33 Burst results for "School Of Public Health"

Wisconsin governor issues new mask mandate after GOP repeal

All Things Considered

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Wisconsin governor issues new mask mandate after GOP repeal

"NPR NEWS Washington In Wisconsin, a tug of war over masks the state's GOP controlled legislature voting to repeal a mask mandate. Imposed by Democratic Governor Tony Evers. Lawmakers voted to end the statewide mass mandate despite warnings from health experts that master the most effective way to slow the spread of the Corona virus that would make Wisconsin one of only 10 states without a mass mandate in place. Less than an hour later, Evers issued a new mask mandate. Even with the repeal, businesses, schools, health clinics and churches. Consistory

Tony Evers Wisconsin NPR GOP Legislature Washington Evers
Covid-19: Rapid tests for asymptomatic students to be rolled out

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:59 min | Last month

Covid-19: Rapid tests for asymptomatic students to be rolled out

"Is is grouping grouping together together Cove. Cove. It It 19 19 tests tests results results from from school school kids kids a a technique technique meant meant to to streamline streamline and and reduce reduce the the cost cost of testing. Watertown Public schools and a few others, including Wellesley, have been using weekly pull testing to test asymptomatic students and staff and evolves, mixing several samples together in a tube to be sent for testing rather than testing individuals, Watertown superintendent explains nurses there perform quick painless No swaps results are quick. If a pool is positive, the school calls each person It has them getting individual rapid test first thing the next morning of another positive results, they enclose contacts will quarantine allowing all others to return to school pool testing allows a lot of people to get tested in a cost effective way. Watertown administrators believe along with preventative measures, it's the reason kids have been able to stay in school even as community covert rates, Serge That's W S XT. Boston's Christine McCarthy reporting. Officials plan to expand pool testing toe all Massachusetts schools. Health experts

Watertown Public Schools Watertown Wellesley Christine Mccarthy Serge Boston Massachusetts
"school public health" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Us like runaway train with britain shutting down again to cope with the new more street holding. It feels like we'll be next. We got a new president coming in. Hospitals are being overwhelmed. Why not just bite the bullet and get it over with believe me. I understand the impulse to shelter in place nationally until we get vaccinated and i know there's a point where lockdowns unavoidable because they prevent the healthcare system from being well but a trust me not that we're in this position we've learned so much about this far we just need to apply it. If we use that information we wouldn't need to shut things down except one. It's an for heaven's sake. Lots of people seem to think kobe's spreads when you pete when people coughing you sneezing you from surface. Whatever else should that's part of it. But it's not the most important part professor kimberly pre there. The university of california. San diego is the world's leading expert on air nintey but she knows more about covid transmissions that any doctor. Because it's an aerosol you have to look at the virus like it's cigarette smoke. It fills the room. Engulfs it if you let the room get filled then. There's a good chance that you're going to get infected. What does that mean. It means we could slow the spread. If we make sure places where people come here well ventilated. Open a window for heaven's sake a bunch of them plus you can use carbon dioxide detectors to see if there's too much viral load. Actually doing that in all the restaurants a lot of buildings in japan which has a much better. Kobe tracked him we. Do i work with dr appraiser on the mass competition. That i help find and she made me feel like we could avoid a lockdown if we just take a smarter approach. She's not advising president. Biden's cloud taskforce hopefully a listener. Dr pre their says we need mass social distancing and then relation. So talk to your family doesn't cause you get infected second idea. Cheap at-home home testing dr michael professor of epidemiology harvard chan school public health came amid money weeks ago and suggested that for few billion dollars. Us government could give every american a bunch of papers chips that tell you at home if you're infected and it's done with remarkable accuracy. The technology is like now that way you'd notice home if you're infectious seems insane. Aren't already doing this. The medical community is fighting what the public health communities urging is a public health problem. Finally remember when the president got koga but back. He's back on his feet almost instantly because he took the regeneron antiviral drug. That drug is now been approved by the. Fda is excellent chesler coping. Perhaps by the now that i just described but doctors aren't using it much because the nih has questioned its value aucoin fda. That's if it was good enough to get the fda approval. We shouldn't be giving it to people when they get off on the night infected. Kick them out of the hospital rather than letting tens of thousands of these does sitting some cabinet somewhere. That's outrageous to now. It might be too late for these tragedies to stable some level of lockdown. But i hope we can find a common sense middle ground where we can keep our windows open. Keep our mass on. Get everyone cheap at home test. Stay socially distance and push regeneron drug for people who've caught it. We don't need to shut down. The economy will be wound. We just need to be smarter about fighting the virus. Maybe i'm naive for thinking. Our country can make smart decisions. Why not give it a shot. I.

kimberly pre dr appraiser dr michael epidemiology harvard chan scho kobe britain university of california San diego fda Kobe Biden koga japan Us government Us chesler nih cabinet
House passes $900 billion COVID relief, catchall measure

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

House passes $900 billion COVID relief, catchall measure

"A huge legislative package includes a nine hundred billion dollar corona virus relief bill and one point four trillion dollar federal fiscal year spending plan in the house Monday evening VA is a three fifty nine the maze R. fifty three passage of a massive bill that includes a corona virus relief compromise and the catch all spending bill along with various odds and ends still on the calendar the relief bill combines corona virus fighting funds with financial aid for individuals and businesses made Republican senator Susan Collins says Calvin Ridley is vitally needed for our struggling families for our hard hits small businesses the bill such a temporary three hundred dollar per week supplemental federal unemployment benefit and the six hundred dollar direct stimulus payment to most Americans are also subsidies for hard hit businesses schools health care providers and renters facing eviction Tim McGuire Washington

Calvin Ridley Susan Collins Tim Mcguire Washington
Congress rushes toward vote on $900B COVID relief bill

Anna Davlantes

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Congress rushes toward vote on $900B COVID relief bill

"US this week. Nuke over 19 Relief bill Shaping up in Congress includes individual payments reaching $600 for most Americans and an extra $300 a week in unemployment benefits. Votes on the bill in the House and Senate are expected today. The covert bill would feed $900 billion into relief efforts. Among those getting help are hard hit businesses. Schools, health care providers in renters facing eviction. Another part of the massive combo measure is of $1.4 trillion government wide funding plan that would keep the government

Congress Senate United States House
Congress seals agreement on $900 billion COVID relief bill

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Congress seals agreement on $900 billion COVID relief bill

"Lawmakers sealed the deal Sunday on a nine hundred billion dollar coronavirus economic relief package that gives Americans a long overdue financial help under the agreement three hundred dollar weekly unemployment benefits six hundred dollars stimulus checks to most Americans and a new round of subsidies for hard hit businesses Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell more help is on the way while Democrats say it's the largest spending measure yet it wasn't as robust as the country needs Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer this bill will not be the final word on congressional coated relief the deal also offers money for schools health care providers and renters facing eviction lawmakers eager to leave Washington are likely to vote today I'm Julie Walker

Senate Mitch Mcconnell Chuck Schumer Washington Julie Walker
"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:27 min | 3 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"As we step back and take a look at where we are with the pandemic we have on the one hand surging cases. Really on a global scale, putting additional strains on the health care system. But on the other hand, we have a least three vaccines and very late stages that will in fact, begin to be delivered this month. Get the latest on kind of how we should frame this. We welcome Lawrence Sour. She's a social professor of emergency medicine, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine joining us on the phone from Baltimore, and we should note that the Bloomberg School public Health at Johns Hopkins is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg founder Bloomberg LP. Bloomberg Philanthropies. And this radio operation. Dr Sarah Thanks again so much for joining us. We really appreciate it. I'd love to kind of just focus on a kind of you know the vaccine and how this will likely be distributed. As we go forward beginning this month. What do your thoughts? Yeah, If I fall, I'm going to jump in here for us before we get to Dr Sour because I want to talk to you about new virus cases in the U. K. We're just getting figures out right now. A new virus cases rising by get this 16,298. Now the seven day average for the UK is 14,408 on. Obviously, there are variations around here in us, at least that would be around Thanksgiving. But the UK didn't have a Thanksgiving. There were the word. There were no reasons for large groups to be getting together and also we know that there had been a countdown on things like that. There were no new restrictions reimposed So grown viruses out there and it's out there Big. Yeah, it really is funny, And I guess it's like, you know, some combination of the seasonality of it. The weather the cold weather folks being indoors but and also some some factor of, I guess fatigue on the part of People out there that just kind of tired of the social distancing tired of the mass wearing on it's just kind of weighing in on people, and I think you put a lot of that together. On. That's kind of what you're seeing in terms of some of these cases here. So let's get to a lot of Lawrence, a renowned doctor Lawrence, or I should say Visor emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins University Doctors our How are our emergency rooms and our ICUs in general across the country? We're seeing an uptick across the board in the country, which both ICU and non ICU beds. Um and you know, we like to see that that Capacity remain, and you know, at hospitals across the country, particularly those hospitals, where they don't have a ton of ice new capacity. We just seen those hospitals filling up and filling up and filling up with covert patients. It's itching. And you know, on The New York Times that I'm looking at The New York Times Digital Edition on my APP, doctor sour and they have a little thing saying, You know, you can click here. Kind of entering some data points your age where you live, that type of thing, and I'll tell you where you stand in line for a vaccine and I'm about 267 million in line, so I will be patient. For the vaccine. How do you expect the vaccine the most efficient delivery methods? How do you think that will be will be hospitals with a big doctor's offices will be going to the CVS or Walgreen's had to expect that to play out. I have a feeling It's going to be a combination of all these things. You know, we're trying to vaccinate a ton of people on DSA that first roll out. We're going to test a lot of strategies as we deliver to hospitals and healthcare systems to vaccinate their frontline workers and, um, skilled nursing facilities to vaccinate their their stuff. And they're, um People who live there, their patients, and so you know, we're going to see what vaccinations strategies work. What vaccinations strategies. Don't you know where we're potentially losing doses of vaccine because of the processing or the holding or the Frosting where we're having backups in the ability to get patients, access or participants are people access to the vaccines, So I think what we'll see is that The strategies that work the best. A zoo. We're rolling this out for health care workers in You know, big hospital systems will be adapted to the general public. As soon as those vaccine doses come online and systems across the country are making plans for how they're going to do this and what this is gonna look like the key will be Um, it's ongoing community transmission is really bad. How do you get people in and out quickly and safely without exposing them to people who may be asymptomatic or pre symptomatic? And then how do we screen people who may have mild vaccine reactions? Andare going to start feeling like, perhaps they do have coded or they have the flu or something like that. How do we keep those people out of emergency departments and testing sites across the country? Yeah, There's so many questions here also, you know, remember when It was problems getting ventilators to the states that needed them. Are we going to have this kind of system or will it be centralized? I think it's a wait and see situation. You know, I think the hope is that there will be some centralizing process with the states than working on the resource allocation that best fits the need across there. Um, state or their region, and it'll just depend on how much vaccine comes online. So dark so quickly. What percentage of people do you think will in fact, take this vaccine because there is some pushback on vaccines in general? Absolutely. I think we have a lot of work to do in that space. I don't I don't have a good sense right now. I think we're hopeful that it will be above 50%. But I don't know on do you know the higher that percentage gets the better for the entire population? Um, but that's our responsibility of science and science, communicators of media members to make sure that the science is getting out there about the safety and the efficacy and what has gone into This process, But just because it's It's shorter than normal shorter than we would normally expect A vaccine development process to be does not mean that we've cut corners does not mean that it's less safe does not mean that we've dropped steps and the regulatory environment to get this to the people. Doctors. Our that's really all the time we have what we love to talk to you for longer, but obviously you've got more important works viewing doctors. Our of course. This is Professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins University and pull. You know, I read a story the other day, literally just yesterday, But in fact, you know a young person suffering symptoms who had gone all of this time without getting covered. And suddenly got covert and had the worst symptoms And I think it serves as a great reminder that you know some people out there when they get us get it really, really badly. And I hadn't read a story like that in a long time. And it was it was very sobering. It's got to Washington, DC, now for.

Lawrence Sour Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins School of Medici Michael R. Bloomberg UK Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School public Health The New York Times Baltimore professor Dr Sarah flu Washington founder DC Professor asymptomatic
"school public health" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:13 min | 3 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on WTOP

"You plan to attend to face a face holiday gathering to be T O P S Michelle Bash has more advice from experts with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health. How does Turkey Dinner on the patio? Sound epidemiologist carry, Althoff says Gathering outdoors will be safer than indoors. If you have to be endorsed, do open the windows turn on fans. Increased ventilation turned on your central A C or heating for that continuous circulation and remind us that they made you need to dress in layers as it might be drafting a mish adults. A senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security says. Think ahead about spacing people 6 FT. Apart at your gathering can families are households that air that are already mixed? Can I stay mostly together? And then you have other people wear face coverings masks face shields when they're interacting with other people. Michelle Bash w T o P News more Than a million people in the DC area. Our travel travel for Thanksgiving last year in their cars and on planes, But it won't be the same during this pandemic. There will likely be historic drops for Thanksgiving this year, with Tripoli expecting at least a 10% decrease in the number of people going somewhere for the holiday on the roads, those who decide to travel all likely to drive shorter distances. And reduce the number of days they are away. And for those flying triple A spokesman John Townsend says Eric Travel at the three major airports in the region will see the largest one you decrease on record. Overall, he says. Triple A expects the lightest Thanksgiving travel season since the Great recession in 2008. Nick I Nelly. W T O P. News. The National Park Service once again going to try and reduce the deer population in DC's Rock Creek Park operations, which will take place at night will begin next week. Running through the end of March, the government began taking action back into 2013 because the white tail deer population was growing and damaging the ecosystem. And for the first time this year, MPs will also take action to reduce populations of deer in places like Pinehurst Parkway, Battery, Campbell Park and Fort Totten Park, which are under rock creaks management. ADM. Fans have probably dance at Echo Stage in Sound Check in D. C. Now a major West Coast promoter, insomniac events has acquired both common be passed and shoulder shoulder and sing along all the things that covert doesn't want you to do, President Mahmoud says. Go Stages World class. It's a 3000 person Hybrid club. You have a huge dance floor, and then we have an upstairs with 40 tables. It's honestly an iconic venue. There's nothing like it in the world. Sound check is its underground little brother. Really cool room. It's underground, most ceilings and the name sound check. It's much soundproof foam foam ceilings, too poor public floors. It's the ultimate intimate experience. Read more on the acquisition of Deputy will be that calm, Jason friendly. It's the open is coming up in money news, a warning from the Fed chair that a covert vaccine will not be an immediate elixir for the economy. 9 24. Are you worried about your underlying health conditions? Did you know that if you have varicose veins, your chances of getting blood clots are five times higher than normal. Varicose and Spider veins are not only painful.

Michelle Bash Eric Travel Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Spider veins Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Rock Creek Park National Park Service Althoff senior scholar Fed John Townsend Campbell Park President Mahmoud Fort Totten Park Nick Tripoli Jason friendly Hybrid club
"school public health" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:38 min | 5 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Bernard. Bernard. If I were to read the resume Our guest today way would go into probably 12 o'clock hour, but we're privileged tohave. Dr. Albert cope. Well, who's with the Yale School Public Health Department chair professor of epidemiology out of medicine. Of doing with infectious diseases. He's an infectious disease physician. And he's also the advisory cochair of reopened Connecticut AA group that continues to meet and provide Connecticut with guidelines. As to how to re open safely. He's been described Reverend as the doctor Fauci off the north. We are very, very proud to have Dr Ko Welcome. Nice to have you the revenue rabbi. Thank you very much. Rabbi Potasnik and Reverend Bernard. It's It's a real pleasure. And and I'm I'm humbled by that. By that? Ah, ah, Ever tactic for in reference to Dr College. She II many leagues below him. Well, I understand what Dr Pouch in Washington. They call him the doctor Cho off that area, so there's reciprocity. No, in no other way. And surely the hero to all of us, You know, working in public, you know, by the way ribbon, Dr Cobell undergraduate work at mighty and just to make a little easier for himself later on. I got his m d at Harvard. So things we do in spare time? Yeah, Yeah. Dr Carl Levin, let me ask you why. Oh, some people find it so difficult to follow the science after all, whatever problem you have. You want to go to a specialist? You know of whether it's for your body for your car. Whatever you want to go to someone who is proficient in that area. Doctors come out with guide lights, doctors A. This is what you need to do to keep the numbers down. There are some people who, regardless of the advisory continue. To be dismissive of protocols. I don't understand mentality. Can you figure it out? Yeah, I think so. Thank you for that question, And it's an important one. And it gets at the crux of Fishing for us Working public health is that we're thinking about wellbeing and well being, you know, goes beyond kind of the molecules. You know, the infectious disease agents really goes into issues of family issues of community issues of good governance. And Ah, and there's So much that scientists, researchers and physicians in public health experts can do much of the work That's important is on the policy side and Ah, and then when you get into policy, you have Tio. I think one of the key things in what's played out certainly across the world the importance of good governance. Now in places that had or government they've been hit hard by the epidemic in places that had demonstrated good govern with good leadership. They've done well. You know, you say good governance stock, not Dr Cho, And we think about some of the ideology that drives both sides and You know, we have an administration in power. And one of the things that they're concerned about is too much government too much government intervention too much government control. And that may be part of the reason why they pushed back against the science. But we also have the facts of over 200,000 deaths in the United States. How do we reconcile those fears? With the reality of science. And so I think a couple of points to be made on that 1st 1st of all that. There are a lot of elements that go into good governance and I think, letting you know Bass. No leading policy based on evidence and facts, I think is one of the hallmarks. You know whether it's for Cove it or whether it's for climate changed, or whether it's for how we teach our Children and fools. You know the importance of evidence. In fact, you know it is foundational. Ah, You know, the second, you know, issue that comes up is that you know when we're dealing with uncertainty in the unexpected we have tohave. Strong foundations, you know? And ah, and with respect you not micromanaging. Being able to delegate being able to communicate information, in fact, effectively and as we can see, played out, especially here in United States. We've seen cracks and all of those things and You can imagine I was I was. I grew up in the 16th. If we looked at the achievements that the United States made on research in science and how they translated that into into public health benefit you thinking about Cancer and chemotherapy. Nimet advancing through, They know we have to ask ourselves what changed between that period and now Yeah, it makes sense that we, you know, take a look at the hard fact and reason with some Ah, in ways that we consider the health of public. I have friends in Africa Doctor who They're experiencing the second way by friends in Asia. Friend of mine on Jakarta, Indonesia. They're experiencing second wave Israel shut down for three weeks. And now we're seeing spikes again here locally in in New York City, and ah, across the United States. What was was opened eyes now close. Paris closed down Jim's things on DH recreational. Facilities. Are we looking at a second wave hitting the United States? And is it? Is it already here? Yeah, that is. Well. First of all, this is You know, we are in the second wave in many different parts of their of the country. Some of the parts of the country is going through their first ways. Ah, this is all highly predictable, really. No from many months ago, given what we know, and we're we've seen and how the epidemic has played out. I'll give you the example What happened in Asia? We had places such as Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong, which you know I had. Very strong, very strong public health responses. The coded epidemic because of the high transmissibility they had small resurgence is You've had other countries, and I think the cautionary tale is what's happening. And in Italy, Spain in French, these places that got hit hard No in the late winter. Um You know, I had strong lockdowns prolonged, locked out, and now they hope end up and ah, have their second search. So you know our ability. We have to learn from our lessons. And they also have to learn from what the science and the evidence tells us. This is a highly transmissible disease. Um, you know this is field by contact in travel. When you have Increases in social contact,.

United States Dr Cho Bernard. Bernard Yale School Public Health Depa Asia Dr Carl Levin Connecticut Dr Ko Dr Pouch Dr College Dr. Albert cope chair professor Fauci Harvard Rabbi Potasnik Washington Jakarta Fishing
"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:23 min | 5 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And Jason Kelly from Bloomberg Radio Carol so many headlines when it came to cope in 19. This week, President Trump and the first lady testing positive For the Corona virus. This after one of their top aides Hope Hicks was confirmed positive as well. You saw that news first via Bloomberg News Global confirmed deaths topping one million London at a tipping point because of an uptick in cases, and we also saw an increasing cases in parts of New York City. So we turned to one of our experts, several experts across the week but this particular guy, Dr Sandra Gala He's the dean of the Boston University school public health. He talked about that public health aspect and how important it is. We should note. We talked to Dr Julia earlier in the week before that positive test was revealed on the part of the president. We as a university have been re opening cautiously carefully with a lot of testing a lot of contact, tracing a lot of isolation as needed and really working hard to keep the community safe. Also. Working on our mission and continuing teaching and containing a research. It's a tough balance. I think it's a balance for everybody. And it's part of. I think a broader societal place where we're at where we're recognizing that we're living with. Hold it for sometime now, and we cannot afford to keep our world slow down because there are important things that we have to do. And so give us a sense of that balance. Dr. Gallant like, what is something where you feel like you've found it in terms of either? Staffing or class size or doing labs, like, Give us an example of where you feel like. Okay, well, this this feels about as good as we don't get well, Jason, I think I don't think I feel confident. Tell you anything is good. I think everything is a work in progress on the local level. What we're doing so We at the university are testing people extensively about 5 to 6000 day happening so students are tested multiple times a week. We have a lot of people who are involved in this testing. But also somebody tested positive and the contact tracing those who they've been in contact with right, so the idea is and we have discussed this before. In our previous conversations. The idea with testing is that you catch a case early so that it does not become a cluster that does not continue the epidemic. So you find a case you do contact tracing you find that people around the case you quarantine those people and isolate the case. And of course, all of that superimposed over, eh? Very strict regimen off building hygiene. And by that, I mean ventilation. The building wiping down surface is a very strong public campaign for people who remain safe wearing a mask. Making sure that people are not in if they're sick and every day doing symptoms screens for everybody, So it really is a fairly comprehensive effort, and it is In some respects. I think the challenge is that compensable. Further tests happen now and has to keep happening really for weeks and months, right until there is a definitive vaccine for Corbett. Talk to me about contact tracing because I feel like we're getting very mixed results mixed reviews in terms of people essentially saying, Yeah, not going to cooperate. It's voluntary. I'm not going to tell you either. I don't want to get in trouble because I was at a party or I feel like it's an invasion of my privacy. How do you manage that? Well, in some respects, I think It's easier to manage that within a closed system of yon institution versus in the general population, so in our in our system We have been very care that this is part off the cost of citizenship. If you're if you're going to be part of the community, you have responsibility to work towards keeping other safe and part of that responsibility is If you test positive is that you talk to the contact racers, and you tell them where you've been in contact with so that they can be taught to those people and make sure we keep them safe as well. It harder to do that in the general population. There's not a lot of reports about 50% of people in civil population answer and talk to conduct traitors in the general population where I think there isn't as much of a sense of shared responsibility for another. There should be. I'm just reflecting probably what's going out. Now that's a big part of it. I mean, Jason, you not talked about it. I know when my daughter got together with some classmates at the end of the summer, and we had kind of quarantined here for months. You know, Ria's families went into it saying, OK, What have you been doing? Who's getting tested? You know, like There was this sense of community to make sure everybody stayed safe and I feel like, you know. They're not Everybody's on the same page with that Also to be fair, and Dr Clay, you understand That's not everybody can be on the same page. There are some people that You know if they don't go to work, they don't get paid in it. They're in a tougher predicament, and I just You know, I just don't think I mean this is why his white hair electing the reopening is so important. I think it's the data are very clear, for example, that your chances of being able to work from home are much higher if you're in the top 25% Quartile of off income. So people who are who are who have to go to work are people who are already making less income. We know that that overlaps with race, right? We know that the disproportion Bernoff Cove in many respects was because We exposed people that low income people of color often to work before we understood how it works, but the economic shutdown, I feel like the public conversation about the economic slowdown. Hasn't been fair because to be Frank. It's been. It's been directed by people whose livelihood not really at risk from economic slowdown because they can work from home. But the fact that more than half the population cannot work from home. So if if we if we say if we take the premise that well, we should reduce the risk of covert at all costs well. You were really mean at all costs. I mean at all costs to somebody else. Right now. We need to be honest with that, and economic slowdowns hurt people who are already at the low end off making income and that Something that we decide to have a responsible try to avoid as much as I get back to our conversation with Dr Sandra Gal, a dean at the Boston University School of Public Health, also the author of the book paint uncomfortable Conversations about the public's health, So let's talk about the public's help, Dr Julia What can we be doing before we get to the other side of this?.

Jason Kelly Bloomberg Dr Sandra Gala President Trump Boston University School of Pu Dr Julia Dr Sandra Gal New York City Dr Julia What Hope Hicks Boston University school Dr Clay president Dr. Gallant Bernoff Cove Ria Frank
"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:12 min | 5 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To speak with Dr Amos Adalja, infectious disease physician for Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. So, Doctor a Dahlia, widening the conversation a little bit and think about where we are as a country. You know, we're at this moment here in the New York area in New York City, where Alex Steel is where Public school students are our back to school. Now we have seen Children go back to school across the country and certainly more recently here up where we are, and I think probably where you are a cz. Well, what are we learning So far as Children do go back to school. We obviously saw a wave of college students go back and then subsequent cases. What are we taking from? Both the anecdotal evidence and some of the data that you're looking at. You have to separate them. They're not all the same. And we do know universities are special circumstance where they basically are minutes gathering. They're not going to be the same thing as a K through sixth grade. So far, we've seen kind of a standard approach. When you look at the K through six schools that some of them have done better than others and opening schools where the outbreak is uncontrolled is definitely challenging. And what you're seeing also is that schools need to have a plan in place to be able to deal with exposures and classes, explosions in classes as well as being able to Switch from hybrid to two in person very quickly and on a dime if necessary, So all of that's been challenging principles, but I do think that their overall we've not had any major concern from the school have not seen major outbreaks linked to them so far, So I do think that's encouraging. What we're seeing so far, especially now will know with New York City starting in person. Schooling being the biggest school district in the country. Well, and speaking of the word cluster is getting used quite a bit now whether it's in New York City. We've seen some clusters like 20 zip codes. They governor Cuomo highlighted. Also the top World Health Organization, officials said the outbreak at the White House constituted a cluster. What does that mean? What we can we contain clusters. We can came contain clusters, but it becomes more challenging because people will then have multiple contacts and you have multiple people with multiple contacts that becomes very hard for a contact or Eastern case. Investigator to get on top of The fact that it happened at the White House and people know who was at the White House on who they were in contact with so many cameras, and so many resources does make this cluster maybe a little bit easier than one that might happen at a rock concert. But but it is something that's going to be challenging because there are AH lot of variables. We have to figure out who was tested when when their exposure was who was a significant exposure who had been significant exposure? And clearly this cluster is going to be challenging, and I do suspect we will Seymour cases that emanate from that cluster because there's already the president. The first lady Ho picks Some journalists. I've been hearing about testing positive. Senator Lee, the president of Notre Dame, So they're like this likely was, you know, in retrospect, will be called a super spreading event. Right. So, Dr Adalja as we think about where we are, even in the seasons and the time of year, people have been very worried about, you know, sort of colder weather coming. People not being able to be outside as much we know that they're almost inevitably is going to be some sort of resurgence. How soon will we know? And what should we be looking for? To ascertain whether this is a very worrisome surge or whether it is manageable? What did the data and what sort of the inflection points that we should be thinking about? It's hard to know exactly when will no, I think we're already seeing some states having an uptick in cases and the percent positivity and increasing in hospital hospitalization. I do think that we're in that time period now where people are doing left things. Outdoor. So I do think that the next several weeks are going to be key understanding understanding. Does this virus accelerate in the winter? But what I would be looking at is percent positivity and hospitalization. Those numbers of the two most important ones understand where we are, and I suspect it will be heterogeneous across the country. It's not going to be all in one big wave. It will be many hot spots that flare And in the kind of alternating seesaw depending upon what's going on in those areas in the in the Sunday Sun Belt states just we round up the conversation here is we're waiting for President Trump looking at a live shot of the White House there, Marine one, So it looks like President Trump will be coming out of the White House to go on Marine one to Goto Walter Reed will have spent a few days Under care of doctors seems to be precautionary. We still hearing that he has mild symptoms than he's been working through the day. How do you treat a 74 year old man? That's been termed Ah, obese with Cove it How do you treat it? Well, you you do the basic stuff supplement. It's going to be kind of supportive care first, so that's going to the I V fluids. It's going to be Tylenol ibuprofen for the Fever's That's going. He's already gotten a Regeneron experimental. In a body cocktail you made If he needs oxygen, you may use drugs like Dexter met his own or Ramdev severe on him. It's you know, we're treating lots of 74 year olds with this, So there is a lot of Canada care types of things that are going to happen. He did get an experimental antibodies, so that's going to modulate his infection, and we don't quite know exactly how effective that will be, but hopefully it will blunt any of the severe complications. But it's going to be just a standard that we do for many of the patients. I get admitted all the time. All right, were really, really glad we got to catch up with you. Thank you so much. Dr Amos Adult Gia. He is infectious disease physician at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, each others on the on the phone from Pittsburgh and, of course Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Mike Bloomberg. He is the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies, and Bloomberg LP, the owner of this radio station. The Johns Hopkins Folks have been Just absolutely critical to us and really the country understanding everything that's going on with this virus, Alex and so the latest headlines as you said, we are..

White House Bloomberg School of Public Hea New York City Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Dr Amos Adalja Alex Steel president Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Philanthropies Dr Amos Adult Gia World Health Organization President Trump governor Cuomo ibuprofen Senator Lee Ho Seymour
"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:30 min | 5 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We're going to check in with our team down at Johns Hopkins to get the latest on that context that we need, but also the broader context of where we are in fighting this virus what we're seeing across the country, especially as we head into fall. So eager to do that in just a minute. But before we do that, let's get the latest headlines. There are a lot of them from Charlie. Thank you very much for listeners just joining us President Trump will be spending quote a few days at a military hospital after contracting covert 19 this from the White House as the virus that has killed more than 205,000. Americans spread to the highest reaches of the U. S government. His doctor says the president quote remains fatigue. Trump is to depart the White House by helicopter shortly for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The White House says the visit is precautionary and that he will work from the hospital's presidential suite, which is equipped to allow him to continue his official duties again. Developing story. But the president will be heading to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center stock slump today. Trading was volatiles investors weighed the implications of President Trump's positive test for the Corona virus, along with renewed efforts to forge agreement on fiscal stimulus. Thie SNP Down 32 A drop today off 1% the Dow Down 134 down 5/10 of 1% NASDAQ tumbled 251 down 2.2% It was a winning week for the U. S. Stock Market 10 Year Yield 100.70% Gold DOWN three tents 18 1990 ounce and West Texas Intermediate crude down 4.4% 37 01 a barrel THIE government's latest employment data show Female employment is falling is a percentage of the American labor force. And with that story, here's Bloomberg's Videl Jude Ice Women are dropping out of America's work force is the fastest space since the height of the pandemic. It's especially true of women with young Children now schooling at home and could erase years of economic progress. Their labor force participation rate dropped to 74.2% after nearly hitting a record. Based on government data and eat down Judy Spielberg radio and again, recapping stocks. Laura's MP Down 32 down 1%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That is a Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Well, the headlines are coming at fast and furious. It has been quite a day. So let's understand what's going on from several different perspectives. And let's start with the virus because it's obviously at the core of everything here. The specific case of the President, United States obviously is catching a lot of the imagination. But it is representative of a global pandemic that we're still very much fighting. We have been so fortunate. To lean on our experts heavily at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, part of the Bloomberg School of Public Health. And, Of course, the Bloomberg school Public Health As you can probably tell by the name it's supported by Mike Bloomberg. Is the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies. And Bloomberg LP, the parent of this radio station. Delighted to have back with us Dr Hamish Adult Gia. He is an infectious disease physician. And he told us on the phone from Pittsburgh. Dr. Adultery. Thank you so much for joining us. All right. Take a deep breath here. Tell me your reaction. When you saw the headlines this morning about the president having followed. This is closely as you have understanding so much the nuances here. What did you initially think? It's not surprising to me. The White House has not been impervious to the Corona virus. Even with the testing protocol we've seen the national Security advisor, for example, get infected, So this is something I think was bound to happen. This is a prolific virus that can spread very easily and When people socially interact. When people are traveling around the country. It's really ah matter of time before the virus finds them. So when you have President Trump going to Walter Reed, How do you read that? I do think it is unfortunate turn of events. We know that people when they get hospitalized. That's a signal that there's some severity of illness. We know that he was treated with an experimental monoclonal antibody cocktail that he's had a fever that he's fatigue. And he is in a high risk group or severe disease. So I do think that this is a no. Ah, setback for him. Even though this is said to be a precautionary and being done out of a quote, abundance of caution. It is something that you don't want to see people be hospitalized with Kovac. Now the political side of this, of course Dr Adalja is about, you know the big rallies and all of those things and candidly the inconsistent advice that many would say we've gotten from this administration around some of the basic health precautions around Fighting this virus, whether it is social distancing, or certainly around mask wearing in your estimation. Does this change the conversation? Does this embolden or empower medical professionals like yourself to essentially say, Look, let's let's just all get on the same page here and say, where a mask social distance Wash your hands. I do think that this is a turning point. This is something that now really concretize its For many people that this is a virus that is dangerous. That hospitalizes people is that There are simple measures that you can take to prevent yourself from getting infected. And I think now is really there really is no excuse for not taking this virus seriously and Doing the simple things that will decrease the rate of people being hospitalized and dying from this and No one is immune from this and we need to get get on with it. Conquering this virus so we can move on with our lives. And I think that this this is Going to be a point that people remember that Maybe this is what will galvanize people to actually started to take the correct action over the next few days as we try and understand what to look for. I think I even asked this question earlier. Today is what air the buzzwords we need to hear, like clearly difficulty breathing respiratory problems, obviously, but like the subtle words That we need to pay attention to Definitely shortness of breath. They might hear something about a pulse Oximeter and the pulse Ox. How much if there's a need for supplemental oxygen. Fever. Dehydration. All of those are going to be important buzzwords to look for when you're trying to monitor the president's condition..

president President Trump Bloomberg LP White House Charlie Pellet Walter Reed National Military Bloomberg School of Public Hea Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg school Public Health Bloomberg Johns Hopkins fever Bloomberg Philanthropies Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Pittsburgh Judy Spielberg United States
11 COVID-19 Outbreaks Linked To New Jersey Schools, Health Officials Say

KYW 24 Hour News

04:22 min | 5 months ago

11 COVID-19 Outbreaks Linked To New Jersey Schools, Health Officials Say

"In New Jersey State website now has a dashboard to track the spread of Corona virus in schools. As we hear from cable W's Mike DiNardo 11 outbreaks are being reported The new dashboard list counties were covert cases have spread in schools, says State Health Commissioner Judy Purse. Achille currently We are posting that there are 11 confirmed outbreaks linked to in school transmission. That had been verified by the local health department to are in Burlington County and two are in Gloucester County, representing 16 total cases. The dashboard doesn't identify the schools, but cases have been reported Atlanta P High School in Burlington County and her fill elementary and Washington Township High School in Gloucester County. The state has a matrix by which local officials can decide whether to isolate individuals, classrooms or entire schools. Governor. Murphy, at his Corona virus briefing, said the state knew there would be cases in schools, and he called having 11 outbreaks out of 3000 schools quote a pretty darn good

Gloucester County Burlington County Washington Township High Schoo Mike Dinardo Atlanta P High School Judy Purse New Jersey Murphy Achille Commissioner
"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:51 min | 5 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Begin with a headline from the Bloomberg Professional Service, France's daily Corona virus cases have jumped to a record 16,096 this after the U. K reported the Most new Corona virus cases since the pandemic started. Stocks were climbing on speculation that talks about a new round of economic stimulus will resume amid growing concern over a resurgence in Corona virus cases around the world. We're off session highs still green on the screen and update here with the S and P off 28. Now at 30 to 65 up 9/10 of 1%, the Dow is up 223 points of 8/10 of 1%. NASDAQ is up. 109 HARD by 1% 10 Years up one 32nd of the Yield of 10.66% gold up 4/10 of 1%, 18 70, Beyonce and West Texas intermediate crewed up 1% $40.30 a barrel Recapping stocks higher SNP, rebounding on a news report that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin plans to restart negotiations on government aid. I'm Charlie Pellet. That's a Bloomberg business Flash Right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Well, we've been giving you some updates about the virus. Clearly it is of concern to investors. It's of concern to the people who run colleges and companies and all of us just as human beings so Let's check in Get the latest with Dr Shelley Hearne, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Advocacy, part of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Of course, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health its support by Mike Bloomberg. Founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies and founder Bloomberg LP, the owner of this radio station, She turns on the phone from Charleston, South Carolina. I love charged Charleston, South Carolina fortune. So I'm going to start there. Dr. Hearn tell us what life is like down there because any time we're talking to somebody outside of our little bubble as it were We want to know what's going on. Well, you know, we all have our bubbles all around the world. But Charleston, you know, you can always count on good food and lovely people. So it's it's It's not a bad bubble. It's not a bad bubble. But let's talk about a nice and family down in South Carolina just outside Charleston. And I know the numbers have been tough in terms of the virus. Well, the number is South Carolina is still struggling as you are tracking around the country who we're seeing different searches different improvements in places and it really kind of boils down to how seriously people are taking public health measures. And unfortunately, just like variations in food from the south to the north. We're also seeing variations in the acceptance of mask wearing the care with social distancing. And so that's what's going to keep this virus alive and well around the country is If we get complacent on and put our guard down if it will return. Well, you know, just a follow. I mean, you are so involved in time in terms of, you know, understanding, health and cities and communities. You know, Jason and I ke that there's you know, one thing you wear a mask. That's one thing we see. Repeat over and over. But there's also that idea of You know, taking care of your community? I mean, this is largely with this virus is about that's why you wear a mask. It is. I mean, you know, we're hoping for vaccines were looking for other kinds of therapeutics. But the really important element is even if those come on board The absolute best thing we could do for our families and for our neighbors, and our entire kind of economic tribe ability is to really practiced these basics in public health. It may not be sexy, but that's actually what's going to make the biggest biggest difference. And if we all did this together Oh, and did it. You know universally, we could probably really dampen this down, Get ready for a tough winter and do much better. I worry so much about our economy that if we if we focus in on just stemming and suppressing this virus by Community measures. It's what's really going to help open up our ability for strong, healthy commerce down the road. So Dr Hearn talked to us about the public health system because you know, Carol and I have talked on this program a lot about this notion that The virus has served to accelerate so many things for good and bad. It is forced us to deal with some things that maybe we didn't want to deal with And now we have to And especially when you parrot with what we've seen in terms of a really reckoning around systemic racism and some of the deep, deep inequalities of the great chasms that we've seen and Having spent a lot of time in South Carolina, having grown up in the south. I know that a lot of that is so apparent there in your state, even in Charleston. What do we need to do at this moment where we do have something of an opportunity to start to close that gap when it comes to public health? Well, it's a it's a brilliant question is the exact one that we need to focus on. So just like, you know, a healthy company needs good roads that needs good education system so that Workforce, eyes ready and prepared for the job. We actually need to have that same kind of capacity in our public health system. These are and the good thing of the pandemic its spring in alive. You need to have at the genealogist. You need to have labs. This is every day. It's not just when of virus is spreading. But we use those tools all the time to keep us healthy and well and actually..

Charleston South Carolina Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Bloomberg Professional Service Mike Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Center for Publi Bloomberg Philanthropies Dr. Hearn Charlie Pellet Beyonce Founder France Dr Shelley Hearne Steven Mnuchin U. K
COVID-19 exposure causes Atlanta football team to quarantine, cancel 2 games

Dana Loesch

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

COVID-19 exposure causes Atlanta football team to quarantine, cancel 2 games

"Testing positive for Corona Virus forces The entire team and coaching staff at the Gwinnett County High School in a quarantine for the next two weeks, 60 student athletes will learn digitally and their coaches will work from home. District spokeswoman Sloan Roach tells Channel two action news. Contact Tracing was a key factor factor with with that that information. information. The The schools schools Health Health Response Response team team kicked kicked in in its its process process of of identifying identifying who who might might have have been been close close contact. contact. The The possible possible exposure exposure to to Corona virus also prompted Burke bar to cancel its first to football games of the season. Top local news

Gwinnett County High School Sloan Roach Corona Burke Football
Over 25 Health Centers to open in Seattle schools this fall

News, Traffic and Weather

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

Over 25 Health Centers to open in Seattle schools this fall

"But they can still get health checkups in person this school year. Almost so Romero has the story centers at 34 school campuses in the county will be open for students in person. Patty Hes with public health. Seattle King County says kids can get regular checkups, flu shot school vaccinations well for mental health services That's one of the number one Things that students used health centers for and that's very important in this time, she says. Some school health centers will also do covert testing. But family should call ahead first all middle and high schools and a number of elementary schools in Seattle public schools will operate health centers this year. Sue Romero Come O New Parkland Woman Is Michigan

Sue Romero Patty Hes Seattle King County FLU Michigan
Health Centers to open in Seattle schools this fall

News, Traffic and Weather

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Health Centers to open in Seattle schools this fall

"Most school buildings in King County will be closed this fall, but school health centers Will be open. Patty hes with public health. Seattle King County's is 34 locations will have health centers where students and families could get routine primary care, mental health services and mohr really important access point for youth, and we wanted to make sure because not everybody has access to the provider. He says. Some locations will also have covert testing or dental services available. All Seattle public high schools and middle schools in the number of elementary schools will have Health

King County Seattle Mohr
"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:17 min | 6 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A Bloomberg business. Much of the equity market is extending. That record breaking rally happened after Fetcher J. Paul unveiled its new approach to setting US monetary policy. The inclination appears to be to let inflation and the labor market both run hot now that risk of higher inflation is sending bond yields higher. 10 Year Treasury has gained five basis points right now. With a yield of 73 basis points. For the moment, Though the equity market is focused on this idea of low rates, the Dow is up 9/10 of 1% financials getting a boost from Mohr Slope to the U. S yield curve, and we have the SNP financials index up more than 1.9%. Right now, that's allowing the S and P To extend yesterday's all time high by 4/10 of 1%, the NASDAQ composite those struggling It's down about 1/10 of 1%, Oracle and Microsoft, each submitting bids to by the U. S operations of TIC Tac. And today we learned Microsoft's bid includes a partnership with Wal Mart WalMart trying to reach customers and grow its third party marketplace in advertising. Business. WALMART SHARES Right now up about 5% in terms of ICO data, US weekly jobless claims remaining above one million, although pending home sales at the highest level in nearly 15 years in the month of July, I'm dead prisoner. That's your Bloomberg business Flash. All right, duck. Thank you so much. You are listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek. Jason Kelly Carroll, Master here with you on a Thursday afternoon, a lot going on and a lot going on. When it relates to the virus. We have to keep track of this. We just talked about testing. There's so many issues around this that we need to explore. We're happy to have with us Doctor Tangela per now associate director of Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute, joining us on the phone from Baltimore. Of course, part of the Johns Hopkins family is The Bloomberg School Public Health and that is supported by Mike Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies. And Bloomberg LP. The parent of this radio station. Dr Purnell Really nice to have you with us and listen, we talk about the virus every day. 19 different ways because we have to. It has invaded all of our lives, whether we've been directly touched by it or whether we've been fortunate enough to not be directly touched by It's affecting all of our worlds and one of the things that we have really come, TTO learn. Is that it does not affect everyone in the same way, And so much of it is determined by the disparities that already exists when it comes to health care, help us understand? The work that you and your team are doing. First I would like to thank both of you for having me here. It is, indeed an honor to be able to talk about. You know some of our work, and so as you correctly alluded to, this is a problem worldwide. But in particular, this is a problem for the exact saying disadvantaged populations that are typically the same population that you see, experiencing help disparities help. Inequities from a variety of different causes. So you know we at the junk. Hoskins ever been healthy, too, then also at the Center for Health Equity. We have a series of different approaches to try and tackle this problem, so obviously we do research that involves vulnerable populations. We do this work in conjunction with Our community in the patient's stakeholder partners who actually have a voice at the table and helping to really help US design, implement and also disseminate our finding. Another approach is really our education and training. Unfortunately, we know that all of these problems these disparities are truly does routed and generational inequities and it won't be all fixed. Unfortunately, it doesn't appear that it will all be fixed in one generation is still another thing that we really focus on is really training the next generation of help equity research chairs or public health practitioners so that we can make sure that this work continues so that the game that we, you know, we also baby keep those gang doctor Bruno. I think we wonder, too. It's interesting. One of the stories we're focusing on, Jason. I were just talking about that, you know, abot coming out and saying they've got you know, a 15 minute test for the virus and getting ready to ramp it up Great, and we've talked about how we need to have systems in place. That help us get control of the virus for everyone, And I do wonder we've had lots of conversations, certainly because of this pandemic about the inequalities in terms of access to health care in good health care. Among the different communities. So what things as you say, you talk with people in these communities. They've got a place at the table What needs to be done, And I do wonder there things coming out of this crisis, whether it's telemedicine or other things that will make a difference. Absolutely. So I think that you know the answers to so first of all in terms of access for testing. You're absolutely right. You know, and saying that we know that there is my equal access and in particular, even as we get these advances in technology, for example, Rafic testing. We also know that the dissemination of this is not equal among different communities, in particular the communities that we're already so I think that one of the things that we need to keep in mind is that as we are trying novel approach is really get this virus under control. We have to think about what one of the structural barriers People who are living, for example, and neighborhoods that don't have easy access to testing. We need to think about things like not necessarily requiring cars. It's about the beginning of this. Many people had to have a car to drive up to get tested. We need to think about things like our people able to get tested as they are asymptomatic are people able to get tested without a physician prescription, so all of these things could really be a barrier to people who are already this advantage by this system. And then you know, in terms of thinking about longer term, what we need to do within the community. I really need to take on love asses and realized that called it might seem, is not some Magical unicorn that just came out of nowhere. And then all of a sudden this proportionately impacted certain groups of people. What it did was really opened our eyes to the fact you know, more mainstream that there are packets of society who have not been properly taken care of by size. We need to be committed to the long term work of adjusting the structural barriers so that the next virus or the next whatever right continues to be the things that keep happening. You know enough is enough with this. Right, Right. Well, a lot has been laid there and we really appreciate the work that you are doing and you know, here's hoping that as it has been laid bare, and we All become more focused on it will be working towards a real solutions. Thank you so much. Dr Tangela per now associate director at Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute, joining us on the phone from Baltimore. Of course, she's also associated with members of the public health, supported by.

Bloomberg LP Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Urban Health Ins US Jason Kelly Carroll Doctor Tangela associate director Baltimore Mike Bloomberg WalMart Microsoft Bloomberg School Public Health Bloomberg Philanthropies Mohr Slope Center for Health Equity Fetcher J. Paul Treasury Johns Hopkins
New taskforce to examine ventilation in every New York City school classroom

News, Traffic and Weather

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

New taskforce to examine ventilation in every New York City school classroom

"There now checking every classroom in New York City schools to make sure ventilation? Systems are ready to go for the start of school health experts say, the better the airflow, the lower the chance of Corona virus spread, so inspection teams, including engineers will have to. Okay, every classroom will be checking fans and if Windows open and air circulation inspection results will be posted online for parents and school staff to see before the plan, September 10th start date. Scott Pringle, NBC News Radio, New York

New York Scott Pringle NBC
"school public health" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Class. This latest decision is based on a strong recommendation from Dallas County Health and Human Services as a thorough examination of multiple factors, he says, that will have online on ly classes through the first four weeks of the school year. Cedar Hill is expected to start the fall semester scheduled on September the eighth Dallas County Health officials are urging all school districts in the county to switch to online learning for the start of the 2020 school year. The school public Health and Education Committee has been meeting twice a week for the past several weeks and has been closely monitoring the local transmission rates of covert 19. They're recommending that schools in Dallas County offer virtual learning on Ly at this time. They're also recommending against organized athletic events or music practices. The committee says that while North Texas has done a good job of flattening the curve of new covert 19 infections, a return to in person learning would lead to an increase in transmission rates. No matter what precautions schools take Steven Pickering news radio 10 80 K rld, Meanwhile, speaking off covert 19 in Dallas County Health Department is reporting another 308 cases of Corona virus, but on Lee 104 of them are new Today. The rest are backlogged cases from June and July. As for kids between August 6th and 14th 227 kids between the ages of five and 18 tested positive for the virus. Thief counties also reporting three more people with Corona virus have passed away, including a man who was on ly in his thirties with no underlying conditions. 846 people with the virus have now passed away in Dallas County. Today, Terran counties reporting another 231 people who have tested positive for Corona virus on Ly 362 people, the virus are being treated in hospitals. That's the lowest number in more than a week, and the county is not reporting any additional deaths today. And in Collin County. Another 40 for positive cases are confirmed and 111 people with the virus or in the hospital in Denton County. They're reporting another 151 positive cases that brings the total there above 8 849. People with the virus are in the hospital. The North Texas Food Bank and DeSoto High School held their third mobile food pantry today. Loading 500 cars with boxes of food and jugs of milk care all these Allen's guy as more from DeSoto High, One woman coming.

Dallas County Dallas County Health and Human Dallas County Health school public Health and Educa Dallas County Health Departmen Collin County Denton County Ly DeSoto High School Cedar Hill DeSoto High infections Steven Pickering Terran North Texas Allen Lee
"school public health" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

06:34 min | 7 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"My treatment that I used only four hundred milligrams a day like Dr Salenko and what he's been touting he's been working having the most success of anyone in the country in my patients died it that doctors out there they would not only be celebrated by every. Mainstream News Oregon's the organization that's being funded by Pharma. They'd be canonized by Dr Chee himself and the FDA they I'm sure have looked everywhere to find a real life Dr in realized circumstances have been the opposite reaction to the thousands of doctors that are talking about success around the world. But in case that you know anecdotal story I just told you red wine that goes off in my head isn't enough we had Zuckerberg say there's to say that there's proof that this treatment works we're going to take it down. That's what we have to do. Well, what do you? Call this or medical center had six hospitals. This is one of the biggest research hospitals in our country treated with hydroxide chloroquine cut death rates significantly in Kobe nineteen patients Henry Ford Health System study shows it backed it went on to say that half the amount of people died that received hydroxy chloroquine in the hospital compared to those that didn't get it. So it cut the death rate in half. Imagine if we had just cut our death rate in half that would put us currently at seventy five, thousand deaths less than the flu season of I, believe two, thousand, eighteen. So there you go. I'm pretty sure that a double blind study across six hospitals by one of the greatest research hospitals. In America, should at least be considered into the dialogue of proof meaning these doctors are not crazy. They have something to back it on. But if that wasn't enough we've been hearing from DRI you'd is we've been promoting on this show the French biologist who's having about ninety eight to ninety nine percent success rate using hydroxy chloroquine. We also have a Yale epidemiologists that put out this headline just recently, Yale. Epidemiologist hydroxy closer quaint could save one, hundred, thousand lives. It goes on Dr Harvey Reisch. In Epidemiology, professor at Yale School Public Health said that he thinks hydroxy chloroquine could save seventy five to one hundred, thousand lives. It drug is widely used to treat corona virus. There are many doctors that have gotten hostile remarks about saying that all the evidence is bad for it, and in fact, that is not true at all rice told Ingraham angle adding that he believes the drug could be used as a prophylactic for frontline workers as. Like India have done, there are so many doctors. There are other speaking out here are sixty four studies. Around the world showing success with hydroxy chloroquine in the corona virus or Kobe nine, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty studies approved Mr Zuckerberg who wants to silence doctors that support these doctors. But let's for second one and we take a look at what they're citing is proof that Tony Faculty standing behind and the and the WHO and Ohio's attempt to take take this away from you. Well, there was this brilliant study in. The Lancet. Retracted hydroxy chloroquine chloroquine without with or without a macrolide for treatment of Kobe Nineteen A. National, registry analysist, of course, the dachshunds were talking about this. The Lancet has made one of the biggest retractions in modern history. How could this happen the now retracted paper halted hydroxy chloroquine trials studied like this determine how people live or Die Tomorrow That's the landed and that study ended up being totally bogus in fact, I. Think you had some adult dancer as part of the tiny handful of people that said, they had an international database but could never prove that they did this was a hack job by what and published in Supposed Peer Review Journal The Lancet everyone whol Bouchier everybody pointed to as proof that hydroxy chloroquine didn't work and it ended up being a disaster. That should've sent off red flags for everybody but that didn't stop them. Right? They continued on they continued on with the trials and one of the trials at the WHO had stopped because of this incredible discovery by the Lancet had to be started again. But then when we looked into that study by the World Health Organization, the Solidarity Clinical Trial Coping Nineteen this brilliant article by age of Autism Governor show solidarity and UK recovery clinical trials of hydroxy chloroquine using potentially fatal doses. You'd see this is the other genius science that that is utter Berg who relies on the WHO and FDA are pointing to a study that is murdering people to make its point. Make that perfectly clear. The link uses four hundred milligrams of hydroxy chloroquine. Uses six hundred. This article shows that the two trials that are regulatory agencies in the World Health Organization are pointing to as prove are using potentially paid or doses not from four, hundred, six, hundred, thousand milligrams, not two, thousand, twenty, four, hundred milligrams per day when I asked Vladimir's link or what he thought of that dosage this is what he had to say. A great article in age of autism that got into this found that they were appears to be they were using fatal doses of hydroxy chloroquine in the neighborhood of twenty, four hundred milligrams per day I e since you actually work with it to begin with is it fair to call twenty four, hundred milligrams per day failed dose? Do you think that is overdosing from your perspective? Not If you're treating very elephant. Okay. I. Appreciate that. Our four, hundred, a day four, hundred. Okay. And I and I believe if I'm correct era was is usually somewhere around six hundred milligrams of hydroxy chloroquine per day so. You're using..

chloroquine The Lancet World Health Organization Mr Zuckerberg Dr Salenko Dr Chee Kobe FDA Oregon flu Dr Harvey Reisch WHO Yale School Public Health America Henry Ford Health System professor Journal The Lancet Solidarity Clinical Trial Copi India Ohio
"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:44 min | 7 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Up the most since 1999 hard by 13%. Rival FedEx Up 2.4% Mood Media, which owns the music brand, has filed for bankruptcy. Also filing for bankruptcy today. California Pizza kitchen, it becomes The latest restaurant chain to try to cut debts as it grapples with a pandemic. I'm Charlie, that is a Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Charlie Muzak plus C. P. K. What is going on in the world. Scarlett, too. All right, let's head over to a conversation with our friends at Johns Hopkins. We're talking about Anita Cicero, deputy director at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and effective Remember at the Bloomberg school public Health as you can probably tell by the name Your school public health that is supported by Mike Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies. And Bloomberg LP, the parent of this radio station. Anita Really nice to have you back with us so much going on, and I want to go straight to the issue that I know is completely front of mind. As parents for both Scarlett and me, which is reopening schools. Where are we? What do we do? Thanks, Jason and I'm with you. I also have two high school age Children who would love to be back in school, and I would love to have him back. And so I think that the most important thing we can do to get our kids back in the classroom are really three things one. We need to get community transmission under control. It's hard to send kids back to school when there are still raging out breaks in our local communities on DH, then to one school open, open them very gradually with Tight mitigation measures that we know work like physical distance and mask used. And to get that physical space. We may need to prioritize some kids over others so it would make sense to bring younger kids back before older ones. And then also maybe those Most vulnerable or who need special attention in class and then three invest in research that we need to understand more about kids role in transmission of Corona virus. So we know in the future. How? How careful or how tight those mitigation measures need to be to keep everyone safe? Yeah, well that investment can't be at the expense of schools because they already have enough expenses to deal with me enough headaches. Jason and I are both in the suburbs of New York. And a lot of the public schools need to submit their proposals to the state Department of Education at the end of this month, So I've been hearing a lot of different proposals from schools on how they're going to make this work. One thing that strikes me though, and I'm always puzzled by this. It seems like we're reinventing the wheel. Other countries have done this. Canada reopened its schools in May. Taiwan never closed schools. Granted Taiwan situation never got to the point like China or the United States, but other countries have done it. There are best practices that we can employ. Why're we kind of fumbling in the dark here when there are examples to draw from? There are a lot of good examples. But for the the country that open schools successfully, they had much lower prevalence of disease rates. Then we now D'oh are outbreak is there you know cases are increasing in most of the states. Hospitalization rates for Cove. It are now matching your feeding numbers scene in New York and March and April from in many states. Hospitalizations were getting under pressure. So it's very difficulty to think about opening schools in areas where the epidemic is spiraling out of control for those that are able to reduce The prevalence of disease and communities. I think we can use a lot of the measures that have worked successfully in other countries, and they will work for us, too. So that's what we should be focusing on And tell us about some of those. I mean, what are some of those measures mean? You've talked a little bit about the social distancing and other things are there things that maybe aren't as well known that you've seen because you've looked into this much more in depth, and most of us have I think many of them people have heard of now certainly succeeded. Physical distance is important. Also requiring masks indoors can significantly decrease the chances of infection. Increasing the number of students per class. And as CDC put out its recent guidance, they emphasize the issue of co boarding, You know, get kids and smaller Groups and keep that same cohort together throughout the day. Now, that's a lot easier to do in elementary school than it is in middle and especially high school when kids have different kinds of classes and move around, But also ventilation is an important factor. I know schools are looking at ways to upgrade the ventilation systems, which really gets back to Scarlett's point about how costly It is for schools to be able to put all these measures in place and then other schools in other countries have put up you know plastic barriers either between students or or in front of the teacher to give them additional safety. There's a lot of discussion about you know, Denmark and other places that held classes outdoors as much as possible. That is a great idea. We should be creative and thinking about other spaces to bring Children. But it's not going to be possible for for all schools in all places in all states as we, you know, start in the hot summer and Continue through the cold winter, especially given how much it rains here, Jason I mean, you can set up all the tents you want, but when the rain starts coming in sideways, that's not gonna work Very well. Yeah, it gets cold here in the Northeast. I say that as someone who grew up down south. It's cold. It's cold here in December, January and February, all right, we're going to continue our conversation with Anita sister in just a few minutes. On the other side of some news. She's the deputy director. Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and effectively member at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Joining us on the phone from our nation's capital. And you know, Scarlett, you I have to say you've been a great resource for me and sort of understand. We've been comparing notes a lot because we live Not too far from each other here in the New York suburbs, But it's also strange to think about You know, sort of different parts even of our state will probably approach this differently, right? You have to because the infection rate varies from upstate to downstate to the city. Right now, we're feeling pretty good because the transmission rate is fairly low. But again, all that can change with one bad egg or when unfortunate incident and the cold weather. Yeah, And you think about right? And.

Scarlett Bloomberg LP Jason New York Anita Cicero Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Bloomberg School of Public Hea Bloomberg school public Health Charlie Muzak deputy director Johns Hopkins Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg Philanthropies Mood Media California Taiwan Canada CDC Department of Education
"school public health" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

04:37 min | 11 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Are experts. Believe the worst days of the pandemic are behind us. I think what happens is it's going to go away. This is going to go away and whether it comes back in a modified form in the fall we'll be able to handle it will be able to put out spurts and we're very prepared to handle it. Go Away and modified form. I don't know what he's trying to say with modified form and what. What what do you say that well? I wish that were the case. I think that the you know in the beginning when we started tracking the novel Corona Virus. There was a question of will there be seasonality to this you know so have these ebbs and flows depending on the weather and there might be a little bit of that but you know what does it. Becoming clear is even in places where the weather got really warm and very humid. The virus continues to spread a lot China for example. Even after whether they're changed it continued to spread in places in the Southern Hemisphere. I thought maybe we're going to be a little bit protected because Southern Hemisphere wasn't exploding with the number of cases but it is so it's a contagious virus and we don't have immunity to it so those two things in combination means. It's not going to go away as far as coming back in a modified form. I mean. Perhaps this is good news in the sense that this doesn't appear to be mutating that much people always worry. Could this mutate to something worse? That hardly ever happens but it appears to be relatively stable which which might be good news for future vaccine but unfortunately it doesn't look like this is going away right right. Yeah and as you point out. Generally speaking of virus would last virulent overtime if it did mutate But president trump was asked today about testing and the five million tests number. You know that he put out there that he said we were going to be doing per day. He said we're going to be there very soon. How soon I find it hard to reconcile what he's saying with what I heard from. You know the the briefing yesterday in terms of the White House's plan I mean when I did the calculations and anybody can do these calculations they're talking about two percent testing per month right so six to seven million per month. Five million per day is what the Harvard School Public Health said. We need sort of by by mid June. They say we need to go up to twenty million day in order to really be in a position where some of these industries some of the ones that we're talking about can start to reopen. You can take a look at the Delta here Erin. It's significantly we. Currently this is how many have done so far. Five point eight million You know the White House maybe six or seven million a month but ultimately twenty million a day I. I think that we can get there. The plan that was laid out yesterday didn't give me a lot of confidence in. That plan was going to get us there. There's a lot of things that need to change. This really needs to be a priority. I still feel like in many ways. There's a you're responsible for this now. You're responsible for this. You know this is a national effort. It has to be a national effort at this point. Because we're all in it together if a state fails that's GONNA affect you. It's going to affect me no matter where that state is earned all right. Thank you very much. Sanjay was Mike Pence today at a hospital without a mass even though the hospital told his office that he needed to wear one plus CNN investigation begging for help hospitals and clinics testing in this country. has stalled or even stopped in some cases. How is this still possibly happening? In the United States and tens of thousands of students at a huge public university may be able to go back to campus back to the dorms for the fall term. I'm GonNa talk to the President of the school who is also a doctor about why he thinks it's the right thing to do. Us Bank thanks you for going to work and for staying home for treating patients and having patients for being on the front lines while having our backs. Thanks for working together and playing podcasts. You Love U. S. Bank can't thank you enough but we can do our part that's why we've donated millions to help our customers employees and communities in need equal housing lender member. Fdic work as we know it has changed. And as you've probably figured out when your home is also your office. All sorts of lines become blurred. Mcadoo you ask your boss for more flexibility. You can look after your kids. How Long Did you let that slack? Message go on answer before following up. And how do we even begin to talk about work life balance? We're here for you. We've created a newsletter. Called Work transformed tells US figure this all out together. Sign up to get work transformed into your inbox twice a week at CNN dot com slash work transformed that CNN dot com slash work transformed.

United States CNN trump White House President Southern Hemisphere Mike Pence Harvard School Public Health Fdic China Delta Mcadoo U. S. Bank Sanjay
"school public health" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

10:47 min | 11 months ago

"school public health" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Kiedy Katie listen to take my radio in this is John interesting this is Audrey so I'm really excited about this gas as we've been saying there are so many cool people and companies in Pittsburgh that are just directly working with what's going on with the whole code crisis right now and in the walls of health monitoring is on the front lines when it comes to the stock so excited to have on the show tonight yeah we need to jump in this is a cheap science science officer of health monitoring system hi Andy hi thanks for having me here great so just let's jump in and just sort of set the stage what what is health monitoring tell me yes or health monitoring is a public health software company we provide a service to health departments across across the country whereby we collect electronic healthcare data mostly anonymized data on their behalf from hospitals physicians offices urgent care centers anywhere people going into king healthcare we're trying to provide an information as quickly as possible so it's often pre diagnostic information you're going to the hospital you say I broke my arm I'm worried that I have the flu I have a headache and I don't know what you know what's causing it they record that that's what they send us and we try to put those into different categories to understand trends of my be happening in the particular jurisdiction of state county and provide that information to the health department that oversees after section so they can track and and identify things that might be of interest to them and things that they need to follow up on very cool so you also are doing some pre diagnostic data in terms of code nineteen can you talk about that yeah so we're collecting those that data from emergency departments and urgent care centers on different places and we're looking among other things for patients who meet the symptom criteria for covert nineteen so fever shortness of breath cough some of the other symptoms like fatigue even things like a loss of appetite we're looking and seeing how many people are coming into different regions about emergency departments in different parts of the country with those symptoms and letting the health department about that I'm an ongoing real time basis so soon as a person walks in the hospital now complaint is reported we get it and it's available to the health department so they can see that before test results come in before even a patient is necessarily seen by a physician they have some sense of what's going on in that so you because of your background and your background is what describe your background yes so I did a PhD at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health in their department of molecular microbiology and immunology when I was actually doing there was a lot of statistical modeling of the spread of infectious diseases in the ecology of infectious diseases and from there I did a postdoc Carnegie Mellon in computational biology the evolution of viruses and trying to see if we can understand something about how large the change over time and how that might inform vaccine development also I developed skills in a sixty six in your programming as well as understanding the biology of infectious diseases and immunology our bodies respond to them and a little bit of understanding from going to school public health what public health does much of it allergists are interested in what they need so brought all that to health monitoring to try to help serve as a intermediary between all the great programmers and business folks so we have and our customers who work in public health on a daily basis that's amazing all right so we actually talked about viruses help perfect bleeding time does this I'm fortunate Alber exactly exactly yeah so you know we've been I've been interested in Paris is pretty much my entire life you did a lot of work on the biology of viruses as soon redwood student and even a little bit as an undergrad and so yeah it's been wanting to help public health in and help the population of your country better understand to be better prepared for dealing with situations like what we have right now so what's the yeah I mean how's the Kobe virus your house it's been playing out is is is is is typical from what the study done and all the modeling you've done is typically what we see is some of the sources specials is different so what is different about this situation is that this virus is particularly contagious relative to some others that have emerged recently such as the early years of sars coronavirus right or things like the nipah virus or even like a bola it more people get infected from each individual case then in some of the with this new code nineteen coronavirus than some of these other viruses and the infectivity starts before you even feel sick all right so that's one of the big things that can help to limit the spread of infection is that you get sick and so you know to avoid other people other people note to avoid you and that limits those contacts like that because transmission but with this virus it seems that there is some amount of opportunity to spread the virus before eating insects that's what's going on but in terms of of the general spread of things I mean it's you know it's following the kinds of models that we expect okay following your contacts between people limiting those contacts limits the spread of the more people makes an interactive people the faster it's spread around and so in in the general contours it fits well into our understanding of how epidemics and pandemics progressed just have to adjust the parameters a little bit for the specifics of this virus it's tricky in the beginning because I see people walking around having it not knowing it and so then you're spreading it and yet no because you're doing it so right and and in the early days we didn't even know that that was a possibility right so we don't even know exactly the details of this virus was were you were still trying to figure that out in some ways we're still learning more about the biology of it and how it how it spreads from person to person and then if you guys are collecting all this data then this is something that as these new ads and obviously this is a new virus will come up at some point obviously in the future so we have so much more knowledge now how did that handle those a new virus right yes ostensibly what we do here at the health monitoring in the United States is what was detected this corona virus in the first place and China to have a cluster of unexplained pneumonia cases that they had to figure out what was causing the man eventually isolated a new virus that was causing and that's exactly what we're looking for the kinds of pre diagnostic data they were collecting in the kinds of surveillance that we're doing on automatic analysis we're doing on it we're trying to help a public health departments identify exactly those kinds of clusters of diseases that don't are explained by other things are explained by it what we know is circulating at the time so they can respond quickly so in my lifetime having been through you know lose and you know some epidemics we now we're set now we're hearing from our physician Dr Levine at the state level who is saying that we all need to have mass right and so you you know social distancing etcetera so why so exasperated now and what's the relevancy of mass just masked in general yeah so why is this exacerbated right now it's because it's a virus that spreads quickly that none of us had any and you need to so with the flu yes you know we all the flu goes around every year and we deal with the flu season every year but we all have some amount of immunity even though the virus mutates every year and changes a little bit well at least some existing immunity to it and so we're less likely to get sick ourselves we're less likely to get severe symptoms and we're less likely to spread it on to other people because of that partial immunity that we pretty much all have from previous getting the vaccine nobody has any of that when it comes to this particular coronavirus that's one big issue that's one big difference what's going on right now with the mass in particular so you know the mask under the understanding of what mass do hasn't changed even though the recommendations of change we know that these N. ninety five mask with the advent of translations style mask the fit exactly tightly around your your nose and mouth those are the kinds of massive protecting you personally from getting infected because they block most of the virus articles from coming in contact with your nose and mouth and ideally want some eye protection to go with that as well because you can also get infection through the first round your eyes and ninety five goggles right so yeah so then those mass what we would recommend it for health care workers and what have you and for a potential people who are particularly high risk these other kinds of masks the surgical style masks or the homemade masks the clock master just kind of you know route loose more loosely cover your nose and mouth those don't do as great a job of protecting you personally from getting infected because they're still area around the mass where the virus can get in and so what those are recommended for is for preventing you from spreading the virus to other people and so they were originally recommended for people who knew that they were sick or suspected that they were sick because they had symptoms they should they should wear those massive they were going to be around other people to protect those other people now that we understand more about this particular virus and that there is this period of one to two days before you start really feeling feeling symptoms where you might be in Texas and for some people that might be there the only experience that they have they never have symptoms but they do have the virus for some amount of time in our inspections for some amount of time they need to do we all kind of needed to adjust to that reality now we understand about the virus and so now the recommendation is that everybody really should be wearing those masks when they're in public not so much because it's protecting them but because it's protecting everybody around them and so all of us are wearing masks and we all get the benefit of that protection your mask protects me and my mass protects you so what's shifted in our understanding that so I know that we don't have much time in some time we're going to do a deeper dive with you because you're just a wealth of information and it's awesome awesome stuff so fascinating what about the the the prognosis for developing a vaccine you have any opinions on that yeah so I've been reading a little bit of the work including the paper that came out from the university of Pittsburgh a couple weeks ago some really neat work they've done a lot of great things to speed up the development process so we can skip things like how to even grow a lot of the virus because what they're doing is putting the virus in other kinds of putting proteins from this virus in other systems at the university of Pittsburgh.

Katie John Audrey Pittsburgh
"school public health" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"school public health" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"For everyone so that they weren't fearful to go to the healthcare systems receive a higher bill. And that's that's the challenge. Right now is that you've got folks who are experiencing fever and a dry cough which are symptoms that people have learned to ignore for a long time. Because they're worried about the bill and now you tell them well look if it's Cova nineteen you're going to be covered but they're now playing the odds they sell. Well what if it's not nineteen to have to pay the bill? And then they choose not to go because they don't have the money for it and so your your point is exactly right. I A lot has been made about about that. The the inaccessible testing kits. Which is just a a major failure to have responded to this in a timely fashion. If you all of a sudden could snap your fingers and you could deploy a inexhaustible numbering of testing kits into the world right now how would you use them in where they most effective well at this point we probably have so many cases in the US contact tracing is no longer feasible originally? When when you first have an outbreak of a novel disease you WanNa do contact tracing identify the chain of transmission and diagnose all the contacts in the context of contacts. And you can clamp down on the disease that way that was done for a Bulla that was done for SARS and those strategies worked but once you've really lost control of of a virus as I think we more or less have now there's community transmission. I think contact tracing has has become infeasible because we had such a lag in the the testing kits. Which is really shameful. You know and and and the in our arrogance as Americans the WHO offered testing kits to the US and the US. We said No. No no we can. We can do it better. And we didn't accept their their offer of testing kits and so- meanwhile other countries have a surplus of testing kits and we are lagging shamefully behind. So if we had the testing kits that we need now though it seems like testings being focused on you know symptomatic people to decide whether or not they have covert or something else. It seems to me though based on what we discussed earlier that you have a number of people who are asymptomatic carriers and therefore spreaders and the best use of the testing kits would be to identify them and to isolate them. What do you think is the best use of testing kits now while we know that our ability to contrast is limited? How would you use them now? If we knew everyone who was infected whether or not they were a symptomatic or not we could ask them specifically to stay home. If for instance a healthcare worker has come into contact with a patient and we think they they might be exposed if we can test them and they actually are not infected when they can go back to work. Otherwise we've we've lost that that person. They need to remain quarantined when they could be treating other people. So I mean of course it would be extremely helpful if we knew who was infected and ask them to stay at home and then people who weren't infected Could still be contributing to the healthcare system and are just the functioning of our daily lives. Well this is extremely helpful and I really appreciate Alison you. Can you tell us what you're doing to pass this time? Well fortunately we can do a lot of our work remotely so we use computers and we don't need a wet lab so I'm still able to continue that work. And there've been lots of conference calls about response strategies and that sort of thing. Yeah and and you and your family are doing well. Yes deeply appreciate you sharing your insights and your work. That's Professor Alison Vanni at Yale School Public Health really grateful for you taking the time to join US thank you that was Professor Alison Galvan and Infectious Disease Model or and professor at Yale University as usual on our way out. I want to tell you what I'm watching right now as I told you earlier. The trajectory of epidemic in the US is steeper than Italy's was when Italy had as many cases as we do right now that means that are doubling time. The amount of time it takes for the number of cases to double is quite short at about two and a half days with the physical distancing measures. We've seen across states. Will it slow it down? Second our frontline. Healthcare providers need more industries around. The country are starting to answer the call. Will they be able to get enough protection out to the brave women and men who are serving patients across the frontlines right now third the economic consequences of covert nineteen are getting more dire by the day? Will Congress Act fast to put money in people's wallets so they can make Renton pay their utilities and put food on the table for their families. Those outcomes are particularly dire for marginalized people people in jails in or in detention centers on the border. They can't physically distance leaving them at particular risk and all of us the worst off for it. Where is the action for them? Lastly Americans are adjusting to life under quarantine. How are you coping tweet or instagram?.

US Cova dry cough Professor Alison Vanni Renton fever Professor Alison Galvan Alison asymptomatic Yale University Yale School Public Health professor Italy
"school public health" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"school public health" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"To health on the next episode of what's eating America Sunday at nine PM Eastern only on MSNBC five days ago state and local officials in the San Francisco area banned all gatherings of thousand or more people that is until three days ago when they banned gatherings of one hundred or more people and then today they ordered residents of San Francisco and five other counties to shelter in place to stay at home. Full Stop San Francisco is not alone here in terms of coming up with one standard for combating the spread of Corona virus and then ripping up coming up with the next one coming up with the new one the next day as lots of places around the country. Try to figure out how they're going to respond to this and everybody comes up with their own nuanced response for how they think they need to deal. Here's what I WANNA know. Having this patchwork of standards and strategies from place to place in day to day is it as bad as it seems. It Seems Mad. But if you think about this like an epidemiologist you look at and think about that as people test driving stuff that other people now need to start around the country or do you see it as stumbling around in the dark. Well Dr Ian Lipkin is director of the Center for infection. Immunity at Columbia University School of Public Health is one of the world's leading infectious disease. Epidemiologist Dr Lipton. Thank you so much for being here tonight. My pleasure so let me ask you. I if I if I've said anything tonight that strikes you as wrong or wrong headed in the way. No I think you said what needs to be said. The one thing I would I would emphasize is that. There's no reason to test drive this in the bay area it's already been test-driven in China. This is how the The outbreak was shut down in who bay province in Wuhan? That was sheltering place. We're talking about here is being novel. It's not novel at some point. As you pointed we wind up enging word fewer people sheltering in place starting with large gatherings than smaller and smaller. Why would just go there all at once if we go there all at once than we will trunk eight the time required to actually get out of this mess so if it is a sort of epidemiological from epidemological perspective? It's the sort of gold standard. That people should shelter in place. Stay home not get together. What I worry about is in a society with almost no testing. Are you guaranteeing that pop? People who are positive right now are going to infect all their family members with whom they're sheltering in place that's part of the price you have to get them out of the community. There is no other way you what you said. Earlier about. Testing being essential is is the point. And that's one of the reasons why in our center we focus on testing. We refer to it as medical intelligence. This is what allows you to make informed decisions without testing. We don't have informed decisions now. One of the problems we have with test is that we may assume that all tests are equivalent. And they're not some tests. Give you false negative a false negative. That's a big problem because then you have a sense of security and complacency and you put people together. Who shouldn't be together. But you do know that if in fact you move this direction and say we're going to shelter in place we're going to isolate people we're going to prevent the continued spread. Then you will indeed flatten that curve. That you've shown and that's exactly what we need to do now. There's some other things that we can do to. We can begin to look at a variety of medications. Look like they might be helpful. We need for example. There's one drug. That's a role called. Hydroxy quin alone. Which is which may in fact be useful as a preventive measure. We know that. Antibodies that people have when they convalesce can prevent disease. We're not investing enough in tried and true classical sort of methods repurposing drugs and strategies that have already been shown to work most of our investments and things which are sexy and new and patentable at Depaul. Bright we're in the middle of a public health crisis and we need to start with what works. Let me let me ask you just to reiterate that I think you've already made clear but I just want to underscore it. You believed the kinds of measures that have been announced tonight for six counties in the San Francisco Bay area should be instituted nationwide. Yes right away. Do you believe that the US is capable of doing that if we if that was decided at the federal level? That's what everybody should do. Do you think we're of doing it. Well the president seems to be capable of doing whatever the president really wants to do including some things that surprised me sometimes And I he is my present irrespective of all our political differences and this is an opportunity to step up and do the right thing. And he has advisers who tell him things they're not palatable necessarily but we're going to go through this pain irrespective of whether or not we do it in one fell swoop or decide to slowly pull off this band aid. It's going to hurt as you said we should do it. Ian Lipkin is the director of the Center for infection and immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School Public Health. Thank you so much sir. I know that you You have a lot of work to yourself and you taking time to talk to the media right now as part of your public service. Thank you my pleasure thank you. I'll be right back. Stay with there are a lot of Americans who have to keep coming to work during this pandemic. There's a lot of Americans who are losing their work because of this pandemic but then there are the tons and tons and tons of Americans.

Dr Ian Lipkin San Francisco director San Francisco Bay Columbia University School of MSNBC president Dr Lipton America Depaul China US Wuhan Mailman School Public Health Columbia University
Seattle students told to get vaccinations or not return to school

News, Traffic and Weather

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle students told to get vaccinations or not return to school

"News time's running out for Seattle public school students to get their vaccines or they won't be allowed back at school after winter break Washington state law requires students to be fully vaccinated or have a signed certificate of exemption this week the school district is holding free vaccination clinics hope with the Seattle public schools health services is the big push those years due to the recent resurgence of the measles virus not enough families have chosen to get the measles vaccine and it's allowed us to creep up into some of our population students have until January eighth to be vaccinated or be kept out of

Seattle Washington
Afghanistan's government says the Taliban have again attacked one of the country's largest cities, Kunduz

Morning Edition

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Afghanistan's government says the Taliban have again attacked one of the country's largest cities, Kunduz

"Taliban fighters entered conduce overnight from several directions at once triggering a fierce battle with government soldiers Afghan special forces have been confronting the militants street to street backed up from the air but Taliban fighters reported to have taken shelter in schools health centres in residential areas the government says it is conducting the operation slowly to avoid civilian casualties the Taliban of captured conduce twice in the past three years this attack suggests it's business as usual for the militant group in spite of significant progress in peace talks between the US and the

United States Taliban Three Years
 Taliban launch major attack on Afghan city of Kunduz

BBC World Service

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Taliban launch major attack on Afghan city of Kunduz

"Taliban fighters entered conduce overnight from several directions at once triggering a fierce battle with government soldiers Afghan special forces have been confronting the militants street to street backed up from the air but Taliban fighters reported to have taken shelter in schools health centres in residential areas the government says it is conducting the operation slowly to avoid civilian casualties the Taliban of captured conduce twice in the past three is this attack suggests it's business as usual for the militant group in spite of significant progress in peace talks between the US and the

United States Taliban
"school public health" Discussed on Fit Club

Fit Club

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"school public health" Discussed on Fit Club

"So if you're looking at doesn't calorie diet that's about five hundred calories a day however they only were able to get told percent but they still got benefit from cutting percent it was over two years the at lower blood pressure reduced inflammation and improve blood sugar control and they all lost about sixteen percent of their body weight which was ten percent of the body weight which averaged about sixteen pounds of fat for everybody and most of it was fat is what they said so. I thought wow three hundred calories a day is all it really took for all these great signs. I think we don't realize how little it takes but it's really the consistency of retirement the keyword consistency and then there's also too. It's like again. You have to just to your lifestyle so for me. There's some days where my days are super long like. I'll wake up at three and I don't go to bed until like one A._M.. Just because of how work is so <hes> if I start eating at eight o'clock it's going to be easy for me to feel like I'm hungry and eat four like meals. So what I do is I just you know I might snack on something like it's like something super small like me a couple of raisins. There's something are few almonds and then I have my breakfast literally. Maybe like between eleven and one and then go out go throughout the day eating the rest of the other two meals at the other one meal this adjusting to tear day because these star eating the moment you start eating and up that long. It's on your mind yeah. You'RE GONNA have to dinners easily struggled for these people. They actually had train them. They brought them in the show them how to prepare their food so they went through. They had them check. They had them do check ins and all access but still couldn't get to the twenty five percent so so I thought that was actually like interesting but also comforting to know that you're gonNA fail. You're not gonNA get perfectly right but even getting close and not even close. It didn't get the half of the calories they still got to a point where they saw Margaret Improvement are even I mean if you get rid of some of your starbucks strings like those ones alone are five hundred. It's crazy and in the lab they've shown that eliminating these calories is actually extended lives rats and different other other animals in the lab so they're doing research now to see if we can apply that to humans is looking pretty bad. It's also depending on what they're eating so you can eat talk hundred colleagues with the crap. Oh Yeah and that really the store next door so they have actually found the plant based Diet Lowers your risk of type two diabetes something. I think that we know subscribe to here <hes> but you know it's always good to have more medical medical journals to solidify the fact this is out of the Harvard Chan School Public Health and published in Jama Internal <hes> the journal Jama Internal Medi- Medicine and they actually did they did a almost like a canopy study where they looked at all the studies in in the area and evaluate all those studies did nine different studies covering thousand the people twenty three thousand of whom had type two diabetes and they found that the predictors of the type two diabetes risk was strong with people that had a lower plant based diverse people that higher plant-based Diet and group the group of the highest plant-based Diet had a twenty three percent at lower risk than those are the lower lower amount of plant plant based Diet and what they found was that you got the benefits immediately went as you increase the amount <hes> of the plants in your in your in your diet right so I just thought what a wonderful thing to to realize that as you crease this you can actually kind of combat these effects that we're seeing with blood pressure stroke heart disease cardiovascular disease. I mean the purpose of the put you have to eat more vegetables as you get full then you won't have to eat the other crap and then and you were to just one week go without eating like the fast food. I'm talking about like I I don't know dirty fast food like McDonald's Burger King and all those places and you you eat stuff. That's a little bit healthier..

diabetes Jama Internal Medi- Medicine starbucks Harvard Chan School Public Hea Burger King McDonald three hundred calories five hundred calories twenty three percent twenty five percent sixteen percent sixteen pounds ten percent two years one week
New mother tested positive for opiates after eating poppy seed bagel

WBZ Morning News

04:06 min | 2 years ago

New mother tested positive for opiates after eating poppy seed bagel

"And other hot humid day good morning I'm Deb Lawler top stories now too high stakes elections. One for a house seat in Ohio the other for governor. Of Kansas are too close to call although President Trump claimed, victory, on, Twitter last, night for Ohio Republican Troy balder. Sohn tough news for Red Sox nation this morning as announcer Jerry Remmy is facing another battle with cancer Rambis fought that disease for a decade finishing a round of treatment earlier this year and. An overnight house fire in Dorchester leaves one, person displays a firefighter suffered minor injuries battling that blaze. On ash bond street and other news the search is continuing for the driver of a car. That struck a bicyclists in Jamaica plain. The Senate. Was caught on another drivers dashcam WBZ's Ben Parker tells us the victim's family has plenty of questions and concerns the father of the twenty year old woman injured in a hit and run crash on monday says he can't believe the driver of the car involved didn't see her today overtake her and cut her off the man tells w._b._z. t._v. he got a call from his daughter after the collision that left her with scrapes and scratches she was crying tearful because he was shocked at the whole thing and she was in pain now police are looking for the driver of that vehicle a red four door hatchback and they're asking for the public's help ben parker w._b._z. newsradio ten thirty a western man is in custody after stabbing two people near city hall david burgos is charged with two counts of armed assault or murder no word on the condition of the victims the reward for information regarding missing university of iowa student molly tebbit's is now over three hundred thousand dollars the reward money has continued to pour in as individual donations are being accepted on the crime stoppers of central iowa website investigators are hoping the more than three hundred thousand dollar reward will convince someone with valuable information Step forward with a tip needed to break the case open crime stoppers assuring tipsters both by. Phone and online that their tips are anonymous Molly Tibbets. Has been missing for twenty. Days or father rob Tibbett says he believes his daughter is with someone she knows but admits it's just speculation Brian burrow ABC news USC president max Nikki s has stepped down after saying. He, would back in may the decision comes after many faculty members call for his resignation in the wake of sex abuse. Complaints involving a campus Dr CBS's. Suzanne marquess Nikki is based a series of scandals dean of the medical. School Herman Pola Fito was accused of using drugs even in his USC office his replacement mohawk Varna accused of. Sexually harassing a researcher USC settled for one hundred and. Thirty five thousand dollars last week USC as the. US attorney's office to open a criminal investigation into one hundred thousand dollar donation from LA county supervisor Mark Ridley Thomas that. Helped his son get a professor job at USC that money ended up in his son control A ks had, been USA president, since twenty ten Florida Atlantic university postpones its graduation ceremony after what. Police called a credible threat the announcement was made just. Minutes before commencement, was set to begin a sticky note. Containing a, threat was posted in a. Woman's bathroom, friends and, family of the. Graduates were already seated in the school's auditorium when the entire building. Was evacuated a new date has not been announced a Maryland woman discovers that eating a poppy seed bagel before giving birth has consequences Elizabeth. Eden told WBAL TV in Baltimore that she was in labor in. April when a doctor told her she had tested positive for opiates and. She had been reported to the state that net that her daughter had to stay at the hospital for five days while her mother was assigned a case worker however eaten fought back to a school health class where she learned that eating, poppy seeds could lead to a false positive the mom told the case worker about the bagel the file was closed I'm Shelley Adler. The Georgetown librarian Washington DC was forced to close after four snakes were discovered. Near meeting room the library, called pest control and the building, was given the all-clear yesterday the library will have another gathering of stakes today.

USC President Trump Ben Parker Deb Lawler Ohio Brian Molly Tibbets Suzanne Marquess Nikki Twitter Troy Balder Red Sox Herman Pola Fito Kansas University Of Iowa Donald Trump Dorchester Jamaica Senate Sohn
Chun Chang Hsiang, Elizabeth Eden and WBAL TV discussed on Hugh Hewitt

Hugh Hewitt

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Chun Chang Hsiang, Elizabeth Eden and WBAL TV discussed on Hugh Hewitt

"A Maryland woman has learned that eating a poppy seed bagel before getting birth. Has consequences Elizabeth Eden told WBAL TV in Baltimore that she was in labor. In April when a doctor, told her she had tested positive for opiates and she had been reported to the state that net that her daughter had to stay at the hospital for five days while her mother was assigned a, case, worker however even thought back to a school health class where she learned that eating poppy seeds could lead to a. False positive the mom told the case worker about. The bagel the file. Was closed I'm Shelley Adler investigators in China began recalling defective vaccines produced by Chinese drugmaker from domestic and overseas markets investigators, found, Chang, Chun Chang Hsiang life sciences at blended, expired fluids and it's vaccines and falsified records from as early as April two. Thousand fourteen this is townhall. Dot com The Justice department is asserting that the judge who. Allowed.

Chun Chang Hsiang Elizabeth Eden Wbal Tv Shelley Adler Maryland Baltimore China Five Days
Sex and Drugs Decline Among Teens, but Depression and Suicidal Thoughts Grow

All Things Considered

02:22 min | 2 years ago

Sex and Drugs Decline Among Teens, but Depression and Suicidal Thoughts Grow

"Behavior survey the cdc just released results for two thousand seventeen and his npr's corey turner reports there were a number of surprises i sex and here the news is almost all good says kathleen f year she's director of cdc's division of adolescent and school health fewer are initiating sacks fewer currently sexually active they're having fewer partners and they're using more effective hormonal birth control methods one change in the data that easier is not happy about is a decline in condom use she says that's likely because many schools have stopped educating kids about the risks there has been a decrease over time in requirements that school cover hiv and s cd in their health education programs when it comes to illicit drugs like cocaine and heroin t news is way down compared to a decade ago for the first time though the cd also asked teens if they ever misused prescription opioids and fourteen percent said yes we don't know what this fourteen percent number means but we were quite surprised by it one in five teens also said they'd been bullied at school but students of color are far more likely than white students to say they missed school because of safety concerns some of the biggest red flags were in mental health if you're says a third of teens reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness he that's really significant and certainly not what we want to see if we're trying to send our kids into adulthood in the most healthy way the news is even worse for students who identify as lesbian gay or bisexual in fact in every category lgbt's were at higher risk than their heterosexual classmates nearly two thirds reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness they're twice as likely to be bullied and four times as likely to attempt suicide it's shocking and alarming and tells us that things are terribly wrong and we seriously need to address this ellen con is director of the children youth and families program at the human rights campaign foundation she says these data are a stark reminder of the lack of protections for lgbt means and why she says they're sorely needed corey turner npr news washington.

NPR Director Cocaine Ellen Con Washington Corey Turner Heroin Fourteen Percent