20 Burst results for "School Of Medicine"

"school medicine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

07:30 min | Last week

"school medicine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Past Western Avenue. Next report. 1 25 more reports more often. Tom Crean, the video and audio center com Traffic Center, Kay next 10 70 NewsRadio. You're listening to K and X in depth, along with Mike Simpson on Charles Feldman next hour in the next hour of in depth of later on in the show. Let's say that that sounds good. That's reasonable Still to come. Don't go here when you hear it. Rendez severe. The emergency youth authorization for your Yeah, it'll be non the video. When we get there. We're gonna talk about rendez severe and whether the authorization for it was a little too rushed. And also a window into our lives during the pandemic care of what is in your trash can Right now, though, Sweden where they weren't very big, you may remember unlock downs and mass requirements throughout much of the pandemic and Depending on the rise and fall of their covert infection rates. The country has been held up as an example of either the right or the wrong response. So 10 months into this for the new surge of infections ripping through Sweden. The country's is looking pretty much like the rest of us right about now. Dr Peter Castine teachers molecular physiology at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He's also a lecturer. At Uppsala University in Sweden. Doctor Thanks for being with US Thanks for having me It's a pleasure. So I remember on this show. We We actually had a couple of folks here from Sweden a different times. And at one point they were telling us how great things were going and another point. They're telling us Things weren't going so great. So in the in the end, not that is the end, but what actually is happening in Sweden. What's happening right now is we're seeing a near exponential rise in cases and the health care system is as in many other heart rate area is very close to being overwhelmed. And people are very concerned. Remind us how things were. They never went to total lock down their group gatherings were allowed. I think up to a limit that to us would seem strange like 50. Or so they told people, you know, don't go out as much, but it was kind of on your own accord. Right Do is as well as you can. Yeah, The approaches have been, um Up to this point entirely recommendation based and a rather than requirements, and most of those recommendations have been relatively lax by most international standards of focusing on distance and on washing your hands. I think some of the critics of this policy have said it's It's the best science as of March and maybe hasn't caught up with what we've learned since then. But, you know, I I do recall that that one of the gentlemen that we had on from Sweden beginning of this, He basically said that If, at the end of the day, when depend Emmick eventually leaves us whether it's through natural herd immunity, vaccinated herd immunity, Whatever. That everyone is going to end up pretty much in the same place. No matter what the ended up doing, Do you think that that is what's eventually happening? No, I think this that's ah, I find it's a disappointing cynicism. The political analogy I would draw too. That is a little bit what Vladimir Putin argues that all governments are corrupt. And so don't worry if your government's corrupt because we're all lying to you, and and I think we should hold ourselves tires and and I think, you know, places like Um, you know, Australia and New Zealand and South Korea are not perfect, but they're they're doing pretty well. If you look around Europe, you see that There are a lot of different ways to get this robin fortunate. And and some countries to sweeten Scandinavian neighbors are doing between two intent for better than sweet right now, um, but their problem than a lot of Europe and their problems in different parts of Europe for different reasons. Um, you know, the other thing is, as we start to look at a vaccine. It's Every month that people don't get sick are those air people who might not get sick because they could get the vaccine and that I think then sticking it out becomes really important. So what are they doing now? Because the prime minister is started the limit things, but they still don't believe in closing up a lot of shops. Yes. So what they're doing now, The one requirement now is well as of November 24th. So in a week, public gatherings will be limited taking people. Private gatherings are advised to be limited to people, but there are no requirements. Everything else is advisory and because the region's sort of like the counties in Sweden are the ones who are actually responsible for the hospitals. They're very concerned and under pressure, the public health agency has allowed the region's to enact stricter recommendations. And so some of those regions, for instance, Khanna your cooking Hagen in the South is advising that requiring that people stay off public transport and work from home. When possible and avoid physical contact with people who they don't live. On DSA. Oh, some of these regions are are advising more and more. There are no broad requirements and still everyone's At least in terms of public health recommendations. Everyone's in staying away from that There was a little changed today. Um, when some of the opposition politicians said the government really needs to explain itself if it doesn't believe in masks, toe really say why, all right? I'll talk to him. Uh, I had one quick, really? Just one quick question. I'm just curious. Do you feel more comfortable in Virginia? Or would you feel comfortable comfortable now in Sweden? Right now, I think in in in Virginia, I would say the thing in Sweden is, despite all this When I talk to different people, different employers in different working groups around the country, some people are taking precautions that are very similar to The healthcare systems I talked to in Virginia where people who can work from home work from home they have masks available. They have distancing protocols s O. Some is very similar, and some is very different. Everyone's coming into work, and it's just wash your hands And so there's tremendous variability. All right. Dr. Peter Castine teaches a molecular physiology at the University of Virginia School Medicine. Also lecture at Uppsala University there in Sweden when we went a little bit over Saul Rush through this? Yeah, quickly more to come on. And now a game of commercial chicken brought to you by progressive where we see how long flow could go without talking about insurance. Ready? Go, So the weather is.

Sweden Um Uppsala University Europe Virginia Tom Crean University of Virginia School Dr Peter Castine Vladimir Putin Charles Feldman Mike Simpson Kay Dr. Peter Castine lecturer University of Virginia School Emmick
The Diversity of Security Challenges in Higher Education

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:02 min | 3 months ago

The Diversity of Security Challenges in Higher Education

"Now. What is it like? Every year you have a new batch of of students coming on board and they all want to connect to your network I mean what's the? What's the reality of that situation from a security point of view It is a lot of prep-work over the summertime, a lot of you know repair and refine and and. You know replace things that aren't doing well, and then when you know we get about two weeks out from classes starting. which this year is September second. So we're kind of in that zone right now. That's where we're making sure that everything is working. In it in. Its, optimum. Capacity and capability. Following that it's you know let's continue planning for whatever is going to happen next you know we the spring term winter spring term in in January this past year and nobody anticipated. Kobe I I'm not. You know I'm sure that there was an -ticipant because the the fun part of that is we actually did a pandemic tabletop exercise in the division of Information Technology, which is the central a unit on campus. We do that path the fall of twenty and eighteen. So we hit already kind of work through some of the. You know the communications challenges and the organizational challenges so when it came time to do. The transition from online or from in person courses to online courses, we were able to do that in very short time and that included transitioning thirty seven hundred core courses. From in person delivery to online delivery so that really served you well, I and it was the preparation time and it was the understanding. Of what we would need to do and it was also, you know checking those channels you know. I've done some business continuity work in my in my pass and a business continuity plan to just never exercise it's not a plan. It's a bunch of on paper so So we were able to walk through and validate that and that's the kind of work we do during the school year. And we take our you know kind of slowdown period so. Beginning summer you know everybody takes a deep breath and then we exhaling get back to work you know Sometime during the summer I like to encourage my my team to have a little bit of time off. But when September goes in and the students arrive we, we try to work really hard to get him through and then we take it the winter holidays. What what kinds of things are you and your team defending against who? Who's WHO's coming at your network? You know it's the usual array of Fred actors You know think about the things that research is doing. You know we're we're doing. A lot of research in the area of Koga right now, and it's just. Be We have the capability. We have the expertise we have the researchers at want to do that. But we also have school medicine in public health. We also have a school of Nursing School of Pharmacy. So healthcare education is important in that has just a treasure trove highly valuable. Information in it. But we do engineering work, and some of that work is is patentable work. So that's probably attractive We do a lot of business influenced work. we have data science institute which is trying to figure out the the better ways to understand. You know the the magic acronyms of a I in L.. Artificial intelligence. Machine. Learning. And and that's that's attractive information not only that forty four, thousand students twenty three, thousand staff that's a treasure trove of marketable information. You know I always wonder you know someone in a situation like yours where certainly you're going to have some students and I'm thinking of Oh I don't know folks in computer science and other sorts of places who were going to look at you know the the campus system or the university system as you know their own personal playground there that. you know they're gonNA WANNA, test their own skills against yours. I mean I is that an annual thing and and how do you? How do you? How do you not be adversarial? How do you support You know the educational aspects of of those students while still keeping things up and running what's your approach to those sorts of things? Well. So I we we are establishing some really good partnerships with with the Academy with the the the professors and researchers that are interested in studying the cybersecurity arts and sciences. we've had a relationship with the information school. is They're they're part of the College of letters and Sciences and now they're part of what's been amalgam is as the the School of Computing. Data. And Information Studies so CDs. In in in doing that, I, mean, the partnership is if it's data and if it's doing things if it's you know working or arresting or or if it's needing to be analyzed, we have people that are very much interested and so I've had my my department be intentional about establishing those greater relationships we have you know researchers doing anything from identity access. Management Research to data analytics to cybersecurity metrics and then we have others on campus that are doing great work in high throughput. Computing Great Work in in you know engineering the the next greatest you know computer technologies. In other side trips we had We have a researcher that is working on, Thomas Vehicle. Research you know and there's an awful lot of cyber in there too so. Having those kind of relationships is the the real multiplier here, and this is not unusual by the way for university. This is nothing super special. We're doing it's just that You know there's a, there's a lot of cybersecurity programs out there where there you know NSA certified Center for Academic Excellence. Certified and we're GONNA. Get there eventually. I believe But right now we're just supporting the researchers in the courses are being taught. Sue I myself have been a guest lecturer in a one of the business school courses. It has an information security course as part of its core. That's been fun. I enjoy doing. I did a little bit of that as an adjunct University part of my coming here.

Researcher Nursing School Of Pharmacy College Of Letters And Science School Of Computing Koga Kobe Guest Lecturer Fred NSA Thomas Vehicle Center For Academic Excellence
Every Dog Year Is Not Equal To 7 Human Years, Houston Researchers Now Say

Joe Pags

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Every Dog Year Is Not Equal To 7 Human Years, Houston Researchers Now Say

"All heard this for many years. One human year equals seven dog years Well, a new study says. That's not true. At the University of Houston School Medicine, University of California School of Medicine. They have debunked the popular way of calculating a dog's age in human years. The study says that dogs reach maturity faster but slowdown in ageing after doing so. The lead author of the study says the 127 year ratio doesn't make sense because a dog can reproduce when it's less than a year old, while a human cannot reproduce at the age of seven

University Of Houston School M University Of California Schoo
"school medicine" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

07:50 min | 8 months ago

"school medicine" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"The. Us Isn't the only country where government officials are worried about loneliness. There's one country that's taken a much bigger step on. The Minister of Land Meanness Minister of Loneliness. Is that a job at hogwarts. Well some people think that the has parliament but I've had more correspondence more interest on this subject than anything else is responsible for. Data Baron is a member of British parliament. Loneliness is a big problem in the UK even pre brexit in one survey up to a fifth of all UK adults felt lonely most or all of the time so in two thousand eighteen parliament created an official program to help check in on people who lacked strong social ties and a number of big British companies signed a pledge to improve employees connections. I chatted with Baroness Baron for a few minutes during the recent brexit negotiations and. She told me that she herself felt lonely when she began her. Tenure in parliament arrived. Enormous has six hundred best friends. And you don't know anyone. We were all there at some point in high school but loneliness can be just as difficult to deal with as we grow up. Which is why it's important to talk about it. People are very reluctant to talk about. Ns because they feel it's passed failure. I think pretty much everybody does. I mean I think the fact is the most people talk passage. She's been keeping track of a few workplace practices that have brought people together to work places that like evicted with his photo. Sharing have created the conditions to help people connect more meaningfully of implies benched useful pulled shouting tables so it means that if you send it back table expats instead. I have to say I love the idea of a chatty table it might be the most British thing I've ever heard. Well we have one even over-fish which is the friendly bench. I've heard about that. Tell me more send a friendly banshee and find the park and it's an out too fattening table I have to say. I don't think I'd want to sit on. One of those benches preferred not to be approached. These kinds of programs aren't enough by themselves to transform an organizational culture. But they can open a door and send a signal that it's okay to see connection with your colleagues now not. Everyone works on a team that prioritizes connection sometimes. We have to take matters into our own hands colleagues. I think here the culture is more like people seem to want to be more separate police colleagues. Who are friends and so that feels a little bit isolating? My Name. Is Dr Lose Cloudy. I'm an environmental health scientist at Mount Sinai School Medicine. And what in the world is an environmental health scientist? It's not like being in forest. In counting animals is more about. We can protect people from environmental toxins. We talk a lot about data. You seem so sociable. I would've thought you like people too much to do this. Kind of solitary work. It is lonely work in a way but also because I am partaken and as you grow in this field because there's so few people of Color in science the higher you go up the academic ladder the lonelier unknown Jerry becomes because you're one of the few people who are from that background loose grew up in Puerto Rico with a huge family around. She likes going places in grips and she loves SALSA DANCING. Oh I love science music my favorite thing to do outside of work in South Asia. I tried to engage with you. Try to motivate people in my office. Oh there's a new restaurant nearby you WANNA come check it out. And every every other week I would say I'm quitting tussle seeing. Who's coming with me and feeling nobody did? Loose was starved for belonging. For sense of connection with people she identified with. She realized that her New York colleagues weren't going to get a socialist. She wanted she needed to do something to combat her loneliness so she decided to build a workplace community from scratch. She started with interns. Yes I was able to secure funding to bring in Underrepresented minorities in in science to work in our department. I try to create a sense of community among them yesterday. I bought cupcakes after they had a a lunch seminar so we had a time together at the kitchen talking about how they're feeling and how it's going for them in the internship program so. I try to bring them together as much as I can. When your organization lacks a sense of community or you feel out of place in the existing culture you can build your own micro community. It's a group of people who understand you share your interests that could be people who go on runs before work or it might be a book club or even a podcast club that micro community connect outside of work or during work hours and as loose found. It doesn't have to be a group of Pierce. Now she could connect and share her interest in Puerto Rican cultural events with others at work like when a hurricane hit Puerto Rico and loose was hosting visiting interns whose universities had closed down. They were missing home a lot. And if I know of our concert of music from Puerto Rico I would invite him there and so I think that served to help to give them a sense of belonging that maybe they don't have you know in the everyday in the work. Is this something that you've done when you're feeling low? May you know you create this experience for other people in it also helps you feel connected definitely because the cultural isolation has been something that I've experienced so much so for me surrounded myself on with people even though their interns and more junior but just having them around really helps me feel less lonely. On top of building a micro community loose was doing something else important here. Something that directly affected her loneliness. There's evidence that helping others makes us feel less lonely. It allows us to feel that we matter there were noticed and valued and appreciated for loose creating a space for young people of Color to get a foothold in science. Helped her feel more connected to people at work? Helping others helped her by now. She's been running intern programs at work for fifteen years. She's expanded the micro community into an alumni network and loose feels less isolated whenever this seminar in my workplace. I'm the one who the faculty member who comes in with an entourage of minority students. Not everyone is in a position to hire a community around them but the number of friends. You need to avoid feeling. Lonely work is smaller than you might think. And the kind of interaction you need is more basic more on that after the break. Okay this is going to be a different kind of add. I've played a personal role in selecting the sponsors for this podcast because they all have interesting cultures their own today. We're going inside the workplace at sap..

Puerto Rico UK scientist Baroness Baron South Asia Mount Sinai School Medicine official New York intern faculty member Jerry Pierce
"school medicine" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"school medicine" Discussed on Revision Path

"They're probably going to be like excuse me, like, we'll graduated from morale. So they know that. Okay. Okay. Like every time I say. I would some Morehouse school of medicine, people were like. But that's being are you. Trying to tell me Saana saying, no. Is forbidden women? Right. It's a coed school. So I went to Morehouse school medicine in, I a studied neuroscience in got accepted to the PHD program in also got a whole ride in a stipend in a chance to go to Ivy league in the summer to intervene, NASA program. So my family was like, so proud, but I ended up like hating my life solid like dude, why I don't like this. It was just like me like a bunch of light mice all day studying like having like this longitudinal study in, like it was okay? But like I don't wanna work with mice. I'm like social butterfly. So please, like, don't do this to me own instantly ways. I found that I started studying business at night time. Like just all my I don't know. I just started doing it in started to have the each to like get into advertising, you know, be creative. In. So I ended up, I ended up getting out of that in a went to school to get my ABA instead in the middle of that, somehow, I really cannot tell you talk about way into advertising agency, which is like unheard of you'd not have advertising experience or a -education in advertising. I ended up going getting into like a medium size agency in search engine marketing because social media in a digital marketing was so new, you could teach yourself at schools. You know, had not started teaching that yet. So that's how was able to get in in. That was like the beginning of my career in that in I ended up seeing the graphic design department, in I kept trying to go over there in a win. Let me they were like share like you don't have a portfolio, like what are you doing? It was just like, like levian Lee..

Morehouse school of medicine Morehouse school medicine levian Lee Saana Ivy league NASA
Marijuana-related ER visits climb at Colorado hospital

Dr. Daliah

09:12 min | 1 year ago

Marijuana-related ER visits climb at Colorado hospital

"Show. So they say Kim abyss related. ER visits tripled in Colorado after legalization of marijuana. They say thirty three hundred patients visited the emergency room at UC health university of Colorado hospital alone related to marijuana back in two thousand twelve but then that jumped to ten thousand by two thousand sixteen. Most of them had GI symptoms toxication or acute psychiatric symptoms. They say ER visits related to edible marijuana around eleven percent between two thousand fourteen in two thousand sixteen. And the research. Researchers say their findings suggest edible cannabis products. Maybe more toxic than marijuana that has smoked or. Eight. So. All right. We have been dying for data to come out of Colorado. I'm not sure why it's taking so long. But we legalize marijuana Colorado. And then I believe we did Washington, California and other states, and now we have a whole bunch of six following suits. And I'm okay with the legalization of marijuana Ivan. Okay. With that. In fact, the voted for it. Because I wanted us to study a more, and I wanted to police freed up so they could deal with, you know, more severe sort of crimes. However, I wanted it to be legalized was certain. Certain. How do I certain societal measures in place like, you know, how are we going to prevent kids from buying it and getting sold to kids and us dealing with second hand smoke and drivers are we going to have a means to are we going to have a means to? Tests people who could be created or toxic it and now, no, no, that's not the way things. Go in politics. Everything is a a one fell swoop sort of attitude just like with healthcare. Obama comes in the congress decides to make this big huge stupid ACA Bill twenty two hundred page Bill, and we have to now deal with all the ramifications, and we can hardly fix all the mess that it made while we're kind of in that same problem with legalize marijuana. And again, I was four legalizing marijuana. What I wasn't for is the speed and the haphazard and the half ass way. We were doing it. And I'm driving down the highway and I'm smelling pot. I'm driving behind people that are obviously intoxicated. And what are we doing about it? And now kids kids are having access to marijuana. Now. True kids have access to alcohol kids have access to cigarettes. They have access to things are not supposed to have access to. But you know, we just went from zero to ninety and and we didn't figure out how to very very subtly incorporates a legalize marijuana system into our society. And legislators just do that same thing with the opioid crisis. The opioid crisis. Rather than going? Okay. Let's break this down four hundred people died in Nevada of opioid use. All right before we make any laws can we figure out what those four hundred people died of last year the year before. It's three hundred ninety five of them died from heroin. Let's make a law. Right. You know, helping our law enforcement officers seize and arrest those trafficking heroin. If three hundred ninety nine of those four hundred a word because Dr Joe gave a thirty pill-prescription tab, then we restrict narcotics in the states. But no, no, no, no. That's not what they do. Legislators are worried because they got a timetable. They ain't got their election coming up. So they have to make a glove. They have to make a super quick we are going to legalize. We're going to please everybody legalized. We'll get California. I gotta give credit credit. They had a little bit more of a plan. I don't know if it was long enough, but they had certain restrictions and not everybody could go and get a license and. You know, they had a fairly slower rollout than some of the other ones. But the the rollout mostly had to do with who can own the dispensaries who could sell disturb you'd I really didn't see much of a plan on how we were going to limit secondhand smoke. How we're gonna limit it in public places, which is where I mean, I was getting buzzed off. Somebody who was smoking two stories above me in the hotel. So if you have a public place, and it's mostly a nonsmoking hotel. How are you going to protect because people smoking pot and the rule of smoke. Smoking pot is legal. But I get there's money. There's a lot of money. So, you know, it's been really really slow to get studies come out on what actually were the ramifications. But we're starting to get some stuff from Colorado at least. So they say thirty three hundred ER visits at the Aurora clinic or relate to marijuana two thousand twelve which jumped to ten thousand in two thousand sixteen and tripled. And there were also sharp increase for the rates of hospitalization and the team from the university of Colorado school medicine believes that not only will the visits increase as marijuana becomes more widely available and used them state, but the findings suggest that the edible products. Maybe more toxic then marijuana that has smoked invade. Now, this is huge because I've been telling individuals if you're going to take marijuana for whatever you think is going to help before I would smoke leave the lungs alone. The lungs are very delicate. I'd rather you eat it. It. Problem is is you get the buzz as quickly with eating. So you we more or the potency you'll get or getting into your bloodstream? You know and absorbed through the gut maybe change some of the gut flora, I don't know. But they are noticing that cannabis edibles. For causing a number of visits, and we want to put some data behind this. So they publish this in the annals of internal medicine and the team looked at patients who visited the ER at UCLA Chelsea university of Colorado hospital, they found that there was a threefold increase in cannabis associated visits during this time period about thirty three hundred patients visited the ER and two thousand twelve when just medical marijuana was legal. But then it shot up to ten thousand we discussed that. And they say thirty percent of Colorado are now currently using marijuana. Thirty percent. They say toxication was the second. Most common reason a third most common was acute psychiatric symptoms. What was I the cannabinoid, hyper emphasis syndrome? That's when you get these severe bouts vomiting cyclic vomiting, many of them want to take a shower. They see a shower seems to help their symptoms and the only way to stop it is to tell them to stop smoking marijuana. Now are ers are already pretty slammed. Now, people can say, well, let's just restrict you know, getting marijuana. Let's you know, what why are there? So many people smoking marijuana. Why are some people moving to it over? We're gonna talk after the break. There's a lot of seniors that aren't able to get their medication their pain medication. And there in a lot of pain. And so what are they doing? They're going to be using marijuana for the joints. So we are driving with a lot of our policies people going to marijuana. We stopped. We we did a great job with the tobacco epidemic. Told everybody quit smoking cigarettes a bad scared. Everybody. What did a great job, and I'm really proud of ourselves. But that just shunted everybody to the vaping or people went to food right rather than smoking to keep the weight down the eight. So now, we have obesity. Now, we have more joy issues, we have more pain issues back issues, and then rather than having pain medications accessible because the opioid crisis. We start limiting those. So people are gonna wanna pains not going to go away. And again, we're legislating faster. Then we set up the system in place, and so people end up going it's like the resistance and marijuana

Marijuana Colorado Uc Health University Of Colora Cannabis California Kim Abyss Washington Obesity Nevada Barack Obama University Of Colorado School Annals Of Internal Medicine Heroin Ucla Chelsea University Of Col Dr Joe Bill Aurora Clinic Congress Thirty Percent
"school medicine" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"school medicine" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"I know how you can make an incredible keep everybody beer or stone. Cold music, sh-, big cat comes out tax. So if you got tanks say you got the call next year. Yeah. What is your plan? I'd swear a lot. They'll love you. If you cuss swear, lots. Would cause any remember. Yeah. Maybe remember their way series away to be. I dunno. I'd probably I it's weird because there's things being funny. Yeah. That's you're gonna trying to be honest. Because charted be like, hey, look like college is fun. But it really doesn't matter kind of that kind of thing. Like, hey, guess what? Guys. Like, none of this ship matters could tackle big cat. Bring him out on stage. And it'll be like Zac Brown. Right. That was real right? I might go. Sit front row that guy broke a rib. The I heard it was in sales also peaked JJ it was what if I sat front row like the godfather you saw my face. You're like, oh, Jesus Christ just freak in your underwear supposed to picture everybody in their underwear. Big cat will give you a model. It will just be there. Yes. Just that'll relax. I actually have a piece of advice. You should start out with joke. Do you want here? My favorite shirt. It's what's the difference between a chick pea Ghorban being what doesn't cost fifty bucks to have a Bonzo being on my chest. Okay. Okay. Chickpea got break the ice. I think actually the people Wisconsin with love that they went into the laughter. Yeah. So this I obviously live in Texas now and the Baylor school medicine gave me a doctorate degree. So I wasn't. I don't wanna put any pressure on the people..

Bonzo Zac Brown Wisconsin Baylor school Texas
"school medicine" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Cable ex news. I'm Michael Calhoun for the third time in recent weeks. A homeless person has died in the city of Saint Louis. The latest victim man in his thirties was found dead Wednesday night inside an abandoned church north of downtown this man lives with some twenty others in that church the downstairs area, there's not too many. They come and go, but they do drugs down there in a believe they're doing some kind of bad heroin or something that was my understanding what he died from us up here. We don't do drugs on Christmas day a homeless man was found dead in a vacant lot near Milan. Pick and thirteenth street and the day after Christmas. A homeless woman was found dead inside the abandoned car school medicine county, annoy set a new record for drug related deaths in two thousand eighteen kmarts is Brett bloom has more corner. Steve non tells kmox news that for the first time drug deaths in Madison County reached triple digits not breaks the record of ninety one setback back in two thousand fourteen a non-point. Out that the circumstances surrounding those deaths has completely changed in that time, which absolutely shifted in in two thousand fourteen when you had those ninety one desk, those were mostly heroin, douse. This year in two thousand eighteen none of them were heroin. Only douse sentinel is absolutely taking hold of the nation. And he says that's reflected in the local numbers as well. Other. You're a numbers from the coroner's report so nine murders. Forty-five suicides in one hundred sixty deaths in accidents in Madison County last year in KOMO exports. Nine minutes to go over in the third the blues.

heroin Madison County Michael Calhoun Brett bloom Saint Louis Milan KOMO kmox Steve Nine minutes
"school medicine" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Of risk in. Actual results may vary. Cable ex news. I'm Michael Cal Hoon for the third time in recent weeks. A homeless person has died in the city of Saint Louis. The latest victim a man in his thirties was found dead Wednesday night inside an abandoned church north of downtown this man lives with some twenty others in that church the downstairs area, there's not too many. They come and go, but they do drugs down there in a believe they're doing some kind of bad heroin or something that was my understanding what he died from us up here. We don't do drugs on Christmas day a homeless man was found dead in a vacant lot near Milan fee and thirteenth street and the day after Christmas. A homeless woman was found dead inside the abandoned car school medicine county, Illinois, set a new record for drug related deaths in two thousand eighteen kmarts is Brett bloom has more corner. Steve non tells kmox news that for the first time drug deaths in Madison County reached triple digits that breaks the record of ninety one set back in two thousand fourteen. And non points out that the circumstances surrounding those deaths has completely changed in that time, which absolutely shifted in in two thousand fourteen when you had those ninety one desk, those were mostly heroin douse this year in two thousand eighteen none of them were heroin. Only sentinel is absolutely taken hold of the nation. And he says that's reflected in the local members as well other. You're a numbers from the coroner's report show nine murders. Forty-five suicides one hundred sixty deaths in accidents in Madison County last year in KOMO exports. Nine minutes to go in the third the blues.

heroin Madison County Michael Cal Hoon Saint Louis Brett bloom KOMO Milan kmox Illinois Steve Nine minutes
"school medicine" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"I'm very excited. We're gonna be talking about breast cancer, specifically triple negative, breast cancer. We've got to experts with us Milan. Radovich and Brian Schneider. Both of whom again work at I use school of medicine with me, we're going to be partnering as we've talked about before with ice school medicine over the next year to talk about topics that are both of clinical interest to the general public while also talking about research and things that are going on on the cutting edge to try to improve the way we care for those Ellis's. So I'm going to let both Milan and Brian. Use themselves. And then we're going to get started polo. Thank you for having us this morning. My name's meal and rod vich assistant, professor at Simon cancer center. Also, co director of the precision genomics program, and I'm Brian Schneider. I'm an associate professor of medicine and rector you health precision Nomex program. And so part of what we're trying to do as well as talk about sort of the different professions encrypt has the people get to these jobs. And so could you tell us little bit about your training, which degrees are how you got to this place. Yeah. Absolutely. So interestingly, I'm actually genomic scientists. So my job is really focused on understand the underpinnings of breast cancer. What causes this cancer? What are the mutations that have caused a normal brussel to become cancerous? And so my training actually was in classical genomics, medical genetics. I got my undergrad in biochemistry my PHD in medical molecular genetics that I you and then actually with Brian and head then the honor to join the faculty at school medicine. Great. And I am a classically trained MD and the decided to. Do my specialty in medical oncology? So I do fun things like chemotherapy pills for cancer was trained by great breast oncologist, George sledge and also had a translational laboratory and subsequently partnered with Dr savage in opening the precision Nomex program. Great..

Brian Schneider Milan Simon cancer center associate professor of medicin Radovich MD George sledge professor Dr savage Ellis director
"school medicine" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on This Week in Science

"So this is scribe. Oh, this is this is described as having been very surprised by this binding the first surprise, and then they go on to tell you that they were surprised the first surprise. This is quoting voice. If you can't tell shifted the first surprise. You can kind of identify these different buckets that people fit into. And then the fact that the bucket seem to have some impact on how you respond to the virus and how sick you get was also interesting is Ronald Turner, MD university, Virginia school medicine. There were affects on virus load and how much virus you shed in your nasal secretions. The background microbiome background bacterial pattern in your nose had influences on the way that you reacted to the virus in how sick you got? Well, sort of because they're going to take that right away. So. The nasal neighborhood of microorganisms are not the cause of any of these colts. The colds themselves were caused by cold virus that the volunteers voluntarily took after they've made microbiome was checked. Oh, yeah, I I would not sign up to get a cold, right? You kind of have to be in the right the right place in your. Week, live. Actually, I got college, Audrey, it'll hard up for some beer money. Maybe. I don't know how you really choose it, but you know if somebody says it's recites, I think I'd do it anyway, so so maybe it's because your colds aren't as severe as mine are. And so you wouldn't mind as much so your your nose bacteria's different than mine. But but it does that mean that we would be affected by Colt differently according to this? Yes. So what we're boarding is an association. So it's entirely possible that the fact that you have a staff, they have staffing your nose and they have more sentences not directly related. It may will be. There's some underlying host Ristic that makes you likely to have staffing knows that also makes you more likely to become ill correlation. They, they didn't have it drill down. So. What do they do next? They give an antibiotic. They give. So they had one hundred fifty two participants at all. So this isn't even a small group of people who ran hand. People people who were like, I don't need to do anything this week. Yeah. So they tested the nasal microbiomes before giving the cold to give him the cold and and then they gave people probiotics. So they found that after getting the probiotics, the changes that they saw were none. Not a note me type attics. They were wiping them clean or they were. They were adding bacteria right question. If it was a terrible question, I would have told you it was a terrible question to just to be fair, but that was a great question because that's what they propose doing next. The probiotics didn't have any effect really even on the gut microbe because they didn't wipe. It didn't change the nasal microbiome at all. Didn't change symptoms and ginger, no difference. But they do postulate that they need to redo the study where they do. Do use antibiotics, it's just tougher to do because they don't know, even scientists doing research, don't like to give people antibiotics because of the day and age we live in, but they're saying like, yeah, that's the next step to start with antibiotics, do the cold and see if that same. Today's, yes, if that changes and that you get a different result from there. And so. Yeah, I'm just going to say I'm not surprised about the probiotics, not having an effect. However, because there are have been lots of studies recently that have kind of suggested that probiotics don't work. So..

colds Ristic Audrey Ronald Turner Virginia school medicine MD university
"school medicine" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Her recounting of a memory from thirty five years ago on his since we have no other evidence. Correct. Northwestern study came out in two thousand twelve blew my mind at the time. I found it disturbing. Frightening troubling. And just to recap briefly, if you've just joined us every time you remember an event from the past your brain networks change in ways that can alter the later recall of the event, thus the next time you remember, you're not recalling the original vent you remembering the previous memory. And the northwestern study showed this was a groundbreaker a memory Donna bridges post doctorate, fellow at Northwestern University school medicine Bobo, a memory is not simply an image produced by traveling back to the original event. It can be an image that is somewhat distorted because of the prior times you remembered it your memory of an event can grow less precise. Even to the point of being totally false with each retrieval. And the professor she was working with and she pointed out that it it's really troubling for witnesses giving testimony in criminal trials, maybe a witness remembers something fairly accurately the first time because his memories aren't that distorted after that it keeps going downhill. Then they go into some of the methodology and the number of people. They they did the studies with every single person showed this affect they said, it's really huge. Is there? I doubt this. It's really is troubling way beyond this case. It just why do we discuss things when I was a kid. I blank a why do we even engage in those sorts of conversations? Probably did something similar. I'm just saying close enough. Says the gal who is the head of the study when someone tells me that you're sure they remember exactly the way something happened. I just laugh. Memories aren't static. If you remember something in the context of a new environment and time or even if you were in a different mood, your memories might integrate the new information while for the study people were asked to recall, the location of objects on a grid bombed. I caught myself in one of these the other day over something inconsequential. But I said something, and then I realized later wait a second. That wasn't me that was this person. It was somebody else I know had that experience, and I told as my own, and if I hadn't like for some reason it had popped into my head from here on out. It would have been me. Yeah. It's really disturbing. And then a therapist told me about like how this happens with fear. So my fear of needles that I've got when you remember when I remember the the needle experience from when I was a kid. I'm not remembering that, I'm remembering the most recent time, I remembered it and remembering the fear, I get from the fears. She become afraid of the feeling of fear builds over time. That's what anxiety is to a large extent. So your fear. So why wouldn't that be the same thing with a traumatic event, you know, a sexual assault where your memory of it it grows right in intensity. Well, listen. This is not an argument now on Saturday, the other of the cavenaugh -solutely because what happened is not only unknown. It is unknowable, but. It's possible. For instance, your needle thing, you're not nearly as terrified at the time as you remembered being years later, almost certainly not which is because with your greater age and maturity. You'd think we'll that would just be silly to be that afraid. So it must have been really crazy is you're telling the story, which again is disturbing and troubling original their names. I've heard the example of when Kennedy shot or nine eleven attacks. Where were you? How'd you hear about it? They've they've pulled. They've asked people and ask them again five years later, and it changes significantly Murray. Which is crazy. It is. And I'm just telling you, this gal may have endured precisely what she described which is awful and scary and disturbing disappointing in one hundred dollars things. But not only is it unknowable toss. It's not even knowable to her exactly what happened especially given three and a half decades passing. Well, it was three decades when she talked to her therapist embarrassed is three decades time passing a fifteen year old girl with a beer inner and a couple of stumbling drunk teenage boys. The actuality what happened is on notes. So if you had a strong memory from your childhood, I have a few doesn't have to be traumatic. But it's just. Birthday party where this happened or something a fishing trip? Whatever it was and then you saw video of it. And it was completely different. Would that like break your brain? I think it might break. My brain all these years. I remember dad, and I do that never happened at all. Some sort of matrix weirdness where you don't have any idea. What's real? And what's not? Seems to be based on that study. What is the case? We just don't have the reality ever presented to us. You know, what I think I'm maybe in the future will with so many kids growing up like my kids with videotape of so many of their iphone recordings of so many of their experience. How interesting point now. If I were gonna comfort myself, and I have to because I find all this so disturbing, particularly as a guy was not a great memory. I would I would say to myself. I am saying to myself. We have the greatest brain. On earth among any beast. That's ever roam the earth. Most most on average. I'm not sure there are probably some really break chimps or Saint of the radio says you. Right. I'm sure there are chimpanzees smarter than and were designed the way we're designed, and it works the way it works. And that's the way it's meant to work. That's the best. It can work. It only had to work as good. It was working to get you up to like fifteen so you could reproduce after that nature. Didn't care. Nature's bastard. So you know, when I look back at my first kiss. Maybe the circumstances were a little different still.

Northwestern University school Donna bridges professor assault Kennedy Murray three decades one hundred dollars thirty five years fifteen year five years
"school medicine" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Sugar is something listen everybody's dying and the amount of sugar is pretty amazing of what people take in each year but it's well understood that sugar contributes to be city we know that and that americans consume too much of it in the journal of nature communications they found that sugars actually toxic and research at the university of utah gave mice edyta about twenty five percent extra sugar in the equivalent of the human diet plus three kansas soda a day the female mice on this diet died at twice the rate of the control mice in the male mice did not experiment the same way they did reproduce as well as male mice in the normal sugar diet so the reason behind the gender differences that clear but experts say the humans may respond differently than mice to equivalent sugar boost we know that one hundred percent that too much sugar is going to kill you early for sure that's christopher ochsner he's a phd and assistant professor at the parts of pediatrics and psychiatry at the school medicine in mount sinai so this study in collaboration with other mounting evidence shows that sugar is really terrible for you in recent studies the american heart association recommended that women consume northern sixteen spoons of added sugar day why men should have no more than nine teaspoons added sugars are typically found in soft drinks candies cookies or other desserts it is it's killer no doubt about it and everything from diabetes to the different challenges that we face every day obesity the rise of obesity it's incredible the more we learn the more we teach the more we educate it's like the more obese and overweight we're becoming in that's a challenge within itself so the percentage i think he's up to sixty eight percent of americans are overweight and almost thirty eight percent or obese was something we definitely need to work on again hopefully getting a handle on our lifestyle choices are what's going to matter more than just about anything and understanding how our choices really impact our overall health makes a tremendous difference along the way triple eight two eight three seventy seven to give us a call you're listening to on call radio let's go to.

kansas christopher ochsner assistant professor mount sinai american heart association journal of nature university of utah thirty eight percent one hundred percent sixty eight percent twenty five percent nine teaspoons
"school medicine" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Actual economists not being especially worried about it there are a whole lot of reasons why we import so much more stuff from beijing than we sell over there but there is one area of this economy where china is trying really hard to import more from us academic talent and that is raising alarm at some of america's top universities as marketplace's supreme inishmore reports if you stroll around the campuses of china's top universities and research facilities you may well bump into someone like this chuck david system professor at seen why university school medicine for nurse david is an american he studied at duke and columbia and sloan kettering in new york he's not the only foreigner at his school or even his department in biology or life sciences we have a british guy someone from spain and an italian woman who ran lab at yale for awhile thousands of them over the past decade have moved and set up shop at top chinese universities and research centres this is more than simply a sign of china anna's growing ability to pay for town it's part of a broader policy by the chinese government there is a strong interest in recruiting faculty from abroad michael powers is a professor of finance at sing while university school of economics and management he was at nyu stern school for twenty years before that he says he was offered a competitive package to move and says china's top institutions that government and private foundations are willing to spend what it takes the universities in china have to be competitive with international salaries so one way or another they will put a package together to attract the foreign faculty in some fields salaries can as a result meet or exceed what a professor could make in the us the central government and regional governments offer stipends and support to foreign faculty and researchers some programs offer health insurance housing subsidies and money for faculties children to go to private schools actually covers a lot of things that is actually fairly important that i got an you know thank god i did.

michael powers university school of economics professor of finance columbia chuck david system professor beijing professor nyu stern school china chinese government china anna yale spain new york david america twenty years
"school medicine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fair number of the cases because i didn't know going in at all what do they were anything they were very violent murderers and some were serial killers this is james fallon james fallon professor of psychiatry and human behavior university of california irvine school medicine author of the book called the psychopath inside it has a longer title but the psychopath inside will get you there james is a scientist who studies the brains of psychopaths he lives on a cul de sac on the uc irvine campus he married his childhood sweetheart when i got there he was preparing to go to a hockey game with his son the people he studies feel a million miles away from here for legal reasons james can't reveal any details about the psychopaths but some of them were famous for how heinous their crimes were james's job was to get inside the minds of these killers i started receiving pet scans from the early nineties and those included killers who are psychopaths and so i looked at him and then took the notes on what areas of the brain were got a dysfunctional turns out that the psychopaths had this pattern i don't want all man's know for neuro anatomist like me seeing patterns is everything and so when i saw that i saw anderson patterning nobody had ever really talked about it basically what james saw were these big dark spots in the brain places where there was little or no activity these were the areas where things like moral reasoning and impulse control come from the place where we manage our most base instincts there are also dark spots for empathy originates that sad feeling you have when you see someone you love crime psychopaths don't get that feeling james studied these minds for years piecing together this puzzle climbing patterns then one day james was at his desk in his office i was sitting in my office the medical school was surrounded by piles of printouts and print outs were different types of scans all these analyses that have been looking at murderers james had a lab of tax and students working with them on this on this day one of them came to his office with a pet scan attack was confused about something this brain was supposed to basically be a healthy brain scan should have been glowing with activity colored red and blue and.

scientist james fallon professor of psychiatry university of california irvin uc irvine hockey anderson one day
"school medicine" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on WDRC

"Or orders zone dot com as listener too intelligent medicine plus folks are offering you fifty dollars off and free shipping just use the coupon code hoffman at checkout folks have been a long time since i've been this excited about a new natural medical innovation it's those zona plus find it at order zona dot com all right here's nine let's been in the news this week and it has to do with a theater this week and they didn't have paper towels and the the reason that they don't have parallels well it's more sanitary to use hand dryers and plus it saves the environment oils cheese trees we have to chop down to make paper towels so the handdriers are thought to be an enhancement over those old fashioned paper towels well according to a new study researched meter is a connecticut school medicine recently conducted a study published in applied environmental microbiology to determine if hot handdriers in public bathrooms carry bacteria so the exam thirty six bathrooms across the campus and there were specifically scanning here is rebecca area colonies and they put into the air in the bathroom a harmless trina bacteria to see if it was spewed out by the dryers and says hey we never thought of this but those drivers have to have an air intake and they suck in air from the bathroom which may have harmful bacteria spews them out at high velocities and that stuff that goes directly on your hands perhaps also into your lungs not great i'm dr ronald hoffman this intelligent medicine.

hoffman dr ronald hoffman connecticut school fifty dollars
"school medicine" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Boston school medicines up in but british there are movement here it is anybody proposing anything is the government involved in this into you have a congressman her senator it doesn't matter what these former players think unless they get with somebody who could then bring this to white yup people years ago there is government oversight committee had a hearings on youth sports concussions but there is nothing out of that that initiated an odd nationwide rule do you think joe thomas's point could work against this that a national policy that every state has to follow the people don't like national i don't think you can they do you then you have what if oklahoma says yes we'll have this and then the state of texas has no will let 1213 year olds play football and how does that work i think it's hard to just have this this one war you know that it just blankets the entire country and have people that you have to agree to do that under what under what kind of penalty of fifth fall of a sudden a a thirteen year old or thirteen year olds were plane tackle football i i just don't know how you impose this in like texas is texas going to go yeah all right we're okay with us yarmuk lo i think the timing is there's a new study yesterday from bu that it's not be concussion to cause a problem it's repetitive blows starting in youth so be you release his study and harry carson screw came out intensely on the same day to try and start a move it in okha ob in a los angeles joins us on this topic ob good morning what do you have for me today perfect michael churn uh i believe that the tackling techniques must be improved yup and i think this thing improve tackling techniques 'cause they're teaching these kids how to hit about so much how to tackle yep now would helpers uh immensely yep thanks again i agree great show you guys are you guys a great thanks for taking my call thanks for the phone call i've said all along you have to read teach an entire generation to help the next generation and that's what you're seeing with some of these teams that.

Boston school congressman senator joe thomas oklahoma texas football michael harry carson los angeles thirteen year 1213 year
"school medicine" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Well um it's it's been something we've been interested in for some time well actually fairly recently mud historically my the research i've been doing is focused on epigenetics which leads has led into this entrust in the environment and how it affects behavior so that's been sort of a slow process and in my research but on it in recent years we've become very interested in in the brain offers from work we started on the aunt us system and we actually have an aunt lab over at prome and school medicine um we've been interested in in anson studying their behavior they've been ah great model for behavior and then recently we became interested in mouse and on behavior of of a mouse in studying the brain an epa genetics in in the brain uh so that then led through conversations with michael that we can get to a little bit how we this whole thing began on on crossing species and studying mouse primate and even in human it so for people that haven't heard of epigenetics for before give us a little a better understanding of what exactly it is right i i think genetics this is the study of how on how the how the environment really effects on the way on jeans are expressed so on work we commonly think about mutations affecting genes in gene expression by epa genetics is the study of how uh the environment can affect the way genes are turned on and off without mutation so it specifically the effective how chemicals coming in from the environment through our bodies can sort of decorate the dna decorate the proteins that associate with the dna and change the way genes are turned on and off so that's of great interest because.

anson epa michael
"school medicine" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Good donen the research that was published in the journal american medical association they looked at the brains of two hundred two the people would played football at various levels from high school to the nfl these brains have been donated to a brain bank at boston university for further study on a lot of players have done that even guys that have taken the alive have done it in a way where they said please donate my brain to this science into the answer this was university school medicine and it suggests that it is probably not a rare disease if you're exposed will out of football the severity of cds symptoms who aggressors the more you play the sport high school players only high school players have tended to have very mild disease but most college semi pro and professional players have had nothing short a severe symptoms and nfl players as we said one ten out of one eleven among the players would severe ct eighty five percent had signs of dementia eighty nine percent a mood swings that was severe and 95 percent of cognitive symptoms which included mirror memory loss or you know functional problems and all kinds of dissension attention disorders so the number for the nfl was staggering and what it means is listen it doesn't mean that they're gonna shut the game down.

american medical association football boston university nfl cds eighty five percent eighty nine percent 95 percent
"school medicine" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"school medicine" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"From peter with saraf group how do you extrapolate met adherence from sensors will you build support assets for patients doctors to understand data or deliver the raw data yeah very good good question so i at coming from the physician seidel answer that physicians don't want the raw data they wanted this is important information to really understand and get that missing link know how their child's been doing we have a onepage summary for the physician the patient can download it can be facts to them good old all school medicine that will that were in it can be brought printed out it can be sent through that so we don't have to do integration with each are we can give a summary that physicians wants and now forgetting other question that's good enough let's get a final question from the live audience more a two questions one built on at like do you have enough data to convince customers do a bike the device that's one question and the second is why did you decide to put on the bed instead of a wearable fits measuring griqua hinault yeah absolutely so y you know wearable is not completely passive you have to charge it you have to choose to put it on you miss a lot of data and in something like this with asthma it comes and goes and when you're stopping take your medication your stopping doing all of those other things including wearing a wearable that gives you that information is exactly when you need to be getting information so we felt it was essential that are something passive that was always monitoring all you have to do a sleep in your bed.

seidel raw data asthma peter saraf