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Fresh update on "school" discussed on KTOK Programming

KTOK Programming

01:00 min | 5 min ago

Fresh update on "school" discussed on KTOK Programming

"And first year returns and up to 20 years. Of 6.5% in compound of growth with an income you can never outlive. Let's get back to the question of why your money's in the market. Was this your idea? Chances are that sometime in your high school or college years, some teacher Or professor introduced you to the to the idea of investing. And after school, you probably got a job And during your first at work, the human resource staff introduced you to the concept of the 401 K. Of matching employer contributions and the advantages Of using pre tax money from your paycheck to fund your retirement. After investing in the market. You had a reason to pay attention to what was going on in the financial world. When I got to this point in my life, I remember watching the nightly business report on PBS religiously. And today most people watch CNBC or Fox business or Bloomberg, But basically what I'm trying to say. Is that everything everyone from your professor to your job to the news to financial shows on TV. They've always told youto work hard. Invest your money in the market. And your retirement will be secure. Here's a tough question. How's the retirement going for all those people that told you to put your money in the market and leave it there? Might be going all right, But in a lot of cases, it's not going as good as they would have you believe And here's what they probably won't tell you. They won't say my retirement money is doing just fine. I'm participating in the market for the last 20 years, locking in my gains without participating in any market losses. You won't hear that. You probably also won't hear that. My lifetime income account has been growing at more than 6.5% compound raid owns guaranteed to more than double every 10 years and provide me with an income. I could never live. Why won't they tell you that? Why is it that almost every person you talked to today looks like a deer in the headlights or a semi. It's simple. Their education, jobs, television and broker have been feeding them propaganda based on speculation and not security. And you know, at a certain point in your life, that's okay..

Professor Cnbc PBS Youto Fox Business Bloomberg
Noose found in building owned by elite university

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 12 hrs ago

Noose found in building owned by elite university

"Found at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. It was discovered Construction site at an off campus building owned by the school on Thursday Happens, leaders in an e mail to the community have referred what they call a potential hate crime to federal law enforcement. The university has also launched its own independent investigation.

Johns Hopkins University Baltimore
Fresh update on "school" discussed on CBS SUNDAY MORNING

CBS SUNDAY MORNING

00:39 min | 6 min ago

Fresh update on "school" discussed on CBS SUNDAY MORNING

"Demands for action, many companies have pledged to improve racial equality. In the past, companies have used the so called business case for diversity to instigate action. But should they have to hear to tell us why it's time to stop framing diversity around a business case is Laura Morgan Roberts, a professor at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business and the coeditor of race work and leadership, New perspectives on the black experience, So let's start with the you know the whole premises to stop framing the decision to increase racial diversity around The economic reasons or the business case. Tell us about the problems with the what's in it for me mentality. When we're talking about what's in it for me and was in it for you, then that gives the possibility to you know, strengthened the resource cool and the set of opportunities for all of us. I've become more of a mutual collaborative XT ain It's a question of what's in it for me when it's instrumental can lead us down a path of exploitation, and that's where we have been for far too long in the history of race relations in our world. You've been about what's in it for one group in terms of maximizing the best entrance and the access to resources for one group with Ah, lack of equal consideration. No regard for the condition of life and access to resources for the other group. And in this case, we're talking about black workers. Black laborers Having been exploited for a very long time, and not having the same opportunities or reward of resource is for the work that they're doing is what you call the bias status quo. Always more profitable. Tobias Attica was more profitable as long as a stakeholder except the bias status quo. Now, when the key stakeholders decides that Tobias set a flow is no longer Palatable for them, and they will put back against organizations that is solutions that operating on that by a paradigm. So when consumers boycott and say that they will no longer use product, the service is that Are built upon the serial type, so the labor exploitation of black and brown people, then that bias that is slow is no longer profitable. So you point out in your column that it doesn't prepare leaders to make difficult moral decisions that may alienate some explain that it was right. What would prepare leaders to do that? Yeah. The whole world decisions requires sophisticated analysis, tradeoff conversations in business audiences around live costs and benefits around the investment. On then forecasting there. Be fun on that investment, so to make a calculated moral decision means that you're going to take a stand for the greater good with the knowledge and understanding that it will cost you something. Ah, in the long run, you believe that there will be positive externality, but those positive personality maybe in the realm of justice. Value. The linemen broader social good, and those air, this type of benefits that can be immediately captured on a quarterly balance sheets. So how do you get companies who owe their first allegiance to shareholders to make these kinds of difficult decisions to not consider? The economic argument. The first piece of the conversation is sort of disentangling. What is the possibility through the shareholder? Is it to generate a positive turn on 1/4 by quarter balance sheet? Is it to ensure that the business remain viable and generous is into the future and that the future that's available for all of us is one in which we can all ride. You know that longer term or broader perspective around value add, I think is one important piece of the puzzle Me and the second is yes. The importance of Any leader, acting with a sense of moral conviction or secretary about the right thing to do you know, all leaders have their personal mission and their cause and You know they're they're set of initiatives and efforts that I think are worthy of their time and the organisation's resources so this conversation is simply saying. Leslie racial justice on that agenda. I guess I'm saying many leaders have already made the statement. And so they now have a responsibility to all of their stakeholders who live up to that commitment that they have found Laura Thanks.

Tobias Attica Laura Morgan Roberts Darden School Of Business Professor Secretary University Of Virginia
Every Dog Year Is Not Equal To 7 Human Years, Houston Researchers Now Say

Joe Pags

00:36 sec | 12 hrs ago

Every Dog Year Is Not Equal To 7 Human Years, Houston Researchers Now Say

"All heard this for many years. One human year equals seven dog years Well, a new study says. That's not true. At the University of Houston School Medicine, University of California School of Medicine. They have debunked the popular way of calculating a dog's age in human years. The study says that dogs reach maturity faster but slowdown in ageing after doing so. The lead author of the study says the 127 year ratio doesn't make sense because a dog can reproduce when it's less than a year old, while a human cannot reproduce at the age of seven

University Of Houston School M University Of California Schoo
Fresh update on "school" discussed on WIOD Programming

WIOD Programming

00:23 min | 12 min ago

Fresh update on "school" discussed on WIOD Programming

"One of our offices in Miami and have insurance for Lauderdale, Boca Raton, West Palm Beach and Jupiter. Whatever. One is closest to you, Uh, I have one of our advisors joining us today. John L. Smith. How are you to know? I'm well, Eve. Glad to be here. Yeah. Thank you for being here. You know what I know? Is your first time broadcasting on the radio. You nervous? A little dank. Okay, So let me give the audience your background is nothing to be nervous about the very nice people that our audience, um general has worked in the financial services industry for 12 years. A few years ago, she attended the University of Miami School of Law. She's now an attorney. She also has an advanced degree and tax which is very, very rare. So good job one that you also did some pro bono work in law school, didn't you? I did? Yes. So because of my financial services background I was selected to join the investor rights clinic at U. M. The clinic brought names against unscrupulous financial advisors on behalf of senior clients. We also represented them in arbitration in Finn Ra. It was sort of this wording to hear the facts of the case is, I'm sure you can imagine it lost their entire life savings. But it was rewarding to be able to obtain a favorable result. CLIENTS that's awesome sedan after law school you were working as a financial advisor for Morgan Stanley. Now, however, for over a year you've been advisor with singer wealth. How do you like working as an independent judiciary Advisor? I really love working as if Fiduciary OB. It feels so great being able to serve my finds about complex. You know, when I was at working at a big firm like Morgan Stanley, I was a broken or that was the capacity with which I work. So I earn commissions. When I sold investment that I was encouraged to present to my clients on now I don't have those conflict and it feels great. Also, you know, when you're at a large, publicly stated armed like that you're ultimately working for shareholders. And how I feel like my interests are aligned with our clients, and frankly, with my personal values. I also wasn't allowed to practice law and keep. I couldn't even put J B on my business card. And you know how you work for that? That's the great thing about our clients with their state. Plenty needs as well. Um, I know our client certainly appreciate the fact that if they hire us to advise them on their financial matters, they don't get a bill every time they call for a legal question. Yeah. And our clients really appreciate the big discount. They get on their state plan. Well, durable.

Advisor Attorney Morgan Stanley John L. Smith University Of Miami School Of Miami Judiciary Advisor Boca Raton West Palm Beach Finn Ra Fiduciary
Epstein's alleged accomplice Ghislaine Maxwell set to be arraigned next week

AM Joy

09:39 min | 16 hrs ago

Epstein's alleged accomplice Ghislaine Maxwell set to be arraigned next week

"Maxwell. epsteins closest associates. And helped him exploit girls. who were as young as fourteen years old? Mental played a critical role in helping Epstein to identify the friend and groom minor victims for abuse. In some cases, Maxwell participated in the abuse herself. Okay if you thought the Jeffrey Epstein case was over after his apparent suicide in his jail cell last year. Thank again you'll remember that Epstein was the disgraced financier and convicted sex offender who socializes powerful men like Prince Andrew Bill Clinton and Donald Trump on Thursday, his longtime associate d'alene Maxwell, was arrested and charged for allegedly helping Epstein recruit groom, and sexually abused girls as young as fourteen years old. She has denied any wrongdoing. Here's more of what the US attorney from the southern. District of New York had to say about it. Max will and Epstein had a method. Typically. They would befriend these young girls by asking them questions. About their lives, pretending to be taking an interest in them. They would take them to the movies. And treat them to shopping trips. Maxwell would encourage these young girls to accept offers from Epstein to pay for their travel and their education. Making these young victims feel indebted to Jeffrey Epstein. Developing a rapport with Victims Maxwell then try to normalize sexual abuse with a minor victim. Joining me now. Our our sisters in Law Maya Wiley Professor at the new school and NBC legal analysts Barbara Maclead, former US attorney and MSNBC contributor and Joyce vans, also a former US attorney, and also MSNBC contributor so ladies first I love the all female panel, but I will say starting out I used to be a field producer for America's most wanted, and my beat was covering missing and exploited children. On, this and ask you if you could. How important is the role of the person WHO's The enabler? The person who is recruiting these young girls and my experience, that person was integral to abuse cases when I was a journalist covering these types of cases so. What what say you on that? Yeah. You're absolutely right, tiffany. This is this person and the person who plays the role that. Just Lane Maxwell accused of playing is a Predator is just as culpable as. Jeffrey Epstein or anyone else who sexually assaults anybody? The reason it's so critical to have a person play the role maxwell is accused of is because it's manipulation gain. We have three hundred thousand young people in this country estimated to be sex trafficked domestically, and what that means is finding young kids met male and female. We shouldn't pretend that it's just girls here. In this country who are vulnerable, who need help who need the support of a system hasn't provided it. These are young women who were disadvantaged in many different ways, and what the role that Maxwell played was to play on their need. Get them to trust and being a woman who does that is particularly important, because if you're a vulnerable young woman, you're more likely to let your guard down and believe that the person who is offering you help means it so her role. Is Pivotal in enabling essentially the victimization of a lot of young women and girls, and it happens all over the country. One of the things that so important about this arrest is that predators who are powerful too often go unpunished. So something I found interesting reporting coming out of the Tampa. Bay Times highlighted that this case is actually being handled by the Office of Public Corruption Unit so I. WanNa ask you, Barbara. What does that say about the scope of this? Nation is that. Link to anyone in the current administration. Is it possible that Labor Secretary Alexander Costa's entangled in this break it down for those of us who don't necessarily know how the inner workings of the Southern District. It's a really interesting detail. Tiffany of the press release that was put out by this other district of New, York. This is also true when the case was originally just against Jeffrey Epstein that the public corruption unit is involved, that's a unit that has specialized training and expertise to deal with public officials who get charged there a lot of nuanced issues that arise when public officials are involved and so it says to me that this case. Case at least touches in some way public officials. Now as you said we know that Alex Kosta had some involvement with this. We don't know that he is a subject or a target of the investigation, but his involvement in negotiating sweetheart plea deal a number of years ago. With Jeffrey Epstein could be a reason. We also know that Prince. Andrew has been implicated as recently as last month Jeffrey Berman. The former US attorney recently ousted. Ousted was demanding an opportunity to talk with him and Prince Andrew was a dodging that request to be interviewed. It may be that he is only a witness and not a subject or a target, but this no doubt touches some people who have positions of power, and that could explain why the involvement of public corruption unit or could be others as yet unknown I think four names I be looking at immediately or not public. Public officials, but enablers as Maya, was talking about. If you look at the plea non-prosecution agreement that was negotiated with the Southern District of Florida back in two thousand eight. You'll see the names of four individuals that Jeffrey Epstein specifically wanted to protect. Those are very likely to be people who were enablers recruiters I'd want to get to the bottom of their role. and I think that this case is not done being charged yet. I want to turn the Joyce. Barbara brought up Berman and his abrupt firing. Do you see any connection here with what the dismissal of Berman and the FCC case? So, Tiffany I think it's very hard to know. We know that. The Attorney General Poll Day late Friday night effort to usher Berman out the door, unceremoniously in the southern district of New York and that didn't work became public when Berman refused to go along and instead of having the Attorney General's political appointee in place. We ended up with a woman who was. was already in the office, a career employee, a career prosecutor who will hopefully be playing things straight up so it's difficult to make any sort of direct political line there what we do know is that this is the classic type of an indictment that looks like prosecutors aren't done. It looks like they're headed in further direction, and that's something that there could perhaps. Perhaps be powerful. People who are interested in shutting off when I say it's a classic indictment. What I mean is this indictment comes in six counts, and there's a I can't. That's a conspiracy count and the maximum penalty. There is five years, but there are also substantive counts and conspiracy counts of enticement and transportation of minors, and those counts actually range from ten. Ten years to lifetime sentences, and so as MS Maxwell, is forced to confront the potential charges. She's looking out. Does she want to go to prison for the rest of her life, or is she willing to cooperate and become a witness and look at lesser charges? Perhaps five year sentence that I think will give some powerful people some reason to sleep poorly. All right. Am I GONNA? Go back to you. What do you think that gain maxwell will do you anticipate that she? Said they say. It's hard to know. We're looking at a case as both Barbara Jo of a choice have said where there are powerful people connected to Maxwell and Epstein. There's the mysterious death of Jeff Jeffrey Epstein that has still raised questions in people's mind. And I think the question becomes. Where do you feel more vulnerable? Do you feel more vulnerable from law enforcement, or do you feel more vulnerable other ways we don't really know. We're not going to know, but the one thing we do know and I think is important to remember is this is an over for the victims? This is only the beginning of what will be a very deeply difficult. Possibly re traumatizing process that they have really bravely stood up and faced down despite the fact that I don't think there's any illusion for them. They will have to protect themselves from further victimization in the way, in which the defense will be mounted for Maxwell. So if there's any decency at all left in this woman, she will certainly spare them.

Jeffrey Epstein D'alene Maxwell Jeffrey Berman Us Attorney Southern District Tiffany New York Barbara Maxwell. Epsteins Office Of Public Corruption Un Prince Andrew Bill Clinton Prince Andrew Msnbc Tampa MAX Donald Trump Barbara Jo NBC Labor Secretary Alexander Cost
Singapore GE2020: Global concerns, national elections

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

05:01 min | 18 hrs ago

Singapore GE2020: Global concerns, national elections

"One of the things we're gonna be covering is the Singapore elections coming up July 10th and for a closer look at what's happening and why it's so important. For that we go to Bloomberg. Daybreak Asia host Brian Curtis in Hong Kong and his colleague Doug Prisoner. Thank you. Now, one of the exciting possibilities for the pole is no more. The estranged brother of Singapore's prime minister will not stand. Lisa and Young said he decided to step aside because quote Singapore. It does not need another league. Well, that said Brian Singapore will surely get another early Prime Minister Lee Shin loans People's Action Party has won every election since independence back in 1965 and that is not likely to change this year. It's going to be very interesting and one point Whether or not these results will reflect the P a piece handling of the covert 19 crisis to get some insight. Brian and I asked Bloomberg's the bureau chief in Singapore, Joyce Co. To join us. Thanks so much for being with us, Joyce. I guess. Let's pick up on that issue of the fact that there is unlikely to be any surprise outcome in the election. But the question is whether or not this is going to reflect in anyway. Voter sentiment on the prime minister's Handling of the crisis. What do you think? Hi. Hi, guys. Yeah, that's right. Reading something awful way election has kicked off into losing so long has Put the nation that this will be election like no other And that's because this is happening in the midst of the pandemic, and he's asked for the elections to be be called because he wants a fresh slate. He thinks that things have stabilized and it's a good time, too. To get to hold this post to get a good men date for the ruling party we've seen over the last few months and sing upon the government has really tried to get control of the crisis. I's been interesting journey is a lot of ups and downs to sing off over here. So we set it up. Well, we We held out the model of how to contain the virus, but against like many other countries who cut also by how contagious and asymptomatic the virus who are still Somewhere in April with various cases such in a foreign worker Dhamma trees with a lot of these farm workers stay and live in close quarters, and that has actually pushed the surgeon does that. Our workers has actually pushed all virus told the various cases in Singapore to more than 40,000 which is one of the highest in Asia, the government has said. Repeatedly that, um the cases have been so high because they're doing a lot of testing, and a lot of these people have been asymptomatic. If you look at the total cases, actually. About 0.5% of the people actually in hospitals, and we have one of the lowest fatality rate in the world. I think a lot of people really admire Singapore. It's it's AH, It's a place where Have a first rate health care system. It's one of the richest countries in the world, great schools and all that. And a pretty good social safety. That too, so other than the handling of the Corona virus outbreak. What are some of the key issues that really move the populace? I think the main thing for a lot of people would be the economic fallout and how the government would be dealing of it. We've heard a lot of about this being said during the during the run up to the election. Something about facing a contraction of as much as 7% this year, and this would be the list contractions since our independence in 1965. So it's AH It's a big blow to the economy for people for us, so I used to be a success and be thankful girl continuously every year. It is a quite scary dudes that the economy would be contracting so much. If the government off their shows have won that more businesses local Glenda that unemployment rate in Singapore could could hit a record this year. So the grim picture actually off the economics in Singapore, some of the economic analysis that has been done surrounding the economic fall out of the crisis. Comes away with a conclusion that is essentially created a greater wealth gap. And I'm wondering how that's playing out in Singapore. I was reading that over 80% of the population live. In public housing, and I'm wondering about how this may may figure into this election. Well, we've had for stimulus budget in about 100 days in Singapore this year and the Singapore Sending about Singapore dollars 100 billion almost 100 million to to try to prop up the economy and still for a lot of people who find themselves other jobs or businesses who are ah Facing lots of troubles. We're seeing the government giving up the direct cash handouts, which is pretty rare onto people. So blessing apartments like me. We get $600 count. India had 303 $100.

Singapore Brian Singapore Prime Minister Asia Bloomberg Brian Prime Minister Lee Shin Asymptomatic Brian Curtis Hong Kong Joyce Co Doug Prisoner Lisa India Bureau Chief Glenda Young
Joey Chestnut breaks record in Nathan's hot dog eating contest in New York

CBS Sports Radio

00:27 sec | 19 hrs ago

Joey Chestnut breaks record in Nathan's hot dog eating contest in New York

"Hot dog Eating becomes a sport. Joey Chestnut broke his own record today to win this year's Nathan's famous hot dog eating contest. Scarfed down a world record 75 hot dogs in 10 minutes to win the mustard Yellow belt for the 13th time in 14 years. This year's hot dog eating contest looked a little bit different, though Normally it's held on the boardwalk in Coney Island, with 15 contest in school today. A battle was held indoors with covert 19 safety measures in place and just five competitive

Joey Chestnut Coney Island Nathan
Philadelphia school district may delay return to school due to virus

KYW 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 1 d ago

Philadelphia school district may delay return to school due to virus

"The Philadelphia school calendar says the new year starts for students August 31st but his K Y W's Mikey Narda reports Corona virus may push that date back starting a school year during a pandemic requires more support by and four school staffers, says Superintendent William Height. And he says that could delay the scheduled start of school by as much as a week. Height says one consideration will be staffers who may have experienced a loss due to the virus. I am anticipating when individuals get back and see their colleagues, there will be some emotions. That individuals are having to deal with, so there's a need to do training around well, there's a need to have supports around those things, Height says. In addition to extra training around this infection and social distancing protocols, teachers will receive guidance on equity and confronting racism. The district comes out with its back to school plan and possibly and adjusted school calendar on July

Superintendent William Height Philadelphia School Mikey Narda
Trump: Children are taught in school to 'hate their own country'

Doug Stephan's Good Day

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

Trump: Children are taught in school to 'hate their own country'

"Trump takes aim at what he calls a new far left fascism. To the sound of the Washington Post March name for a newspaper he frequently attacks President Trump took the stage beneath huge bus of four of his predecessors. Fora Mount Rushmore Attack on what he calls a merciless campaign to wipe out our history. Our Children are taught In school to hate their own country. Mr. Trump welcomed by several 1000 supporters sitting close to one another very few wearing masks and Mr Trump saying little about the pandemic that has killed about 130,000 Americans. Tom Foti. CBS

President Trump Tom Foti CBS Washington
Why Did the T. Rex Have Such Tiny Arms?

BrainStuff

03:39 min | 1 d ago

Why Did the T. Rex Have Such Tiny Arms?

"With a name that literally means tyrant Lizard King You'd assume that tyrannosaurus rex would get a bit more respect, but the giant predators disproportionately small arms have been the subject of ridicule for decades there are also a scientific puzzle more than one hundred years after discovery of this species, experts still don't know why huge animal one that could reach lengths of forty feet, or twelve meters, or more had four limbs. That were much longer. Longer than an adult humans, if the arms were limp muscle free pegues, it'd be easy to assume that they serve no purpose. However, the evidence hints at a more complicated story, a few studies have argued that judge by the muscle scars left behind on T. rex limb bones, a full grown dinosaur could curl more than two hundred and twenty pounds or one hundred kilograms with each one of their biceps then again. This isn't as impressive as it sounds. Thomas R Holtz of vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Maryland tells us that some people like to overrate Tirana sources upper body strength that figure from before only translates to about one point. Two five percent of the dinosaurs total body weight, which may have been in the ballpark of around eight tons or eight thousand kilograms. Holt says that's like a two hundred pound or ninety kilogram man proud. Proud of the ability to curl two point, five pounds or one kilogram on these grounds, a few experts have concluded that tyrannosaurus arms were either functionless or seldom used, but not all paleontologists by this idea for his money. Kenneth Carpenter of UTAH. State University thinks the little limbs made great hunting tools in two thousand, eight, he and fellow paleontologist Christine. Lipkin impaired the five to source rex wishbones. For years that were known to science at the time shaped like a giant boomerang. Sits between the shoulder blades, three of the five wishbones that carpenter and Lipkin studied show, telltale signs of injury, among these were stress fractures, which must have re healed in life. So, what does this mean well? According to carpenter? The fore limbs were subjected to a great deal of repetitive stress, which was not uniform or steady, instead there were moments of extraordinarily great force applied to the arms. The likely explanation is that t rex used its fore limbs to grab hold of large struggling prey, a plus sized thrashing victim could easily fracture the carnivores, wishbone, or at least tear a few arm. Arm Muscles loose other ideas about the purpose of T.. REX arms have nothing to do with subduing victims. One School of thought involves naptime perhaps after a good night's sleep. Taran disorders use those arms to push itself up off the ground, or maybe they had a sexier function. Henry Fairfield Osborn the paleontologist who named the species back in nineteen o five believed that males used their four limbs to grab hold of their mates as Holtz and others have admitted. There simply isn't enough evidence at this time to conclusively refute or verify any of these notions, such is often the nature of paleontology.

Kenneth Carpenter Thomas R Holtz REX Henry Fairfield Osborn Lipkin Tirana Taran Holt University Of Maryland State University Utah Christine
Review finds Mike Gundy's relationships with players lacking, not racist

Marketplace

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

Review finds Mike Gundy's relationships with players lacking, not racist

"After a week's long investigation. Oklahoma State University officials say there is no evidence of racism in the school's football program. Jessica Gahler, her reports. The school released a statement on its findings. Oklahoma State University athletic director Mike Holder says football coach Mike Gun date needs to build stronger relationships with his student athletes. But found no signs or indication of racism Holder statement comes after star running back Cuba Hubbard, who was black, called Gundy out on social media for wearing a T shirt with the one American News Network logo on it. A far right news channel has been critical of the Black lives matter Movement. Gundy, who was White, previously apologized while appearing in a video with Hubbard. The player said he might boycott the program. His tweet garnered support from current and past OS you players

Oklahoma State University Gundy Cuba Hubbard Mike Holder Football Mike Gun Jessica Gahler American News Network Director White
Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell arrested in U.S.

Morning Edition

03:39 min | 2 d ago

Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell arrested in U.S.

"Close associate of the financier and convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein is under arrest today. Her name is Gillian Maxwell and just a quick warning that some parts of this story or really disturbing because of the nature of the alleged crimes. Prosecutors say Maxwell helped Epstein sexually exploit underaged girls have seen died in prison, and authorities ruled it a suicide. But the investigation into what he was doing his continued. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following this story. In the meantime, he Ryan Good morning. How did Ah, Maxwell and Epstein know each other? Maxwell comes from a prominent family in the U. K. Her father was was a media magnet there. And she and abstain met in the 19 nineties. They dated for a period of time, but on a broader level, she became a close confident of hiss. They had a professional relationship as well. And there have long been allegations in lawsuits brought by Epstein's alleged victims that Maxwell for years helped abstain recruit young girls to be sexually exploited on even after Epstein suicide last year, prosecutors said that the investigation is, you noted, continued into his associates and possible co conspirators, and Maxwell was seen then a za likely person of interest for investigators. She's facing federal charges now what are the charges? She faces six counts in all, including conspiracy to entice minors to travel to engage in sexual acts and conspiracy to transport miners. To engage in criminal sexual activity. She also faces perjury charges for allegedly lying about her role in the scenes activities when she was asked about it under oath during a deposition a couple of years ago. What are prosecutors saying about what they allege? She did. Well. The events detailed in the indictment took place between 1994 1997 on they relate to three underage girls who were allegedly abused by Epstein. Here is how the Acting U. S attorney in Manhattan, Audrey Strauss summed up Maxwell's role. Mansell played a critical role in helping Epstein to identify the friend and groom minor victims for abuse. In some cases, Maxwell participated in the abuse herself. Prosecutors allege that Epstein and Maxwell had a sort of systematic method for luring these young girls in they would pretend to befriend them by taking them shopping by taking them to the movies by asking about their family or their school life. Maxwell would encourage the girls to let Epstein pay for their travel and their education, and prosecutors say that this was all part of a scheme designed to make these young girls feel indebted to abstain. And once Epstein Maxwell had developed a report with these with these underage girls, prosecutors say that Maxwell would try to normalize sexual abuse in a couple of ways by undressing in front of the victim. Or being present when Epstein was sexually abusing the victim on in at least one instance, as we heard, Strauss say, prosecutors allege that Maxwell participated in the abuse herself. Okay, so she's arrested now she's been charged. Does the investigation into Jeffrey Epstein stop here? This is not the end of the road. The top prosecutor in Manhattan Audrey Strauss, who I mentioned earlier said yesterday that this investigation is still ongoing. Of course, this case has generated a ton of public interest, in part because I've seen had ties to a lot of prominent people that includes Britain's Prince Andrew. On. There are questions about what Prince Andrew, for example and others. Other prominent people knew about absence activities. As for Maxwell, she has serious charges here. This sort of charges that could induce her to cooperate with prosecutors and share what she knows about other associates of abstinence.

Jeffrey Epstein Gillian Maxwell Audrey Strauss Ryan Lucas Manhattan NPR Ryan Good Perjury Prince Andrew Mansell Britain Prosecutor U. S Attorney
NFL to play "Black anthem" before all Week 1 games, reports say

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 d ago

NFL to play "Black anthem" before all Week 1 games, reports say

"The NFL plans to have a song described as the black national anthem performed on the field. The first week of the regular season. More from CBS News correspondent Steve Futterman has been performed by many great vocalists, Aretha Franklin Beyonc. On numerous church and school choirs. Now the National Football League reportedly plans tohave the song, lift every voice and sing what many call the black national anthem performed before each game during the first week of the

National Football League Aretha Franklin Beyonc Steve Futterman Cbs News
New York City Opens Some Streets to Outdoor Dining on the Weekends

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 2 d ago

New York City Opens Some Streets to Outdoor Dining on the Weekends

"To pandemic re opening, many parents think too much time has been spent on thinking through how to reopen restaurants and and bars bars will will not not enough enough effort effort has has been been spent spent on on getting getting school's school's open open again again in in the the fall. fall. Mayor Mayor DiBlasio, DiBlasio, who who hesitated hesitated to to close close the the schools schools when when the the pandemic pandemic hit, hit, says says they they will will re re open open in in the the fall. fall. With With mandatory mandatory face coverings and other precautions. Schools will be opening in September. Mayor De Blasio says face coverings will be required handwashing stations deep cleaning in schools and using every space inside for schools that cannot accommodate all their kids. By definition, some kind of staggered schedule. That piece will be determined with the school's that's ongoing conversation with the unions. The mayor, also announcing 22 city streets will be turned over to restaurants on Friday nights and weekends Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. Fifth Avenue in Park Slope, Little Italy, Mulberry Street here in Manhattan. Think about what is possible Dining streets in all five boroughs with more to come, the mayor doubling down on outdoor dining because for now, indoor dining just isn't possible. Al Jones 10 10 wins news.

Mayor Mayor Diblasio Mayor De Blasio Al Jones Park Slope Little Italy Manhattan
Montgomery county police investigating dozens of sexual assault and harassment claims by students

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 d ago

Montgomery county police investigating dozens of sexual assault and harassment claims by students

"County School students. We're hearing now from the head of the school system. In a letter to family sent out last night, Montgomery County Superintendent Jack Smith promised action in response to hundreds of allegations that were posted on social media last week, with students claiming they had been victims of sexual misconduct by their teachers or fellow students. Montgomery County police are investigating and Smith said the school system would launch its own investigation into each viable report and take the Necessary steps in response to what they find. He's asking parents and students to report any information they have saying. The most direct way to do so is to notify their school administrator neck in L E w T O P News coming up safe, beginning stressed for

Jack Smith Montgomery County County School Superintendent Administrator
How Much Equity Should You Give To Your Partners?

Marketing School

04:54 min | 3 d ago

How Much Equity Should You Give To Your Partners?

"To another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil, Patel and today we're gonNA. Talk about how much equity you should give to your partners and I. Think Neil this maybe a good way for us to start this off after we kind of talk about a little bit is to share stories. Yeah, so equity guys just to recap. What percent of the company should you be giving to potential partners and I think the high level answer to that would be depends, but I think it'd be helpful for you guys to get an idea of how Neil I have thought about this historically and how we've done things, so neil you WANNA start. Yes so I'm a big believer and basing on value if you think someone is. Doing a lot of work, carrying majority of the way, or they should get majority of a are doing very little work. She get much lower of equity if they're doing half the work and pulling hathaway fighting half value than give them fifty percent, the reason I would vary it a law and don't always look at it as you deserve the majority or you deserve, the least amount is if someone else is doing the majority of the working. They're carrying the company and you do very little, but you own a big chunk or more than half eventually they're not going to be. Happiness can create friction. And then eventually the business can end up going to zero or does not work out on the flip side. If you own majority an were, you can also think about the opposite way as well right so in essence well I've learned and I've done so many different business partnerships says it has to be equal based on the value and effort that each partner is providing, and that could be one partners, providing more money or do. Do More work or they're bringing more deals are revenue. However, you want to slice dice. Yeah, and one way I think people might be thinking. Hey, like what if I want this to be an exact science? I think it's tough to make an exact science, but if you want to do it, there actually is a way to make it a lot more mathematical. There's a website I, think it's called slicing pie so slicing it. Slicing Piedras actually a book on do and basically you actually have to record how many hours you're putting in for the year and I think at the end of the year it calculates equity you got now. That is much more mathematic, but to Neal's point. Let's say somebody joins a company and they want equi now I think it's good to entertain the conversation, but really it's basically a negotiation. You're having so okay. You want equity in the company. How much do you want? Okay? You want twenty percent. Okay? Why do you want twenty percent? Okay, how? How much work have you put in so far? How much money are you going to put in now? If it's really zero zero, starting out I'm just joining because I'm talented. That's hard to compute because if the companies are doing well, you've been doing it for five years. You put in the sweat equity and you put in the money already and this person just come in and say I want this. I think they're probably being unreasonable, but if they're being reasonable, then continued negotiation. I think you've gotTA. Make all parties. Happy on that front, so I. I think with partnerships in the past. We can just talk about our partnership here. Neil like fifty fifty right down the line, so that's true so in general. What do you do with all your partnerships? Because you have multiple partnerships, some are less than fifty fifty summer more than fifty fifty. How do view it? Yeah, so let's look at the software side of things so originally it was two co founders that this is for click flow so I starting out with sixty percent, and a he started out with forty percent of the company and the reason. Reason for that was because I was using my social capital, so I was getting people to put in money for the company secondly Ozzy Mike Capital as well third was using my social capital to get US customers at the same time, and so he thought that was more valuable, and he also wanted me to handle the recruiting financing division all that kind of stuff, and he was going to handle strictly to technical side of things, so that's how we split it that way and we agreed, and it was fair to really know fights on that front. Have you ever had business partnerships, not out and people are fighting and arguing yeah. I mean Oh single rain. Were you were a partner before two? Yeah years ago. Why didn't it work? Single Green didn't work out I guess or the Partnership Workout Right? There's many reasons why the company didn't work out, but why the partnerships not work out partial didn't work. This is my opinion. I think the level of work was not distributed. Some of the people that had equity were no longer putting in the work, and so that actually caused issues friction, because it was like I'm putting in this world and this person just kind of sitting on the size I. think there. There is kind of that going on, but at the same time the company wasn't doing that while anymore. Period because of all the algorithm updates that google was making so cash was coming in, so that led them more stress and people were just like. Forget it at this point is like the company's not really worth anything that was where I think it landed, and then there were five partners as myself a zoo and there were three other people, and that's what happened. Look, at the end of the day business partnerships are GonNa go to ups and downs, oil and a finding out is equity mainly becomes a problem when you're making money when you're not making money, no one really cares for some reason. Even when partners are all happy when money starts rolling in dozen people get greedy and picky and have issues, and that's why it's not structured fairly at the beginning, it creates issues wants money is trying to be made.

Neil Partner Eric Su Google Hathaway Ozzy Mike Capital Neal Patel United States Green
Photographing Fine Art Nudes, with Cam Atree

This Week in Photo

06:21 min | 3 d ago

Photographing Fine Art Nudes, with Cam Atree

"People. It's welcome to another episode. I'm here with Cam at tree. He's in Australian based photographer. Who is kind of talented? He's very talented and knows his way around shooting both shooting nude women and boudoir that whole genre, as well as the business side everything, so we're gonNA. Take this interview food standpoint of. Hey Tell me how I do this. If I want to get into it and tell me, what if I WANNA shoot? What are the different tips and techniques? You can throw at me and some of the pitfalls that I might want to avoid cam welcome to the show man how you doing. The great thanks for having me along on the shots. Really pleasure to be here. Yeah, no, it's the pleasure is all mine I'm. Impressed and humbled by your work it is. Fantastic. To notes, not no a link to it in the description for the youtube video and in the blog post for this episode, so people can see for themselves what you're doing over. There but no very good stuff man. With these kind of interviews when you and I literally just met a few months ago, so I want to start with kind of an introductory. Introduction, so tell me how who is chemistry. How did how did YOU COME TO BE? Be The photographer. Today! What was that trajectory? I guess it was kind of. Ingrowing to me as I was growing up, my father was a cane, amateur photographer, and mostly he was interested in landscape and wildlife and nature, and that's how I started, and I studied photography after left school because it was anything I was really interesting. And For quite a while, I was pursuing the wildlife route I did a trip to and toxic air and Africa and places like that and. But after a while realized it was really difficult to kind of make, make money out of wildlife photography less your. And I had the backing behind you to be up travel. Nine months of the year kind of thing so. I didn't have that so eventually. I started shooting Patriot people. Generally on a pretty shy guy by nature, so took me a little while to get used to sort of photographing people. Actually started by accident. One of the local models just getting started contacted me randomly and speed. Portfolio shoot with Aaron. Literally had about three people photos on my website. At the time. This would have been back in the early two thousands around two, thousand, three, thousand four. and. I saw I fell in love with it pretty much. Try to why you know. I love the interaction working with her, and eventually started shooting some of her friends and then eventually. Should sorry get rid of? All, these other APPS. No you're, you're fine. You're screamers is perfectly finalists. I can't cook. So yeah I started shooting some of her friends and. Then eventually around her at two thousand four, I think to identify of I, did my very first art nature. One of the goals asked me to shoot some nude, severe and then. Then I started working with some. Traveling professional new models from around Australia and always hoped can. Soften shooting out nudes, nasty around two thousand and five. I love that I. Love I. Can you know with that you're you're. Obviously an expert at what you do, and you live and breathe this every day. They're like we talked about before we started interviewing. There's a stigma that's associated with photographing nudes so. I wanted to dive in and hopefully demystify or least shed some light on it. And I'll put a fine point on it, so there's there's. Boudoir in no, no particular order or hierarchy, but people people look at glamour photography. They look at boudoir photography. They look at Fine Art, news and then far away from this stuff is the porn stuff which is yet for that purpose right so sharp demystify that world for people that that see it all as one thing. Yeah I think a lot of people just aren't exposed to the whole breadth. You know they get exposed to pornography mainly because it so freely available on the Internet. And for a lot of people, that is the only reason to look at a Nike woman. Or Man in some situations So a lot of people with that. Kind of an art of talk background. Really exposed to the artistic side of it. And, that's something that I would love to see become a little bit mainstream, and that sort of realize that the human body is is nothing to be ashamed often, and we all have one and you know we. Appreciate everybody's. Body equally and. But it's a difficult thing especially when you're dealing with. Different People's upbringings whether it be religious aspect or just some sort of. Morality in in their lives as they grow going up. And a lot of it obviously counts stems from the parents, and what sort of things they instill in growing up that. My parents I wouldn't say they were. Extremely Liberal. and My mother My father. He Pasta idea about eleven years ago now but. He was. Extremely proud of. What I've become as a photographer. and My mother is proud as well but. She's see limits has exposure to my work. Would agree. She appreciates I love, and it's my passion, and and also my career, but. She. She Looks at some of the images but. She keeps it down to a degree so. I can understand you know. Not Everybody is totally comfortable with, but I think. If they understood the differences. It would make. Difference in how everyone accepts it, we'll put A.

CAM Youtube Africa Fine Art Nike Aaron Australia
The 7 Remote Work Trends That Will Impact Your Business

Marketing School

04:20 min | 4 d ago

The 7 Remote Work Trends That Will Impact Your Business

"Welcome to another episode, of marketing, school I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil. Patel and today. We're GONNA. Talk about the seven remote work trends that will impact your business, so we're still in the thick of it five twenty eight. This is may twenty eighth twenty twenty, so there's there's been a lot of chatter about remote work, and we believe it's going to continue right like so eric and. And I? Believe with them opening up more more stuff were already seeing a trend of covid spreading more in resurging backup. Sadly so Moyo working is a huge trend yard seen companies like twitter. Saying you don't have to come back to work if you don't want to. Yeah, so I guess that's that's really the the first one right there. It's I think there's GonNa be a lot more. People can't twitter. People look at facebook's people saying like Oh. They're saying you don't need a comeback for the rest of the year. Whereas companies like Microsoft are kind of waiting and seeing what develops I think what's going to happen is some people are still going to have a semblance of an office because I was looking at a twitter poll the other day I I think actually heating, put it up. He jaw and couple of thousand people responded to it. Maybe it was somebody else, but it was basically saying. Saying look how many of you are would like to come back into office. How many would like to go purely remote? And how many of you want a hybrid? The vast majority of people picked that they wanted to go. Hybrid and I think hybrid is the motto of the future sure he can socially distance, and all that but I think coming to the office, maybe two or three days a week under the other days are remote i. think that's what's going to work and before turnover to uni all. The Israeli government or Israeli scientists came up with a smart model saying hey, why don't you try a four ten model meaning you come into the office four days a week virus six fourteen days to incubate so four days. You come into office the other ten days. You don't come back and then boom. You're back again like next next. Monday so I. I see that potentially being an option as well. That's. The other big trend that I see is people are moving towards different communication channels like. I know in our office. We used to have so many meetings. The amount of time people spend on meetings at one point was just so ridiculous. Start enforcing policies on how many people could be in meetings because we don't want people wasting time in meetings versus actually getting work done and when you look at this is what we found. Is that people using zoom more slack? Mormeck soft teams more, they're actually getting more efficient and people are learning how to get work done from their home. Same Time we've also found that some people aren't good at working remotely. Some people are amazing at it. Others aren't so with your business. You're going to have to figure out how to adapt and how to help people transition and teach them how to work remotely 'cause not everyone's used to. Yup and then this is number three. Number three cut into Neil's point. I would say. There is zoom fatigue or Google meet. Fatigue is very real right now so i. just mentioned like I think. The last time recorded this the week before maybe that week. I was camping out at twelve calls. They even know how it got to that point where Mike. Allen Rogers booked up, but at the very end of the day as just. It's straight up like depression and like I feel like it's Friday every time that happened so I. Actually see less zoom meetings happening so sometimes what I do now. Instead of doing zoom calls I say hey, let's just do a phone call, and then that way. You don't have to keep looking at the screen. The whole time goes. By the end of the day you're just you're the vegetable so I see I. See changes happening totally number four. Another big thing that you're going to have to start. Taking into account is hours. So what we're seeing is businesses normally would be open from eight to five or whatever the hours may be, we're seeing. People are starting to work more sporadic hours. They still may be getting the work done, but they may stay earlier. Finish later or start later and finish earlier and just be more efficient work less. Less hours in one day, but the next day they may end up working quite a bit more hours because they're also adapting to their family life with other people being in their homes, their kids or their kids having to do zoom school calls, so they had to be there for the kids and help them through that as well so I think one thing that your business has to learn how to adapt to. Is People not working eight hours consistent and working during random hours and time and as long as. As they get the work done, you shouldn't really complain much or have much base. You

Twitter Moyo Eric Su Patel Facebook Israeli Government Microsoft Google Neil Allen Rogers Mike
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

01:17 min | 5 d ago

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"Graduated. In two thousand six. I'm from new. York and went to Boston University and They. It was just a generalized film education, and this was kind of at the dawn of host Wes Anderson. People care about movies and this entire generation of kids who didn't know what they wanted to do. Who probably like a generation earlier would have been sociology majors? All of a sudden film school becomes this huge thing. Post interesting Emerson have an impact. I feel like there was there was something in the water at that moment where arthouse cinema surge bleed into mainstream. And there was this Jason Reitman was. Was Doing. His thing is consideration of like twee as a as a lifestyle brand Lake Piso doesn't knows a thing. So I think I think. Film schools became wildly successful, nationwide and and. Everybody on Earth wanted to be a director. I didn't I know I've really had minimal interest in being a a a traditional filmmaker, but I knew I knew I was really good at facilitating, I know it was really good at digesting the concept in the science and filmmaking and communicating that stuff but I didn't want to be a

Jason Reitman Lake Piso Wes Anderson Director Boston University Emerson York
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

00:55 sec | 5 d ago

Expand 2 - burst 05

"Of host Wes Anderson. People care about movies and this entire generation of kids who didn't know what they wanted to do. Who probably like a generation earlier would have been sociology majors? All of a sudden film school becomes this huge thing. Post interesting Emerson have an impact. I feel like there was there was something in the water at that moment where arthouse cinema surge bleed into mainstream. And there was this Jason Reitman was. Was Doing. His thing is consideration of like twee as a as a lifestyle brand Lake Piso doesn't knows a thing. So I think I think. Film schools became wildly successful, nationwide and and. Everybody on Earth wanted to be a director. I didn't I know I've really had minimal interest in being a a a traditional filmmaker, but I knew I knew I was really good at

Jason Reitman Wes Anderson Lake Piso Director Emerson
"school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

02:10 min | 2 months ago

"school" Discussed on Business School

"Thousands of entrepreneurs on every single day. On I'm an investor and adviser to some amazing companies. In fact entrepreneurship is in my blood as both. My parents started a business out of our one bedroom apartment and grew it over many years, so you can see I literally lived in like a business school. and. That's one of the many reasons why I'm super excited to launch. My New podcast called the business school show very simple. I wanted to do this short trailer episode to to share with you why this is a a must listen show for you and more importantly how this can be. Continuous business mind that you have and you've always wanted to stay plugged into so every week. I'll be sharing episodes specifically designed to help. You do these three big things. Got To find a way number one to grow your business strategically number two to build your brand. elegantly a number three. Most importantly to integrate the prophets in your business to hopefully have an overall joyful life, right? Listen. You don't have any time for fluff. And if you've been with me in my universe for any amount of time, you know that I'm no fluff. No gimmicks straight up truth Kinda Guy. This is about a new kind of business school that I wanNA share with you where we literally bring everything to life, it's about like actual strategies and tactics about the technology psychology, and even the exact scripts that we use. Look I went to business school I get it, but what I've learned outside of business school has helped me tremendously and I. Really Want that same thing for you. I'm also going to be bringing on brilliant minds for my personal advisory board, my personal network to help you get the most from this podcast as well so do me a favor. Be Sure to subscribe wherever you're listening to this from, so you don't miss out on any of the upcoming episode just smashed that button and I would be super super thankful if you shared this link to the show on social media and just tack me that way I know. Keep an eye out for episode one. That's coming very soon right here until then. My name is shree signing off on the brand new business.

advisory board
"school" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"school" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"Mitch Bell or knew early on. He was going to stray from the beaten path. After all when you grow up in a tiny village Manitoba Canada. That beaten path doesn't lead to many places now teaches people how to draw through online courses under the moniker. The Pencil King of course stories of royalty not always began with once upon a time when he finished art school way. Back in two thousand and Mitch didn't go to his own graduation instead. He hopped on a plane to China. He taught English to support himself but he quickly figured out that. Instead of giving private lessons he could teach kids in groups at a discount to them but more overall money for him cutting his workweek down to eight hours I gave him plenty of time to pursue his other interests Tai Chi and three art improving his art skills in the off. Time meant that Mitch soon landed a job as an artist for a Chinese studio one that supplied art for big video game companies such as EA and activision and then during a holiday they trip back to Canada. Mitch ask himself a fateful question. How can I make money in my sleep back? In China Mitch had to balance his day job with his burgeoning side-hustle he would wake up at five thirty. Am every weekday working until eight thirty when he had to leave for that job even though he was paid artist he he was nervous about putting his workout there under his name to him. There were so many other talented artists all over the Internet. Fortunately he had conditioned himself to create regularly whenever he had more time with his English teaching schedule so to keep himself accountable in the face of imposter syndrome. which by the way? We're GONNA talk about Imposter Syndrome very soon on the program. Stay tuned want to keep himself accountable. He said a goal to make new art every day and sure video lessons with anyone who wanted to watch. It is new website. Drawing coach Dot com setup was bare bones. He balanced a tripod between his desk in a window and sat below it reaching up to drop any additional startup. Costs were simple materials. Purchasing runs to the art supply store for less than fifty dollars now. Interestingly Mitch didn't charge for these lessons they were the content that was going to bring in advertising. Money made Google Mitch's first customer technically because their ads for the first ones. He tried putting on his website. It also meant that. Seo Oh or search engine. Optimization was Mitch's second daily Hustle priority after working on new content of course he was learning as much as he could about this so he can understand how how to make his site rank on search engines then. He started writing his own articles. Because it's easier for Google's robots to read text and watch videos. Earnings were small at first drawing coach about thirty dollars a month in those early days but after ranking for keywords and pumping out content consistently the numbers increased. Mitch been about five years off and on growing drawing coach by putting out this quality content and lessons before quitting his job. At that point he was making enough money to sustain a digital digital nomad lifestyle in Southeast Asia plus he had an idea for his next site Pencil Kings Dot com pencil kings dot com. You heard it here first. We're drawing coach was a website with basic lessons that relied on advertising revenue Pencil. Kings was an entirely different new site. Mitch teamed up with other artists offer courses covering topics like anatomy. Photoshop caricature art and more missile charges. A flat monthly fee for access to all. Its course now you might think that sounds great but where would the pencil kings customers come from. Well I'm glad you asked. Because Mitch had a great referral network. Already set up to build subscribers. It was a simple shuttle. It would convert some of the traffic from drawing coach into customers for his new site while some of the links and ads on that first sites point the other companies a few well-placed ads for Pencil kings sent thousands of visitors each month. This established the new site a sort of logical next step in a young artist S. Journey. It's also use some of those same tactics he's already learned focusing on. Seo after growing pencil kings he added a third project. This one was called evolve. Artist artist replicating his success converting students from drawing coach to Pencil Kings. He uses evolve artist as a way to teach the business fundamentals of art for this one he partner with another well known artist to create the lessons freeing up time for him to focus on strategy instead of focusing on just one side at a time. Mitch keeps all three running for one simple reason. They all generate income altogether. The sites bring in more than six figures a year in annual profit and while Mitch believes in investing wresting. Back in the business. He takes enough to support himself and save for retirement plus. He gets to work with fellow artists every day. The Pencil King's reign appears secure. Cure and Mitch is living dream..

Mitch Bell Mitch Manitoba Canada Southeast Asia Google China activision Cure Tai Chi partner Photoshop S. Journey
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

13:02 min | 6 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"Design and production in the privacy of your own home or on your own laptop in my closet or closet right so yeah that was a big part of it. I mean I was not going to spend two and a half years on this and not have it sound as good as possibly sound right. I mean I didn't know anything anything about how to make it sound good when we started this and I'm completely deaf on completely deaf in my right ear so that's a little bit. It's been fun. Yeah which is a challenge but made it work really great and by the way very little money I get. I don't get any extra salary I get paid to be executive director. Max Max has gone months without getting paid. We've had to scrape for foundation dollars and still we have more money to raise going forward. We're we're also trying to do community based outreach with this so it's a lot yeah so we WANNA close out. And I know y'all are not supposed to have favorites Ritz and would love for you all to share with folks if you have a favorite If you have a favorite interview right like it could be. You could be because of a person Jason or because of a thing they said everyone at this point knows that I love the net Robinson getting bit story but do you. Do you have a favorite interview you from this experience. Yeah I do and particularly because we were not able to use most of it so if I ever have the opportunity ability to to somehow share out or make something make something else. Out of our interview with Veronica G She was a twelve thirteen year old student at junior high school. Seventy one during Otieno Brownsville. You heard her in episode three. She's the one if you've been listening to the show. She lived right across the street from the school. And when things were really crazy the police would come through her apartment to go through the window to go up on the roof to be up there with snipe like two snipers up there like anyway so we heard it. We heard from her about that on about her experience in the classroom. What it was like for her to have teachers but she's completely fascinating being really incredibly warm person with a really interesting life? I mean her experience at school was super interesting because the you know there was a lot of work going on around around black pride and black history. And she's She's biracial her and her. Her mother is white and she like that was that was that made it actually challenging for her and this is like there was no. We didn't have the space for that in the In the show but one of my favorite one of my favorite things we've gotten to do actually is is that So a lot of the tape. That's episodes two and three the ocean. No Brownsville. Stuff comes from the Archives of Henry Hampton who was the filmmaker behind eyes on the prize is which is this landmark many many many episode civil rights documentary on PBS late eighties and early nineties and mostly we use interviews from eyes on the prize but there was a bit uh of footage dislike raw news footage that they shared with us from you know like police officers outside junior high school to seventy one and I was looking through it and it it the the camera pans from the school to across the street and the building across the street and you can see through the window like a white woman in the window and I was like okay and Ocean Hill in nine hundred sixty eight. That's probably not that many white women poking their head out the window and smiling. I mean just like a beautiful mhm straight and I called her on again. I said come over here. I want to show you this video. I think I don't know if I told her I thought it was her mom or not but she came over here and we showed it to her she. You know her mom's been her mom's passed longtime ago. I don't think she has anything like that. So that was that was was one of the most special moments to me in this process. That's so powerful for me definitely again. I won't reveal it but when we found our connection to Otieno Lebron's villages maximize when we found our our connection that was that was that was fascinating interviewing my uncle. My eighty seven year old uncle. And you know he'd forgotten a lot of things but it was just. It felt emmy feel sad that I had gone all those years without talking To the to my father to my uncle to all my aunts and uncles who are part of Oceano Brownsville. Never once put a mic up to them and ask them their experience so that was important that that that was captured even if he had forgotten a lot and then of course Adderley Sanford not just the interview itself but just the whole experience of going up there and being in her apartment which is like a museum itself you know And have this ninety three year old woman to speak with such clarity imprecision imprecision. And so I don't say articulate. Just her total recall was just fascinating to me and yeah I think that again that resonated with other people as well recall and conviction I mean absolute conviction about what what children need And do not get and why they don't get it. Well Mark Winston Griffith. Max Friedman. Thank you all so much for just this this gift it really talking to you all makes exit really clear. How much love and care with which all have done these interviews and just Maldon them into this story to give to people central Brooklyn Heights but really it sound like anyone who's interested and education race and class? Yeah hope so great so so if you have not listened to school colors yet you need to go. Download it right now available wherever you listen to podcasts. And if you like it half as much as we love it. Leave a review on Apple podcasts. Plus some stars on we know Israel you know what I mean. So.

junior high school Max Max Otieno Brownsville Oceano Brownsville executive director Brownsville Max Friedman Brooklyn Heights Otieno Lebron Henry Hampton Adderley Sanford Apple Veronica G Israel Jason Mark Winston Griffith Ocean Hill Robinson
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

14:16 min | 6 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"Why did the Teacher's Union react so strongly to what they were trying to do? An Ocean Hill Brownsville. And one of the answers. That's out there and I think to give credit where credit is due. I think the person that I talked about this with was a historian named Dan. Perlstein that his one of his his ideas about it is that probably what happened in nineteen sixty eight would not have happened exactly the same way or with quite the same ferocity if not for the previous year. Nine hundred sixty seven was the six day war in which the young state of Israel was attacked by neighboring countries and miraculously people like to say thought what those countries back very quickly and not only survived but took over Jerusalem and the West Bank and create a lot of problems that we still live with. This day I nine hundred sixty seven is really really pivotal to American Jewish identity to American Jewish the American Jewish ship to whiteness the into the development of American Jewish masculinity which certainly is very like formative thing for me. And that's something that I that's that's a that's a huge topic I would love to get into And we've actually done a whole. We've done episode on sort of black Jewish relations for lack of a better term or dynamics and that doesn't that's actually topic that interests me like the the intersections between black identity and Jewish identity and who gets to claim being the oppressed and I find the whole thing fascinating myself as complicated and I'm happy we're starting to get into identity named that. You know you're very different peas in a pod right And Mark You your Executive Director of the Brooklyn Movement Center. I feel like I've heard of it. It's you know where a black self-determination organization right. So what is it. What did it mean to you to partner with Max? WHO's not black? You haven't if you just tuned in your like what would it mean to partner on this very black story with someone who who is in black. It's not something we've ever really talked about before but you asked the question it was it was a lot actually. I mean you can't talk about. You can't have a podcast EXPLO- self-determination and not be conscious of the contradiction of having a a white person and someone who's not from central Brooklyn who's part of not just a part of the production but like his half of the production right and so I I I was. Doin' always hesitant sees and you know In the beginning I wanted to be the primary post of the podcast. Cast not not really because I wanted my voice but because I just I felt strongly about there being a black voice that Wa- that was centered on this and the the more we went through the story the board became obvious that having Max be a part of it just added an element dimension that it would have completely lost headed. Just been me and we you know you can't have the sound of the. There's no sound of one hand clapping right. If you you talk about race relations you know you can. It's not just about black folks. But it's about what they are reacting to and so having having a person who white and yet is not unconscious you know what I'm saying and who has a sensitivity to a lot of these issues who spent time in this neighborhood. I think Max was the perfect person if we're GONNA have a white person on this podcast. Max was one. I'm to bring in and you know you know you've been you've been a member of BMC for years for years you've been to walk through through this very black neighborhood lots together. So you're you're very conscious as mark said of your whiteness right and have worked in schools in central Brooklyn and so what does it been like for you to interact with your whiteness and this very different platform you know. In some ways I think by the time we started started working on the podcast sort of used to it like I develop enough of a practice. I'm thinking about my own whiteness that I think what's been interesting since we started putting it out is hearing people react to that like the reaction to myself identifying as a gesture fire which is just like something that I'm used to doing because it's self evident to me is is like all right people don't do this and I don't mean to be like Whoa so I've got it all figured out. That's not the point. I just yeah I mean I also so like like I'm an only child and I'd like to like thinking talk about myself like I all over. I hear you know the the idea of picking apart the pieces of what makes me and the difference between sort of how I feel and how I how I present what I think in Heim perceive. That's it's all just interesting to me. Yeah and the fact that we talk about Jewish identity and what was perceived as anti Semitism during Otieno Brownsville. The fact that we talk about gentrification it was really important that Max identified himself in certain in ways and I think that if I'm not mistaken some people push back against that right. It's like Oh you know. Why are you coming on this on the on the show in self identifying fine as fire and I thought I thought it was a courageous move and I think it was? I know you don't want to hear that right. I just think we could not odd preceded in a certain way without that acknowledgement right and I think it just freed us in many ways and I think part of what you're saying about Max being the ideal white person to do this really is also about. There's humility there right and identifying as gender fire in a way that's almost else flip it but very humble right that says like am identifying ginger fire. But it's not like identifying a male feminist right like it's not self l.. Celebratory in this showing up like I did my work. y'All I`Ma gentrify it out. Nobody wants a black neighborhood. Nobody cares about that right right right the story. And you're clear on that but I do think it's preaching to the choir but like one of the privileges of Whiteness is that you don't have to go around like you know naming or having named for the identifies the the the identities that you hold. Yeah every every almost everything in our culture is designed around the idea that the consumer of it will be somebody like me so it's surely the important name what that is and and understand there's something specific and distinct. That's so true because I think that on in some ways I wear my identity on my sleeve and I think that it would just obvious if I'm going to be involved in this production. People assumed and that I was going to talk about myself in in the Indian to section with the story but I think people may not have expected that from you right and for some. I'm for a white person. Come on a show like this and be very open and transparent about their identity is something that most people are just not used to mark. What is it like for you? I guess doing doing the work that we do today as organizers in two thousand nineteen in central Brooklyn to be I mean most most of most of the episodes on the present day haven't come out yet which is why we're talking a lot about the history but what was it like for you to sort of go on. It feels as some. It's fills almost like a glory tour of like Black Self-determination district right like I hear Ocean Brownsville. And I'm like this. What was going down? The civil rights movement Breckland in like a rice movement was at you know I hear the episodes about about the ease right like you there. There is glory torn. What was it like for you to to go back so important? You said that it was so self affirming you know I mean I as we tell stories realizing this is stuff. That's kind of like bursting interesting Outta me that I've been wanting to tell for such a long time It's such. It's so deeply sort of connected to just my my spirit my spiritual tool being here in central Brooklyn and so yes. We're telling history but for me it's self expression and I have I just I feel stronger every time each episode comes out and every time we tell the history and people respond to it in the way that they do. It just makes me feel prouder of this work. Then I have of most things. I've done particularly activism work which is always I'm usually you're more strident you're like you're so righteous. This was more humbling and more sort of more acknowledging of our weaknesses. This as much as our strengths. I don't mean to call it. A glory tour. It's just they're not perfect brownsville density or there wouldn't have been more up it's on the inactive pride. Though I mean you know I mean yeah I I'll just leave it at that. Yeah it feels like such a beautiful marriage of the you know. We hear often people talking about our resistance and like this beautiful storytelling. It brings so many dimensions to work. We often understand as writing. Talking points for press conferences or sending out emails to get members right like you all are able to zoom out and really give us the texture of what organizing I think actually looks like over a span of time. That feels so difficult to grasp when you're going to a coming education council meeting just saying you know we we call ourselves a citizen journalism outfit and I think what was really exciting for me. I don't see we gave voice anyone. You know people have ahead the voices already. But it was exciting to put a mic in front of the in front of people who are just not used to having Mike's in front of them and for people to hear them. I wish we could have done more of it because with you. And if there's anything comes out of this work I just hope we get to do a lot more of that Vami too and while all this talk about doing more now. We're not actually going to get there quite but I mean what you have done. We've are in named has been an incredibly your professional piece of work right and I know the budget has been low because I'm the voice on the podcastone people to give money talks about wettest like doing this with like basically no bread but it sounds like some NPR shit okay. We're going to like. Do you really want us to curtain behind with with the wizard is Mike. I'm reluctant to say it but look let's just put it this this way. I mean we were half of this half of what we recorded was done. Did you hear the. Did you hear the cars in the background. Okay that's what makes citizen journalism. Listen we spend a half the time in a professional studio here in Brooklyn really lovely sound and then we realized that the sound that we could get right here at the office in a five by five closet was actually very good. So we're literally in a closet. Yeah we're we're literally recording in a closet and what the closet allows us to do is also more flexibility. I mean we can keep going back in there when we if we we need to the last minute. We don't need to put time right but yeah so. We're we're recording closet we. We've had to pause on several occasions with the recording because our landlords children saying location several all the time we at the time recordings. It has to be weekdays like before too when the kids are at when the kids are at school so this House request. I don't think people I have to say I've been working in building now almost three years or four if you can if you include these this research I have never seen these children at at one point when we when we first moved in here I was like they must be Leprechaun many. I remember when one of them was born. Yeah so today. We're we're recording episodes. Six and we add like our whole plan for the week to get done by. Friday was to record Tuesday Wednesday Thursday. Good morning well. Tuesday morning turns out today's election. Day Right as a holiday. Their heads are at home and they they were. They were having a really fun today. This is what we he got their oath to bring quality for real quality journalism. Yeah and that's what's so lovely about it because you know like you said the people look and I'm going to be putting Max and elise on the back more. They just they just know what the hell they're doing. Technically and that's the beauty of this day and age age. You hit a truck in the background. We can't do that for every once. The honks better than this. This conversation is good. Say So yes we. We're on this low budget and we're dealing with all these issues. But I think you know I think we have to give some real acknowledgement to Max and Elise Hu were working on the technical end of it and who made it sound so good. And that's the beauty of this day in time where you can do professional level Sound.

Max Brooklyn Brownsville Ocean Hill Brownsville Brooklyn Movement Center Israel Perlstein Jerusalem Dan partner Executive Director Otieno Brownsville West Bank Wa Mike BMC Heim
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

12:56 min | 6 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"Different voices in that episode in the first draft of it and she thought we were insane? Mom because that's just not really. How particularly with audio when you can't put a face to a name? It's hard to. It's hard to do. It's not that's not really. There's not a lot of stuff like this in audio where you have that many different voices and we pared it back a little bit but ultimately I think most of those twenty two voices are still in there Because I do think actually the the number of voices is part of the method. Take this is that there are particularly with ocean no Brownsville but also with how things are how things work today. There's so many different sides to both like if people who who are trying to work the system from different positions but also like. There's no one way to see any of the issues that we're trying to talk about. Yeah and like you said along the way we had to make choices and there are some people who we felt really strongly about but ended up on the cutting putting moon floor and at the end of the day. We had to choose voices of people who we thought you know the listeners. We're going to resonate with a WHO. who were whose voices were going to resonate with our listeners? And like maxine would pop and would help tell the story in some ways representative native sink terms and so rather than try to. Just you know again. Include every voice we were we were somewhat strategic in trying to choose the voices that we thought told the story in the most comprehensive way possible and I think all the way through. We've been trying to balance this. I think both of us mark and I have the impulse goes towards like wanting to do something really comprehensive. I mean we really kind of love to nerd out and get into the weeds. Yeah Yeah and I and I think that comes through in the show and have it be really emotional to do. Both of those things to same time has been really hard and I hope people feel like you succeeded. In into that. To that point I think to the most important characters in there are maximum me. Yeah and or maximum. I should say and we made a conscious decision for this to be a little bit different. Then then you're sort of you just Dry kind of Journalistic approach we wanted. We wanted to put ourselves in there because we all have relationships with a lot of these people with these issues so we are journalists but we also have a stake in these issues. I think the outcome is that it really feels like the the two of you are guiding us through this community rain like I think having all of those voices having all of those different perspectives really really creates creates a fullness of community right like I feel these characters right like when when an Robinson those someone in her school board meeting like visceral. I'm there. I'm against everything I could. Just tetanus shot afterwards yeah right just about to say that Robinson was I well. She's been a lot of things she's been a school board member. When you had the old the board of education she was a city council person she was a state assembly person and she's just sort of a venerable figure on the central conceit very well known very well respected? I'm talking about somebody right highly dignified right and yes she goes in and it's fun to listen to. Yeah Yeah and that that's juicy right like and you've gotten really good tape from a lot of folks who are well respected right. I mean you had interviews with Adelaide Sanford who is a local legend but I think is not necessarily although well known outside this randy and particularly after episode one came out so many people they were like. Oh my God athlete Sanford. Where did you find? So she's definitely one of these stars out there right like you would to Philadelphia to talk to her. Went to her apartment. Spanish panicked like two or three hours with her ninety three years old. That is dedication right. Like you interviewed Nicole Hannah Jones whose genius literally certified MacArthur. I exactly right. Yeah Right. Yeah so the the interviews are really they feel like a strong driving force here and and then as we said you all are shepherding through this community through these interviews. So you know I if anyone who's listening in any of the promotional materials for school color. There's the logo which is really awesome. And then there are these black and white pictures of this black white guy and I look like a little bit of an odd couple right like Max thirty-something white guy who's been in bed stuy for less than a decade mark. You've been here you've been in Crown Heights your whole life here Ebonite in your thirties so nice of you. I'm north of I'm right. I'm I'm north of the thirty s so lovely north of the things so so so yes so on the surface. y'All look like a bit of an odd couple Tell us a little bit about sort of what y'all have in common and what drew aalto partner here. It's quick question. I mean the things we have in common. I think are not obvious right like you said on the surface we seem very different Khun different kinds of life experiences. But I think honestly like half or maybe more than half of the reason that we've stuck through this stuck with this for so long like you said two and a half years through various phases of funding and no funding is just because I think we like hanging out MHM speak for you but you know we got a lot about that a lot of the same things related to the podcast and not related to the podcast. Yeah and now we have a shared love in movies and storytelling in plays and drama. Week out like like Max out about a lot of the same things but I think we also in our hearts are like you know desire to be story tellers and I think we both have similar sensibilities in terms terms of you know history storytelling in a love for this community. And it's the shared interest in values that I think was the glue and like you know I'm excited. We like hanging out and you know he's become part of my family. I mean When I went on vacation this summer the show had to go on maximum Jamaica with the laptop? Exactly I you know. Last night. He was sitting at my kitchen table eating with me or my youngest son and his friends. So Oh you know we've just become a part of each other's family and there's I think there's so much more that overlaps that doesn't yeah I mean there is a direct connection that we didn't discover until until direct action literally between our families that we didn't discover until we were more than a year into production. We shouldn't we shouldn't so three Max like don't talk about. I think we both also we. We really believe that at the universal is to be found in the hyper local. Samar that well you know when we met Max this was a graduate student I was here at EMC and he came to be emceeing and got me and BMC to work work with him on his master's thesis and I think it was there that we sort of started. Discover how much how interesting central Brooklyn was. And how interesting Brooklyn wasn't how. How interesting like this fight for self-determination and this moment we're in in terms of gentrification? That's all hyper local. Cool and very few newspapers or publications are really tackling things in that fashion and we just saw such an opening for this rich storytelling telling that we jumped in with both feet and some moments have been a little overwhelmed by it to be quite honest with you but but yeah I mean to me to us these. It's a hyper hyper local. But if there's an entire university you can discover there and I think that every city has not every city has has ocean browns in terms of the the the scope and the impact of that event but every city has been sti- Every city has an has an Robinson or a few of them uh-huh you know like the the the way that we're telling the story. I think it's a way that stories could be told that communities all over the country and I and I hope and believe that the stories that we're telling about Bettstein Central Brooklyn will resonate resonate with communities all over the country and say this one last thing I mean what I think really draw us together is complexity right. It's like if this had I've been like a simple thing of right and wrong or you know this white versus black. We wouldn't have been interested but there's so much contradiction and complexity layers. Here's to this whole thing. We just and be quite honest which we have to stop ourselves because there's only so much we can burden this podcast with but you will find find. That is the driving force in all of this our our need to just to find a complexity and deconstructed. I'm going to do a really sort of I'm just GONNA go for it in fiddler on the roof. There is which I've been thinking about a lot. Is We've been making this podcast because there's this recurring something. where the main character fiddler was a musical from the sixties he gives these monologues to the audience where he says on the other hand this on the other hand that on the other hand that other thing on the other hand that and that that's that's us all the time I'm making this thing Like you said we have to stop ourselves because we could other hand to other hand other hand forever. Exactly yeah. It's such a to describe your working relationship ship around your love of complexity I think is just such a beautiful foil to the story that you're telling him and you know on the other hand uh-huh if you what. What are the stories? And I'm GonNa ask you all day. Enter these separately. What story would you have? Viewed not gotten a tall enough of that you would love to tell more of and the different way and now you might be over podcast right now. But what's the story beyond Sir beyond the whole school colors universe like someone something that's on the cutting room floor of this. I mean you've uncovered so many stories and there's so so many tangents that I feel like you could go off on and just explore and do an entire creative project on so if you know tomorrow macarthur's does your a genius. You WANNA go explore creative project that comes out of school colors. What what story would you want to tell you? I know what I would go on. Tell us and this speaks to my own sort of personal stake inness. I've been in this neighborhood. You know like you said it's not just I've been here. I've I've worked in this neighborhood for a really long time. Worked for elected officials and a few years ago ended up running for office and found myself on the the opposite side of the political establishment of political establishment. That I've been on some level when I'm earlier's idolize for a really long time and that to me like the the political class in central Brooklyn and the middle class and how they've gone from sort of revolutionaries these two part of the two holders of the status quo. I think is really fascinating and says a lot about where cities are today as as far as where they started with activism and how a lot of that energy has calcified and people just power God good to them and the the oppressed became the oppressors on some level. So I would love to tell the story of central Brooklyn and it's political class because again and I've I've I've seen it up close and personal like I said my other podcast is called unsettled. And it's about Israel Palestine Jewish Diaspora And I there's a there's like a little worm hole between the two podcasts. At a you wouldn't see unless you knew where to look for it and it's in episode three so so the as you said the version Brownsville. Anthony that you grew up with was black Community activists wanted to fire all these Jewish teachers which is not exactly really what happened happened but the fact is is that the teachers union which was primarily Jewish. Went on strike against this experiment community control and the one of the questions actions that I think is impossible to answer in just one ways..

Brooklyn Robinson Max Brownsville tetanus Bettstein Central Brooklyn Philadelphia Israel Palestine Jewish Diaspo maxine Adelaide Sanford Nicole Hannah Jones Jamaica Khun Crown Heights partner representative Anthony randy Ebonite macarthur
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

13:06 min | 6 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"To subscribe to Third Rail. Wherever you get your podcasts piece everyone and welcome to Brooklyn DC third rail where we tackle political and social change issues that impact the lives of Central Brooklyn Knights? I'm Anthony Pierre. Deputy Director of Brooklyn Movement the center and your guest hosting and with us as always is our engineer extraordinaire gypsy the Creator producer and Co host of the hangover hangover takeover gypsy. Now if you've been listening from jump you might remember me as a co host from the early days and it's so oh good to be back with just for this one episode while Marcus and the guest seat so on today's show we're going to be going inside the highly acclaimed podcast school colors and then of course as always will end the show with tell me why you mad so full disclosure. I'm completely biased at love this podcast and I'm so looking for words are giving out with this behind. The scenes interview with the host is school. College is so fascinating and I've been listening for the last two months. Hopefully along some of y'all so school colors is a little a little bit different from third rail starters. It's a limited series of just eight episodes and as a documentary is kind of like cereal except us about outrace class and power in American cities and schools through a central Brooklyn perspective. Just like surreal so one school colors there's co-producers and Co host is of course. BMC's executive director. Mark Lynton Griffith who is just chiming in there. And other CO producer and Co host Max Friedman and is a longtime Brooklyn deep contributor and Brooklyn Movement Center member so Mark Max. Welcome to rail up thank you. It's nice to be on the side of the Michael uh-huh Y'all acting as we haven't been working in this room all together brought into my house. The podcast US true is true so so educators parents. BMC members honestly just regular folks who live in central Brooklyn. Keep hitting me up so talk about how well well done. This podcast is I think is really different for people's a here just really high quality journalism about events happening like right in your neighborhood and and I've been hearing a lot of that excitement so for folks who haven't heard any of the episodes yet. Max Mark What is the story. You're telling still school colors so like you said school colors eight episodes and it's about the way that the this neighborhood has its changed and evolved less hundred hundred and fifty years has changed the schools here along with it and how the schools then have changed the neighborhood And how looking at all of that can help us understand. Stand the way that Americans not just New York City work and don't work particularly for black folks. Just add that you know when Maxima I I started thinking about this what was sort of our trigger on some levels. was what was happening in central Brooklyn Right now. That is the background ground of gentrification charter schools and a lot of sort of power struggles within the district and the more we wanted to tell that story the more we realize allies we had to go into our history. So half of the half of the podcast takes place pretty much in the present and the other half look at the history of look at basically how we got to this moment and I should say this moment when you say this moment in the immediate kind of news hook for that. Is that Community Community School District Sixteen which takes up the eastern half a bed stuy with a little slice of crown heights is drastically under enrolled. Schools are basically half empty and fifty years ago. They were so so overcrowded that students had to go with the students had to go to school in shifts so we started out shifts shifts like half day. Oh that's that's one word for you right so we started just started off with being like what what the hell's happening and It just opened one hundred different doors that we felt like we had to walk through right so yeah so the whole the whole series is in some way an attempt to answer the question like how did how did the schools get so under enrolled in a very concrete storing. We try to untangle all the threads from it. Yeah I mean so you mentioned that the first half of the story takes place in the past so in China untangle all of these threads how did you decide like what what points in history should you tell the story from right. Like what's what's relevant about the history to encapsulate in four episodes. Well I would say one thing. One incident particular that takes up to whole episodes woods episodes. Two and three of school colors is the Ocean Hill. Brownsville Oceana Brownsville decentralisation well Brownsville community control oh fight and that was one thing that maximize both were very aware of when we went into this and knew that we were going to have to tell that story. You can't talk about whether it's unions and the rise of charter schools and this conversation around community control and decentralisation. You can't tell any of that story without looking at Ocean Hill Brownsville. I so so I know that you spend two whole episode talking about how Brownsville for folks. Who are listening? Who may not have ever heard of air? Don't have an understanding. Did you give us one sentence. One sentence I know yes well. So there was an experiment and community control of schools in Ocean Hill Brownsville around so so there was a community controlled school governing board. The Teacher's Union believe that that governing board had abused their power went on strike for seven weeks in the fall of nineteen sixty eight. It's still the longest teacher strike in American history. They say they were going on. Strike just for the rights of workers rights and a lot of people believe that they were striking against students of the color on the way that that shook out profoundly shaped the school the school system in a city great. That's more than one sentence I apologize. No it's totally fine so so that that was a real central part of the story. What else is a real important part of the history of telling the story of district succeeding? Well I WANNA say the part of the reason that that's such an important part of the story is because because I think you can't totally understand the tension today particularly around gentrification actually charter schools entered vacation without understanding the deep profound. Long struggle for self-determination in this community particularly as it's been acted out through the schools and that starts with Ocean Hill Brownsville also although actually go back before it starts actually about one hundred years earlier which is something that we discovered doing research. which is that well? I didn't discover weeks. Also but if you've been listening to this podcast for a while you probably have heard about we so before which is the An independent basically autonomous self sufficient black community that existed On the other side of Atlantic Avenue in the starting in think around in the eighteen thirties and so in episode one. We talk about the school that was their colored school number two And what it meant to have sufficient black school here and what happened to that school when European immigrants move in to central Brooklyn in the eighteen seventies. These people have to listen and to be clear we could have started before. Then I'm sure I gotta sit down a marker somewhere so we started with one hundred and fifty years ago ago. We could've talked about the draft riots so we started with weeks for which a lot of people who live in central Brooklyn might be aware of because there's a whole the heritage center dedicated to the preservation of the memory of weeks Ville but there is definitely not a heritage centre dedicated to the preservation of community control and ocean till Brownsville this. That's true right and I think actually a lot of people who live in that area in particular Ocean Hill and Brownsville. Maybe I don't know about it. We talked to people who live there have lived there. The whole don't know about it and I think there are actually reasons why that stories and doesn't get told and that's part of the reason why we felt. We needed to tell it. Yeah I mean I grew up in Brooklyn I grew up right right next. Brownsville and Brownsville a lot had I basically understood or Shahal Brownsville as some black folks didn't want Jewish teachers teaching their kids. which is I think y'all do a very good job deconstructing? The what's wrong with that. Narrative often gets sold about ocean. Hill Brownsville so when you So when you all told the story of Shell Brownsville then moved into the east right so and and some other pieces so tell me a little bit more about where you at historically there there. Yeah I mean we we start like we said one hundred fifty years ago and then we sort of jumped to Ocean Hill Brownsville. And then you know which happened in the late sixties and so and even actually before she no Brownsville. We talk about tempts bussing attempts in in central Brooklyn kind of what led to the experiment notional Brownsville in after original Brownsville. Like you said we talk about the community of the East which was a sort of alternative black nationalists. Cultural Movement meant that not only began here in central Brooklyn but had its roots in Ocean Hill Brownsville and a struggle for self-determination. So we talk about that and the schools. They opened and how they were working in parallel to what was happening in central in in New York City which was an attempt to take this. Experiment Bereavement of community control water. It down and then apply what we call decentralisation to New York City so such which that there was some semblance of autonomous I'm GonNa say autonomy but some kind of assembly of local control in school boards across the country. Sorry sorry across the city and so from there we you know we we trace everything from there From from the seventy s until the present day. And what's been like just piecing the story together. What was it like? It's been exhilarating. Exhilarating and exhausting. Yes do you mean like personally or do you mean you know. As far as the craft it does concern of putting putting together this podcast. Well if it feels important to share with folks y'all have been working on this for two and a half years formerly an idea. It's been four years so this this has been a huge chunk of of you all's life right and when when you know a few things come across when you listen to podcasts. It feels very professional office very well done and very high quality journalism. I ready start by saying I'm super bias as much as I want and you know one thing that feels really impressive when you listen to the trailer is there's just how many voices you hear. It feels like you interviewed a ton of people so the with more than sixty people. Yeah so you did sixty interviews. What was it like pouring through all those hours of tape? And and how'd you even decide what to leave on the cutting room floor. Well the some of the stuff that we left on the cutting room floor were interviews that we didn't need the beginning when we didn't know what they didn't know we were doing the wrong questions. And the sound quality was banned so that was easy But other you know having never really done anything like this before I mean I have another podcast called unsettled where I've cut my teeth. A little bit on the craft of this but definitely definitely there were there have been people along the way who we spoke to. Who in some of this is them and some of this is me? They didn't come through as characters characters and I think you know people told me this but I've only it's only really sunk in through doing this. Doing the work is that you know people can have look really extremely articulate opinions about things and kind of express to you yeah opinions and and and they can have a lot to say without coming through his characters and actually we've been incredibly lucky because we knew how many stories there were in this community to be told but we didn't know that the people that we were gonNA talk to it'd be good would be such great characters and they have been for the most part. I mean we've met. Yeah just incredible characters people who really pop I think in in the podcast. Yeah and that was part of the decision making process like you said we had sixty folks and yeah. There was some that sort of fell by the wayside because we didn't ask the right questions because the sound quality was bad but there were a lot of others that we could have included on here and we had to make. We had to make a conscious decision. It's like do we just flood this with voices and have it. Just be a parade of voices and that would have would have highlighted all these people but it really would not have made for very good listening. Well I got to say I mean shadow to elise splinter. WHO's been our who's been helping US edit and San Antonio Knicks this thing when we first brought to her particularly was the Ocean Hill Brownsville piece when we first started working with her on this last year I think there were twenty two.

Ocean Hill Brownsville Brooklyn Brownsville Shell Brownsville Central Brooklyn Knights New York City Brooklyn DC Shahal Brownsville Community Community School Dis US Ocean Hill Third Rail Co Brooklyn Movement Center Anthony Pierre Marcus Deputy Director Creator producer and Co BMC
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

03:05 min | 10 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"And migration to bed stuy really picked up on the new a train along Fulton Street allowed black refugees from an overcrowded Harlem to make their way to greener pastures here in Brooklyn. The train was so important to black life in New York City. Got Its own saw. Ooh Must Take the age ray to go to him way up in Harlow. Take you for a while though bed stuy was racially integrated what changed that was redlining. When I learned about white flight in school I learned about it as a process that only started after World War Two and as the term white flight implies all all the responsibility was laid at the feet of individual families. Who fled the city to the suburbs? The real story actually starts about a decade earlier and surprise surprise centers on some shady backdoor back-door deals to try to get us out of the Great Depression. The federal government agreed to insure mortgages to get banks to start lending money again and get the economy going but the feds wouldn't you can put their money behind just any old loans so in hundreds of American cities local real estate and financial interest got together to draw maps there would show where it was safe and unsafe to to lend each neighborhood was given a letter grade. Each letter grade was indicated by color on the map was green be was blue. Sea was yellow. Andy was read. That's where the term redlining comes from in all of Brooklyn there was only one green neighborhood and it was where nobody lived and nothing had been built yet so there was limitless this potential to make money the implication being the presence of any people at all would bring value down and some people more than others along with the map came a description of why each area received its grade frequently citing racial and ethnic makeup in D. rated neighborhoods. They'd say things like Negro. Concentration or influx of Jews and communists wasn't wasn't subtle as a result of this the white people who could get out got out and the people of color who couldn't and for those left behind it became almost impossible impossible to buy or maintain a home all this got much worse after World War. Two hundreds of thousands of black Americans came to New York from the south as part of the second second great migration fleeing real terror and looking for factory jobs when they arrived the handful of neighborhoods where they clustered like Harlem in the Harlem of Brooklyn Bedford Bedford Stuyvesant were at the center of a perfect storm of disadvantages the manufacturing jobs southern migrants had hoped for were disappearing into the globalised labor market white people we're leaving for the suburbs with the help of the Gi bill and the Federal Highway Program and with the white people went essential city services quote unquote slums were cleared to make way for modern public housing but the modern public housing was built on the cheap and never properly maintained and thus bits die became known as ghetto.

New York City Harlem Brooklyn Brooklyn Bedford Bedford Stuyv federal government Harlow Andy Federal Highway Program
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

04:54 min | 10 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"Schools we just want at the same resources as the other schools have that so for colors. I'm just laughing because the debate you hit the same debate eight hundred and fifty years later the same thing. Should we keep our kids in color schools so the color schools even have the name in colored schools in eighteen sixty nine principal Junius Morrell hired a white woman Emma prime to be the assistant principal which set off a huge debate within the community these as quotes come from letters to a local newspaper at the time there were educated black ladies compelled to accept menial positions at six eight dollars a month while here was a position one of them ought to have held by plight woman the tax payers of weeks Ville. The colored folks supported the school and and they ought to have black teachers the board in its wisdom having selected a white teacher will well satisfied with her and to discharge on account of her color simply would place the colored folks in a strange position. She was labor and with success to instruct their children and this is kind of in the context. It's also funny because the color schools actually sean had white students in them and they had for years. Julia read to us from a report from eighteen fifty three. You'll have to excuse me language the old as has been before hinted some paleface children attend this school the committee observed four boys and one girl who who were unquestionably of the pure Caucasian race besides several other some doubtful origins so at a certain point there was a debate about whether are they should throw the white kids out of the school because it was like like if it's GonNa be a color school then maybe we need to actually move all the white students out always a white population and weeks by eight hundred seventy the white population black population there nearly neck and neck with each other and then later on the white population definitely surpassing there was a huge wave of immigration from Europe and more and more of these immigrants came to Brooklyn after the Brooklyn Bridge was built meanwhile cullet school number to change his name to sixty eight but it was still mostly black and still operated out of a kind of one room country schoolhouse so oh Brooklyn still at this time its own city independent of New York was going to build them a new home but the nearby public schools were severely overcapacity and local white families petitioned. They should get the new building. They also argued of course that increasing. The size of the colored school would decrease their property values under pressure from these parents. The Brooklyn Board of Ed gave the new building away way to the white school. PS Eighty three initially the building was quote unquote integrated in a sense that you had to call at school on the first floor and the white school on the second floor but inevitably the colored school wasn't getting the same resources as the white school so families at the call at school came up with a plan to essentially integrate the schools by force they decided to register in mass ask for the white school not the coats but what that would have man would have been the and also of colored school number two and people had mixed feelings about that their concerns about the black teachers concerns about the control over education and what it would mean to just be an general school and not necessarily have that out leadership probably. GonNa think to yourself or the teachers that looked like my son or my daughter. Would they learn to take pride in who they are but at the same time audy's teaches competent will they learn skills is is very very similar to what's going on today so the school was integrated with an integrated teaching staff and integrated students and a black woman system principle but the neighborhood kept changing. We went for a walk with Alphonse who the neighborhood once known as weeks bill. This is like a on the hub of weeks old life so that's according to Troy Dean Street this right here behind. You is as you see it. It says public school eighty three right there. It's an imposing building with carved stone around the windows and doorways abandoned now. Broken Windows is public school eighty three. It's about to be turned into apartments in the eighteen hundreds black families in weeks. Ville had owned homes and land which they used used for farming and raising animals with a turn of the century as the city became more and more urbanized and more and more European immigrants moved in weeks full lost its independence homeownership homeownership and job opportunities declined most of the black institutions of weeks vote closed or moved away and weeks fill itself was mostly forgotten so even though weeks bill is now basically considered a part of bed stuy or at least bed stuy adjacent but has its own history after the break.

white school Brooklyn Bridge principal Brooklyn Brooklyn Board of Ed Junius Morrell Ville Emma prime Julia sean Europe New York audy Alphonse six eight dollars fifty years
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

08:14 min | 10 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"We really get started. I want to tell you a little bit more about who we are where we are and why we're doing this. If each borough of New York words on City Brooklyn would be the third largest city in the United States after L. A. in Chicago and at its center is the largest urban concentration Asian of black people in the country exactly which neighborhoods make up the area we call Central Brooklyn can be debated but the historic core of it is Bedford stuyvesant and crown heights a my routine not run deep my grandmother and her siblings born in Jamaica. I came to Crown Heights in the forties and fifties I was born here. My parents moved to Queens when I was still in elementary school by made a very conscious effort to return after college in nineteen eighty five at the time mainstream America Sodas ghetto ghetto but I we saw the beauty strength the grit to walk blocks and blocks and see nothing but black people celebrating themselves to see their culture to eat their food to patronizing businesses. That was everything to me so that's why I want to fight this place. I've started in run half a dozen community. ORGANIZATIONS WORKED FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS DONOVAN RUN for office here myself in two thousand eleven. I Co founded the movement center a black lead community organizing group fight discriminatory policing Organiz ten in is to push back against abusive landlords and were even building a neighborhood own food corp but it's really just our way of surviving gentrification is a feels like we as black folks here are endangered endangered species. I get people see the Brownstone treeline blocks the profound sense of history and community. They want to be a part of it. People see the value here but for many that values predicated on getting rid of the low income black people were inconveniently still around bed is now listed fifty percent black. It's what I've always seen as so beautiful. It's evaporating. My roots run deep to my grandfather came here with his family. In the nineteen twenties they were choosing grants from what's now Ukraine and they landed in Brownsville to southeast of bed Stuy. My mom was actually born in this area but my grandfather and his brothers and sisters sisters they all got out of the old neighborhood and never looked back so I didn't even know that family history here in Brooklyn until I got an adult markets funny one thing that we have in in common that we both moved here right after college but it wasn't such a conscious decision for me to be honest. I only really came to bed style because I got priced out of the neighborhood next door but once I arrived everything that you're describing is what I saw the Brownstone and the tree lined blocks and the pride I saw how what made the neighborhood beautiful and unique was being celebrated and erased at the same same time and I understood that was part of that and I understood that it was much bigger than me. I've been here for seven years now. Teaching New York City History in public school classrooms all over the city using theatre to organize against discrimination in housing and health care eventually. I decided to go to Grad School of urban design and I knew from the beginning. I wanted to use that experience to learn more about this place place right live but also to contribute something to the fight that you've been fighting your life having been both agenda fire and a teacher. I was especially interested in the relationship between gentrification and schools and I saw the website of the Brooklyn Center that you were doing some parent organizing so that's what brought me to you and we had done some research district sixteen at Emc a few years before you showed up but I work had been basically either ignored or blocked by anyone who had the ability to do anything with it which is a story. We'll get to later anyway. I wrote my thesis. Listen when I was done. We were both like okay. I think we need to put this out into the world and that's how this podcast was born. We felt like we had stumbled upon something this rich and uncomplicated unique moment in the history of this neighborhood and city that we wanted to capture and share real time and the more we learned the more we knew that we have to go back in time wave eighth back in time to fully understand what's happening now all right then so we go two weeks. Ville so a lot of people who are me especially those who live in Brooklyn they said Oh. I never heard of this. I think people for some reason surprised when they hear that there was a free black settlement right here in Brooklyn. My name is Alfons Fabian. I am at soy educator at least from Heritage Center but Weeks Heritage Centre teaches the history of weeks though a free were you black settlement founded in central Brooklyn almost two hundred years ago. Let's back up for a second. The first Africans arrived in New York or as it was known at the time New Amsterdam as the property the Dutch west India Company in Sixteen Twenty six when the British took over New York became even more reliant on slave labor for by seventeen or three New York City had the second highest highest proportion of slaveholding families in the colonies up to Charleston South Carolina after the American Revolution New York state passed a series of gradual emancipation laws starting in seventeen ninety nine and in eighteen thirty eight a free black man named James Weeks bought two plots of land in Brooklyn. He wasn't the first but he got his name on the place. The men like James Weeks who came to central Brooklyn and started buying land subdividing and selling it to other free black men they hope to create a social and economic refuge for black people from an unfriendly white world dass what the original land investors had in mind like some sort of free space a safe space for black people in this country but it wasn't an entirely separate as project owning land in Brooklyn would also enable them to take part in politics according to eighteen twenty one st state constitution for free black men vote. They had to own at least two hundred and fifty dollars worth of land. This is a very vibrant self sufficient community in the eighteen sixties sixties and eighteen seventies as a self sufficient community. They established a number of institutions churches an orphanage a Horford elderly cemetery insurance companies the newspaper later on they own baseball seems there was the headquarters of the African Civilization Society a back to Africa movement seven years before Marcus Garvey even came along and a few doors down from that there was a school so we're looking at a concrete wall that says no dumping do not trespass the not litter do not graffiti. It's got barbed wire on the top and I believe it's a New York City Department of Transportation Tation depot. Some it takes up damn near an entire city block and it looks pretty kind of trouble it. I'm taking in the. I don't know what you want to call it irony or whatever uh. This is the site where colored school number two the second school for Black. Children Brooklyn was located as of eighteen forty seven. We I do know that. Language has changed around this. We're going to roll with what they use back. Then the earliest free black schools in New York City were in Manhattan and they were developed by. I guess what we would call benevolent benevolent whites but Brooklyn was different. We don't know exactly who started colored school number two but we do know that they were connected to a network of black leaders who are actively ably cultivating these schools as an expression of community uplift actually have some pictures this audio so Julia Kaiser's the collections Sion's manager at the weeks. They'll heritage center. It was a small school and it was mixed ages like when you see those pictures of like the country schoolhouse. That's that's kind of what it was like. When we think of all black schools now we immediately associate them with overcrowding in bed quality less than white schools but by all accounts the color schools in Brooklyn serve their students well the principle of colored school number two for many years was Junius see morale he had been enslaved and he went to Philadelphia. He was very very active in Philadelphia. He was active in the colored conventions movement. He was a writer from Philadelphia. He went to Albany but then Albany public schools were integrated in the process of integrating their public schools. All of the teachers that were in that black school lost their jobs. I call the school number two. They were having debates and discussions Russians. That would sound pretty familiar to us today. They were asking themselves should they integrate into public schools and while other saying no we need to keep our color.

"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

03:10 min | 10 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"My name is Mark Winston Griffith. I'm an organizer a journalist and a public school parent. I was born in Central Brooklyn. I've been working here for thirty five years. My name is Max Friedman. I'm a teacher an audio producer. Anna any gender fire together we've been to dozens of public meetings and interviewed more than sixty people parents teachers and administrators politicians historians and activists my landlord and Lord my uncle trying to figure out what's going on here and what it means. We started with what seemed like a pretty straightforward question. Why is enrollment going down in district sixteen but nothing here is straightforward. You could blame it on the quality of the schools themselves. I have a big issue with people constantly saying district sixteenths will suck they suck they they don't you could blame it on the competition from well-funded charter schools shining themes and if you showed us a shiny that's the way they want to go. You could blame it on gentrification bed. Stuy is changing and a lot of the people moving in either. Don't have kids like me or send their kids elsewhere. The thought of even considering a public school in this neighborhood in our neighborhood was unheard of you know no only ever think about doing anything like that ironically. If more parents like Sarah Joe Hanson or convinced to choose their local school gentrification might actually resurrected district which would also contribute to the racial economic integration of at least one corner of New York City's deeply police arrogated school system but in Bedford stuyvesant one of the most iconic historically black neighborhoods in the United States integration writing on the coattails of gentrification might be you're tough sell. Some seat is part of an erasure of black and low income people. I think that every time minority have something good it gets taken away from US and liked to be able to hold onto something. District Sixteen is at a tipping point and what's at stake a lot more than lines on a map. It's the power to control control not only how and what children learn but what kind of city we're gonNA live in and who that city is going to serve and the biggest oldest questions we have is a country about power. I've been tested worked out right here in the schools of central Brooklyn for as long as there have been black children here and that's a long time to plan for community control was renewed renewed black people were capable of running schools. Say will burn the city down. It was a beautiful thing that got destroyed. The government was hostile pressure that we went to church church many of us. This is what happens when you don't have people who you're trying to serve as part of the solution and want us to be puppets heads down when they say the through supper we not having it. What am I doing. Why am I leave my kids at home to go and fight for something that the parents from that school didn't even come out to say your name. You're not born and raised here. You're and I do it di- you just got here. I am white but I am no dummy. What do you think you are. I am a pariah. What's happening in district. Sixteen is happening across awesome New York City and what's happening in New York City. It's happening in cities across the country. We've got eight episodes to tell you all about it. Welcome to school callers.

New York City US Brooklyn Mark Winston Griffith Max Friedman Sarah Joe Hanson producer Bedford stuyvesant thirty five years
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

02:51 min | 10 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"Lohan Roman and lack of demand for instance families and consequently. The deal is proposing that his twenty five close of the end of the school year. This school is just a small to them. It may is big to us but it's more everyone knows. There's only a few children in the schools. They don't think is as serious or just closed down the schools. It was only a couple of children school but you know we see the same people over and over. You know just don't custom to it. They know what your kids need. They know what they lack. Is this beside the closer. What did you think of this meeting tonight. I think is is not gonNa make a difference will we will we say as their mind is made yeah whatever happened. It don't matter what we think's. PS Twenty five is part of community school district sixteen which covers about half of bed. Stuy district sixteen has a higher percentage of black teachers than any other district in the city. The Superintendent is black. Almost all of the principals are black. The schools are named after black heroes and like ps twenty-five twenty-five almost every school in the district is hemorrhaging kids but just three blocks down. Marcus Garvey Boulevard found a very different scene another public school also in district sixteen that appeared to be in high demand brighter choice community school a couple of months after that hearing at PS twenty ninety five and one choice for an open house. The Gym was alive Music Games laughing children why parents most of the parents were black and in fact. I knew quite a few already but there are a handful of white parents as well. My Name is Sarah Johannesen and I'm here with my husband Rogan and my son Raven and we we are here because we apply it to the school for next year so hopefully we'll get in and September. Sarah is originally from Denmark and it's always been really important to us that he went to a place that was close to where we live and that was certainly in the district that we live in. We don't want to send him somewhere else and plus you know the school is great so we're just hoping that he gets in here. I mean it's really good ah I'm really proud that. The school is very popular. I'm really proud that people are looking and vying for spots like people are literally trying to get their kids in here and that's amazing it was the PTA secretary brighter choice at the time and she was excited at other parents. Were excited about the school would some reservations. I really hope people who are are buying for the school who are coming winning their children to be here. I'm really hoping they're coming but the notion of wanting to be part of a community so why would parents be throwing elbows to enroll their children abroad a choice when the schools all around them are desperate for student and if brighter choices doing so well what is CNN Everett so worried about the change is good but we we want people to come in. You fell in love with the car reason Haman and just meld into that part of the reason. You don't need we don't. I don't need the change makers right now..

Rogan Sarah Johannesen Lohan Roman Marcus Garvey Stuy CNN Everett Haman Superintendent secretary Denmark Raven
"school" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

01:42 min | 10 months ago

"school" Discussed on School Colors

"Marcus Garvey's widely considered the founding father of black nationalism born in Jamaica where my own family is from Garvey opened the first yes. US branch of his United Negro Improvement Association in Harlem in Nineteen Seventeen and by nineteen twenty the USDA had chapters in more than forty countries around the world they established the Negro Factories Corporation the Black Cross model on the Red Cross the Negro World Weekly newspaper and the Black Star Shipping Line if you've ever seen the Red Black and green black liberation flag that comes from the USDA Marcus Garvey died in nineteen forty but his ideas lived on from Oakland to Omaha to Brooklyn Brooklyn generations of black Americans were inspired by Garvey to build black businesses and institutions in Brooklyn nor did this ideal of black self-determination. Come more live than in Bedford stuyvesant so it's no surprise then in nineteen eighty seven a major thoroughfare in bed stuy was renamed Marcus Garvey Boulevard but bed stuy dies changing and you can see that change very clearly but in very different ways at two different public schools at both happened to sit on Marcus Garvey Boulevard at the corner of Marcus Garvey and Lafayette right across the street from the place where I do my laundry. There's a public elementary school called. PS Twenty five the New York City Department of Education says that PS yes twenty fives four story brick building has room for almost a thousand students last year. There were just eighty two so on a cold Monday night in February very twenty eight team. I went to PS twenty five for a public hearing there might have been thirty people they're scattered around an auditorium that seats to three hundred before the hearing began a a few kids with handwritten signs just about as tall as they were started marching up and down the aisles.

Marcus Garvey Marcus Garvey Boulevard Black Cross Nineteen Seventeen United Negro Improvement Assoc Negro Factories Corporation Negro World Weekly Brooklyn USDA Jamaica Harlem US Bedford stuyvesant New York City Department of Ed Omaha Oakland Lafayette
"school" Discussed on Sunday School

Sunday School

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"school" Discussed on Sunday School

"You know and that's why actually came up with this that phrase conscious luxury because we realized wow there's actually a connotation here and let's just remind mind people you know there should not be compromise ever in the aesthetics or the qualitative positioning of a product if it is environmentally sound and so in case of Russky you know we have worked with <hes> fair trade gold so working with the tiny little gold in Peru and actually <hes> the miners are predominantly Apopka farmers that just happened to find gold on their last hearsay so they're mining it and all the prophets profits they get from the mining goes into their farming and the entire community the benefits from it you know and it was so sweet we had a little video conference with them and they all dressed up nicely near sued for the video conference decided that wasn't feed and the you know Andy's but it was so nice was so nice that they knew that there somehow contributing to some luxury good product and here they are so far away and try to dress up what we appreciate it so much but we're so and it's Ross we just have to added with my Gosh. We have to source materials anyways so we might as well to source from a sound location and the same thing is also applying to our gemstones. The older gemstones our minds sustainably we have been certified by the Responsible Jewelry Council which does a very thorough audit is to work at the body shop L.. What a great experience? I was a great experience and Anita Anita Roddick was working with some Pharma's in Nicaragua and she was guessing sesame seed from them to make sesame scrub but she had taught the farmers how to follow gallantly not herself. She doesn't know how to form <hes> but she also while she was in the Karakia. She met some some kids who were on a dump who used to municipal dump and they would go and collect bottles on that and she didn't know what to do about it so she set up a schooler for the children and we went to visit the school and it was the most amazing experience of my life because she was so they was so proud of her and she was so revered and these kids were guessing appropriate education they have proper school uniforms and it was like the Queen had arrived when we went to visit it was the most incredible experience and shows how businesses can go above and beyond behaving responsibly they can actually change lives and I thought that was a really good example of that's that's one full story and it just gives me chills you know and so often for us. It's so easy to make that contribution but it's incredible see how huge the positive impact yeah you know again Dan that's a matter of will she had the will to want to have a positive impact in one to make a change in how wonderful and I'm sure that it has a very positive <hes> trickle effect and inspired other people and I really am such it's a shame when when she died obviously shame also and she stopped doing the shop because I think that that passion kind of went with how exactly anyway okay so now I have a question for you own real diamonds versus manufactured diamonds up you really interested to know as Dan and so the same thing then applies in as we're talking about fair trade gold it also applies to the gym industry so as I mentioned all our stones are <hes> responsibly sourced and then one other new category besides being sourced from the earth is of course the lab-grown diamonds and yes it is a fact that lap grown diamonds do use less energy to be grown and certainly people in planet it or not negatively impacted that is just a fact and this is the fact that we're embracing and we're actually stepping into credit diamonds as the next chapter of russkies initiatives within within the world of sustainability but having said all of that we are also and we have <hes> expressed ourselves to the diamond industry that we are very excited to also use diamonds as long as they're sustainably sourced so we are in conversation with the G._I.. which was the Geologic Institute of America to look for those minds and they certainly exist <hes> in Botswana? You know where there are very regulated processes. <hes> diamonds are traceable. <hes> the G._I.. has created an APP. When you buy a diamond jewelry store you can get this APP and you can actually trace your diamond their photographs of the diamond coming out of the mind and chose entire process of what happens to that diamond until it ends up in your ring and that is fantastic and you know it's Russkies these efforts within the credit diamond world has the impact of encouraging minors <hes> or the mining industry to mind sustainably and that's fantastic and we will be their customer you know home and how when when you say about manufacture diamonds how how does manufacturer so they're actually three different processes to are the most popular that's vapor deposition? <hes> in the other one is high heat high pressure her which is the one that's high energy which is really exactly that's totally replicating the natural process by heat high pressure <hes> and then I think de Beers with their plant are really also growing the colored diamonds which I think is really really exciting <hes> right now predominantly it's more clear or slightly brown or yellow that we're seeing coming out of China and India <hes> but I have to say totally appreciate the technology. That's behind it. You know try right. If you're GONNA grow diamond that's hard try to figure out how to make a crystal that is hard. I mean we have these melting pots. That are the size of this building right and we chuck in Certain Chemicals from Potter Sodium Courts and so on quartz sand. That's that's all melted and outcomes would looks like honey but that's crystal and then it goes into the different malls and then we cut it you know that such a tedious intricate process I appreciate the crystal because of its manufacturing and I can only say the same thing about created diamonds. You know I really appreciate the technology in the human intelligence. That's behind it. You know do you think though that that the real diamond industry said when I say real isn't even the right phrase but the mind diamonds <hes>. Do you think that the jury industry is going to be trying to tell us that they have more value because they're older. Maybe in there certainly something about that you know but I also think in particularly young generation or the younger generation they will all have seen those documentaries they will have seen the blood diamond movie you know and I have to say <hes> my mother probably would not by crater diamond but my daughter's only and it's really a matter of the values and the values that are associated associated with the younger generation you know they don't care for its old. They don't they don't care or they don't care if it's old but they care it was extracted and bad conditions and I have to say it was interesting. I was just at the Las Vegas Jewelry Fair last week and had to give her presentation at G._I.. <hes> about this topic and there are a lot of people from Africa that had minds and there were saying well. What about all these artisanal minds you know then the livelihood of so many people are dependent on listen? I said yes absolutely right and you know if we can assign a process of cleaning that up and making sure people totally taking care of intrigue at the Right Way and you know the technologies out there to extract these wonderful <hes> stones from the Earth if we can just apply the more environmentally safe practices. It's everyone wins the you know and certainly I have to say by embracing the created diamond industry does not mean that one dismisses certainly the artistic element you know that's wonderful but <hes> and I just felt in general last week from Las Vegas at the whole injured industries ready to embrace a better process you know and because people are at stake and people's voices are being heard and the photography is documenting. Everything and everyone wants the best so I think it'll it will take up few years but I think I totally believe in the sustainability of extracting these wonderful mill minerals from the earth so you you're celebrating one hundred twenty five years and what can we expect to see is part of your celebration my Gosh and selling we're realizing what one hundred twenty five years out about happen you know in a certain sense. I have to say you have the source retail stores but every time I have asked speak somewhere of course I speak about Swarovski's history and I'm usually mobbed after I speak by people saying I had no idea about what's Russky. Did we didn't know that it was crystals on Dorothy slippers and the wizard of Oz or Audrey Hepburn Tiara at breakfast at tiffany's or unmanned Marilyn Monroe's dress when she sang happy with Mr President different so I think in terms of sauce history we have so much communication to do. We have to communicate about that heritage slow. I think that's what will focus on <hes> next year and you know I think what we really wouldn't position as the fact that we're master cutters we cut crystal. We cut gemstones. We can cut real diamonds. We can cut <hes> created diamonds so really emphasizing Swarovski's craftsmanship its heritage. It's strong long value for quality and then of course what we really want to celebrate are those various different collaborations. We're talking about from the past to the present and <hes> again you know our product truly is so multifaceted. No Pun intended ended so our customers also you know and that is why those different collaborations are so important to continue to show how the crystal can be implemented so many different ways you know in so many different areas with its clothing or fashion jewelry <music> architecture also up cycling. I yes exactly tell me about that. So we're working with <hes> young fashion designers wells working with various different universities like several Saint Martin's the world Cultivar Parsons F._I._T.. And we're certainly <hes> working with the students on the sustainable use of crystal and that means reusing crystal up cycling crystals and we're working with <hes> young designers to do that as well such as Kevin. And get Monier Kevin Yemen yeah has been amazing at <hes> reusing the crystal and still as we mentioned earlier showing an incredibly luxuries product so I think that is really a new unexciting chapter <hes> <hes> it's interesting you know because it's Russky as I mentioned we had such a we have such a strong quality consideration which means the quality control is very strict so not won crystal leaves the factory with a bubble in it or scratch on it and my question is are we to strict with our quality control so if you upcycle crystal it might have that scratch on it and might have that bubble in which you of course can see until you take a loop and look at it so you know for the sake of the planet environment. Oh come on lead me to loosen up a bit but it's simple and penelope Cruz telling me that well we dressed her at the film festival in Venice three or two and a half years ago and <hes> we gave her first our first collection collection of credit diamonds along with our sustainability report and apparently she took really three hours to read that report and we got a call the next day from her agent asking if she could work with us wow and that was such an honor for us you know <hes> to be asked by her..

Russky Anita Anita Roddick Kevin Yemen Responsible Jewelry Council Dan Nicaragua Las Vegas Jewelry Fair Apopka penelope Cruz de Beers Karakia Peru Andy Ross Potter Sodium Courts Africa Botswana Saint Martin Las Vegas
"school" Discussed on Sunday School

Sunday School

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"school" Discussed on Sunday School

"Go. He's all can I say for me. Sure, let's get much done cry. No. But honestly, we literally came up with this idea to focus just before Christmas. Maybe like November Mehanna came to me and said do cost, and then we worked together, and it has been so amazing, and such a wonderful thing to do and to have an opportunity like this. We did not expect this. We did not expect number one genes that we did not expect any of this. And it's because of you guys listening. We appreciate it so much Joe Nikki came to us will we awaiting guys like oh my gosh. Everyone's so lawyer. They were. So we just wanna say thank you to all the plane come in. You so much. Coco can you cook tells public about twenty about twenty five minute health, twelve thirty twenty five minutes. So we here we're going to we will reach. We'll take if if I didn't want to we want to take some pictures of you guys. Can we just do all I need a little something? Everyone to do. I know chair. What people do? I'm gonna put it on the life and lipstick. Oh and was Hanan from Intel. And I'm hoping you little on Intel by the way because honestly you download the so-called because you can download the behind the scenes picture. You can save all the links. So people always asking what was not thinking about on your podcast. I'm like, it's. Baron nova. See what's to is the V talking about. So you can always go downstairs where he could go shopping off to this this and this, but thank you so much for coming. If he's like chairs, we should. But he. So I did the two. One. Can you just say it's the guys on? Thank you, Terry. Thank you, nichole Harvey, Nick. To find out more about coming Sunday school by Harvey Nichols vents. Please Sunday school by Harvey Nichols online. Thanks for listening. And we hope see for the next episode.

Harvey Nichols Baron nova Intel nichole Harvey Joe Nikki Coco Terry Nick twelve thirty twenty five minu twenty five minute
"school" Discussed on Sunday School

Sunday School

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"school" Discussed on Sunday School

"Going. Little live. My name's Orrin. And I'm sorry or. I've never heard it before Arush or in. Oh. Will you stop? And you kicking the grousing. I was just wondering you'll favorite face that you've made up as being old. That's how. One. I'm going to say Shaikha Akon. That's cool. On. A worker festivals. I made that happen. So that I can party off afterwards. Oh, my. Shattuck on five passive eyelashes on her. She had a denim jumpsuit on kind of let us which by the way was owing earlier light vast is amazing. You're going to shed a Denver voted on and full. And that was that was just so amazing. And this isn't actually a face. Where are we going? I can see the people's faces. I'm talking about what to the bridge summertime festive years ago. I was working by sation. Bon Jovi and the Rolling Stones the DeVos me because I let she went to work at seven AM every day and got home at three AM one day. He was like where all us about the tree and. Honestly, the ghost you guys came. We're gonna see Lionel Ritchie you came to goes. Yeah. The guys came. That's that's the benefits of jogging take your friends along some of the really cool stuff, but I didn't do the voting makeup because actually needing we took them out. But now, I was there with them doing that dancers and backing people and stuff like that. But for me shark Akon what bloody icon, and it was sing at her. I. I think I would've Dickey by did. I just kept thinking national check. Okay. What about another power Shaw as long as you can open your eyes? We didn't believe them shot. Yeah. Oh, gosh. I have. So so many pinch me moments where I've had someone in front of me I've been like. So recently it has to be Dame Helen Mirren. Yeah. Because I was so an or of her, and I think I fell in love little bit. And she was so lovely, and I told her about my experience as a young wanna be thespian, not getting drums school, and how my confidence was knocked in just eight levels. I didn't have time for her with fair competition I entered it and my played really old person and educate like, and you have a played the person just want to warn you about Oprah acting. Call much. The I was I was actually crushed. And I told Dame Helen about this while we were on set, and she was like swine, and that like I could cry because my mom used to say swine. So I was like. And she took a photo of my hand because I use my hand as a bit of a pallet. And she's like God. That's amazing. Let me take a picture. I had this big. I mean, it was massive. I keep checking Instagram Casey post a picture of my hand. But she was just lovely. I also learned a really valuable lesson. And that was. After lunch. We were about to film the video part of the day and Dame Helen walk music. Have a toothpick bloody hell, I didn't have a toothpick. And I was like, Robin headlights. Well, and to like the makeup artist always had a toothpick. And. But it's okay, I found part did teeth BIC. But I kid, you know, I will never know have teeth pick ever again. So thank you Dame. Helen bego. That's the motor store. Two more questions, by the way, we are not going anywhere. You have questions after his people. Says shopping the hall. Somewhat terrifies. We're going to put the knees back home. All right after this will probably have like twenty minutes half an hour to kind of stay a couple of drinks, take some pitches executive. Let's take some bitches you guys Nickless high. Look that stealing looks amazing bit. Does you need to your? But you definitely camera. Alice. I did the poem. This is all new competition winner everybody. In the put curse I was like famous you all. Sorry. For being now. Now, go proof. So me. We did. I just say. Can you read out for us? Go on going lease to read the only case you didn't hear it because we do all we literally were by fly. Okay. Here we go. I'm going to. There was one support cost of make up jokes. Amazing. It was leaving everyone broke husbands dealing with beans for dinner, women everywhere. Tried the notional shimmer. Coca canoe was sweeping the nation along with the latest Loria mercy, Laura mercy foundation. So please consider me for this prize before my hobby finds my makeup stash surprise. And.

Dame Helen Mirren Dame Helen Shaikha Akon Lionel Ritchie Dickey Bon Jovi Orrin Helen bego DeVos Denver Laura mercy foundation Shattuck Coca Robin headlights Shaw executive Oprah Alice twenty minutes one day
"school" Discussed on Sunday School

Sunday School

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"school" Discussed on Sunday School

"Hi dies. And welcome to the next episode of Sunday school live on the fifth floor of Harvey Nichols Knightsbridge. Today's special episode is guess hosted by myself Hannah, Martin and the fabulous. Lisa politics from life and lipstick in this episode. We'll be sharing with the favorite picks here from the BBC floor Harvey Nichols and answering questions live from the audience. Well. I promise each other. We wouldn't cry for the baby. Hi, everyone listening. We alive from Harvey Nichols for ever. I mean, this is actual amazing people in front of them say. Oh. So we all live in hogging. It goes we are so far Catta we can have a chat about the awesome wonderland. The is Harvey Nichols. My my favorite place in the world right now. I know I sure I've been here for times this week. Just give me a name badge. And I'll just become part of the star and say, it's one of my favorite places about fifteen my first ever trip to London I came to Harvey Nichols. Just because I love fashion so much. It's always been the beauty mecca. So I came here when I was fifteen and literally I wouldn't go in for about an hour because looking at the window displays thinking my compulsively. The big it's just so surreal for for both of us really to be here. And it sucked a beauty destination. Anything like who were the move them. Shakers in beauty retail is Harvey Nichols. If an what stuff that we didn't know MAC when it was brought to Europe it was bought to Harvey Nichols rest phaser that they are really. It's one of those things where if you wanna try new products if you wanna try Copeland. It's just really cool who's not been here before by the way. Oh, you're in for straight. If I say the beastie who'll as sprawling like your so sport for toys, but then there's a whole other mecca coop on Beatty. Yeah. I mean, the thing is for me personally. I mean, you guys we love make we absolutely love as you guys. Really? I think it's try new things as well. Isn't it? I mean, I am obsessive. Join anything new I get so excited. Even now off to make fifteen years. I just think that every time I get something new. I'm not gonna go just Chuck it on my face. Yeah. Junkie on. So for me, which he goes shut. Lasers cooks. It's got some of these new things that you might incredible each brands that you might not find errol's, but also stuff that you don't have to go to a dermatologist office to find you can find them here. And I and I love the light Ceylon everything everything everything I just think that like for us this is so you know, when like a kid anything to yourself oh favor and a grow for whatever member honesty when I was fifteen just being this is London. I didn't live in London at the time. So this is London. This is so cool and coming up with my mom at the time. He was a model back in the days. She knew about makeup and everything and just coming in here. This is amazing. I keep say like because I'm reading site. I've got like high. Absolutely. But you have to kind of have a. Womanizer say it's really enjoy it. And we've been of course, when we did little video. Did you love it? We spent two hours trailing the faction floors finding outfits, and I mean, we were just totally support for toys. Weren't we switched on? It was the way. Eight I think that just me. Hands kept sunglasses on by the way. No, they ping. Say my is. It'd be president Bryce. Okay. So what we did? Join that video is we literally did where we were talking. We said we said like guys Harvey Nichols, really premium Dale Whittington sweet. Kid sweep. Spike, todd. I'm telling you know, every girl's dream have the minute in Harvey Nichols be tool after hours, grab whatever you want. Yeah. What? Yeah. Yeah. So we show on the beautiful and they said, right? Do that. So we had as you saw we ran around picks up some of favorites. So for obese he bit. So we're going to talk through the favorites. And that you know, what they were. I know that in the show.

Harvey Nichols Harvey Nichols Knightsbridge London Beatty BBC Lisa Hannah Catta Europe Chuck Copeland Ceylon Martin errol president Spike Dale Whittington Bryce fifteen years two hours
"school" Discussed on Sunday School

Sunday School

32:32 min | 1 year ago

"school" Discussed on Sunday School

"Me that you have had thoughts about the material world and reducing fashions footprint, and I think it's a very difficult subject, and it's a much broader subject than you. I think and I think it's very difficult to know what's underneath sometimes you're almost afraid to lift the lid on the fashioned supply chain because what's underneath is a bit too. Ghastly to think about when we buy food. We might choose organic. Or we might choose vegan. We might choose something that comes from food. We might actually won't be on the budget and want to buy something from a supermarket. We might care about packaging, and we might care about prostate bags, but with fashion it's much more difficult to actually make those choices. We will recycle as much as we can. I'm sure but with fashion, you're buying blind. You just don't know what it is. And where it's come from. When I saw at Harvey Nichols. The first thing I really wanted to do with to see where we were in terms of responsible business practices, and I want to make it clear right now that we're not squeaky clean. I couldn't possibly say that we are. We're not. There are lots of things that we need to do. The first thing that we have done is to set up a responsible business practices committee and on that committee. We have one of our CEO's, and I think that that is a major step in retail practices. So joining me. Today to discuss this. I have Kara Smith who is the vice president of the Glasgow Caledonian, New York college, and she's also the founder of the fashion center, and Tamsin ventured is fashion journalist and editor, and she's also part of a global campaign called fashion revolution. So welcome ladies car. Can I start with you could you tell us a little bit more about the fashion Jensen's? So I am a longtime fashion person. I work for you bowls. Jill Sander for Burberry and kind of grew up at a time where we were not as smart as we are today. Let's say we sent out designs disassembled parts to be sampled, and then produced and sold, and we were maybe not as we're of the environmental and social impacts that our business was creating in a way that we are today. So now that we're all smarter we like to do better. And I think it's important that fashion people fix their own industry because we understand better. How it works than nonprofits and other entities. So we start. The fair fresh and research center brought together a whole group of CEOs. We now work with forty CEO's. They represent about two hundred and forty two brands and around two hundred and fifty billion dollars business. How can we collectively work together to resolve our problems and kind of redesign our industry from the inside out? We have a big focus on profitability and sustainability because obviously the companies have to be economically sustainable as well. I'm ki Tamsin, I've been a fashion journalist since the early nineteenth. I saw the independent and then moved to the guardian and telegraph magazine is the fashion beaches director for ten years throughout that time really as oppose my main interest in being part of this fashion industry was it was about the foam, self expression dressing. How you dress really tells the world who you all what your opinions what your politics. This is always been really at the center of. My relationship with fashion. So I've long been an advocate for better ways of doing things. And you know, when people started recycling rubbish in the nineties thinking about fashion was just pause and parcel of who you were. So I suppose in the early nineties brands like Patagonia started to create fleeces to recycled plastic bottles, which seemed quite revolutionary at the time. Now, it's pretty commonplace suppose, I've watched this whole story unfold is taking quite a long time. But I feel like now in the last twelve months things have really really shifted, and I became part of fashion revolution. Which was the campaign that was set up almost six years ago now as a response to the plaza factory disaster when one thousand one hundred thirty eight dominant workers were killed when the factory corrupts, and it was a real wakeup call to the industry as a whole that the industry. He seemed to go out to control things being made too fast too quickly too much. And I think we're now to stage were industry questioning it consumes the questioning it, and I feel. An a much better place today than we were even twelve months ago because the conversation has become much more mainstream, and you're not seeing as some kind of crank talking about this stuff. So yeah. And it's great that with is in here and Harvey Nichols today having this conversation this being a lot

CEO Harvey Nichols Harvey Nichols Sunday school Bloomberg Tiffany Kara Smith Tamsin Mike Bloomberg Patagonia United Nations Jill Sander Burberry knightsbridge Herbie Jensen Debbie Caroline marketing director Meghan Markle