make our announcement. She's standing in front of a crime lab surrounded by a bunch of cops and he was there to say that finally almost cinematic investigators had found a golden state killer. This man who had terrorized california's throughout the seventies and eighties. There were upwards of fifty rapes twelve murders crimes that spanned ten years across at least ten different counties nor decades had passed law enforcement. Hit dead ends and then regrouped amateur on the internet swap theories and then after more than forty years abroad got him and done it by putting his dna profile on genetic. Teeny apology websites. It is fitting that today is national. Dna we found the needle in the haystack. And it was right here. In sacramento joseph jams. Dangelo was arrested. We'd guilty disturbing twenty six life. Sentences and his case was billed as a triumph for crime solving and genealogy and it marked a seismic shift in how investigators used dna in cold cases. Do you remember what you thought. When you heard that genetic genealogy had been such a big part of that case. I was really intrigued Because i have a biology background before i went to law school and i never thought that you would sort of come together in this way. That's nilo bala. She's a senior attorney the policing project at nyu law school and she studies. How technology and policing come together.

Anne Marie Schubert Sacramento County Dangelo Susan California Sacramento Nilo Bala Nyu Law School
Sacramento DA Schubert seriously considers 2022 run against Bonta

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Sacramento DA Schubert seriously considers 2022 run against Bonta

"15th Everybody 16 and older. Sacramento District attorney Anne Marie Schubert, reportedly considering a run against a similar member Rob Bonta for California attorney general in 2022. Schubert drew coverage last year for helping to uncover a massive fraud case, including unemployment benefits going toe California inmates. And on Wednesday, Governor Gavin

Anne Marie Schubert Rob Bonta Sacramento Schubert California Governor Gavin
Brian Schubert, University of Louisiana at Lafayette  Using Fossil Plants to Measure Climate Change

The Academic Minute

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Brian Schubert, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Using Fossil Plants to Measure Climate Change

"What can fossils teach us about. The future of climate change doctor lin pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute. Brian schubert associate professor in the school of geosciences at the university of louisiana digs end. To look ahead. We learn as children that all plants require water and carbon dioxide to grow. The water comes from rain or melted. Snow that infiltrates into the earth and enters the plant through the roots all the carbon dioxide diffuses through pores into the plant's leaves every plant on planet. Earth uses these two ingredients to form new compounds via photosynthesis when the plant dies a fortunate few are buried beneath layers of silt and sand removed from the ravages of oxygen decomposition and preserved in the geologic record as a geochemists. My job is to analyze the chemical remains of these fossilized photosynthesis to answer questions like when was the last time. Carbon dioxide levels were as high as today and how will global warming effect precipitation patterns across the planet to answer these questions. We studied the products of photosynthesis that had been locked away for millions of years. Within fossilized plant remains we do this using a specialized piece of equipment called an ratio mass. Spectrometer this machine has a giant magnet that separates and then counts individual molecules freed from within the fossils by first heating to over one thousand degrees celsius. These liberated molecules contain the exact same carbon oxygen atoms that once made up the carbon dioxide and water that were combined many millions of years ago. by the plant's photosynthetic. Machinery has shown that these compounds provide a chemical fingerprint of the amount of rainfall that fell over the forest and the amount of carbon dioxide available for photosynthesis many eons ago. Our end result is a veritable weather report of changing climate across millions of years of earth. His that implicates changing carbon dioxide concentrations as the primary perpetrator for perturbing earth's climate past and present. That was brian shubert of the university of louisiana.

Lin Pascarella Association Of American Colleg Brian Schubert School Of Geosciences University Of Louisiana Brian Shubert
Seattle-area restaurant owners plead with state lawmakers to reopen at 25% capacity

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle-area restaurant owners plead with state lawmakers to reopen at 25% capacity

"Pleading with state lawmakers to end pandemic related closures and save their businesses more from comas. Corwin Hank Schubert Ho is owner and chef at Salt and Iron and Edmonds. This shutdown has deeply impacted our business. You sure state senators reopening can be done safely. He did it before the three or four months in the summer time that we were serving custom. Where's that 50% capacity? Not one server caught Covitz owners tell the Senate Business and Finance Committee they'd like an immediate move to allow reopening at 25% capacity. Lacey Fehrenbach, the state health departments, covert czar, says she gets it. We want to reopen our economy as well. It's saving lives comes first. Restrictions that we have put in place have made a different under the governor's plan. A region can qualify for Phase two reopening if new covert cases fall 10% over two weeks, and the region's ICU beds are at less less than than 90% 90% capacity. capacity. Corwin Corwin

Corwin Hank Schubert Ho Salt And Iron Senate Business And Finance Co Lacey Fehrenbach Edmonds Corwin Corwin
"schubert" Discussed on The Birth Ease Podcast

The Birth Ease Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"schubert" Discussed on The Birth Ease Podcast

"I've <Speech_Female> <hes> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Music> had to do <Speech_Female> my own work. I <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> that is still <Speech_Female> an evolution <Speech_Female> for me <Speech_Female> as i walk <Speech_Female> through different <Speech_Female> phases of <Speech_Female> this work. <Speech_Female> What <Speech_Female> are my limiting <Speech_Female> believes. <Speech_Female> What is the root <Speech_Female> cause of those <Speech_Female> limiting beliefs <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> being <Speech_Female> able to step <Speech_Female> you know out <Speech_Female> of that and move <Speech_Female> forward to <Speech_Female> where we are today <Silence> <SpeakerChange> with it. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well and i <Speech_Female> think also <Speech_Female> is someone that <Speech_Female> holds space <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> you are that <Speech_Female> person <Speech_Female> and really essentially <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> helping <Speech_Female> people's bodies <Speech_Female> to remember <Speech_Female> that they can <Speech_Female> be safe <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> that they can <Speech_Female> experience trust <Silence> <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> when we <Speech_Female> hold space. <Speech_Female> It's so <Speech_Female> important for us <Speech_Female> to do our own <Speech_Female> work. <Speech_Female> Absolutely <Speech_Female> absolutely <Speech_Female> lynn talks <Speech_Female> about. <Speech_Female> That's the preparation <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> our day <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> pending on <Speech_Female> what happens <Speech_Female> we may <Speech_Female> need to sweep our <Speech_Female> own bowls in <Speech_Female> between clients <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> To make sure where. It's <Speech_Female> just a conduit <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> send this <Speech_Music_Female> energy <Speech_Music_Female> back <Speech_Female> to the earth <Speech_Female> or up into <Speech_Female> the sky. Were <Speech_Female> just there <Speech_Female> to help <Speech_Female> this flow. <Speech_Female> Were not <Speech_Female> there to <Speech_Female> hold it <Speech_Female> and to take <Silence> it on right. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And sometimes <Speech_Female> that's a lot <Speech_Female> easier said than done <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> empathetic <Speech_Female> beings <Speech_Female> as we are when we get <Speech_Female> into help care <Speech_Female> but <Silence> really <Speech_Female> it's <Speech_Female> important to <Speech_Female> do and <Speech_Female> it's kind of oddly <Speech_Female> said but <Speech_Female> i find <Speech_Female> bat <Speech_Female> the clients <Speech_Female> feel so <Speech_Female> much more <Speech_Female> empowered <Speech_Female> when <Speech_Female> they <Speech_Female> have <Speech_Female> moved <Speech_Female> this energy <Speech_Female> when you see <Speech_Female> that empowerment <Silence> <Speech_Female> it makes <Speech_Female> it easier to <Speech_Female> flow <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> energy out <Speech_Female> my own <Speech_Female> body and not hold <Speech_Female> it <Speech_Female> as something <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> i need to <SpeakerChange> take on <Speech_Female> for them. <Speech_Female> Yeah <Speech_Female> yeah and as you're talking <Speech_Female> could see <Speech_Female> the need to <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> a collective <Speech_Female> pelvic bowl <Speech_Female> where we <Speech_Female> clear <Speech_Female> out. <Speech_Female> Just the collective <Speech_Female> unconsciousness <Speech_Female> surrounding <Speech_Female> birth <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> around <Speech_Female> pregnancy <Speech_Female> around being a mom <Speech_Female> being <Speech_Female> a woman <Speech_Female> regina <Speech_Female> flying as a woman <Speech_Female> here <Speech_Female> at this point <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on our planet <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the past <Silence> and where we are now. <Silence> <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> i am definitely <Speech_Female> gonna be getting <Speech_Female> tammy <Speech_Female> lynn kim's book <Speech_Female> the wild feminine <Speech_Female> and i am going <Speech_Female> to mention that she does <Speech_Female> have a pregnancy <Speech_Female> book as well <Speech_Female> if anyone's interested <Speech_Female> and i'll have <Speech_Female> those links <Speech_Female> and the show notes <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Male> then as <Speech_Male> she mentioned <Speech_Male> they can find <Speech_Female> your meditation <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> on <Silence> your website. <Speech_Female> Just <Speech_Female> go to my website. <Speech_Female> The balanced pelvis dot <Speech_Female> com <Speech_Female> right. Now if <Speech_Female> you go down to the very <Speech_Female> bottom it'll say <Speech_Female> please join my mailing <Speech_Female> lists <Speech_Female> if you join the <Speech_Female> mailing list. <Speech_Female> It should send you <Speech_Female> the link to the pelvic <Speech_Female> bowl meditation. <Silence> Okay <Speech_Female> it's <Speech_Female> Belt <Speech_Female> four to five minutes <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> in length. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> That's doable <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> there another <Speech_Female> pearl of <Speech_Male> wisdom that <Speech_Female> you might like <Speech_Female> to leave <Speech_Female> the listeners <Speech_Female> that birth <SpeakerChange> these families <Silence> with <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> honor <SpeakerChange> your intuition <Speech_Female> i think <Speech_Female> is the last thing <Speech_Female> i would like <Speech_Female> to leave them with <Speech_Female> today and <Speech_Female> if <Speech_Female> every fiber of your <Speech_Female> body is <Speech_Female> urging you to <Speech_Female> speak up and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> put words <Speech_Female> to what your body <Silence> is feeling <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> at any point <Speech_Female> please <Speech_Female> do please <Speech_Female> do <Speech_Female> in order to honor <Speech_Female> your body and respect <Speech_Female> yourself long. <Silence> Run <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> yeah yeah <Speech_Female> and that <Speech_Female> too. <Speech_Female> If we experienced <Speech_Female> trauma <Speech_Female> it feels like <Speech_Female> the beauty of this <Speech_Female> work can <Speech_Female> help

"schubert" Discussed on The Birth Ease Podcast

The Birth Ease Podcast

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"schubert" Discussed on The Birth Ease Podcast

"Right right. That is so huge right there. And i'm thinking that especially women people that identify as a woman that often we carry trauma and our pelvic floor that there may have been instances where we felt violated or we participated in. Maybe some kind of intimacy that we really didn't want to because we felt like we should or we were supposed to or we felt bullied and giving very generic experiences or someone could have some kind of sexual trauma that i'm thinking that this could be a powerful act. Junked to other forms of therapy to really get to that feeling being held in the body and honoring it and giving it space to release and he'll agree very very much so i would say as in my basic physical therapy education. We learned about the nerves. The muscles you know big pitcher that come into the pelvic floor. We learned about the sexual components with the bladder does with the bowel systems. Do but in general most of us. Don't practice in this pelvic bowl this pelvic area so i kind of jokingly call it no-man's-land If you're not a pelvic therapist you'll come down so far maybe to the abdomen. You know to the low back and then you kind of jump down to mid thigh and move on down because you are entering such a sacred personal space for that person and you're right if they're not ready for you to go there and you're not in tuned with that person to know what is appropriate. Then yes you can inadvertently cross boundaries. Yeah as a whole generation that has grown up with. The doctor is always right and that what the doctor does is right for me. And i'm not to speak or question. It right right and i said that's what i love about this younger generation. Is they ask tons and tons of questions but it doesn't mean that they haven't already had some experiences where they didn't feel comfortable speaking up about things and you're right it can be done in the vein of a medical procedure or a medical question or it can go on into social relationships that they were not ready for as well. Yeah yeah there's just.

tons and tons of questions
"schubert" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"schubert" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Mother. Yeah. Yeah, Yeah. Oh, yeah. I was just doing what I was getting. Valentina Silver Medallion stream came to me and I'm just I'm just walking. Please. Days you may just another man. Make money. Schubert. That's mad, Mother! Nothing. You just got to me. Taking patients away, blaming it all on the same. Come on, just another man in.

Schubert
#86  Aprenda a dizer NO! - burst 2

Cueca Apertada

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

#86 Aprenda a dizer NO! - burst 2

"Newest into new mucus. So you can't make it or not. She was aliki. Ceo leaders program to source. Then you mean sizes pursues. He no sobbing zero. Craziest seamless fussing. Beep oversee those monday for the east. Mary's room. I

Brooke Metra Combet Moore Llamas Wien Grace Todd Matecki Judy Brazil Bosnia Foley ROY Asha Hikkaduwa Janeiro Aliki LA Hobart Jane Schubert Barack Obama Mary
California Legislature Passes Mental Health Parity Law

All Things Considered

01:27 min | 2 years ago

California Legislature Passes Mental Health Parity Law

"Federal and state laws require insurance companies to cover mental health Justus they would medical care but actually getting insurance for mental health treatment can be tricky. In California, the Legislature is trying to make that promise riel yesterday it past one of the country's strictest mental health parity laws as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports. When Monica Vera Schubert son Bobby, injured his knee a decade ago, she monitored his painkiller prescription until it ran out. That's where all of a sudden his behavior started changing to the point that he was no longer a friendly, happy go Lucky kid. He raided his grand prize medicine cabinet and sold off his mother's jewellery to feed is growing addiction. Where Vera Schubert lives in Burbank, California, state and federal law already require insurance companies to cover mental health as they do medical care. But she says she encountered multiple hurdles once her insurance pre authorized her son for inpatient rehab. But when he showed up, they couldn't get the insurance to coordinate with them. So my son walked. He walked home to his grandparent's house, and he goes, I'm never going back there again. She ran into other roadblocks as well. Long waiting periods requirements. He tests positive for drugs. Paying out of pocket would've cost nearly $50,000 for a single month felt terrible, overwhelming, so overwhelming that how many times was it fate for certain Bobby eventually received treatment and entered recovery.

Vera Schubert Bobby Monica Vera Schubert California Yuki Noguchi Legislature NPR Burbank
Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

Published...Or Not

07:43 min | 2 years ago

Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

"Have someone sitting opposite me just twitching to tell his story. The book is flat. Lines and the author is Andrew Dobson Andrew. Welcome to three C- I thank you. David I'm curious about the would twitching. I haven't really made a close study of twitching despite writing. This book. Twitching is a word that is used by dedicated. Some say obsessive Burgers and sometimes they detractors to Indicate their preoccupation with finding the next bird. An observing bird minded research. Because it's not actually mentioned in the book the twitching behavior of Howard Medhurst who was one of the leading birdwatchers in the nineteen fifties and sixties. But this book in other words is about birds or in particular one species of birds the grey plover a daoist wallflower of the shorter dance. It spreads thinly around the world's margins and is often overlooked. What's the fascination with the Gripe Lot? Well let's start by working our way towards the bird from what we are. Probably the closest bird that we know to this is the masked left wing. It's often colder plaza. But it's sexually left wing but that's what we know as a plot now go through that gate and think about the kinds of things that the left wing does transfer them to the tidal flats of the world the far-flung tidal flats of the world. And there's this small bird not much begun a blackbird gray when it's out of the breeding grounds highly colored up when it gets to the breeding grounds and it is commonly found with others in the group of Long Distance Flying Margaret lowrie shore. Birds the ultramarathons birds. Now when you say ultra-marathon sort of distance are we talking so the two birds that I particularly follow which were satellite tag in South Australia and flew north on the first flight. Each of them flew over the entirety of Australia of Indonesia the Philippines to land one of them in Taiwan and the other in southern China so each of them took a nonstop flight of more than seven thousand kilometers. Just to give us a sort of indication in layman's terms. When you're holding this bird. How much are you holding? Well you're holding about a cup of sugar not a big white. You're holding something that really can be quite placid in the hand. Despite its wildness. And you're holding. I guess the promise of many generations of optic life birdlife and they transcend boundaries in many ways in the journey. We've got apple tree boundaries as people on borders and they bicycling cross all of those hemispheres international borders and such like. It's it's quite a phenomenal feet. If you want to get carried beyond the trivialities of human life like borders then migratory long distance migratory birds are a really good way to start because there will pass through the margins of many countries but is not off one eye and they have total disregard for human borders. Now one of the things that the book sort of touches on as you look this journey other various forms of tagging that have occurred or the ability to follow from banding to rocket nets and now two satellites. The satellites would give you an inordinate amount of opportunity to try and be particular about what you say quite revelatory. They are Give you almost near real time information. About where on the planet this bird is and what it's doing even because if you have a lucrative say on a breeding ground you'll see it move from point to point to point as it fades and then goes back to the central point which is the nest So yes it can be unrivaled information and It really is hugely illuminating. As opposed to the banding which was more happenstance abandoning as the book suggests started in the lighting hundreds. But that would rely on. Someone actually catching the Buddha game. We'll exactly Either catching the again or killing it or finding a dead. The doyen of Australian Migratory Schubert's studies like Clive Minton when he lived in England. Has I band on? A migratory shortbread was on a lovely good coach spotted. Red Shank and he was really pleased to have it in hand really priest to put the band on it and some weeks later he got the band back because it had been shot by the mayor of putting your in France who returned the band with the address on to Clive. Now a couple of things fascinated me about. The birds are reading this book. I'm the song lines. There's a connection here with an indigenous song. Lawn is moving up. Moving from group to group and changing as guides and there's an equivocal mention of what the birds was well yes we'll I'm careful to not impose my description on indigenous cultures. But I hope that I have drawn out of the records of indigenous couches The great variety of names. This bird has as it travels not just from Australia. But through China up to Siberia and across to North America where? It's pretty circum Paula. It has a series of lovely nines. And the they are run there are really illuminating series. Too you know they describe often. I described the bird by its phonetic. Call sometimes they describe it by its coloring in Alaska where I went It was cold emphatic. And that means the scorched bird. But so there's a similarity through the sort of landscape in many ways. Yes depending on which part of the world now for such a fragile creature. They are quite a number of threats in this day and age the threats for the gripe the mind well. We've got a bird here. That has persisted down through evolutionary generations for about one hundred and thirty million years so it's not easily removed from the face of the earth. But while it's doing well other others. In the group of long distance migratory shore birds are not doing so well And as a whole the contracting in numbers. I'm this four that have been listed on Australia's critically endangered list in recent years. Because of the problems they face pardon the analogy but the canary in the coalmine. Well certainly you know I think migratory shore birds. We Stu people generally in Australia particularly and when we look at the coasts we should think about the health of Alco spy. The prison or absence of birds like

Australia Andrew Dobson China Long Distance Clive Minton South Australia David Margaret Lowrie Howard Medhurst Alco Burgers Alaska Paula Taiwan North America Red Shank France Philippines England
"schubert" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"schubert" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I didn't know you did Hey I didn't have blown away the people still get delivered milk I think it's fantastic yeah because it's all natural it's it's a really great things if you do drink milk which I don't drink milk but if you do it's a great way to have milk would not you know none of the antibiotics and that crap in it and then also get delivered but it looks really good he was saying hi to everybody I yeah I got your mail and I brought you some a eggs to warm movie star right this is like a script written for point and husbands are like you don't drink milk your lactose intolerant starting now I'm so embarrassed work on the show really it's a brilliant marketing model I love this is a great business idea I'd seriously people should do this with bags like if there's a guy out there is hot I'm just saying you can you can or what and for that matter this is great why don't capitalize on your looks speaking of hot milk men and all organic Brian Shatt Schubert news which it is but publicly he said whenever possible I mean maybe that's maybe like two is phased checks like do this is like a really good.

Brian Shatt Schubert
No Charges in Sacramento Police Shooting of Stephon Clark

790 KABC Programming

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

No Charges in Sacramento Police Shooting of Stephon Clark

"Thing. No charges for the Sacramento. Police officers who fatally shot stuff. Fon Clark year ago, Sacramento county district attorney and Marie Schubert defended her office's decision, and it's sixty one page report saying, quote, the evidence in this case demonstrates that. Both officers had an honest and reasonable belief that they were in imminent danger of death or great bodily injury. Correspondent Brynn Gingras says investigators referenced footage from police body cameras text messages detailing a fight between Clark and his fiancee days earlier and detail the drugs that were in Clark system at the time. He was

Fon Clark Sacramento Sacramento County Brynn Gingras Marie Schubert
No charges in fatal police shooting of Stephon Clark

The Gun Guy

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

No charges in fatal police shooting of Stephon Clark

"Debbie hand light to Sacramento police. Officers will not face criminal charges in the fatal shooting of an unarmed. Black man, no criminal charges will be filed in this case does not diminish in any way. The tragedy. The prostration. That we. We cannot ignore that Sacramento county district. Attorney Emory Schubert says police are twenty two year old Stefan Clark, vandalism suspect was carrying a gun. But it was a

Sacramento County Sacramento Emory Schubert Stefan Clark Vandalism Attorney Twenty Two Year
BrainStuff Classics: What Is The Oldest Living Thing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 3 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: What Is The Oldest Living Thing?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren bulk ObamaCare with a classic episode from the vault our earth while host Christian Sager is exploring a tangling question. What is earth's oldest living thing? Neighboring stuff Krishan Sager here. So as far as aging goes humans have it pretty good. I mean, we're no giant tortoises, but we're generally capable of living for decades some of us for more than a century here at brand stuff. It got us thinking, what is the world's oldest living thing. Well, that's a tricky question. And the answer depends on how we define living and thing, I let's tackle what we mean. By thing. If we say a thing could also be a clone will colony than the competition heats up quickly. There are numerous plant and fungal. Clone. Colonies that have been around for tens of thousands of years, and they're still barreling along. There's king clone the creosote Bush in the Mojave almost twelve thousand years old, and we can't forget pando the gigantic male quaking Aspen, colonial colony in Utah. He is about eighty thousand years old. Incidentally, he's also the heaviest living thing weighing in around six million kilograms. But what if we stick to sing? Single organisms if so then the tiny end lifts are strong contenders. These extrema file Methuselah like to kick back and take it easy for millions of years. They've lived a mile and a half below the ocean floor with metabolism slower than molasses only reproducing once every few centuries or millennia. I mean that makes pandas look like rabbits, there's a big let's call it loophole in the definition of living dormancy what if something was frozen in time trapped in stasis and then revived like captain America the alien in the thing in two thousand and eleven professor Brian Schubert published a paper on just that he discovered bacteria in what he called a kind of hibernation state inside tiny bubbles of thirty four thousand year old salt crystals. Other scientists have claimed to find older organisms such as the two hundred fifty million-year-old bacteria in southeast New Mexico. But Schubert's work was. Independently reproduced. So if we allow an organism to take a time out and spent thousands of years in stasis there are loads of competitors for the title of oldest living thing, many of which may still lurk undiscovered in the isolated hinterlands of earth. You know, deep oceans remote mountains, endless Arctic wastes. Now, I'm thinking of HP lovecraft well moving on. There's one other important thing. Some organisms might be immortal. Now, don't get jealous. We're not talking about some super sexy vampire type immortality. No. We're talking about jellyfish specifically hydra and the turritopsis Dory. The turritopsis is only four point five millimeters large, but capable of something that may be unique in the animal world after reaching sexual maturity, it can revert to its polyp stage, it can reverse and reset its aging cycle rendering it biologically, immortal, and the hydra doesn't seem to age at all. That means that potentially the oldest living organism could one day be a jellyfish. But for now, even counting states of dormancy, the oldest living continually active things on earth appear to be the extreme file organisms collectively called Endo Litz. But of course, there may be something older varied in time. Dormant waiting for intrepid humans to wake it from its deathly slump. Today's episode was written by Joan McCormick and produced by Tyler playing to hear more from Joe check out his weird science podcast stuff to blow your mind wherever you tuned podcasts. This vary up perhaps. And of course, for lots more on this and other well preserved topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking a comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts for on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Quicken Loans Brian Schubert Krishan Sager America Harvard Turritopsis Dory Christian Sager Twitter Obamacare Katie Golden Iheartradio Endo Litz New Mexico Bush Captain America Apple HP Professor Utah Joan Mccormick
Washington Mystics must look to have an early answer for Seattle Storm in Game 2

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Washington Mystics must look to have an early answer for Seattle Storm in Game 2

"Here. This early Sunday the ninth of September. Are we going to school well pack, your child's lunch time to get them to go to bed early clashes will resume and a couple of school districts where teachers have reached contract agreements. Here's what we have Seattle. Teachers getting a ten point five percent pay raise under the deal ratified yesterday. Subs and paro professionals will also get raises clashes will start in Tukwila school district tomorrow teachers reaching a deal last night giving staff a ten percent raise Puyallup. Teachers also came to an

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