26 Burst results for "Schmitt"

interview With Susan Schmitt Winchester, Applied Materials

Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

01:20 min | 2 weeks ago

interview With Susan Schmitt Winchester, Applied Materials

"Susan thank you so much for being on the show today so excited to speak with you. Know we've got a lot to talk about the thank you so much you're busy and your time is very valuable so thanks. Thanks for dedicating some of it to our show journey so much honored to be here. Well let's start because we've got a couple of things to discuss. I wanna i wanna talk a little bit about the work that you're doing at applied materials. And then i and then i. You've got an exciting book coming out so a little bit of a two part episode here. But why don't you start by just giving our listeners. A little bit of a on your professional career kind of leading up to what. You're doing now sure i'd be happy to george. Thank you so. I have worked in human resources or now thirty three plus years. I joke with my friends and family that my middle name is. I love the profession very fortunate to have been able to work in a number of fortune. Five hundred companies I've served as head of hr to those companies now for over fourteen years and currently head of hr for a company called applied materials. Were seventeen billion dollar company based in silicon valley and the semiconductor industry is hot. Hot hot Very exciting so yeah. I've i've worked in. Hr all those years. I worked at pretty much every job of hr and i love. I love the work.

Susan George Silicon Valley
NASA Is Lending A 3.9-billion-year-old Moon Rock To The Biden White House

Innovation Now

01:13 min | 2 months ago

NASA Is Lending A 3.9-billion-year-old Moon Rock To The Biden White House

"The request of president. Joe biden the lunar sample laboratory facility at nasa's johnson space center some monroe to the white house. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped our future. Triangular glass display case boasts photo glass sides than aluminum top and bottom and holds three hundred thirty two gram piece of the moon. The sample was returned to earth. And nineteen seventy two by the apollo. Seventeen astronauts ronald evans and moon walkers harrison schmitt. An eugene cernan. The last humans to set foot on the moon chipped from a large boulder located almost two miles from the lunar module. The sample surfaces contain tiny craters created as micrometeorites impacts that sandblasted the rock over millions of years the flat sides were created in the jc lab when slices of the rock were cut for scientific research. Now the moon rock has a place of honor in the oval office of the white house on loan to the current administration. It represents the accomplishments of an earlier generation and is a unique symbol of support for america's plans to return to lunar orbit and beyond

Johnson Space Center Ronald Evans Harrison Schmitt Eugene Cernan Joe Biden White House Monroe Nasa America
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 5 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
How to make video meetings more real

Talking Tech

02:46 min | 9 months ago

How to make video meetings more real

"On your first box. Everyone's Jefferson brand. Here you're listening to talking tech spending a Lotta time actually talking to people about video meeting and how we're living with them during this very challenging time and twenty twenty today's topic. How do we make the meetings that are virtual? Feel the same as it for their in person. So I taught allow people for this. What you gotTa do at work a lot harder to make them entertaining to make them fun to reach out to people to game affi- everything's one of the people I spoke to her name is Camille Schmitt she works at a streaming service called Filo. And what they do is they do getting to know your day they basically every day is like kindergarten. Tell us something we didn't know about yourself share something with us. It's a little Corny but Camille tells me that it works also spoke to mark Hohmann who is a small business owner he's got a camera store in L. A. called Paul's photo, which has nonstop classes during the pandemic he had to shift the all online. How do you replicate the experience where students come in really to interact with other students and with the instructor? By starting early. Starts every class a half hour early. So people can just sit there and talk to each other sounds like a pretty good idea. Randy. Lerman he is a DJ. He works the Wedding Bar, Mitzvah and Party circuit in Los Angeles. He's lost a lot of parties. This year as most have because parties have stopped. What does he do? He is moved to do Trivia Games on line four corporations and for anybody else who's interested he gets people involved by playing trivia it's working for him. I talked to a guy who is a classic salesman he works for Schneider Electric going from town to town. Selling his electrical outlets to hotels, and now can't do that. He told me what he really misses the handshake walking side by side the opportunity to finish the meeting grab lunch afterwards that's what he misses. But for Tyler Hake what he can do is have a lot more meetings because he's not traveling. So he can see more people in it's working out. Susan Orlean has been meeting with high school students for years consulting with them on how to best prepare for college? Not, at our office anymore she's got rid of the office. She's having video

Lerman Camille Schmitt Susan Orlean Jefferson Los Angeles Filo Schneider Electric Mark Hohmann Tyler Hake Randy Instructor Salesman Business Owner Paul L. A.
Atlanta-based Spelman cancels in-person instruction, shifts to digital learning for fall semester

The Frame

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

Atlanta-based Spelman cancels in-person instruction, shifts to digital learning for fall semester

"Spelman College and elite. Historically Black College in Atlanta is among a growing number of colleges that are reversing their decisions to bring some students back to campus. With cases rising in Georgia and the politicising of that state's response, Spellman President Mary Schmitt, Campbell says it would be irresponsible to bring students back. We felt very comfortable about what the protocols and practices we were putting into place on our campuses. The one star students walked outside of those gates. Once they went into the city of Atlanta. They were an environment that we felt was Virtually unregulated because classes will be entirely online. Spellman has announced a tuition

Spellman President Mary Schmit Atlanta Spelman College Black College Georgia Campbell
Spelman College Announces Virtual Instruction for the Fall

Fresh Air

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Spelman College Announces Virtual Instruction for the Fall

"College and elite. Historically Black College in Atlanta is among a growing number of colleges that are reversing their decisions to bring some students back to campus, with cases rising in Georgia and the politicising of that state's response. Spellman President Mary Schmitt. Campbell says it would be irresponsible to bring students back. We felt very comfortable about what the protocols and practices we were putting into place on our campuses. The one science students walked outside of those gates. Once they went into the city of Atlanta. They were an environment that we felt was Virtually unregulated because classes will be entirely online. Spellman has announced a tuition discount,

Spellman President Mary Schmit Atlanta Black College Campbell Georgia
The Logic of People

Between the Slides

08:13 min | 1 year ago

The Logic of People

"Everybody welcome back to the people process. Progress PODCASTS I'm your host Kevin Panel this episode twenty the logic of people in. We'll see why I'm calling that here in a little bit as we talk more with my Matt Schmitt. Ceo OF PEOPLE DOT AI. And thank you again for everyone. That's listen download subscribe. Please give us a rating out. There obviously more stars as good. Help US bump up to the top and share more great stories. Like we're GONNA get today talking with that and so today we'll learn about Matt where he grew up those kind of things Matt. Thank you again for being on the PODCAST. Really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you this evening. No Problem Kevin. Thanks so much for having me cool. So he mentioned. Let's you know the people process progress right so we're learning about you. Cover in the people component obviously a lot of process which is great. I'm excited to have that conversation and share that with other people all the processes you've been through in in in the industries that you've been part of and then of course share with folks As we make progress so kind of jumping into it. Where where are you from? And where did you grow up? Yeah so grew up in eastern North Carolina North Carolina's one of those interesting states. That has this island in the middle between the beaches and the mountains and everything in between is a farm country in in SPLAT and So I grew up in the farming country and was driven to build to get into technology and build a way to escape from the lack of of technology and progress in So came up to to the island here in Raleigh and went to College at NC State. That really kick me off in my My Journey Nice did you were you into technology. Maybe a lot. Were you excited about it or into it when you were younger like did you enjoy like Atari intendo or things like that? Did you have kind of a? You know an attraction to that and I'm GONNA be dated. I'm forty six. I may be older than ordering us. No totally totally had had all those things and you know we had. We had dial up internet. Remember getting my first computer and being intrigued by the potential of that and quickly taught myself how to program and That was really the first you know way to to begin. Escaping on started helping people build websites Back when I was a teenager and so that I've always had that sort of that entrepreneur. Draw ever since I was really young and That seems I've carried well for me did you. Did you get into any particular kind of code you know doing websites begging HMO or or just kind of a little bit everything a little bit of everything early on You know heavily into html and you know even before this was before there was really CSS and early into Java script and then quickly into building programs in basic and And then moving into languages like Java as I taught myself more and more about how to program it was really the I in the early days. It was really driven by You know funny enough as I had a an early computer and we had this. We had the dial up internet and I was really one of the things I was really driven by was. Hey you know. We don't have Microsoft word. I really think I could build something like that. That was foolish of me in the early days while ambitious vision ambition. Never Was Never Short on my in my youth man edge and that with Imagine right now what we're going through with dial up all. I don't understand the true pain that that is a you know when you had to have a separate phone line just so you get kicked off right Yeah that I I think I told some of the other day guys. We head this pandemic during the eighties or even the early nineties How much worse it would be and you didn't get your free Internet. Cd in the mail may trying to figure out how to get into AOL right. You're it'd be along in. Would you know what that's also included that bug of doing that making Got TO NC state and so did you major in computer science or similar a major there. Eso majored in computer engineering and computer and electrical engineering because Foolish me I thought I wanted to actually build the parts of the computer that I wanted to program them until I learned that I hated. Physics hunts so that that really kinda pointedly you know. I still went through with the computer engineering and the electrical engineering but was really focused on programming. And the more computer science aspect of it was doing that all throughout college and That was really where I found a guy connected with my partner. These on Long before it was called We started to build a business together. So were you you met at college. Yeah so he had a business that was had relocated from New York and was in Kerry and he was looking for some people to join his team. And this was in. You know I guess. Mid Dot Com crash Here And so you know. I joined in. You know everything plummeted as know. Our customers lost their customers. And so on and we had this great website called Java lobby and We figured out how to sell ads around and that was really the start of it as we built some interesting technology and learned how to publishers in turn that into a building one of the world's largest developer portals Diese wow I mean that's pioneering stuff right and then there weren't as many tools right to be able to that kind of wrote a lot of scripts for you or helped you along. So did you all have to do a lot of you know just a lot of hours in front of the keyboard. And you know mapping and work like that. Yeah this was you know long before you could really you know there were You had to build everything in those days send so there were know the early days of even things like Google ad sense in go blab words in those types of things. But you know we were. We had to build our own community software And so it was. This was even probably before the May have even been before blogs but certainly before blogs became the place that everybody Trying to put their communities. How did you find Many like minded in in school folks at school they are or were you able to against still pretty. I guess earliest days kind of reach out to other where their user communities than that you all could kind of bounce ideas off each other as well. you know. So that's what we provided primarily and so job lobby had been started by my partner as we scanned it. But in those days you know. The the developing world is much more fragmented job lobby really provided a place for developers have an independent voice in an independent community that was separate from the vendors who were really controlling the messaging Peru tools and development. The is in those days Which is is somewhat different than than what you get. These days and open source was what it was. You know what it is now. It was a big deal if he were open source back so everything is sorta come much further much more quickly than it was in those days.

Matt Schmitt NC Partner North Carolina Kevin Panel United States CEO Raleigh ESO AOL Google New York Developer Kerry
Olympians face uncertainty with Tokyo delay because of virus

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Olympians face uncertainty with Tokyo delay because of virus

"Olympic wrestler miles I mean earned his spot in the Tokyo games by finishing fifth at the world championships he says waiting year is tough but he's an optimist I just like to this is really just an opportunity to you know get another year to develop and and train Olympic swimmer Allison Schmitt who won four gold medals has been trying to qualify for a fourth appearance and says it's the right decision but there's mixed emotions of frustration of course yeah there's a plan in place and if all of that's where most people corona virus causes mild to moderate symptoms such as fever and cough for some it can cause severe illness and death the vast majority of people recover I'm Julie Walker

Allison Schmitt Fever Julie Walker Olympic Tokyo
Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong And Michael Collins discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

13:12 min | 1 year ago

Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong And Michael Collins discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Knows the the three human human beings that we sent up an apollo eleven commander Neil Armstrong <hes> lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin and the other Guy Michael Calling Yeah Command module pilot Michael Collins and you really like we WANNA sing his praises because the it stinks to be known as the other guy I would imagine sure everyone remembers those other. Two names ask Roger Adultery. They got what they got to <hes>. Walk Around on the Moon while Michael Collins Essentially babysat babysat module command module eating Hojo's to come back. That's that's unselfish it extremely and I'm sure they were assigned. These roles because of their you know what they trained for but to be the Guy Psych Yeah you you know what that's okay. I'll be number three. That's what he did the he said up there with the command module majored State in orbit and that's right. It's waited for the dudes to come back so hats off to you. Michael Collins all right so July sixteenth nineteen sixty eighty nine nine thirty two in the morning. I'm so excited Apollo Eleven <hes> Lis- off from J._F._K.. Space Center at Cape Canaveral <hes>. It's no no coincidence there he said are <hes> go get them and named after me so it was it was a huge moment <hes> for the sort of the end of the space race. You know if it all went well. If they're all went well so remember we'd practiced everything up to the actual landing yeah we'll get to the landing in second but <hes> Buzz Aldrin later said that he was the most worried about the landing because there were the most unknowns the most questions remaining because it was the one thing that hadn't been studied in practiced in done before <hes> and it was up to these guys this is the last thing the last part of this whole thing and no one had done it and so when they took off at nine thirty two they went through everything just went perfectly stage fired find second-stage fired fine the third stage age got him into a lunar trajectory and I think they traveled this two hundred thirty eight thousand miles <hes> over about two and a half days before they started to reach lunar orbit yeah so on July nineteenth is when they enter that orbit they spent spend about a day there. <hes> sort of you know. There's a lot of checking on things you don't just get like plough ahead with your plan. You take a day once you get up there to make sure everything's working there. Checking the communication systems then basically <hes> preparing for the big <hes> the big show convincing Michael Collins that he couldn't come sorry still drawing straws if they're in the orbit right so here's the kind of cool thing that I think <hes>. Maybe if you don't know this full story that's really pretty remarkable is the lunar module was supposed to basically land on autopilot but they saw were. They were headed <hes> they didn't you know the moon doesn't have atmosphere. They'd never really done this so they didn't know exactly how to calculate their altitude and airspeed and realize in short order they were heading toward <hes> a crater with very steep sharp rooms and landing either on those rams or down in that crater was no good no and <hes> so Neil Armstrong said screw it. I'M GONNA fly this baby down he did he wasn't even the lunar module pilot he just took over. I guess as Commander Yeah because if they were gonNA crash it was going to be on him. I need to see this movie. Have you seen it yet. No not yet now and there's another documentary I think just call Apollo Eleven. That's coming out it it. Oh it'll have been out because we're releasing this around the okay anniversary so I think it came out in late. June may be on C._N._N.. Or something yeah so so <hes> so Armstrong had to take over the controls in again no one ever done this before and this guy's landing lunar module basically manually in this is unscheduled he had to make the thing travel further away from the spot it was going to land and so when they finally landed <hes> they had something like thirty seconds of fuel that's not and it was a little Harry and there is a very famous <hes> quote that came out of the Eagle Lander said Houston. This is his tranquility base. The Eagle has landed and tranquility or Houston said thank goodness yeah Houston actually said you got a bunch of guys about determine blue. We're breathing again <hes> and funny enough that was Charlie Duke. Who Was it <hes> he was the Capcom on the ground in Houston but he would later be up in the air in Apollo Sixteen Yep Pretty Neat and I'll bet he was wearing a tie with short sleeve dress button assure probably so said all those guys boy he had the problem back then was you could never tell car-salesman apart from regular people right from it engineer teacher a Bit Your Dad Rock that look oh well into the ninety s with the old pocket protector and so they landed and <hes> they were gonNA abort their mission right there and go right back up well no they? They set it up so that they could aboard at the drop of ahead if they had to. I think it was okay. I'll thought they were going to abort. No I think they the first thing they did was prepare for an aboard. God J. Something went wrong. They wouldn't have to prepare to abort press the button and take off all right. I'll get down there CYCLI- go back. I'm I'm having second thoughts about being the first person to walk on the Moon <hes> well that actually does make a lot more sense in because what they were supposed to do is take a four hour rest <hes> for safety but they were all indigo so they're like now. We're GONNA work through this yeah. It's still took about four hours just to get out onto the moon but they were hard at work the whole time. They weren't taking US news yeah which I guess men would have taken them eight hours head. They taken that snooty but they did take us news <hes> later on yeah. That's something that I didn't realize about billion the moon landing they spent a total of twenty-one hours on the moon and only two and a half hours of out walking around on the move yeah the rest of the time they were in the lunar module including <hes> seven and a half hours of sleep. I I mean they needed did so I was like. How did they sleep very sound? I thought I got drugs. I'll bet they took drugs. <hes> you think they did not they had sixteen tablets of seeking all on them. They took zero. Although later <hes> <hes> later Lunar Lander would would take a significant amount of seeking all but buzz Aldrin and <hes> Neil Armstrong didn't take any secret although they did take decks adrain tablets during the mission to their pepped up <hes> okay which is hilarious which means they probably crashed I guess so but they were not in any shape to sleep but they still slept for seven and a half hours. I bet that some of the quite asleep. I don't know I would be too excited but yeah I guess so maybe just being there in having already gone walked out on the moon. When you come back in right ready for arrest Yes oh <hes> six hundred fifty million people watch this? It's about a fifth of the world's population at the time. <hes> Armstrong spent about twenty minutes out there by himself. which I imagine was something else it's not like Aldrin crashed his come on the twenty minutes out on the Moon by himself like you just it's hard to even fathom what that was was like or would be like now? Even <hes> then Aldrin follows him down and his description of the lunar surface was magnificent desolation. I'd never knew that before to do yeah. I'd heard that that's pretty cool and <hes> they started working. They started collecting samples. <hes> surface material moon rocks <hes> basically taking note notations on like what the gravity was like <hes> because it wasn't no gravity it was one six of the Earth's gravity so you know they they were able to hop around in jump around have swimming pool kind of yeah yeah. Have you seen that footage of <hes> Jack Schmitt from Apollo Seventeen now he keeps falling down really he like headed collection beggars putting stuff in and he'd like drop any bend in over and get it and like kind of come back up and then like almost somersault like he was having a really hard time and they figured out like pretty quickly you you can't just walk on the moon especially in these spacesuits. It's a hop right yet to hop but I think even hopping hoping is not just like innate. We'll sure so you can follow over but there's a learning curve right but I did not see that Buzz Aldrin or Neil Armstrong fell down me no fault down who fell Schmidt from on Apollo Seventeen <hes> Klutzy Jack that was his nickname yeah just like astronaut falls down pretty fun to watch especially if you listen to yacky sacks or another tab so we mentioned that American flag that iconic flag drop <hes> them or flagstick or flag raise. What would you call that all of the above Commie poke <hes>? It's a great drink too by the way economy poke so the poll win in <hes> the first like six inches or so very easily and they're like Oh. This is a breeze and then it hit something super hard and I guess they're like Oh. It's not so easy so they had to lean the flag back well yeah they kind of you just wriggled it back and forth right thank you because I realized people can't see what I was doing but yeah in doing this. This is really important in doing that. They created ripples in this flag and that's the that's took moon hoax people point to really there's wind on the moon yeah. They're like House there wind you idiots. Obviously this is here on earth and that is the explanation that when they were wriggling it back and forth Gotcha created ripples and that you CONC- in footage that astronauts moving around the flag and the flags ripples remain static right so no there's not any wind on the moon but that's not win that did that to the flag on the moon. Yeah I saw about six years ago. They they feel pretty good that most of those flags what are their seven and all six six I believe are still there. They should still be there. I don't know how they would fall off the moon. Well not fall off but just this the temperature swings on the moon true those a lot of surmising that they wouldn't have survived the stuff okay <hes> but really yeah and the solar radiation and everything will we'll get all that stuff but it did <hes> it did say that they took a lot of pictures of the various times of day and they think they have found. I don't think they found Apollo eleven but you know it's not like they can get it from the surface so these are all aerial shots so they're comparing like shadows basically Gotcha and saying oh well. It looks to me like this. Is the flags really yeah so. Are they still standing up today think well. I don't think you can tell okay but if it's gassing a shadow it must be oh yeah. I guess right yeah very you. You need a job at NASA. Come mm-hmm and be like this shadow proved standing a head <hes> but in all for Apollo eleven they collected about fifty pounds of <hes> lunar material a bunch of pictures took to court tube samples and <hes> like you said had spent what two and a half hours out there yep just romping around having a good time having a good time in twenty one hours total on the on the lunar surface and then they at after while after about twenty one hours the lunar module went food which no one realizes but that's the sound that it makes space right and it went up and Ron viewed with the <hes> the the command module it were in a very <hes> passive aggressively hostile Michael Collins who's very quiet for the rest of the trip but they docked again docked like they the docking procedure after launch it when it rendezvous docked with it they got out and then they said so long eagle thanks for everything yeah blasted it off again and just Senate on a crash course to the moon surface and where it's crash site is no one knows. It's an unknown site <hes> but it's on there somewhere but that's what they did they. They said they use the Eagle to go down. Come back up and then they sent it back to Mama. So what happens on the way back it's is it. There's two scenarios. It's either those two guys can't stop talking about it and Michael Collins. She just like Yup. Great or Michael Collins is like what was it like guys. What was it like and they're like you wouldn't understand we could we describe it but it wouldn't make sense to your brain? Yeah those are people like the the solar eclipse either. One of these bad had right yeah. Kotelly you know if you didn't then just forget it. That's that's a bad outcome for Michael Collins either way pretty long flight home

Buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Michael Collins Commander Jack Schmitt Roger Adultery Houston United States Charlie Duke Hojo Apollo Seventeen Cape Canaveral Apollo Nasa Eagle Lander Swimming J.
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"My best example would be Harrison Schmitt the of the twelve men that walked on the moon only Harrison Schmitt was actually a train geologist. He had helped train the other astronauts to look for unusual rocks, but think about the advantage that he had. He already knew because of his years of training is geologist what normal rocks look like. You can even pick out what the heck a weird Rockwood be right. You need imagination to think up potential weird rocks all those again derived from hypotheses, right? But in the end, the most important frock found on the moon of all of those missions was found by Harrison Schmitt it was an unshockable of all Evine. That is one of the best proofs we have that there was volcanic activity on the moon after its formation. Yeah. So without a doubt, human set of. Senses and humans ability to think about a problem into look for unusual things provides it incredible advantage to doing an discovering meaningful science, right? The downside is the tremendous expense. Yeah, to keep a human alive up. There could that rock that hair Schmid Heff found been found by a robot possibly and the robot would have had an advantage in the sense for the cost of taking humans up there. You could have a dozen robots well, and you know, robots can be driven remotely and they have cameras, and if the cameras are high resin af-, you know that the potential didn't do, but those things are harder in every sense while it is an extension of our senses, it's a restricted extension. So all of that is harder in a one of the elements of the, the moon gateway base, they wanna build an orbit around the moon is so that you could put scientists in orbit around the moon, which is easier to putting them on the service of the moon to do that with. Space station and have them operate robots in much closer proximity. So they can afford to follow hunches and and to explore and more detail and and take more chances with a robot that is eligible serviceable. They for better or worse. When you put a robot like curiosity on Mars, you are incredibly cautious with it because there is no option to repair it. Wanna take any chances with soft terrain in in the end spirit got stranded in some soft sand and may eventually got an angle were the solar panels could be properly charging. That's how they lost spirit. And we have a risk right now with the dust storm going on Mars of losing opportunity as well. Although OS nothing those Rovers supposed to last ninety days and opportunities at fourteen years. Yeah, right. But without a doubt, the strength of humans on site is there much faster ability to react and to explore and to hypothesize experiment, but it at what in tremendous cost. He's just due to consider. I love the prospect of sending a human onto the surface of Europa, but that means keeping them alive for a decade or more from round trip and the radiation environment around Jupiter is no Phoolan. Like that's a hard problem to do. I think ultimately we'd get more science value from it. That's a tougher problem. Because you think of the number of missions we could fly to your robot with robotics versus the number visions for the same amount of money that we'd take one mission with human right interest. Oh, that that's sort of the battle in my mind for that whole thing is just it's a cost thing, but the capability is really, you know, humans are always going to be better to stuff, but Jason, I really appreciate your comment and copies dako- buys on its way to unify copies to by write a comment on the website at dot net rocks dot com or via any of our social media. 'cause we publish every show Facebook and Google plus. And if a comet there my read on the show, we'll send you. Copies Dakota and definitely follow us on Twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl Franklin, send us a tweet. We scan them for cavities. With our MU on mid airs. Yes, portable and Blue. glue. I can see through your clothes. Nice someday. Maybe someday. Maybe not maybe wants to do hopefully not. All right..

Harrison Schmitt geologist Jason Evine Schmid Heff Rovers Carl Franklin Facebook Twitter Dakota rich Campbell Google fourteen years ninety days
"schmitt" Discussed on Asymcar

Asymcar

05:39 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on Asymcar

"Chest oak on the brutal okay we we have a guest today bertel schmitt and maybe virtual you can kick off the show with a little background on your world and your your relationship with the auto auto industry over the decades well first of all i have to i have to say hi to haaretz because i'm a big fan of your work i've read you all along i'm not i'm not so great ten commandments us i know i know where very all i you know i think every everybody was in the car industry should should nail him to the wall very very right with everything especially especially the one that what was it as okay i was spreading there's other option based on drive trains right yeah yeah and the other one which which i always say in it's much easier to make a supercar than than a small car you know it's it's easier to make up for our ford right even you know jim you met you met my friend i the different chief engineer of elevate yes and even he says it's true he's here he's had so much heart no but honestly it's it's so much harder to make button not maybe to make one but successfully make me i mean that's the different successfully to make us wolcott it's very very hard so anyway what am i me okay what am i me i'm first of all i'm i just dated me so i might as well go ahead i'm as oldest china and determine roof republic that means i'm going to be seventy next to year when i do this test on facebook on five i have been in the industry all my life nine hundred seventy three i tried to advertising agency and and everybody that was the beginning of dog prices and all the people in our cars are not going into it so they put me onto volkswagen account because nobody else wanted to go on the folks account dell is wanted to do the safe stuff like alcohol cigarettes and stuff like that and unfortunately and i fell in love each other and i did the launch campaign of to golf and then we stuck together over thirty five years and i worked for them in various capacities around the world i worked in germany worked in america went pector chairman impact you america worked in china and now for the last years i been living in japan why not because of work i come here from the love i i wish life life and and and and mr mr country ended up thing and i don't never leave him either so anyway so that's my story here loved loved the other industry in old age studied become i started as a journalist way back and it came back to my roots and started right about it i'm not reading about the cars writing work decor industry right daily kanban but that's right this great i found through through the daily combat i don't remember how i got to that website but i was so charmed by and i remember reading your your your forget how you called in these these old stories about the truth behind the industry which is which is very humorous the autobiography of bs yes yes actually they were convinced i mean speaking of two convinced it but be a done yeah the the the story and folks good by the way is is something we i think we touched on a couple of times that i'm always fascinated by i actually own hundred seventy one beetle which i purchased a couple of years ago and i need converting to electric i it's it's like eighty percent down it's been eighty percent on for a long time perpetual eighty percent down but it's it's a it allowed me to tear the car completely apart it had been done once already to an electric version with the lead acid batteries and so all i did was out the great to lithium ion new ac motor all all kinds of any improvements redoing the interior and so on but boy i tell you just getting your hands on the on the on the metal the you know the getting completely to bare metal and understanding how the car will was constructed and appreciating that design which actually is from nineteen thirties i think he would earlier perhaps was the prototype facing what does that car you could literally take part with a screwdriver in an wrench i.

bertel schmitt eighty percent thirty five years
"schmitt" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"schmitt" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Of screaming a lot of yelling a lot of history avocado the out of there right wet weighing media entertainment wing of the republican party footwear though steve the twelve percent or order the twelve percent right well let let me sleigh down and your view and audiences what negative trout percent their schmo and i don't know i mean this is all positioning and propaganda go ahead the country of three hundred thirty million people's pretty big number deputy another three hundred thirty million people i would like mr schmitt the no the people is the pleura for people i guess you could say people's like monies but the proper english is people go ahead it's it's not a majority number and what we're gonna find is if if these guys don't banned is that this group of people so dominated our politics injected this anger this vitriol their power less put them matter business that's what the opportunity right now for this country is what does that mean steve the put them out of business in your put them out of business by pretending they have actual inflow ads that there's a majority of people in this country you subscribe to these absurd possessions that are propagated on breitbart on the talk radio wing of the of the republican party does anyone even understand what the man as saying you put them out of business by pretending they have actual influence you know i can only speak for myself when i come behind this microphone i'm not pretending anything i give you my opinion all endorse a candidate i'll tell you what i think and so forth and so on i don't know why they're so frightened of us if we only have this tiny miniscule fraction of the population who care about what we say or what you think out there my audience the white and talk about us my would you like care for in business now this guy is a shrill useless loser consultant talking to a shrill loser.

mr schmitt breitbart republican party consultant steve twelve percent