23 Burst results for "Schramm"

Residents begin to clean up after tornado hits Newnan, SW of Atlanta

Tom and Curley

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Residents begin to clean up after tornado hits Newnan, SW of Atlanta

"This'll has been a day for cleaning up in places like Newnan, Georgia, south west of Atlanta, one of many deep South towns hit by Tornado touchdowns. At least one person has died there in the fire chief says 95% of the rescue operations are done. With everyone accounted for more from Wgcl TVs. Rebecca Schramm City and county workers and private citizens worked through the night and into the daylight as neighbors couldn't believe what they'd survived to describe it, You know? It sounds like a train. It sounds like a train is right at you, Becky Trace and her family found shelter in their basement seemed like forever. But it was probably just a few seconds. Crazy enough. Her neighbor almost slept through the whole thing. No, I'm like the only person in the town that didn't hear the silence him

Rebecca Schramm Newnan Georgia Atlanta Becky Trace
Pile of Junkers

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

05:31 min | 4 months ago

Pile of Junkers

"On the morning of the third of august. Two thousand eighteen. A two day tour run by you. Air began taking its passengers from dubai. Dorf north of the alps to the canton of chino on the south side of the alps. Both the outward flight on friday on and the return flight on saturday were scheduled to take place on the dick yonkers. You j. you fifty two. We're just going to say j in this case Three mg four e commercial aircraft registered as h. b. dash hot Hp ht conducted as a commercial air transport operation under visual flight. Rules pilots a. m. b. had been entrusted to want to perform both flights alternating the roles as commander or pilot flying and co pilot or pilot monitoring. Pardon the interruption. When we're recording the show live. The only person who can hear me is captain jeff. Now he's decided to include my audio here in the post. Show edit lucky you enjoy. Here's something important from my haul boxes here jeff okay. I'm directing my attention to something in the chat room. oh yes okay. and s. u. s. T. would be pronounced dee schweizerische since your highs soon dares schramm geshe gel. La is guess. Us brave. I have one full year of highschool germany under my belt high school during german. I spoke german nailed. I haul boxes playing steps role. That's what she says. Yeah all right. Thank you very much for that Little interruption i think that was worth it and now i just have to figure out where i was. Okay switzerland's and i'm not gonna pronounce that again s. u. s. t. released their final report concluding the problem was going to mention that in the really really nice little video that the s. u. s. t. Put together kind of an expert explanatory video of the accident. The talked about the fact that both the captain and co-pilot both pilots here were previous military pilots and then they were also previous airline pilots. Kinda like nick. And i if we ended up doing one of these two are thing. Nice nice little retirement gig. They were in the early sixties. Yeah it's beautiful. I love aside. Finally young jay fifty two around on your new leisurely days on fortunately did go very well for the direct cause on the final report. The accident is attributable to the fact that after losing control the aircraft there was insufficient space to regain control thus the aircraft collided with a train The terrain. I should say no there wasn't a train. Evolved like to. The investigation identified the following direct causal factors of the accident the flight crew piloted the aircraft in a very high risk manner by navigating it into a narrow valley at low altitude and with no possibility of an alternative flight path. The flight crew chose a dangerously. Low airspeed has regard to the flight path. Both factors meant that. The turbulence which was to be expected in such circumstances was able to lead not only to short term stall with loss of control but also to an unreliable. I don't think i looked at word. Thought on rectifiable. Don't think there is such a word and there isn't So a not rectifiable situation Directly contributory contribute contributory factors. The investigation identified the following factors as directly contributing to the accident. The flight crew was accustomed to not complying with recognize rules for safe flight operations and taking high risks. Just like naked. I would do. I'm sure The aircraft involved in the accident was operating with a center of gravity position that was beyond the rear limit. Who that's not good. That's never get ya. This situation facilitated the loss of control. Systemic 'cause the investigation identified the following systemic causes of the accident the requirements for operating the aircraft and commercial air transport operations with regard to the legal basis applicable. At the time of the accident. Were not met Some other systemically contributory factors the investigation identified the following factors as systematic systemically contributing to the accident. Due to the air operator's enact inadequate working equipment. It was not possible to calculate the accurate mass and center of gravity of its j. You fifty two aircraft in particular. The air operator's crews who were trained as air force. Pilots seemed to be accustomed to systematically failing to comply with generally recognized aviation rules. Who to get free potted bank ever employee mac down on the air force over here. I know and a taking high risks. When flying j fifty two aircraft

Captain Jeff Jeff Okay Dee Schweizerische Jay Fifty Chino Schramm Dubai HP Switzerland Germany LA Nick United States MAC Air Force
Making voting machines safer from hackers

The 3:59

12:20 min | 1 year ago

Making voting machines safer from hackers

"What exactly is Homo Morphou conscription? And what's wrong with good old fashioned paper and pen ballots? All right first and foremost thanks. Everybody Hope Y'all had a nice weekend. We're glad to be back after a little Monday American holiday President's Day break And it's also great to have Roger Bag. Hey thanks how was dad? The sequel daddy was it was good. It was taxing. It's someone asked me like how was my vacation. I'm like definitely wasn't that a vacation. Not a vacation at all so I'm very happy to be back good to have you back. We definitely need your expertise. We got some good questions and comments. Alfred the way you phrased it. You have to account for human error. I was Kinda curious and how that perspective shifts in the this system prevent human tampering. Well yeah that's that's the whole point like it's supposed to okay okay. Actually it doesn't prevent it can't let it can't prevent tampering. It basically makes it so that if you do like hack a vote. It's very obvious right. If the person checks yes voter check. Yeah I mean like the voter. The election board can also check themselves. That's okay because it's all open source. Once all the votes are supposed closed. Anyone can download all the votes all the encrypted votes and check it to see if it matches up with what's being reported out there Gotcha. Yeah like disinformation like happens very frequently with stuff like that. Where if I were an attacker I I would say I would pretend to say like. Oh I downloaded the votes. Here's what they are and look like this person like one even and it's just it's if that's the loudest voice on social media. Everyone will believe that even if it's not necessarily true yeah Just because I've seen disinformation campaigns and that seems to be the ongoing trend so it does not prevent tampering but it prevents very effective tools to catch it and try to stop like disinformation campaigns. Which is a very difficult task On that no. If we're going to continue dumbing things down so that I can understand them homo more. Fic- what is it more? You started to explain that you did a good job. I'm still stupid. What what the Layman's terms for. What IS HOMO MORPHING? Mean when it comes to the elections. It's like a math thing. I was speaking with Josh Bonilla hit this Microsoft's like senior cryptographer Microsoft Research Department And he gave a very good quote for it. That I'm looking up right now and this is this is basically the the easiest way to explain it? it's it's sort of structured gibberish. Like you can't tell what it is. It's like one it's encrypted at his gibberish but it keeps enough structure to it that you can actually work with the gibberish rather than like making it not gibberish. I don't know if that's the easier way to explain it. But I mean the system recognizes the GIBBERISH. Yeah and can manip- manipulate on top of it. That's the basic part right there. It's Gibberish to the point where the system won't be able to identify the person who put that down in right. Yeah only what the what the value the vote is suppose yes casted or like who they cast it for got it. Yeah it's just an interesting thought to try to grasp because historically there was some form of algorithm or some way to crack a direct translation by the sounds of this that takes that completely out of the equation if its pseudo randomize that kind of how the away to visualize encryption is light and decrypt. Something is imagine you put like a banana in a blender at announce all mush right. That's being encrypted and decrypted. It would be somehow returning it back to regular state of being a banana. Which physically is impossible but like encode like that's kind of what it does Very basic understanding of it. It's and there's a lot of ways that like that analogy is wrong but for the average person. That's Kinda how I describe it like. Obviously you can't get banana back from that but like decryption would do something like that sure and the idea being annoymous encryption for a vote. You can't do that right like you can't decrypt it because then you know like this person voted for this person and that you're not allowed to do that so home. Amorphous would basically like. Oh we don't need to turn it back into the normal banana. We can use this mush than at each other and say oh. They're like if you just see the most you don't know it's a banana right but home amorphous encryption would basically. Oh there's ten bananas here like they can tell from parts of it. That like what? It was originally a really bizarre effective way to explain. That was actually pretty good. Timothy says I'm all for new technology but voting needs to stay old school paper and pen or is that just me. Matthew Dacha says I love the potential voting technology but if it can't be explained to lay people it'll never get traction paper for the win. How do you guys feel as registered voters are? We excited to see. Just personally go ahead and editorialize are excited to see this technology. Come to play Do we think is actually going to be helpful in our experience and going to the polls and engaging with modern politics or it's kind of like blown smoke I mean. Yeah that's that's a big problem with election guard. Is that you know I spoke with another cryptographer. Who who had mentioned to me like there's only about three thousand people on the planet that like fully understand home working corruption and with election counties and like with Voting Technology. The idea in the. Us is that like you have to be able to properly explain this to everyone working on it because part of like of election and part of democracy is not only like counting like who won but being able to show a paper trail for it to show the person who lost so they can like openly. Admit like yes. I lost this election when you have something this complicated. It raises up some issues of like while. I don't know how this encryption works. How do I know that I lost this? Vote is a sham. The Outer Yada Yada so like adding more. Technology will always like create Complications again not because of the technology itself. Sometimes more so like people don't understand it except the vote for what? It is the lack of transparency. At the thing of it is I. Think to your point that it's simple say just. Let's go back to paper ballots but there are a lot of places that don't use ballot or prefer to use voting machines and that sort of the reality that we with a work with that reality. It'd be great if we all just went back to paper ballots. But that's not where we're at. Also the accessibility issue to like. Microsoft was bringing this up like if you notice in one of the photos. They were using the xbox adaptive controller. Oh yeah right and then like you know just using the touchscreen part of that being like well you know there are people that might not be able to use a pen pencil. That and this is kind of a way for them to do that. So that that is also like one of the reasons why voting machines may be used more than like pen pen and paper gotcha. Adaptive Controller continues to be one of my favorite stories of the last several years. Good things just keep coming from it in a world with crabby news Okay we got a few minutes left. Let's take one from Brian. He says Not How to phrase this many attempts to digitize voting stress paper backups? If we become confident in the system because of the backup how do we stop them from becoming complacent? We're going deep on that one so in this situation with Microsoft. They're not saying. The papers are the backups. A paper the electronic system is the backup like they're still using paper as the main way to vote and then they're using the electronic systems verify that and actually at this practice relic. This system actually requires that voters not be complacent. They actually go and actively check. Yeah the verified cop or their their their second copy so like you can't be complacent or else assistant breakdown. Yeah and the other thing is in Wisconsin. They have a law that like the poll workers have to initial every vote. Cast in the ballot. So what they're doing at this election today is that they are When they initially they're also going to ask the people like did you check your vote to make sure everything's like right So and they the same study that was talking about. We're only six percent will had only like actually check their votes. If something was wrong and reported they did a counter. Study on it or like the control for it where it was basically. Let's see how many people report if we tell them like? You need to check this and it was like eighty percent so it does go up when okay. They're told like you need to. You need to do this. Gotcha now will that happen in every election across the country definitely. Not because the way that. Us elections work is that it's up to every single county to decide how to it and there's no standard for security or technology Guidelines that we go before moving forward shouted to my mom who's watching the show after coming in from shoveling the driveway hello commodities SCHRAMM. What's your son's amazing. You did a great job. Thanks guys all right. Next question is coming in from commander trim up in the great white north are. They're not encryption technologies that don't rely on particular identity cannot these be coupled with tracking vote has been cast by an individual on vote acceptance separately. There are but you can't count on. You can't do math on those I that's like that's the whole point of home. Amorphous encryption is that you can encrypt vote. All you want. But like if you can't count the vote which encryption like makes it difficult to count like it's you can't do anything with it That's why they needed this like this other concept rather than just encrypting itself because they would have to be decrypted for them to count the voter right. That would be. Ucs unless he's talking about like the chain of command stuff where it's like encrypting like Oh. This vote was counted. That kind of stuff but I mean home amorphous encryption. Kinda already does that and then is still able to count the vote after this is dense stuff out. Thanks for making time to explain this because I think this is extremely helpful We got a couple of really really good questions coming up next from our old timothy on Youtube does the federal or state set the standards for encryption Well no one sets the standard for encryption The state though like sets the standards for Election like technology guidelines so. This is a problem that Microsoft has encountered for awhile. To where like there's there's the election assistance commission where that start around two thousand two and they like set guideline and that's federal and they set guidelines for like what you should do for security on your machines that kind of stuff but the thing is that those are just guidelines not requirements. There are no federal requirements for election security. So it's up to the county and they do that because it's like every county has different needs right if one county if there's a federal guideline that says you need to spend at least you need to buy these machines only these machines then like a county. That doesn't have that much money like they're just not gonna be able to vote millions different for every like area So like counties like set their own guidelines for this kind of stuff but like I said it's extremely different and there are no There's no like standard of encryption per se but there are there they do have security standards but it might be different from like one to the other and sometimes those standards will go against their own technology so like I said some counties only only some counties adhere to the Election Assistance Commission And some others don't but the their guidelines like even if you do something as simple as like updating the security on it like getting a security patch like you don't get a new machine you don't like whatever you just updated so you're not vulnerable to an attack you have to get the entire machine recertified again which takes awhile. Which does that. That's an interesting point like would incorporating this election guard system into your your overall only system if you have machines with that require. Yeah that's the other. That's the other is a lot of red tape for that. Yeah Yeah Okay.

Microsoft Election Assistance Commission Homo Morphou Alfred President Trump Roger Bag Youtube United States Wisconsin Josh Bonilla Timothy Matthew Dacha Microsoft Research Department Xbox
"schramm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"schramm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Maria Manetti Schramm founders of the minute he Schramm UCM of art at UC Davis through June fourteenth twenty twenty the museum presents a new era the gate cans immersive installation that pushes the limits of perception carbonite offering data protection of businesses including email spreadsheets calendars and more carbonite data protection for small businesses hi Marco Werman lately we hear the word Ukraine and we think corruption next time on the world Ukrainians talk about corruption in their country and beyond why Ukrainians may be the experts on corruption our story from Kiev on the world we'll bring you the world thirty minutes from now it starts at two o'clock when KQED public radio this is fresh AIR I'm David Bianculli in for Terry gross back with more of Terry's twenty twelve interview with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas he's among this year's recipients of the Kennedy center honors for lifetime artistic achievement which are given out this week when we left off Terry was asking about Michael Tilson Thomas is grandparents Boris and Bessie Thomas shifty who were stars in the Yiddish theater they emigrated to the US from Ukraine in the eighteen eighties so I want to play a recording by your grandmother the late Bessie Thomas Chesky singing a song and I'm gonna have you introduce at this is actually from a D. V. D. out take from your shell so tell us about this song and when you think it was required this is a little introduction to a song called mink as song because monologue one of best sees most famous parts in which she's playing a girl from a little village whose country United States and is on the eve of a huge adventure a pig million like experimented which she will be elevated from her lowly parlor maid status to being the lady of the house okay so this is Betty Thomas shifty recorded approximately one nineteen twenty something well okay here we go yeah thank right I wanted thank you so that was the late Bessie Thomas shifty singing and she and Boris commissions are the lake grandparents of my guest conductor Michael Tilson Thomas so what kind of music did your grandmother introduce you to I was lucky enough to hear her deliver a lot of her biggest numbers right there at our living room since she would arrive every weekend to our house and we would put on a little show together which I would accompany her and some of her songs and she would do recitations and we did little scenes together so although it my parents fondest hope that I would become some kind of scientist a mathematician I realize that she was already getting me into the whole theater experience right there a whole that's really interesting and one of the things she says one of things you describe her having said to you in your area yes you are more like me than your parents are there more conventional and you have more of what which is a like a creative spirit or something that she said your parents are very lovely people but terribly conventional your like me you're an adventurer you'll have to prove something did you take that to heart I paid attention to it I didn't know quite what it meant as I listen to her tell all the stories of her life from her childhood through her stardom and then even her reflections on the way fashions changed and the way she was in her late life of quite lonely person I took it all in and what I kind of understood from her was that it had been a very interesting ride but she really was proud of what had been accomplished and when she saw somebody very successful entertainer coming up and she could see in them something that had come from the kind of things that they have done in the theater she was very proud of it she recognize them and appreciate them so when your grandmother died and you were under sixteen or seventeen was there music at her funeral there wasn't much music at my grandmother's funeral there were a few prayers and there were very few people there and her plaque just says Bessie Thomas have ski Yiddish theatre pioneer star which is exactly what she wanted to say but of course there's a whole repertory of songs that we played at home all the time whenever we thought about her and that I still play it was a very big moment of big right of passage in my life the first day that I took over playing her songs instead of my father playing and measuring the way I was playing them against the wonderful nuances that he and my grandmother had brought to the music I was lucky to hear my family play that music for me I wanted to keep in my ear is exactly the way they had sung the songs and played with all the Iranian Morton C. and snappy little gestures and comebacks so you mentioned some advice in in in your show that your grandmother gave you about when you're on stage you have to remember that the people in the uppermost balcony for the people who pay the least but enjoying at the most and you have to even if you're whispering you have to make sure that those people can hear you how has that affected you as a conductor my way of expressing what she said to me is what is it like for people beyond the sixth row that we play in such a big hall sometimes in classical music in their their halls designed to be very rich which is on the one hand very nice the gorgeous sound it's there but to get the sound to be distinct it is difficult and I sometimes tell my students that playing classical music is like making an announcement in an airport that you hear someone say passengers on flight three ninety one the golden rule I immediately please so you're trying to make every single moment completely distinct another way Bessie had of saying that you said listen venha blowing on accident you gotta watch out for the nine Floyd this the night Floyd that stains of us could just saying I was giving to the park one day and I noticed the most beautiful suddenly a dog around that you'll suddenly dropped the axe at your job but you got to keep the contour of it all the way going through same thing in music that's really great my cousin Thomas thank you it's been great as always thank you conductor Michael Tilson Thomas speaking to Terry gross in twenty twelve he's one of the honorees who will be saluted at this weekend's Kennedy center honors the annual salute to the arts will be televised on CBS December fifteenth after a break we remember child advocate merry preppy as the director of the.

Schramm UCM UC Davis Maria Manetti Schramm thirty minutes one hand one day
"schramm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"schramm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From young Schramm and Maria Manetti Schramm founders of the minute he Schramm museum of art at UC Davis through January through June fourteenth twenty twenty the museum presents new era Doug eight consumers of installation that pushes the limits of perception this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest Glenn Simpson and Peter Fritsch co founders of fusion GPS and author of the new book crime in progress inside the steel dossier and the fusion GPS investigation of Donald Trump the most famous part or infamous part of the so called steel dossier this series of memos that Christopher seal steel assembled for you investigating Russia's interference in our election and Donald trump's ties to Russia was the so called P. tape and this is this is the tape that several sources told Christopher steel exists there's no confirmation that this tape exists explain what the P. tape is for somebody who hasn't been following right so the the details you put it is a recounting of source reporting from Moscow that alleges that Donald Trump in twenty thirteen while he was attending the Miss Universe pageant that he sponsored in collaboration with the Russian oligarch was in his hotel suite in Moscow the Ritz Carlton and they was sent a a pair of prostitutes who performed a urination show on top of the bed in the presidential suite at the Ritz Carlton hotel in it with the purpose being to defile the bed in which Brock and Michelle Obama slipped in years earlier now yes you mentioned several sources what we can't get in to sources and methods as we know them but we have strong confidence in the reliability and be well well place or nature of these sources and there were no fewer than seven for that particular anecdote so obviously this is the the most famous part of the so called dossier and there was some internal debate that Chris stills firm and then something that our firm about what to do about this in terms of the fact that it was going to going to distract people from some of the other information that was in the report in in in fact it hit that history of this is now shown that some of the denials that don't trump has made about this period were false ministries visit should precipitously denied this initially he told James Comey that he didn't spend the night in March in the hotel that night that turned out to not be true the so there was a conflict between both of you about whether to include the this allegation in your report or not I don't I want no that's yeah that's no Glenn was alluding to there was a dispute I wouldn't call it is there was a discussion inside orbis that Christopher steals firm with his partner who was also a fellow British intelligence officer former British intelligence officer about whether to include that in it or not in the end Chris who is the Russian as thought it was very important to include for the sake of verisimilitude the reporting right he wanted to accurately reflect what sources were saying and he did not and he thought it was real important to note that the Russian government could have hard evidence of compromise on the presidential candidate this is evidence that Christopher steel feared could be used to basically blackmail don correct correct and in our office we felt the this information wasn't all that significant and could only because a lot of problems because it wasn't really something had much application to the presidential campaign these kinds of confirmable stories about someone's sexual past it just doesn't really have much application in a in a political context so we were sort of stuck with this information when it became apparent that there was other things going on that involved a possible conspiracy against the United States and we decided to turn this information over to the FBI we sell that we do not want to manipulate Chris is reporting or edit it in any way because that would be a bigger problem so we just give my gave everything that's why you decided to that's why you decided to have the steel dossier be separate document from your findings with them yeah we've got you editing it all like this is this is what he found this is what he heard from sources and that will stand alone right is it it's important to point out that the decision to approach the FBI was Chriss you know we a seated we defer to him he is the intelligence for that decision because this is a real turning point in your investigation it then and the whole larger Russia investigate right so in in early July Chris arrange to meet with a contact of his at the FBI in Europe some someone he knew from previous work he asked us if that was a good idea and we didn't disagree it was it's important that it is clear that this is Chris is decision as intelligent professional so he he had that meeting in July fifth of twenty sixteen with the FBI and read them in to some of the information he found in his first report to unbeknownst to the FBI was also independently investigating Russia's interference in the election and possible ties between Donald Trump and Russia but Christians are still yes go ahead well this is an amazing point in the story which is that we now know we've now piece together the beginnings of the FBI investigation juxtaposed against the beginnings of Chriss interactions with the justice department the FBI and it turns out that it was almost simultaneous but the first information to get there was not our information it was the information about a low level trump campaign staffer bragging that the Russians at hacked the Democrats so who who was that so there is reporting that from Alexander Downer who's an Australian diplomat in the U. K. who had had a meeting with George Papadopoulos who was in the trunk campaign as a junior foreign policy aide in which George Papadopoulos bragged about having Russian intelligence on dirt on Hillary Clinton Alexander Downer reported that to use the US government which is where which is the foundation of the subsequent investigation called crossfire or anything and in this is how investigations begin is that data both the government's Australia and us reacted to the revelations that the Russians had hacked the DNC and so essentially the FBI had information coming in from two different independent sources around the same time that corroborated each other to some extent investigations that's actually how they get going is when information comes from more than one place ours came in slightly after the information from the stress you never intended the dossier to the public as as you said in you both didn't directly go to the FBI that was Christopher Steele who do that but you did start approaching journalist why did you start approaching journalist what did you want to tell them at left did you want them to do with the information initially in the summer of twenty sixteen we were concerned that certain people around the trump campaign in the trump campaign were of questionable character de Paul metaphor was someone that we knew a lot about that we believe had probably violated various US laws and might be involved in corruption and money laundering so we talked with reporters about him in others such as Carter page who seem to be inner interacting with the Russians in a suspicious way on a trip to Russia so these are people that we talked to reporters run we encourage them to look into a little bit more same with Mike Flynn now as it turned out all three people were people that needed to be sedated and two of them they've now played guilty to crimes so the initial conversations with reporters were about some of these characters in the trump campaign in the trump organization later with the movie became more concerned that there was a government a Russian government attack on our country that was unprecedented in scale and scope we tried to raise awareness with national security reporters investigative reporters a not so much to affect the outcome of the elections act specifically not to affect the election but because we thought that this was something that we need to raise awareness about because it was a huge digital Pearl Harbor against our country my guests are Glenn Simpson and Peter fridge co founders of fusion.

Maria Manetti Schramm UC Davis Schramm museum of art
"Guardian" of the Amazon Killed in Brazil by Illegal Loggers

Democracy Now! Audio

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"Guardian" of the Amazon Killed in Brazil by Illegal Loggers

"We begin today's show in Brazil were an indigenous this forest protector named Paolo Pollino Wajda was shot dead in the Amazon by illegal loggers on Saturday it's the latest attack in a wave the violence targeting indigenous land protectors since the election of Brazil's far-right presidential you're both Sonata last year why did you gotta was killed when he and another forest forest protector were ambushed by a group of illegal loggers inside the Aurora boy reservation in the northeastern state of Miranda he was part word of a group called Guardians of the forest Wajda spoke to Reuters in September about his efforts to save the Amazon sin sauce nervous listen Y zone the we're protecting our land and the life on it the animals the birds even the tribe who are here too there's so much destruction of nature happening include trees as with would as hard as steel being cut down and taken away the myth obscured sometimes but we have to lift up our heads and act we were here fighting attacks against indigenous people in the Amazon have spiked since Bolt Sinato came to office his administration's work to open the Amazon even further to logging mining and agribusiness business companies while violating the land rights of indigenous peoples earlier this year eight former environment minister warns Sinatra's administration was systematically destroying Brazil's environmental policies with one former minister saying Brazil is becoming an exterminator of the future to find out more about the situation in the Amazon John and the murder we speak to guests shriram Queen Sosa is a field coordinator and legal advisor Amazon Watch he's joining us from solid waste and the northeastern state of Mara now the state where Paolo Pollino Guavas Yada was murdered and in San Francisco Christian Party is program Director Amazon on watch we welcome you both to democracy now let's go to Brazil to speak with our I guess Schramm Queen Bre can you explain explain what took place in the Amazon what you understand happened to this Gordon of the Amazon for civil Good morning and thank you for having me so the situation that the the Gorgonzola forest face today is the struggle for survival and protection of the way of leaving the digits people the Amazon and they have little protection from the state government from the federal government and as as you setting the wrestler leric from both not of speeches further entitles landowners and logging and an illegal oh minors to invade for the more indigenous lands so these struggled at the plight that that that indigenous people have is to protect the forest to to protect the wail of leaving and they all live so what happened to to to Bala Boolean is that he was he went hunting with his his cousin when when they were ambushed by five gunmen and last you look luckily luckily enough he he was shorting be armed so he could hide unfortunately all Lino was federally shot in the head and and died right away then the the other Guarino the forest as you said last whether he ran ten kilometers at wounded to to close by Aldea which is how indigenous villages cold here Brazil then he was helped by by his fellow glazier and took to a hospital and and this is why we know all of this in such great detail I want to go to a clip break now. of the Guardians of the forest that was produced by Vice Survival International Paulo Pollino appears in the clip as the Guardians Coordinator Olympio Budget Datta Warns of the risks to their our lives we're hearing the boys indigenous territory. We are the guardians of the forest contributor blogger pin gunmen to kill some of the Guardians of Harari Boyce thumbs father we're all worried about these threats justify the gunshots have been fired at some of the guardians houses you don't want war we want to resist here Nari boys there to indigenous peoples thing which has had a question genre and Wa where the most vulnerable people in the world you want the president authorities to help protect the lives of the guardians whose lives are threatened boost to I'd like to bring in Christian Party as well into this conversation Asian program director at Amazon Watch if you could talk about the community you have worked with as well Guada- Shahdeh one of the largest indigenous groups in Brazil and talk about who the Guardians are and how what they're fighting eating fits into the whole fight for sustainability on the planet and to save the lungs of the planet the Amazon rainforest yes thank you amy the question Jadida like other indigenous groups in Brazil have been abandoned by the state to defend their territories with volunteer tair groups basically policing massive territories buoyant territory is sixteen hundred square miles that's larger than Rhode Island and they're doing this without any federal support and what they're doing to defend these territories either some of the last forests left in the state of mind you know which the state that straddles both the Amazon and how by incredibly important for us that are left in this area they're doing this on behalf of all humanity because they they are protecting the critically critically important Amazon forest that sustain our climate protect our climate power our should say fuel the rainfall all over Brazil would also here in this country instead of California rainfall is slackening due to the fact the Amazon what is being decimated today and the guardians of the guards the forests are doing this work therefore on behalf of all of us but without the support that they deserve observe their their rights are enshrined in Brazil's constitution their rights to territory and to their way of life they have been systematically deprived of these these rights and what we witnessed today are two days ago with the murder of polly you was example about a manifestation of violence growing in these communities I wanNA turn to another leader of the guardians the forest democracy now spoke to Sogno glad you're Java during the climate strike March here in New York in September she's a leader of the Brazilian indigenous peoples articulation I'm here today to participate in the climate march bringing on the voices of the Indigenous Peoples Brazil to denounce all the destruction of environmental airman destruction of the Amazon and the legalization of genocide against indigenous people owner he was in the for five hundred thousand nine hundred people in Brazil have been resisting resisting by Friday against the political and economic powers under the name of development and in the name of progress

Brazil Sixteen Hundred Square Miles Ten Kilometers Two Days
Get Silver in your Skincare!!

Birthday Skin

10:52 min | 1 year ago

Get Silver in your Skincare!!

"In today's episode we are going to talk about Colloidal Selva you came to me with this identity you know did focus on yeah and he's still on we just pretend that lives I don't know anything about percent in is as I kind of don't want to be around the Bush don't really WANNA lives people make Canosa from the adult so I just tell them what it is than you can do the salaries sit back relax sit back and listen to my own with sounds well I know that you have a product with colloidal silver written Yeah so yeah allies have skin blemish keeper overnight serum one over the long lengthy of exaggerate name is I'm trying to go I've kind of seen it knocking about for awhile now especially plastics and stuff the last with silver in it well it got me Oh is it actually silver Oh my God here we go Ciampino yes right well guys it's not it's not called COLLOIDAL silver for year but it could have been like an extra Sony right you know what everyone who's in just no I'm learning to be fair that except to say it's going to be the opposite way around because I'm completely baffled by next tweaks app let's talk to them let's do you want to read the first sentence nano-tech yes how again colloidal COLLOIDAL colloidal so many people are asking probably thinking what is mean clued it so Colloidal Sofa I'm going to read this and those monitor invoice of a dead obvious reason no that you wrote is a term used to describe a mixture of silver ions and Nano particles in which you're it's highly auntie microbe I'll do this right so essentially yeah tell you oh so God his day and mildly friend. Jade listens Schramm this one with Charlie always says and it really makes me laugh because of no is she says it all I was I wa it she was like it's a word she uses to describe them this went on for about five minutes and she was like this are no one essentially shouldn't yeah over she says it on my time and like I've just been listening to you talk all the time Oh my God really would you say all the time essentially in Webuye whereby he say whereby you are used to say that before known you know say for Beth can get bit they scan drinking game honestly listen listen to our survey essentially everybody knows not do it I know well no it's not a bad thing aw and quickly tap essentially into a thesaurus you different words essentially what it does is Essentially Thea Soroush you've richly essentially written in the nose as well yeah I know okay I didn't realize I like the word so much twice twice Oh God okay confront names I mean on truly approximately what else can I use originally permanently none of these right sink to essentially by beauty it wasn't a criticism it was just feel I was no no no not at all it was just a mere Oh the I've noticed that it was just an acknowledgment okay well let's get back to it and I'm not going to say essentially all Webuye Okay go over the next three episodes I'm GonNa Watch it I'm GonNa Watch she faced her bright reddish in trying to think of a different word and trying to write colloidal silver we'll just go home to all and go off a purge anyway go right so colloidal silver is highly antimicrobial which means that it's really good at killing bacteria so different types of bacteria things like E. coli and stuff August did you ever do you have I don't know stuff a Caucasus it's kind of like E. coli is just a different type of food poisoning so there's obviously good tyrian but by Syria have you ever seen the adverts and like all the good bacteria in your life yes oh drinking something yes so basically it's just the type of bacteria I said basically so colloidal Silva actually used to be used instead of antibiotics so obviously ninety tick also kills bacteria but as you'll be aware because of all of these ridiculous adverse go on TV around winter time we can build resistance to antibiotics which is not good no no no because it means that we just have to find different antibiotics every year and one day that's just not going to be left so civil was actually originally and then antibiotics found out and they swapped the move a bolt it's really really bad to ingest colloidal silver you can still buy it so the disclaimer on this episode is every put it on your skin typically just don't ingest it because it's just not good for you we'll go into in a little bit and there's a funny little Fox that relates to something hilarious she said maybe six months ago really yeah GonNa look I'm not gonNA look I don't ruin the surprise take on the show I wish y'all so am like we've come to the conclusion that obviously really killing bacteria but you have bacteria everywhere this bacterium skin now and like I said some good somebody's gotten bad but it's really good colloidal silver is really good for ensuring that any bacteria on the skin that might be causing any infections oil acne is dead and gone if you with acne and this product or something with colloidal silver will be really good for you because there were a few studies that were done what's showed that there was a type of bacteria that lives on your skin that it lives in the oily region of polls so basically when Paul becomes suffocated and blocked by skin cells and oil nc it creates an environment where this type of bacteria really thrives and it can grow and multiply quickly I'm going to try and pronounce it it's called propane oh actually it's not too bad pro peony Bactariane propia Ni ropy on sounds Italian does what would you like some propia news awesome yeah so the propia antibacterial will thrive in an environment where there's of oxygen and it's just kind of a bit grim so yes you you wanna be having some form of colloidal silver if you suffer acne so what does it do and how does it work I'm not GonNa say Topical Selva does have some pre medical uses I you know I love asides paper aims absolutely shucks I read a really read a disturbed ebbing experiment I don't want to know and to be fair that there's a lot of experiments that adults and that test on animals on the not necessarily associated with Brahms like they're not testing their products animals they just trying to figure out whether it will work full browns to then kind of take on into product floors and a colloidal silver is really good for burns so if you've got activists really good and is really good because when you burn yourself you take off the top layer of skin which means that that skin underneath which isn't used to be in kind of out in the opener is votes expose last word it can be it's really proud to infection and get in bacteria that really shouldn't be there and seek an infected when when he goes green and ooh thing and so using colloidal silver kills all of that bacteria so when you've obviously killed all of that bacteria makes it easier to he bill and those a study that I mean you might WanNa skip ahead fifteen seconds on your lap at this point that had rust in on the way that they tested it was they rob and then compared to been been same way to see whether it was wet weather and I am absolutely not saying that is way should test anything but this is a test that was done I felt sick and I'm not gonNA lie a well to a little bit not swimming pool around yes from that they did find out that it was effective but I think that was a long time ago I don't know I don't have a link to the Nasty little experiment it worked yeah I think it was like I was saying this is good for Ben Scott right knee and it was used as an anti and anti cold from the doctor that was on until you but what you have said it already unable to answer by ozone unto cereal onto so when it's applied to the skin it can be really hunting bandages dresses winds plus days that kind of thing on skin infections so dramatic when I had that those spots along with Joel Line it was probably something to do with this obviously it was an infection so I wish I'd have known about silver then but what I went to the doctor they're like we can give you into politics for it and that got rid of it so it would have been

Colloidal Selva Canosa Sony Bush Jade Charlie Schramm Fifteen Seconds Five Minutes Six Months One Day
"The Justice Department and our FBI have to start doing their job," Trump says at Indiana rally

Lee Matthews

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

"The Justice Department and our FBI have to start doing their job," Trump says at Indiana rally

"A renewed call for the Justice department and the FBI to do their jobs I'm Dave Anthony Fox News people are. Angry President Trump at a. Rally in Indiana last night bringing. Up Hillary Clinton again I mean look at what she's getting away with but let's see if she gets away with let's say any set of Justice doesn't, do his job hill get involved though the president told Bloomberg earlier attorney, general, sessions is job is safe until at least November the president also called the media his biggest obstacle in the Democrats biggest ally just dishonest terrible people I'm telling you that. The president was rallying for a Republican trying to unseat democratic Senator Joe Donnelly,

President Trump Elon Musk Senator John Mccain Dave Anthony Fox Senator Joe Donnelly Democrats Bloomberg Vice President Carl Schramm Oklahoma Hillary Clinton Dow Jones Senator Washington Aretha Franklin Messier Washington National Cathedral Joe Biden SEC
"schramm" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on Harmontown

"Because it's so false i think of you as very magnanimous schramm so you like you like you like dave let's make that the new mem remember what randomness here's woodall's did the there was like a row it wasn't really you had a birthday and you had people that you like perform on your birthday and you showed some stuff that you're proud of like old shit and you had the beginning of harmon town because you did you went up and you did i go up i don't think yeah yeah you did today yeah what did i do well you come at sarah silverman was there back it was it was camille harris sarah and you closed it was a dicta sarah we hung up backstage right but but you just said oh i didn't know sarah who's gonna i didn't know how would be following sarah silverman here that you know i don't know anyways here here is the harris harris that was really funny because he he he went up and said well i'm not gonna you know i'm not gonna roast rob because rob's very sensitive joke writers go to negative place so like like roast jokes are the funniest jokes bribes very sensitive person so i'm just going to do i'm going to i'm going to try to roast rob but in a positive way and then he he did a whole set of like just jokes about rob is so such a good person and blah blah blah and i was like it was really it was really really funny because it was it was actually even to me even more abusive because he was calling you a pussy.

schramm woodall harmon town sarah silverman camille harris sarah rob dave
"schramm" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Yeah so mediatraining word but but when you look at the final product of mother what was your when when you went to my love debt when i love it and i think it's brilliant i do too i think that's what i was going to tell when i arrived i i'm surprised that they opened it you know as big as they did feel like you know art house release would have been a little more real and you know we can expect right now everybody to that i could you see that allegory movie out but um but it is it's it's i think that it's the closest thing 'perfect that i've ever seen and what we thought we were making it was even more beautiful i mean the the camera has its own language via i don't know i'm really proud of it i love it there's nothing like coming schramm razzie nominated jennifer lawrence says i got nominated raising a razzie what is a rosy and it's a worst performance severe award really yeah menominee educate jack nicholson actually got nominated for razzie for the shining so i if you're a way could win somebody asked me like after i watched it the first time i 'cause i didn't because they didn't see it in the conversation with darren was limited because i only widely didn't watch the end by the time i talk to you might have we got enough to work before got crazy and he's like we gotta watch the end because that's where everything happened then did you i can't remember he hit i did i watched it night than i thought about it and he didn't explain the allegory to me yeah i everybody different staff without a real yeah 'cause i was like you know if we don't tell people what it is and they're not they're not gonna see the beauty behind it they're not gonna know what they're looking at but he's an artist as like i made it like you either get it or you don't get it which you you know he's correct in words your ruling that went on for a moment i was coming in on you know i'm gonna i'm gonna talk about it okay.

jennifer lawrence jack nicholson schramm menominee darren
"schramm" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on WLOB

"Publisher of burned the business plan and carl schramm thank you for joining us tonight oh i'm so happy to be way again this is a supplement as as always amazed me i suppose i am not by nature at an entrepreneur i have a creative side and uh and i appreciate that aspect which somehow i don't think that i could ever do what these people do and i suspect that a lot of us uh either could not or or think we could not which might be the same thing what do you think it reminds me of and reports old saying if you think you can or do you think you can't you'll be right um i think the real thing about entrepreneurs in my book is different from most others because truly base time a lot of statistical information and abroad and look at hundreds of entrepreneurs and i think weather patterns that comes through loud and clear is most entrepreneurs are actually surprised that they become entrepreneurs to jim in this case you could say you know i'm created it i don't think i'm going to be an entrepreneur and it may happen that tomorrow something crosses your passed by way of an idea and say you know i got to do that i often say that uh entrepreneurs i studied them are often ambushed by their idea one thing that you're listening to mike listened might think about is the average age of an dr per noor is knocked 21 and his hot 25 not the mozarts but we keep thinking about the average age when people started business the united states just thirty nine and that's more evidence that you know people are in meat trump here before they actually think bought his new business that they're going to create wow i would i was surprised when you said that i would never have guest as old not that that that should be considered old but as old as thirty nine i guess we we tend to think of all the the prodigies who uh uh uh pink cheek to come rolling out of places like silicon valley or or the like and and.

Publisher noor united states carl schramm mike
"schramm" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"We now return to the hard questions with plunked pizza wow wcg l i on a most interesting conversation the other day with a family member family member who's just about forty and she said i don't know i i think i'm kinda getting started late here i have all these ideas and she's a wonderful talent and i said wait a minute i eat me look times have changed forty really's when you get in your chops when you start starting to know that you have more confidence in your capabilities but i thought you know what i'm going to on to reach out to one of the guys who is such an expert on this such a smart man of that he's written a book it's called burn that the business plan what great entrepreneurs really do on talking about carl schramm cross ram he say 40s like the new twenty and i i know you're going to be speaking to a lot of people out there who are timid because they're afraid to get it all going at forty years old uh that's right but you know uh quite concrete could the prevailing myths that entrepreneurs have to have a great idea by the time the thirty five people are big excuse me they tend to 25 people who start businesses you know it's sort of like i call them multiapartment if you haven't done it by the time you're 25 it's not going to happen absolutely wrong the average age for people starting businesses cnn take thirty nine three a friend who's forty is third of almost on target and really honestly i want to boomers is joining businesses and and i think uh the fact of the matter is were were living longer and better health and i i was thinking about like my dad meet on people got fired fifty and they got the gold watch it fifty but now you look at fifty brad pitt's fifth d for crying out loud so people don't and look at the age as the same as they used to and so many people have all their marbles going what are they need to consider if they're going to get launched karl this is really important well you know it's really the quality of their idea in their sort of took her and the.

brad pitt karl carl schramm cnn forty years
"schramm" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"I just did a fantastic interview with the great through taylor's do thank you so much you are fabulous everybody listen to do taylor all right we return and i'm aware ab will back with dr kyle schramm uh in an extraordinary background university professor in syracuse they can't go through this all the time i continuously are we won't get any if valuable information but the book is burying the business plan what great entrepreneurs really do it's a moving up rapidly on the bestseller list dan it is uh published by simon schuster and i just wanna add because i talk with my guest during breaks and uh he's a really nice guy collier a nice guy in it's great to have you back having having said that let let me um let let me explore area we've had a great deal of expertise had people who are an engaged in uh trying to raise financing for a startup companies in ito you can go angels go guy if venture capitalist you can go convential investing or you could go to someplace i never like to go members of family go raise money to do this of course is a price to be paid for everything the venture capitalist loved i mean not everybody wants to get what they can out of it but it's a huge chunk of the business i don't know fifty sixty per said you may have to turn over an idea upbeat should just watch shocked yankin i've interviewed everybody on shark tank and then the question is how you know i always say and i said it when i was in business how badly do i need the is and how fight away have to go.

taylor professor syracuse simon schuster dr kyle schramm
"schramm" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"But it never seem to be the right time uh tex schramm of the cowboys seem to always have you know counter that you know it was already a first we might do something you know is kind of us uh feeder league and never could get traction now when cable burst upon the scene uh and started to really gain momentum uh as you mentioned you know 70s we had some cable but really in the 80s it was starting to pick up momentum early '80s yet about twenty five percent of cable penetration by the close of the decade i i believe they were right up around 50 percent so that's one cable was exploding so dixon's saw this need for programming not only in me for programming but people would pay for it and he decided that the time was right to launch the usfl it was actually supposed to launch a year earlier but they put it off a year uh in order to get a their ownership firmed up and via it was really cable and the the money that you can get from television because you cannot do pro football without a television contract you can't pay for all your expenses just out of ticket revenue there's simply no way and especially when you're looking at a major league when you have such resources committed the player salaries so he was really television that was the driver and that's that's no shame televisions always spend the driver televisions the reason the american football league survived when they got their contract with nbc it's the reason they merged.

tex schramm football american football league dixon nbc twenty five percent 50 percent
"schramm" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Guys got this wrong do we need a of you must you'll lose one we might maybe another one might be helpful we'll see holiday spread what do you what are you doing i'm good thank you it's like fucking with the prize bag you have to start wearing it in a briefcase right like a blues whether harmonica scrape not getting old you guys now's the gray reference for all the people that are not millennials but they still play that movie all the time all the time tv cable cbs outlets beat our guest individually as they enjoy their various food things this is our these pretzels though this is here i believe that there are those are pretzels blameless there they're like hey let's have a salty dildo i think there's a bar around here called that sega rain around you'll bosic covered and maple syrup the other side of the devil deuce let's say hello everybody to a firsttimer why barely no i just met him tonight but i have great great feelings about this man it's mike schramm everybody hello everyone hello sounds famous sounds name assorted right mike shrimp who doesn't know march round right to syllables backed back a couple of thousand followers on the twitter it's true i have a solid amount of twitter followers people i hate talk having on your show i look at their twitter following in its is negative three lake it's possible to have that number and yeah but you have a bit of a following but tell everybody why vicky yes uh i mainly it's because i'm a by used to be a blogger i used to write for a cycle joystick dot com which is a sign of a video game saves there you go one person person's heard of it thank you very much and then i've also 100 have there you go in the world in the world entirely i also worked on a cycle the unofficial have a web log and i'm an actor improvisor i'm a writer i do in practice here in san diego swedem's san diego and a place could find a city in prague which is a great theater lafayette hotel and and that's pretty much it oh and a great name to because this is the finest city according to.

twitter writer prague sega mike schramm san diego
"schramm" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"To make it able to curb illegal everybody else's now it's like stru cockroaches coming out of you know you turn the light on this gathering in i see this virtually every day so those do things in the third thing which i think is is changed a lot and made us go become worse is um of the state's resistance to time anything out his created such frustration that people now like i guess i'm park in in the mould the intersection i guess this is this is the way it's going to be i am so frustrating to try to get to blocks a because i know once they get on the other side of that light whatever that light is starting to get past that light it's going to be things going to loosen up so people not just don't give a rip they will park wherever they want it a railroad track the tali trolleys tracks in the middle of the intersection schramm here of their blocking you if and they just sit there and they look forward like he used to be like heatwave i really i i know amid earlier herds is one time only sorry you your care now it's like f you i've been sitting at that life for an hour some eyes will sit in the middle of the intersection make everybody else feel the misery that i'm fit is up said he will someone camps in the left lane a new fire foggy jump in the middle line to go bottom and a newlook over and they're just look at other phone they're just drive down the interstate and they're looking at their fall us or you're sitting at a traffic light and they miss the cycle of the light and you know they're on the fall city buses are doing it now no ordering i mean so much drivers honest fall apart my bus drivers are just park in you can kind of wedge your way through if it's a car use not an accordion bouchiki accordion baath like i guess this is marlene at round the 45 washington as the worst drivers were at number five number one you know why were to nice no ugo no you go no ugo that is that is fading go.

schramm
"schramm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Support for kqed comes from a generous gift from yawn schramm and maria monetti schramm founders of the monetti schramm museum of art uc davis who believe that all people deserve access to education and culture to enrich a lifetime of exploration and learning tina brown made her name in this country bringing vanity fair magazine back from the near dead and she get the diary while she was doing it the glitz glamour and grind of the publishing business next time on marketplace marketplace heirs at four pm and six thirty pm here on kqed fm eighty eight point five san francisco and kqe ifm eighty nine point three north island sacramento we are live onlinekqedorg and the time now to fifty i'm carol hills and this is the world if you're listening in southern california today well that probably means you're safe and we hope you're able to stay that way intense wildfires continued to burn in the los angeles area the fires have destroyed hundreds of homes and forced roughly two hundred thousand people to evacuate were thinking of all of you out there and keeping an eye on the situation meanwhile on the other side of the country many florida communities are still recovering from a different disaster hurricane erma battered parts of the sunshine state back in september unfortunately it's the kind of event that flirty inns are likely to see more of that's because climate change paths a one to punch a rising seas and stronger storms the.

schramm vanity fair magazine san francisco carol hills california climate change rising seas kqed maria monetti monetti schramm museum of art tina brown burn in los angeles florida
"schramm" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Lot of people my dread brave new world on the end the basis of it was cetina ad 25 forty was the setting of the book mmhmm so it was really were there are a lot sooner than he predicted yeah yeah but the early in his book there was discussions of reproductive technologies sleep learning psychological manipulation classical conditioning that in 1958 he wrote brave new world revisited over which kind of said well now look here's what's happened since i wrote the book i brave new world and his last book was a book entitled an and get the connotation here island who where he kind of revert schramm the brave new world thought 'isolation ozone interesting interesting k he also talked about the eyes the pharmaceutical revolution and how it will make us loves slavery interesting statement right i he said this revolution which is taking place which we have it now powerful mine changing drugs which psychologically speaking are almost cost less i mean they're not like opium or or cocaine which do change the state of mind believe terrible results of physiologically and morally and he said if you want to preserve your power indefinitely i you have to get the consent of the ruled and they'll do this partly by drugs also he talked about political candidates would become merchandise marketed by professionals and he said all that is needed a well he said wallace was talking to him and he said you've said that all is needed is money and a candidate who will be coach to look sincere political principles and plans for specific action to have come to uh to lose most of their importance the personality the candidate the way he is projected by the advertising experts are the things that will really matter wow yeah very very very true voided he nail prophet um yeah i mean it was interesting to hear him i to hear him just really nail so many things that would happen he said evil people will take advantage of technology and government to gain power and of course you know we've seen that but but isn't it amazing that somebody that long ago i think in a time where we wouldn't have thought a lot of this could happen absolutely and completely nails it i don't think we realize how much the pharmaceutical industry is harmed us the rage and provided distractions and escape and and.

schramm opium cocaine wallace pharmaceutical industry
"schramm" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

"I can of those worms and though schramm four packages of um wife's a model of at clugston brie close wash from timbuktu and that's all we have to give away today but that's quite a list also that is a bunch of stuff to do is they will estimates there we have to get the correct answer the question is today from what city in georgia does real tree radio emanate that is what siege in studio in the state of georgia the correct answer there is it give us call let us know what you are what you think the answer is and you a bunch of stuff yep um once you call we'll uh we'll let you know if it's rider wrong but if you went all that stuff you're going to have to uh have ups come by and get a get a fort lifted carried all of your front porch so it that's a lot of stuff right there uh uh uh uh in his november and that's pretty much tally wait for all year as dear hunters myself and in a most of us here abu neil outside had been waiting all fall to get in the woods and i know that o'neill and his grandson cody hunted this week i believe that they solve small leave they let them all go uh they did see some does and they show so that's that's part of you know your quality dear management is to actually harvest the correct number us uh uh um but it is now the second week of november and be honest with you that's what i've been waiting for the the cool temperatures northwest wind it it really gets me excited and i'm sure most of you are right now you know you're you're going into the spot since you've you've let's say all year all dear season and um it's it's time to get in there and.

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"schramm" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"At the brakes i ain't schramm this cya anything i'm telling you i just did you think this is this is just some of the universe makes happened but they're healthy will help at the same time hers is something that they texaco there about you tell me you have twins it's the universe that's what it is is the universe torrance my cake without saying a word they just kind of instinct with each other the only thing time guitars zaents i'm crowd at the same time have at the same time they may not he does they are doing it mr keep it had a sports hernia surgery i had that as well in my herni doctor told me something those such thing as a sports her surgeries here's a question what's going on between way for real i was wondering i said at the beginning of the season when he was in the starting lineup i gave in over under on this program of ten games the that alas thinking ask did three three and in a four game scores in double figures for the first time all year so he's good now do you i feel that he's is there twenty percent to add to the cavs on the basketball floor eighty percent to keep liberal happy off the basketball floor that's the great ratio it twice eighty and also here's a dynamic that the cavs are still going to have to to iron up that nobody's talking about what do they do in the crushed on mount minutes who's going to head of all because that transition happen will curry was there he was the player sent nicky law yes or the shop so with isaiah out in wait not starting all of a sudden i can see the microphones in front of the.

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"schramm" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"As shapiro livshits and schramm what is shapiro livshits instagram what are you guys doing we i'd the teak law firm in dupont circle with age transactional practice announced a litigation practice alierta's mrs commercial real estate then held largest malls the of is the bizarre evening for an attorney at home and how much of support steph probably about twelve to fifteen support staff is while rain where you're from original really i am from a claim for ginny and how many brothers and sisters i have to older sisters and a younger brother actually your third of four 34 always trying to get attention seized two tonnes what kind of sports did you play as a kid i am very active i played soccer i play basketball and my ultimate focused became field hockey in the toast a little bit will roll did you play on those teams i always seemed to emerge as a leader on those teams iit would what specific world the gamble news teams what was your when i play basketball i was the point guard in soccer as a defender an infield hockey i ended up playing field hockey for it division one skoll and was also a defender and ultimately the captain of that team thug what's that mean to a unido sports real well yes so that means that you have to have awareness and not just what you're doing but what the whole field is to end up the times that correct that's correct teamwork has always been a big theme and has followed me through my schooling my family and my career and did the fact with your brothers and sisters to that help bill that teamwork yes three we definitely functioned as a team in terms as just coexist tang the forever i am always very athletic nice are also very sporty at but it also allowed me to express myself to become an individual because i chose the difference for inches to focus on a different path the who's got the next question here but would immune chose a different sport one of the on a different path what so if field hockey was something that i wanted to focus on it provided the biggest challenge for me it didn't come as easy to me i've always embrace challenges and wanted to.

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"schramm" Discussed on Conversations with People Who Hate Me

Conversations with People Who Hate Me

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on Conversations with People Who Hate Me

"When you fish shellfish do you mean like schramm crowd that ramp and lobster yeah yeah i mean so that is also an abomination in the bible right yep talk to me about why that's moral k then you know acting on homosexuality because of what we do a lotta time as we look at the old testament and the new testament and so jesus cook what we had in the old testament and build it so we didn't we don't have to live by those laws bradley i just want to ask i i assume you are not gay right correct but here's just listen to me with this um so i think it's very similar for a straight person who is withholding from these acts until marriage with somebody um in that sense of yeah it's friction hard not to care soared uh making out yeah to have sex with somebody by those urges are so real for men like don't want to have sex is kind of ridiculous but tend not go with what the body once and to wait for what is right how do you feel about a gay person who signs their partner they wait till marriage and then they get married and then they have sex uh i mean it's still like it's still acting upon homosexuality which is the finn and so i believe that to be wrong um i'm not saying it's not a beautiful thing that happens because it's love it actually is love but it's.

old testament partner schramm
"schramm" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"schramm" Discussed on KELO

"One of the worst things to experience in terms of pain the pain levels very high and no one knew what it was then but i found that through my own invest the gatien's when i was eighteen years old i remember reading another book i've learned a lot from books by the way books a fabulous if they're written by intelligent people know what they're talking about rather than be derivative books that teach you nothing that you have learned before but there was a book that was a breakthrough book by george oh saalbach about macrobiotics from for those of you remember those days macrobiotic diets could probably remember many eu x macrobiotic in hippie people and you're in those days of the schramm's and woodstock but anyway wrote a book called it was a high of what was the no he was writing a book on macrobiotics so he talked about various symptoms and whatnot assauer did and he described different diets to treat yourself within most of them were very hard to follow so i tried the most extreme of his dis the number ten diet which which was i think all brown rice and nothing else for a while and then he taught me in his book about elimination diets will you reintroduce certain foods one at a time he was a pioneer in this and you see what's if if if it repeats the symptoms that you're trying to eliminate in your life well it turned out that i was allergic to sucrose anything which sugar in it will trigger me whether it was a migraine or this or that so i then became a religiously avoiding of pies cakes pastries sugary sodas icecream you name it i've only sugar because it provokes headaches in me and really bad feelings what i'm saying to you is diet and mental stability there intimately related and we're going to talk a little bit about low blogger blood sugar and you in his chris matthews and the others on his channel unfit for tv common terry i mean man justed jokingly suggest that donald trump should do it mussalini did to his son in law if that's not beyond the pale i'd like to know what is this friday let's have another rock and roll whatever even the same song i invite you to call eight five five four hundred seven two.

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