Audioburst Search

39 Burst results for "Schmidt"

Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on WIP Programming

WIP Programming

00:45 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on WIP Programming

"After I had dropped one. You're four On so the year before, but 78 On and so it was really Sweet. I've got the game wouldn't hit in the the championship series. Oh, that was a big time for me, and we were not as you mentioned. Plain everyday. I was not Greg was not. And so when I caught that last out, uh, I ended up giving the ball to Greg Luzinski. Because we kind of You know, we neither one of us is happy about our playing time. And but we still pushed each other and we still had to work. So that was good. You know, that was good. That was a good feeling. You know what I remember about that when you you actually made the last two put out's in that game. I believe you got out to end out three, and that's in that game. Yeah, but what I remember what I remember is that the team came streaming out of the dugout and they can gradually taking a bunch of them. Congratulate Ruth Fun Bunch of guys run to Dick because he had a pitch the last inning. But then arrest them run out to you on and there's that famous shot of you being hoisted onto the guy's shoulders. And the guy who has the guy who has your your right leg is lifting you up onto his shoulder is Dallas Green. Which I which I find really interesting, given the fact that you guys you know that had not had a very happy and harmonious month of September that at that moment, the first guy to get out to you and lift you up in the air was Dallas. Yeah, You know, that's one of the things that you know, I think You know, I have my own business now and I've had for Couple of business for a while, but I learned a lot. About how to manage people from my experience. You know, on the team in Dallas, Wass You know, I learned a lot about how to manage people. I knew how I had reacted during That stretch before we got to the playoffs. And when I said when I would think about it, you know I wasn't happy with myself in looking back at how I, uh How I behaved. So now it's interesting when you have employees. You have to manage them and You know, sometimes it has to be Hard and Sometimes you have to understand what they might be going through. So Game taught me a lot and especially talking about Being involved in the in the community. You know, I have to credit the Phillies organization for creating that environment That would allow me to have the success. I did. And to stay around in this area. Where the fan uh They They really like me As a player. They liked me as a person so You know, enjoy making Philadelphia, my home after Ah You know, after my career in that was probably one of the better decisions. I ever made because everybody I mean, you look around today I think myself very Christian. Then we might be the only two players from the 18 that lives in this area. And Larry went back to Washington for a while, but I made a decision. Uh, based on getting some good advice that I was I make my home their home here in Philadelphia after my career was over on. Best decision I ever made. Was there a time? Because she was still, you know, relatively young bye bye. Player centers. Think you're 36 years old. You started this season with the Phillies played 1/2 a dozen games and called it called it And you was the decision. To retire to stay here because you probably could have gotten a job somewhere else. Him, but I was coming off of Ah. You know, I had back surgery and It was Yeah. I've been on the D L on had just gotten off. When I made that decision, but You know, I was in Center field. You guys ever see? Damn Yankees. Sure. OK, and so No. He made that bargain with the devil in him when he's facing that one fly ball, he ages in front in front of our eyes and running in that grass. Hey, stadium built That, you know, I just felt old. I felt slow. And and, you know. Just thought that You know, I have had enough of that. You know, they talk about strength up the middle in baseball, especially defensively. And I always thought when I look back on that Phillies team that you were on the one, the one that divisions went to the post season and finally, one in 80 Everybody talks about the power of Schmidt, Luzinski and the pitching of Karl and you had and you had a stack bullpen. You had five had four really good relievers, but I the one area nobody really talks about. But really should is that that might have been the best defensive team I ever saw on when you go up the middle. I mean, yet Bob Boone won three gold gloves. Larry Larry Bo 12 and probably should have one more. You know Manny Trio 13 and then you went eight out in center field. I mean, you talk about strength of the middle defensively, Manu had it. I mean, top to bottom. You guys really had it And I thought that was one thing you know, Hitting kind of comes and goes. Sometimes pitching kind of comes and goes. But defense is something you could bring out to the field every night and you guys really had it. We did have that in this thing about fans in Philadelphia. They had an appreciation for that. Me. Trust me. They appreciated that defense. And you know, and I enjoy Plain. You know, I didn't know as much about hitting. What In the outfield. You know, I could just Be the ball off the bench and I could play shallow and I have confidence in my ability to go back. And.

Phillies Philadelphia Greg Luzinski Larry Larry Bo Dallas Center Field Dallas Green Yankees Baseball Bob Boone Ruth Dick Manny Trio Manu Washington Karl Schmidt
Kansas governor orders masks to be worn in public, at work

Sean Hannity

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

Kansas governor orders masks to be worn in public, at work

"Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt, providing updated guidance to law enforcement agencies and county prosecutors State wide on the enforcement of emergency orders this following the passage of Governor Kelly's executive order earlier today, which makes mandatory the wearing of masks in public places throughout Kansas, starting one minute after midnight. Schmidt says the attorney general's office will defer to the decisions of local county in district Attorney's has no plans to bring its own enforcement actions simply for not wearing a mask. According to Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt. Sedgwick County Commission is meeting later this afternoon to talk over the governor's executive order for mandatory

Derek Schmidt Kansas Attorney Sedgwick County Commission Governor Kelly Executive
Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

00:43 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

"You're gonna keep me straight. If it's 1 a.m. or one PM with you and I Doing shows together. Whatever the case may be, we were we were We've been all over the place. Yeah, I'm right there with you. I have no clue what time it is right. No comprehension of time. Maybe that's a better way to operate When you just don't you're not worried about the confines of time is just the time you're awake. Yeah, time you're Let's get real deep. Let's get real deep here, man. No, but Yeah, Eso Ah, looking forward. Hangout we got. We got a lot in store for you at the four o'clock hour at four o'clock. As a matter of fact, David Murphy is going to join us from the film off inquire. David had interesting piece. Over the last couple of days over the weekend regarding the return of the N ba And how we should be looking at how we should be rooting for it to be successful, so we'll talk to David coming up at four o'clock we're gonna replay of that was a fascinating interview they collided Regis did with Garry Maddox. Gary reminds me and Mike Schmidt a lot in that Both guys were very deep thinkers. Very, very thoughtful human beings. They're not going to give you Pat answers. I'm going to think about things before they answer it, so we'll we'll play that for you coming up at five o'clock, but ah, couple things that that I want to tackle. So the latest News that we got. Not all that long ago before I came on the air was we've had two more positive test, not Not Phillies players. Two more positive tests around the big leagues. Nationals players. In fact, So you know, you look at it. What we've had so far in the big news yesterday was Freddie Freeman and what we've also found out Is that Felix Hernandez who is now a brave, by the way, people may not, you know. Remember that in the offseason move, and then you know the start. Stop back, Tio playing again. Um, but Felix Hernandez has opted to sit out and, of course, the other really big one. Yesterday was David Price. Who decided that he was going to sit this thing out. You think about it from this perspective that the What? David Price is leaving on the table. And you know what if somebody like Mike Trout decided, and or Bryce Harper, whatever the case may be you talking about the upper echelon guys in terms of what they're getting paid. But even in this abbreviated 60 game schedule David Price would have earned $12 million. To play. And he's electing to sit this one out now. It's the beauty of having accumulated a lot of wealth. That you can have those kind of choices and make those kind of decisions, so make no mistake. You know, I got most of us. Have those kind of options, but he does. But regardless of how much money you have That's still leaving a lot of money on the table, so to speak, because he won't get a penny of it. If he sits this thing out, and he is sitting that he's made the announcement already. He's out. So what you're seeing is opt outs. Positive tests. And you know again, we're just focusing right now. On baseball. We've seen the same thing in basketball. I even heard anything hockey wise. But you know, you really start to wonder like what this is and what this is going to look like and how compromise it's going to be. I mean, to begin with. You're only playing 60 games of 162. And I've said it on record. Since they're the return was in place. But I don't have an issue with anybody who wants to sit it out. That's your decision. And what you feel best is for you, and for your family is your call. Now if we were under normal circumstances There wasn't covert 19 And you just had some some random players saying I'm sitting this thing out, that's a different story. But when you do you have a potential like in some cases. Of a pregnant wife at home. Or a high risk child or a family member, or you yourself are high risk. I I don't I don't have any problem that whatsoever. I can't see how anybody else will or wood. Under any circumstance. But, you know, I've got enough tweets on this from people. Some people, you know, some phone calls. Where people take umbrage with it, and I don't get it. But if you want to talk about that, we could certainly kick it around. But one of the things I want to do today, right out of the chute. Is give you a scale of 1 to 10. Actually 10 to 1. 10 being Most confident. One being least confident. What number would you give yourself on that scale? In terms of sports coming back. I'll tell you where I'm at. I'm at a six I feel Slightly more confident. That there will be sports Then I d'oh, you know, thinking that there won't be I'm slightly on the needle pointing up side of this thing. But That's not a real firm endorsement. I gotta tell you. That's not me, saying this thing's a lock. I don't think it's a locked by any stretch. And as more time goes on, and maybe this is just we need to get accustomed to this. The guy's going to test positive and guys are going to opt out, and it's gonna look like what it looks like. Maybe that's what it is. And maybe we need to get you no more acquainted and adjusted to the new norm. Quote unquote, which I can't stand that term, But I'm going to use it for this purpose because it is different and it is something that we're going to get usedto. But I would say I'm a six Most where where would you say you fall on a 10 to 1 scale? 10 being most confident one being the least confident that sports comes back. What number would you assign yourself? Just comes back at all or comes back and we have complete seasons. Yeah, when I say come back. I mean comeback to completion, not come back for for a week, and things were shut down. I mean, come back and finish. Three or four. Okay, Okay. Very pessimistic about the start of football. Very pessimistic about basically anything that goes on after all this that at best, Okay. Interesting. That's interesting. Yes. Oh, that's an interesting that that's a an important qualifier to put on this When I say sports coming back, I mean, coming back and finishing I don't mean the MBA place the eight regular season games, and then it shut down and we don't see the playoffs. I don't mean baseball gets through three weeks and then we're shut down. I mean, starts finishes. So motions a three or four. I would put myself a little bit more optimistic about this. But a six isn't exactly a ringing endorsement either. The league's We know. Will do anything they can To make a buck. Which means They're determined if they're going to go through this and in the N B A is putting out $150 million. For this bubble set up. So I would say that's a pretty good You no indication.

David Price Felix Hernandez Baseball David David Murphy Phillies Freddie Freeman Mike Trout Garry Maddox Bryce Harper Basketball TIO PAT Mike Schmidt Gary Football
Will My Supply Chain Survive COVID-19?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:56 min | Last week

Will My Supply Chain Survive COVID-19?

"The commercial aerospace supply chain is writing. The sudden collapse, the spring passenger air travel after the outbreak of the latest novel Corona Virus and it's cove in Nineteen, disease has upended fortunes in the airliner manufacturing industry. That matters because commercial aerospace is responsible for about three quarters of the whole aerospace and defense sectors business activity. Cash is king right now throughout the supply chain and companies are struggling to have enough liquidity, according to what several advisors and analysts tell aviation week. while. Liquidity is more of a function of the wider economic downturn inside aerospace. There are even bigger challenges. Where production rates were once being pushed higher now a Williams are slashing them cascading pressure down the supply chain. At the L. A. M. in the top tier level. It has probably never been more important to have insight into your supply chain. Joining me to talk about that need, and what to do about it are John Schmidt? The Global Andy Lead at Accenture and Joyce Klein. Accenture leader in applied intelligence in the North American amd practice John Joyce. Welcome back. Thanks might go good to be back so John let me start with you. It seems obvious that OEM's and tier ones want insight into their suppliers. But while that was always true, I used to be about making sure that there were no bottlenecks that slowed or stop record high production now things chain what of new conditions that demand and customers pay better attention to their supply chain. Might go and in many ways the aerospace industry you know has a clear split between the companies that are working in the Corso world, and does indefens- you in the commercial. As you say, you know the concern used to be, we have a supply constrained world with very predictable demand, right always pushing for more trying take need those increased rates pushed by Boeing and. and Airbus and in the current world that's changed dramatically to being more of a supply volatile with unpredictable demand in the defense and space side of things you know things have largely remained in a predictable demand with an increased supply chain volatility, so by just keep looking at those things, predictability and the the constraint or volatility the spy chain. That's where the primary differences. And Commercial. We know that demand is going to be directly related to the bounce back of commercial air travel and the relative rates airlines choose to bring back stored aircraft versus take more efficient models on order from the OEM's causing more volatility in and demand, variability and defense. It's a bit different again. Demand Israel remained and the supply chains been impacted by Kobe in some cases they're tier one two or three companies, who source both commercial and defense or trying to generate cash to cover expenses and other cases, local Cobra outbreaks, and our common actions are impacting the spires ability to deliver on schedule, known both cases, aerospace and defense companies need. To deal with all totally like never before whether commercial or defense. So Joyce. Last time John and I talked here on Chuck six with. He kind of gave me the peak and do some new technology you all were working on. It's a new capability to peer into the supply chain including using an algorithm approach that allows more predictive insight, potentially even the ability to hotspot. What factories might be in trouble in the future? Can you tell us a little bit about what accenture is working on? And how does this work? Yes, absolutely Michael Accenture? We've been working with our clients in the supply chain area for many years using analytics and machine learning. In fact, if you go back to last year's pariser show in our accenture shall a. we had a digital showcase. Demo that focused on intelligence supply chain, and what this demo is a together machine, learning and artificial intelligence, and we used I at supply chain Europe e data to really understand delivery delays identify missing parts. We also looked at the opportunity for Automation Muller. Doing now is we're bringing together? All Lot of data sets and we're using artificial intelligence to help companies deal with the increase in volatility manage. Manage uncertainty and really get at supplier resiliency. That's really the core of what our solution is all about now so for North, America a and D client what we've done is we've taken and artificial intelligence engine that uses the supplier Jadot and what we're trying to do. We're actually working to predict the number of days late or a particular part, and we're doing that by bringing together a supplier. Number roaches order number eleven worry day in quantity, combination you all that information, Heather actually identify the number of as laid the opulent part is going to be and so by knowing the number of days way them. What were able to do is fight and determine. Do I have enough inventory? As coverage or that? Particular part is ultimately if I Joan I need to make additional decisions around production, and so what? We've been able to do with our solution. Experience up to ten percent improvement apart availability production. And we're also able to change the role of the delivery service analyst. Previous lanes individuals really operating. All here. Allergy by getting parts then wall really. Burning that role inches, someone that now uses ena an ai a better and improve sagem around artists that are going to chase I which parts are actually GonNa come in on Hind. So is a big ship in

Accenture John Joyce Michael Accenture John John Schmidt Allergy L. A. M. Joyce Klein Analyst Boeing Williams Joan I Israel Automation Muller
Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

00:43 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

"You have to understand what they might be going through. So Game taught me a lot and especially taught me about Being involved in the in the community. You know, I have to credit the Phillies organization for creating that environment That would allow me to have the success. I did. And to stay around in this area where the fans uh They They really like me As a player. They liked me as a person so You know, enjoy making Developing my home after Ah You know, after my career in that was probably one of the better decisions. I ever made because everybody I mean, you look around today I think myself and Larry Kristen said. We might be the only two players from the 18 that lives in this area. And Larry went back to Washington for a while, but I made that Uh, based on getting some good advice that I was I make my home their home here in Philadelphia after my career was over, and Best decision I could have ever made. Was there a time? Because she was still you know, relatively young bye Bye Player. Senators think you're 36 years old. You started this season with the Phillies played 1/2 a dozen games and called it called it And you was the decision. To retire to stay here because you probably could have gotten a job somewhere else. But I was coming off of Ah. You know, I had back surgery and It was I've been on the D L on had just gotten off. When I made that decision, but You know, I was in Center field. You guys ever see? Damn Yankees! Oh, sure. OK, and so No. He made that bargain with the devil in him when he's facing that one fly ball, he ages in front of our eyes and running in that grass. Hey, stadium like Bill. That, you know, I just felt old and slow. And and, you know. I thought that You know, I have had enough of that for you. You know, they talk about strength up the middle in baseball, especially defensively. And I always thought when I look back on that Phillies team that you were on the one, the one that divisions went to the post season and finally, one in 80 Everybody talks about the power of Schmidt, Luzinski and the pitching of Karl and you had and you had a stack bullpen. You had five. You had four really good relievers, but I the one area nobody really talks about. But really should is that that might have been the best defensive team I ever saw on when you go up the middle. I mean, yet Bob Boone won three gold gloves. Larry Larry Bo 12 and probably should have one more. You know Manny Trio 13 and then you went eight out in center field. I mean, you talk about strength of the middle Defensively menu had it. I mean, top to bottom. You guys really had it And I thought that was one thing you know, Hitting kind of comes and goes. Sometimes pitching kind of comes and goes. But defense is something you could bring out to the field every night and you guys really had it. We did have that in this thing about fans in Philadelphia. They had an appreciation for that. Me. Trust me. They appreciated that defense. And you know, and I enjoy Plain. You know, I didn't know as much about hitting. What In the outfield. You know, I could just Be the ball off the Bennett. I could place shallow and I have confidence in my ability to go back. And You know, had good communication with trio and uh and Bowen Ball's coming in. It was just fun. Want to do? I got to roam all over the outfield. And I I thoroughly enjoyed it. I have a couple of minutes left. You've referenced the fans a couple of times, but again, you You played a lot of years here. You've stayed here you've been and I want to talk a little bit about your post career. And and you've done a lot of terrific charity work. What's your take? What's your relationship with the fans of this city? Right now. It's great. I still mean I get it. Recognize just walking down the street. I mean, my My employees are They can't believe it. It helps that I used just for men, you know? My hair, So I still have my beard and my hair cut the same way. So I'm helping the fans out, but they they recognized me. And so it is. Love. A great relationship. And we, my charity. No, Glenn, You come out to some of my fundraisers, stuff like that. But we just, uh Jefferson help system they just acquired my charity. To be part of the system at Jefferson. So I mean, that's humbling as it gets right there. People think that you I've done something that's worth. You know, having a sport as part of their organization, so Ah! We just had more time to give back to kids kept me in the community. And so that was all. That's all good. But everywhere along the line, even with businesses even with charity work and stuff I did I got a chance. Take a lot of bounds, but I learned early on that you got a surround yourself with best people. So that makes it.

Phillies Larry Larry Bo Manny Trio Yankees Center Field Philadelphia Larry Kristen Bob Boone Washington Bowen Ball Baseball Bill Bennett Glenn Karl Schmidt Luzinski
LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

The Daily 202's Big Idea

02:47 min | 2 weeks ago

LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

"Gerald Bostock joined a gay recreational softball league seven years ago, signing up for the HOTLANTA, Softball League his job in the Child Welfare Services Department for Clayton County. Georgia. He was fired for quote. Conduct unbecoming of county employ. That men he didn't have health insurance. He recovered from prostate cancer, but it set in motion illegal fight that led on Monday to a landmark decision from the supreme, court, which ruled six to three that the Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty four protects against discrimination based not just on race and gender, but also sexual orientation. And now Gerald's name will forever appear in constitutional law textbooks. After reading Justice Neal Gorsuch as majority opinion, validating his right not to be fired, simply because he was gay Gerald reflected on the journey from the den of his home. When I lost my job, it was my dream job, so imagine having. That, you went to every day and you enjoy doing it. the habits suddenly taken away from you because you decided to join a gay recreational Softball League I lost my income I mentioned that I had lost mine insurance while I was still recovering from prostate cancer I lost friends in relationships with with many colleagues. I had to sell my home in that community. So the Germans been difficult. The court ruling grouped three related cases involving employees who said they were fired because of their sexuality or gender identity. Gerald was the only plaintiff still alive to see the outcome Amy Stevens. A funeral director who was fired, because she was transgender, died last month of kidney failure after attending oral arguments in her case. Last Fall Donald Zara. A skydiving instructor who was fired because he was gay, died in twenty, fourteen, leaving his sister and partner to advance his case. Gerald, who's fifty-six plans to return to a trial court in Georgia to fight his case after all these years of legal roadblocks, he and his partner Andy toasted with champagne last night to celebrate the ruling, which he hopes will bring a little bit of sunshine. In some dark times. He told my colleague Samantha Schmidt that more work remains to be done. He wants Congress to pass the Equality Act which would enshrine nondiscrimination protections for lgbtq people in Employment Housing Credit Education public spaces and other realms of American life. The state of Georgia has also yet to pass a hate crime law. He, says joining the gay. Softball League was one of the best decisions he ever made. The arc of the moral universe is long. But it bends toward justice.

Gerald Bostock Softball League Georgia Andy Amy Stevens Neal Gorsuch Gerald Hotlanta Clayton County Child Welfare Services Departm Donald Zara Partner Director Employment Housing Credit Educ Instructor Samantha Schmidt Congress
Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

00:40 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schmidt" discussed on Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

"Picked up Clare. Downtown and she went in like we all assume that she's in jail, but we never nick, is he? Did or is he in jail? because. They shake sired. Okay. I mean it's just the whole motivation was just truly lacking for me because I'm dislike. Nick committed these murders in. He didn't even have like the full picture for most of the time. He was in the Pussy. Girl like that's what. It is. But clears very manipulative. She played that data. By the way I have to ask you because it was occurring to me like when June was doing the whole like you guys. He's GonNa. Come over here. You'RE GONNA. Shoot them while you're. Like. Have you ever had to do a love scene on camera? No yet. Not I cannot imagine how uncomfortable that shit is. I really can't like people. Talk about it all the time about how? Very uncomfortable is but have not been put in that position yeah. But also like I think public narrative like when they're in an interview and they're like Oh. Yeah, it was like so awkward like it didn't mean anything. Yeah I I. I feel. Like I dated actor, and I was like well like I just feel like. Are you going to be doing like sex scenes? In anything and I'm like Bitch Lake. How easy it was for me to seduce you like it's not difficult. Yeah the COBB. Awkward depending on who the like. On TV and in film like you see a lot more older men younger women, so that's something that might make you uncomfortable, but like if it's like a pairing, that's just two people who are like clearly attractive. I don't think the narrative is true that it's like so offered. People are looking at you like you're not actually having sex, so how awkward can be? Wyatt. Like Ellie Kemper like and I appreciate her sort of like dialysis. Honesty about this but in. Going on a press tour about unbreakable Kimmy, Schmidt like Oh like you know like whenever I would have to kiss someone for a day like I would feel like I was in love with them and like. Like I was like in love with them, and I was like I knew it. Thank you for being honest girl like. Thank you for ninety knowing how honest you're being 'cause. I know like she's like a little kid in that way. This is our final scene. Our little button on the Home Movie One, twenty, six, twenty, nine to one twenty eight I. Think you'll be surprised how this ends up..

Nick Clare Ellie Kemper Bitch Lake Wyatt Kimmy Schmidt
The Future of Surveillance

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

05:30 min | Last month

The Future of Surveillance

"The cove in nineteen pandemic is changing our lives in so many ways. And what's going to happen in? The future is still unclear. Are we going to have to download APPS? Will those under quarantine have to wear responds? Will we BE SCANNED FOR FEVERS? Every time we step into an office or restaurant I've been hearing all sorts of questions like these so I wanted to speak with Jennifer nozoe. She's an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. I wanted to know what role technology might play in our fight against this pandemic. Could we soon be using these contact tracing APPs here in the United States I think it's inevitable and in fact it's actually already happening? That public health agencies are going to use APPS to help them conduct contact tracing whether these APPs fundamentally change tact tracing is done remains to be seen. I personally it would be a little bit worried if we used APPs instead of people. It's not clear to me that we would get better data that way. The question is how are we going to use it? And what features of the technology are we going to use? It's one thing to use it to keep track of data and to help you analyzed data. It's another thing to use it to figure out exactly where someone's been over the last fourteen days and I think there are some important operational questions that need to be answered about those approaches as well as some potential legal and ethical questions we do use contact tracing in this country for other diseases. A lot of people are hearing this term for the first time but with foodborne illnesses and things like that. That already happens right yeah. It's a traditional tool of public health. Tr- instance in tuberculosis outbreaks measles outbreaks. And there is You know case investigations that happened with Woodward outbreaks to I would say the frequency with which it's used has probably decreased in recent years purely due to resources it's incredibly resource intensive to do contact tracing as public health departments over recent years have suffered budget cuts and declining resources their abilities to do contact tracing has declined and that's I think one of the unfortunate kind of preparedness erosions that we've seen over time that we're now in the midst of a pandemic trying to make up for by hiring possibly hundreds of thousands of new contact tracers when you think about the APP based technologies again in merging that with some of these human contact tracers to help supplement that sort of work. Can you give some idea of what life would look like then so there are a few different approaches? There's one method where the phone tracks your movement things off of Cell Towers and it knows where you've been and authorities potentially could take advantage of the ability of your phone to say where you've been to once you become a case potentially look back at where you've been for the last fourteen days and then use that to identify places where you may have exposed people to try to get in touch with people who may have also been at that same place. There are other approaches. Where you use the phone's ability to kind of tell who you've been near and to try to find people that you may have exposed that way that's seen as slightly less invasive because it's more about identifying who's been near you rather than exactly determining where you've been typically in the US and we do contact tracing it starts with an interview where you ask the patient basically remember all the places they've been when you're talking about fourteen days though it can be tough for people to remember exactly and so sometimes you have to use other methods to maybe fill in the gaps for instance for foodborne outbreaks. We try to figure out where you spend money over the last fourteen days as a proxy for where you may have been but we haven't yet in the. Us seen widespread use of the cellphone based technologies the Location Services or the more Bluetooth ones. That tell you who you've been Aaron. I think there has been some interest in potentially using these technologies but in my view these are the ones that have some questions around them in terms of public acceptability and what the limitations for their use are. So what does this mean for all of us? Are we moving toward big brother surveillance? State government officials are now calling upon Silicon Valley's tech leaders to try and help. We need to view this as an information problem when we need to come up with estimates for where the disease is and when we can find hotspots. Put Schmidt used to be the CEO of Google. Now he's leading up a fifteen member commission to help guide New York toward using new technology in the wake of Kovic. Nineteen the Google Apple. Collaboration preserves your privacy but it's completely voluntary apple and Google are collaborating to develop software that would enable Bluetooth base tracking on their devices if users opt in this data would be shared with governments and public health authorities and then there's clear view a facial recognition technology company. What we do is we have database from day one of over three billion photos. We have a mobile APP and a desktop and we also have the highest accuracy out there in the market. The company claims that they can scan public surveillance camera footage to identify people who might have been in contact with confirmed corona virus patients last month they told NBC News that they're already in talks with several state and federal agencies to help with contact tracing

Google United States Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Fevers Jennifer Nozoe Nbc News Apple Cell Towers Woodward Silicon Valley New York Measles Tuberculosis Aaron CEO Schmidt
GUI Pre-Cap

Geeks Under the Influence

03:03 min | Last month

GUI Pre-Cap

"Hello everyone and welcome it is the Gui pre-cap recap of all things they're going to have happened with a week of male eleven twenty twenty before it happens. My name is Bruce. Let's start with G. Y. Pick the week on Sunday. Tea and tea is going to be premiering. Snow Piercer This is an adaptation of the movie. Where all of human civilization is on a train. I've never seen the movie but I'm interested in seeing this for TV pages on Monday. Cbs has the prices. Right at night. With Rupaul Fox has the finale of nine one one Tuesday. Abc has the finale for life. Fox has twenty four hours to hell and back special. Ncw FINALE OF FLASH FOR WEDNESDAY CBS has the survivor finales. Abc Has the goldbergs schooled. American housewife and single parents finale. A knee has a finale of celebrity ghost stories birth Thursday. Abc has stationed nineteen and the series finale of how to get away with murder. Cw has the finale of Kathy keen on Friday. Cbs has the greatest stay at home videos and bravery in hopes seven days on the front line. They're both new. Abc has the finale of Shark tank. Nbc has the blacklist finale and CW has the masters of illusion. Premier burst Saturday. Abc CBS NBC. And Fox are all doing graduate together. America honors the class of Twenty Twenty and. Hbo Has the Premiere of Joker for Sunday. Abc has the finale of American idol. And you have Taylor Swift City of lovers concert. Nbc has the Beverly Hills Dog show. Fox Has the Simpsons Duncanville Bob's Burgers and family guy finale. Cw has the bat woman and supergirl finale. And like I said. Tnt has the premiere of Snow Piercer for movies coming out for video on demand. You're getting the premiere of scoop which make parents happy. Who Don't WANNA see trolls to for the fifty time for? Dvd's you have the birds of prey movie fantasy island and the photograph for on Line Services Net flakes. You have trial by media season. One have a good trip adventures and psychedelics. The unbreakable kimmy Schmidt kimmy versus the reverend. I have a girlfriend who's GonNa Squeeze because this one the wrong missy and white lines season one who has the premiere of the Great. That's their first season and prime has the last NARC season one and Seeburg

ABC Rupaul Fox CBS CW NBC Twenty Twenty Kimmy Schmidt Bruce Seeburg HBO G. Y. Kathy Keen Missy Beverly Hills Murder TNT America
Facebook names first members of oversight board that can overrule Zuckerberg

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Facebook names first members of oversight board that can overrule Zuckerberg

"Facebook is announced the names of the first twenty members have its oversight board that will make final decisions over disputed controversial content the social network giant according to the board's co chair and former Danish prime minister Helle it turning Schmidt well now for the first time have been independent body which will take final and binding decisions on what concerns days up and what content is removed the board is composed of former government officials law professor civil rights activists and other content experts from several

Facebook Prime Minister Helle Schmidt Professor
The Logic of People

Between the Slides

08:13 min | 2 months ago

The Logic of People

"Everybody welcome back to the people process. Progress PODCASTS I'm your host Kevin Panel this episode twenty the logic of people in. We'll see why I'm calling that here in a little bit as we talk more with my Matt Schmitt. Ceo OF PEOPLE DOT AI. And thank you again for everyone. That's listen download subscribe. Please give us a rating out. There obviously more stars as good. Help US bump up to the top and share more great stories. Like we're GONNA get today talking with that and so today we'll learn about Matt where he grew up those kind of things Matt. Thank you again for being on the PODCAST. Really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you this evening. No Problem Kevin. Thanks so much for having me cool. So he mentioned. Let's you know the people process progress right so we're learning about you. Cover in the people component obviously a lot of process which is great. I'm excited to have that conversation and share that with other people all the processes you've been through in in in the industries that you've been part of and then of course share with folks As we make progress so kind of jumping into it. Where where are you from? And where did you grow up? Yeah so grew up in eastern North Carolina North Carolina's one of those interesting states. That has this island in the middle between the beaches and the mountains and everything in between is a farm country in in SPLAT and So I grew up in the farming country and was driven to build to get into technology and build a way to escape from the lack of of technology and progress in So came up to to the island here in Raleigh and went to College at NC State. That really kick me off in my My Journey Nice did you were you into technology. Maybe a lot. Were you excited about it or into it when you were younger like did you enjoy like Atari intendo or things like that? Did you have kind of a? You know an attraction to that and I'm GONNA be dated. I'm forty six. I may be older than ordering us. No totally totally had had all those things and you know we had. We had dial up internet. Remember getting my first computer and being intrigued by the potential of that and quickly taught myself how to program and That was really the first you know way to to begin. Escaping on started helping people build websites Back when I was a teenager and so that I've always had that sort of that entrepreneur. Draw ever since I was really young and That seems I've carried well for me did you. Did you get into any particular kind of code you know doing websites begging HMO or or just kind of a little bit everything a little bit of everything early on You know heavily into html and you know even before this was before there was really CSS and early into Java script and then quickly into building programs in basic and And then moving into languages like Java as I taught myself more and more about how to program it was really the I in the early days. It was really driven by You know funny enough as I had a an early computer and we had this. We had the dial up internet and I was really one of the things I was really driven by was. Hey you know. We don't have Microsoft word. I really think I could build something like that. That was foolish of me in the early days while ambitious vision ambition. Never Was Never Short on my in my youth man edge and that with Imagine right now what we're going through with dial up all. I don't understand the true pain that that is a you know when you had to have a separate phone line just so you get kicked off right Yeah that I I think I told some of the other day guys. We head this pandemic during the eighties or even the early nineties How much worse it would be and you didn't get your free Internet. Cd in the mail may trying to figure out how to get into AOL right. You're it'd be along in. Would you know what that's also included that bug of doing that making Got TO NC state and so did you major in computer science or similar a major there. Eso majored in computer engineering and computer and electrical engineering because Foolish me I thought I wanted to actually build the parts of the computer that I wanted to program them until I learned that I hated. Physics hunts so that that really kinda pointedly you know. I still went through with the computer engineering and the electrical engineering but was really focused on programming. And the more computer science aspect of it was doing that all throughout college and That was really where I found a guy connected with my partner. These on Long before it was called We started to build a business together. So were you you met at college. Yeah so he had a business that was had relocated from New York and was in Kerry and he was looking for some people to join his team. And this was in. You know I guess. Mid Dot Com crash Here And so you know. I joined in. You know everything plummeted as know. Our customers lost their customers. And so on and we had this great website called Java lobby and We figured out how to sell ads around and that was really the start of it as we built some interesting technology and learned how to publishers in turn that into a building one of the world's largest developer portals Diese wow I mean that's pioneering stuff right and then there weren't as many tools right to be able to that kind of wrote a lot of scripts for you or helped you along. So did you all have to do a lot of you know just a lot of hours in front of the keyboard. And you know mapping and work like that. Yeah this was you know long before you could really you know there were You had to build everything in those days send so there were know the early days of even things like Google ad sense in go blab words in those types of things. But you know we were. We had to build our own community software And so it was. This was even probably before the May have even been before blogs but certainly before blogs became the place that everybody Trying to put their communities. How did you find Many like minded in in school folks at school they are or were you able to against still pretty. I guess earliest days kind of reach out to other where their user communities than that you all could kind of bounce ideas off each other as well. you know. So that's what we provided primarily and so job lobby had been started by my partner as we scanned it. But in those days you know. The the developing world is much more fragmented job lobby really provided a place for developers have an independent voice in an independent community that was separate from the vendors who were really controlling the messaging Peru tools and development. The is in those days Which is is somewhat different than than what you get. These days and open source was what it was. You know what it is now. It was a big deal if he were open source back so everything is sorta come much further much more quickly than it was in those days.

Matt Schmitt NC Partner North Carolina Kevin Panel United States CEO Raleigh ESO AOL Google New York Developer Kerry
Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus

Morning Edition

03:43 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus

"Greene the state of Missouri is doing something unprecedented it is suing China over covert nineteen the suit claims that China concealed the corona virus which led to deaths and economic losses in Missouri we should say the state of Mississippi appears to be getting ready to file a similar lawsuit but states typically don't sue foreign countries Frank Morris of member station KCUR joins me to talk about the possible motivation behind this long shot litigation hi there Frank Hey David I see have Eric Schmidt the Republican Attorney General of Missouri filing this lawsuit start by walking us through what they're alleging China did here bush is laying the entire blame for the pandemic every bit of the death the financial pains caused in misery squarely on China he says that at the onset of the virus December and January China destroyed medical research interested whistle blowers and it allowed thousands of people to leave Wuhan after it was clear that a highly infectious disease it broken out there Chinese authorities engaged in a campaign of deceit that directly led to this virus spreading around the globe in Missouri is not immune to that all right so it sounds like a lawyer who sounds angry and is laying out a case but I mean what's the law here can a state like Missouri just sued China not normally turn Ginsburg allow professor at the university of Chicago says the case raises a huge jurisdictional issue Robert Munich that's the word that we use for the principle that states can't be sued in each other's courts governments cannot be sued in courts of other governments the real the statue here is the foreign sovereign immunities act and does have exceptions so Schmidt isn't just suing Chinese also suing three Chinese government agencies province city of Wuhan lab science agency and the Communist Party and that's where some of the exceptions to the foreign sovereign immunities act come in there's one for commercial activity Schmidt says the labs were engaged in some kind of commerce there's another exemption for non state actors like the Communist Party but even if the last two clears the sovereign immunity hurdle there are others Missouri would have to prove that what happened in China at the onset of the pandemic directly cause pain and suffering in Missouri and even if the case gets past all that and wins there's no clear way for Missouri to extract money from say a lab in China or the Communist Party well then what do we think might be the real motivation here politics critics say it Liz Schmidt an elected official do something about the pandemic it also fits neatly with Republican efforts in the Senate to strip some of China's sovereign immunity protections and also keep the focus on China and its culpability for the pandemic and keeps the attention off what critics would say we're trump administration missteps that worsen the outbreak here downplaying the virus the sluggish rollout of testings bocce allocation of medical equipment shouldn't Kuttner at the university of California Hastings college of law is a former state department lawyer she says that there will be a reckoning for China's role in the pandemic that US courts are not the place and now is not the time are we going to engage in a blame game now while the command and it could still reach one or are we going to focus on our domestic respond and they did turn things are when people are back to work and not having to wake up every morning wondering if they're going to catch a potentially fatal disease as of the latest update here in Missouri we're up to six thousand one hundred and thirty seven code nineteen cases and two hundred and eight

Greene Missouri China
Missouri files lawsuit against Chinese government over coronavirus

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

00:25 sec | 2 months ago

Missouri files lawsuit against Chinese government over coronavirus

"Missouri becoming the first state to sue China over its handling of the outbreak state Attorney General Eric Schmidt says it's about holding the Chinese government accountable this lawsuit in reason why I think it's so important and we hope that other states might follow suit is really about getting to the truth and the more we learn the more disturbing it is private class action lawsuits seeking trillions of dollars have also been filed in several

Missouri China Attorney General Eric Schmidt Chinese Government
Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus handling

Rush Limbaugh

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus handling

"Secretary of state Mike Pompeii taking aim at China today accusing the country of concealing the true nature of the corona virus outbreak censor those who tried to warn the world in order to halt to testing of new samples and it destroyed existing samples also pointed a finger at China Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmidt was deploying the point is squarely in our lawsuit first the country brought by Stephen I'm proud of that a six to hold them accountable I feel like as a street sweeper you officer moral obligation to do this some legal experts say Missouri cannot sue a another sovereign

Mike Pompeii China Eric Schmidt Missouri China Missouri Attorney Stephen I Officer
Missouri files lawsuit against China over coronavirus

Rush Limbaugh

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Missouri files lawsuit against China over coronavirus

"Missouri's Attorney General Eric Schmidt defending the state's lawsuit against China this lawsuit in reason why I think it's so important and we hope that other states might follow suit is really about getting to the truth is and the more we learn the more disturbing it is and it's about holding the Chinese government account which is why we feel so strongly brought that case in federal court yesterday Missouri is the first state to see China over its handling of the initial outbreak but there's been a string of private class action suits around the country speaking trillions of dollars all of them in doubt though under current law which offers

Missouri Eric Schmidt China Attorney Chinese Government
In a first, Missouri sues China over coronavirus economic losses

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

In a first, Missouri sues China over coronavirus economic losses

"The state of Missouri has sued China's government claiming China is responsible for the enormous death suffering and economic losses across the world including in Missouri Republican Attorney General Eric Schmidt in a written statement said the Chinese government lied about the dangers of the virus and didn't do enough to slow its spread now it's unclear whether that lawsuit will have much if any impact U. S. law generally prohibits lawsuits against other countries with few exceptions China calls the lawsuit

Missouri China Eric Schmidt Chinese Government Attorney
Mike Schmidt homers in four consecutive at-bats on this day in 1976

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Mike Schmidt homers in four consecutive at-bats on this day in 1976

"Forty four years ago April seventeenth nineteen seventy six Mike Schmidt breaks out of a slump by slamming four consecutive home runs I remember I had had a very good start to the season we went to Wrigley Field and take our session before the game we talked to me about my confidence in that I need to have some fun Schmidt's Rogan eight runs in the Phillies eighteen sixteen comeback win over the cubs at Wrigley Field including a tie breaking two run blast on the tenth after the fills a race to thirteen the two deficit the game was it that you know that the game was tied at that point close ball game and when I go out where I had nothing on my mind at home that was the reason I hit forty one Schmidt led the National League in homers eight times including nineteen seventy six I'm Dave very

Mike Schmidt Wrigley Field Cubs National League Dave Rogan Phillies
How countries could recover from coronavirus, and lessons from an ancient drought

Science Magazine Podcast

09:14 min | 2 months ago

How countries could recover from coronavirus, and lessons from an ancient drought

"Now we have contributing correspondent. Kaikaku for Schmidt. He's written a piece this week on Corona virus phase two or recording Tuesday April fourteenth. So Phase Two. What happens after cases? Slowdown had countries. Come TO UNLOCK THEMSELVES. Haikai. Sarah it doesn't seem like there's a straightforward answer to this question like. It might be a lot easier to lockdown than to unlock. Is there any kind of consensus on how to do this? There isn't a consensus around this. And it's GonNa look a lot more varied. I think that the first phase did I mean. Most countries have did more or less the same thing. I mean they instituted Pretty Harsh. Social distancing measures of physical distancing measures someone further than others but the basic aggressive. He was the same. Once you have the cases down you might be able to relax some of these measures and then of course it depends a little bit on the country and culture and also what seen as politically more important which ones you want to relax. Not which ones you can relax without giving the virus too much of a chance to rebound right. The country's kind of have to balance safety their economy and the freedoms of individuals of the citizens. It's tough to solve this especially in in different contexts. And as you say your story a lot of researchers are focusing on the effective reproduction number. Why is that more important than say? New cases or deaths from Kuroda bias the basic reproduction number of pathogens just means how many people does one infect a person intern? In fact we know that there's a range measles is incredibly infectious? So on average one person will infect maybe fifteen other people and then there's other viruses like say you below a lot lower so it's like one point five to two point five and the basic point here is if one person on average infects more than another person. You get the steep climb in cases and the outbreak is growing everything that we've seen so far with the physical distancing has been trying to make this value of ARGO below one. So trying to make sure. That every infected person infects less than one other person so that the outbreak slowly comes to a halt and there are different approaches to moving this value social distancing when she talked about contact tracing and then also you mentioned in your story monitoring borders. Let's take these one at a time. Kind of how they impact the value. So for example contact tracing this is keeping track of all the cases in the country contact tracing and finding cases and testing really belong together again. It's a very simple idea. We know that we can stop any infection from spreading if we find the people that are infected and isolate them before they can infect anyone else or. If we can't do that we can try to find who they were in contact with and then take these people before they can affect somebody else foreign team. The problem is that we haven't been very good at that one plan from Johns Hopkins University. Where they say at the. Us needs an additional one hundred thousand people to be trained to do contact tracing. I mean just to give you an idea of what a scale up of these capabilities will look like yeah. I saw yesterday that New York state one percent of people are infected. I mean can you imagine contact tracing? It's the Paul. We missed an opportunity at the beginning of this outbreak. Where maybe we could have stopped the virus from spreading if we had really jumped on the cases in contact tracing but at some point the system becomes overwhelmed and I don't think anybody realistically expect someone to be able to trace all the contacts of one percent of the population of a major city but as the cases go down again we get another opportunity. I mean that's kind of what we've been working towards with. The lockdown is to get the numbers low enough so that we can make some of these classic interventions work for us again right. Let's turn to border control so a lot of countries closed their borders at least two non-citizens during this crisis but is it possible to reopen borders? Once the cases start to decline. And how would that affect efforts to combat a second way of what's becoming clear in this outbreak is that it really depends on the pathogen? Another phase of the outbreak. The situation on the ground. Yeah I mean arguably you know borders have been closed earlier than maybe the virus wouldn't have gotten to so many places and now we get into this next phase. Where the Boto? Just might have relevance again because once you've controlled the outbreak and once you're on top of some of your transmission chains then when you introduce new travelers who might be bringing the virus from somewhere and often these are people who might be in your national system that you're using for instance if you're using a certain APP to track people. They might not be using that. They also quite likely if they come to the country to meet with a lot of people and have quite a lot of contracts so you can see how having a lot of travelers is going to make your job harder. You really trying to find every case and find it early. And that's why I think that in the second phase at least will have quite significant restrictions on travel still. Let's go to social distancing as a measure. This is something that we're all going through. You know we're staying at home as much as we can. A lot of things are closed in. It's tough on people. They can't work. Businesses are closing. What do we know about how to reopen? What the steps are what to open. I is there any evidence that we can use to make these decisions. There isn't a lot. I think the two things that we know for sure. Is you better do it slowly and you better do step by step taking the time to see whether you know reopening one part of society whether that already gets you in trouble or not in some ways this is the hardest one to talk about because I mean the pod closures to certain extend bulges stay in place and the contracting testing will have to be ramped up with the social distancing different parts of society also going to have different interests. Some people will think it's the most important thing to reopen schools schools. Exactly I mean that's going to be locked especially in Germany. Recently a report said one. Schools are reopened. We should start with the youngest kids first because they kind of need the actual interaction with the teacher more than the older classes. Rather people say well. Actually it's easier to tell older students to keep a distance carefully. Exactly there are all these trade offs that we have to talk about enough because other people will see that. Actually it's more important to open churches synagogues or gyms or bars. I think different countries will try different. Things I Australia is now. Reopening small shops reopened today. They're looking at this for two weeks before they're gonNA open bigger shops in open malls again then another few weeks before. They want to reopen Baas restaurants. And at every step of this people will look very closely at this value of our which we can track almost in real time. Now how can you track it in real time logically? You can't really know what our is right now. Because you're always looking at infections. That have already happened but busy. You can look back and say okay. How many infections did we have a few weeks ago? And how many infections came out of those infections? So that gives you a first estimate of the are a few weeks ago. What a lot of models now doing. They supplement that with some real time. Data on mobility for instance. Like how far they're going. Yeah exactly so. For instance in Hong Kong. What they're using is the octopus part which is used to pay for public transport but also to pay for some other things that gives you an idea. If that takes up you see that your population's becoming more mobile again. Probably having more interactions. Basically trying to estimate is the are that we had a few weeks ago. Is that still the are we expect to see now or has there been a shift in behavior that makes up or down. Then you can roll back something or you can implement something to control. That are the hope. Is that you say okay. Let's open schools for the youngest kids. You wait a week and then you see. Hopefully that doesn't take up too much and like okay. This seems to have worked. Maybe we can do something else or you realize that. Something makes a huge difference because the problem at the moment is most countries have implemented a lot of different measures at the same time. They don't know which ones barked. Exactly a lot of the researchers that you talked to were less than confident that this is going to be an easy thing to do. They're more like this is going to be a long slog and people are not going to like it. Yes absolutely and it's one of the things that almost surprised me a little bit like I'm quite used to people saying especially model as saying okay. We have these models and if we do this and this and this we can get this under control. Maybe it doesn't work that way in real life sometimes but the modeling at least usually just shows you that it could be done path. Yeah just because it is so clear that a lot of the models require quite a lot of social distancing for this to work after a few weeks of experiencing. This is just a kid to everyone unlikely to have a population in most places in the world be willing or able to keep this up for months

Measles Sarah Johns Hopkins University Kaikaku United States Kuroda Argo Germany Intern Hong Kong Schmidt New York Australia
How COVID-19 disease models shape shutdowns

Science Magazine Podcast

09:07 min | 3 months ago

How COVID-19 disease models shape shutdowns

"First step today. We're GONNA check in with contributing correspondent Hi Cooper Schmidt. He's been reporting on Corona virus for months and just a note. Were recording this on Friday march. Twenty Seventh Haikai. He wrote a story this week with international news editor Martin answering about the order of modeling as the current virus sweeps around the globe. Why did you focus on forecasting disease? Spread forecast. Saw models have always played a role in the outbreaks that have written about buying. I think potential outbreak there have been more important than ever have been and the reason is fairly simple. A lot of the outbreaks that we've had in the past have been with pathogens that we know a little bit about that have been around for decades sometimes sometimes we have vaccines or we have drugs against them with. Kovac nineteen or with SASCO Baotou. We don't have anything we don't have any pharmaceutical interventions basically. So what we're seeing at the moment is the whole world trying to apply non-pharmaceutical interventions which is lockdowns social guessing physical distancing as we should probably call it the handwashing hygiene and the models. Become extremely important. If you want to understand which of these measures are going to be most likely to have a big effect and when you need to implement them and how government policy in most countries has been shaped immensely by the models that that researchers have come up with and I think that makes these models extremely important and it puts a lot of pressure on the people doing these models to huge responsibility. This isn't cutting edge science per se. The models aren't new. The math isn't tricky but getting the key. Variables can be really problematic. What important facts do we have? And what are we missing when we build these models? Well it depends a little bit on what question you want to answer. We have more or less nailed down some of the basic parameters of this virus. So how many people as every infected person in fact the how long does it take for an infection to run its course but at the same time of course there's stuff that we don't know for instance how many people have infections that has been from the start a huge question? We will only be able to answer that once we do big surveys with serology so looking for antibodies in people trying to understand how many people might have added infection but never were diagnosed cases so there are some some of these questions but of course if you're really modeling should close schools or should you advise a look down other things become immensely important as well for instance stuff like how. Many people are actually going to adhere to this advice. How long does it take for people to do this? Characteristics of the population exactly n and just very basic things like. How do people live together like if people stay in the household with two households looked like what context do households have in? Where do most of the contacts happen? Outside of households are kind of contact is actually. They'll contact that spreads the disease while of these things. Do go into these models and so there is a huge uncertainty and these models and I think one of the problems that both journalists have also politicians have. Is that when you read just the conclusions of model? It can suggest a lot more certainty. Then there is. I mean this is still your a fairly new disease that we don't know a lot about and there's a lot of other factors that are just as uncertain when you're modeling spread. Are there different models being used by different countries or different regions? Are these differences? A problem I don't think the difference is so much kind of model you're on. Most models are fairly consistent. I think the question is. What do you use the models for what you want to maximize their was this idea to try to find a middle way? You know at the moment we have to sell them up between issue like this virus spread. It is going to cause disease and death on a scale. That's just terrible on the other hand. It seems that what China did might curb the spread of the virus. It has done in China. But if you do that. You're basically locking down joe population for who knows how many months and tanking economy while he's doing it and causing a lot of knock on effects also terms of mental health and other things so both of those options seem kind of terrible and so some of the models were trying to find a middle ground. Joe. Is there a way to lower how much the virus spreads Joe make sure that it only spreads in that part of the population that less susceptible to equate calls severe disease and the Netherlands? Uk have kind of been the two examples where actually the the heads of state have gone out and said we are not trying to completely suppress this virus window. Trying to get case down zero. We think the better option is to let it spread a little bit and make sure that it doesn't spread so much that it overwhelms our capacity of the hospitals to to deal with cases what what about if a drug came out or a vaccine in people had died because they were part of a plan to expose the country slowly. You know that'd be terrible. There'd be a lot of life lost in you know. Is this something that can be accounted for and models use of the vaccine or discovery of a useful drug. Go exactly this. There are some things that just won't be in the models like if we do find a drug treatment that kind of reduces the risk of dying or when vaccine becomes available that can change the things I mean nobody will probably become available too late to really matter in the next year but certainly that might be drugs that we can find like available drugs can be re purposed that might lower the risk of dying from this that might lower the strain on hospitals and it depends a little bit on. How like you think that is how much you're willing to risk at this point. The other thing I just want to point out I mean if you do this you can model a lot and you can chart a very narrow path to an outcome that you want but when you're doing this in a landscape of so much uncertainty it's just an extremely risky proposition to say okay. We have one model here that says if we do exactly these things and if all goes according to plan then we might be able to avoid tests for fee and. I think that's where you've seen a lot of pushback from other scientists and both the UK and to a certain extent. The Netherlands seemed to have come closer to the approach that other European countries are using right. Which is to try to contain the virus as much as possible for as long as possible. Exactly let's turn to the possibility of a drug treatment for this outbreak. So you wrote this week with John Cohen. Another of our reporters who's been covering rotavirus wall-to-wall like you a story. On World Health Organization launching a global trial of drugs that might be effective against Cova Nineteen. And it's actually four drugs and their intention is to involve hospitals that are actively treating patients and testing. These drugs is this something that's been started already. Hopefully by the time the podcast comes out. Bullets started at the moment that giving up the hope was that they would have the first patients this week. I haven't checked in with them today but they might well announced in the press conference today. So it's pretty unprecedented. I mean we're in the middle of the global pandemic and we don't have any drugs and because it takes too long to develop new drugs. Probably they're just really looking at all the drugs that are available already. That might be repurpose. That might have some effect on covert nineteen. What drugs are they looking at? And how are they chosen the? Wto has a panel of experts. That have been looking at drugs that possibly could treat this Since January and kind of came up with this priority list and reach Leon who has deciliter which is an antiviral drug that was originally developed to treat a bowler and similar viruses had actually failed to do anything in a bullet was tested in the DRC during the carnival outbreak and didn't have any effect but there is some data from animal studies and from Cell Culture Studies that suggested might have an effect against will be too so that's kind of top of the list and some patients in the. Us have been treated with the frustation in snohomish county in Washington state was treated with a and does the any. Am that describes how he basically got better after a day of does. That's not evidence that this drug is working but people certainly have more hope that this might have an effect on some of the other drugs the second one on the list is an old combination drug against HIV called collateral. So that's two substances revere via the idea there is that this combination drug actually acts against approach of issues that the virus needs to to produce its proceeds. It might have the same effect in Saas Cova to we. Don't really know there's one study that was done in China where one hundred ninety nine people were treated either with this combination drug or just the standard of care and they didn't actually find significant difference in outcome but one of the problems that we have with of these drugs of course is the sickest patients are getting these drugs because the hospitals are overwhelmed. And they're mostly treating the rea- sick patients but of course it might already be too late to have a really good effect of these drugs when you give the bed late in the disease.

China UK The Netherlands JOE Hi Cooper Schmidt News Editor Saas Cova WTO Sasco Baotou Martin Kovac Cova Nineteen Snohomish County DRC World Health Organization REA Cell Culture Studies Leon John Cohen
The Labor Market Catastrophe

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:54 min | 3 months ago

The Labor Market Catastrophe

"If we had to pick exactly one economic indicator right now. The best shows the. Us economy has come to a sudden. Stop that indicator would be unemployment insurance initial claims. That's a bit of a mouthful so we are just going to call it. Jobless claims and jobless claims are exactly what they sound like. When people lose their jobs they can file a claim with their state government to start receiving unemployment insurance money and employment checks so if jobless claims are climbing by a lot it means a lot of people are losing their jobs. The syndicator comes out once a week. Every Thursday and the number of jobless claims filed throughout the country. Last week was released just this morning by the Department of Labor and it was so hard to grasp that we called an old friend of the shows to walk us through it. My Name is Martha and I'm the manager of economic research at Schmidt futures so back in the first week of March just earlier. This jobless claims were still very low by historical standards. Roughly two hundred and ten thousand people per week. We're filing for unemployment. After having just lost their jobs that's really really low. The labor market back then was excellent. Martha says if you think about the conversations we were having three weeks ago. It was longest expansion on record. Steady growth people coming back into the labor force. Oh what a difference. A week can make businesses very quickly started feeling the economic effects of the corona virus pandemic and in the second week of March jobless claims shot up by thirty three percent. Martha says that was a massive massive one week increase so the only time that we've ever seen numbers like that previously is when there's been some kind of natural disaster like a hurricane the difference is that usually after a hurricane when you see a big jump in unemployment insurance claims you expect it to come down the next week instead. We found out this morning. Is that in the third week of March. That's last week three point. Three million people filed for unemployment insurance benefits. That is a record high number for a single week. It represents an increase of more than a thousand percent from the previous week also record about a year and a half of jobs. Growth in the economy was just obliterated in one week. It is almost certain that the economy is already in a recession. Even if it's not official yet and Martha says for people who follow the economy. This jobless claims number is just unlike anything they've ever seen. I mean you look at this number and you almost. It's so overwhelming. You almost feel numb right. I mean more than three million people filing for unemployment insurance in a single week is truly almost incomprehensibly horribly sad plus Martha says we also have no way of knowing yet what happens next. The biggest question now is what happens after this week. Do we see the same number next week? Does it accelerate? Does it start slowing down? And it's actually incredibly important to remember that unemployment insurance claims are usually an undercount of the number of people who've lost their jobs or lost income in some way because not everyone qualifies for example people who are self employed or contractors gig workers do not qualify and a lot of people have struggled to file for employment because their state systems have been so overwhelmed. I mean the websites in many cases have just crashed because so many people are trying to file at the same time so their claims might not show up in the data until later so as Martha explained. The jobless claims number is actually underestimating. How brutal things are in the labor market right now and this incredible jump in the number of people filing for unemployment shows not just a sudden economic collapse in the US but also the very strange way that the corona virus pandemic is affecting the economy and affecting economic policy. Yeah because the strategy policymakers are using to fight. The pandemic is too severely reduced contact between people so that the virus stop spreading as everybody knows by. Now that's social distancing and it has meant forcing people not to work if they have jobs that require a lot of interaction with other people. Not just people who work in stores and bars and restaurants and hotels in the travel industry but also for any kind of other business. That has been shuttered. This strategy is very different. From the one. That policymakers used to fight a normal recession when they tried to get people back to work as soon as possible. Instead what policymakers are trying to do now is to deliberately stop a lot of people from working while the public health crisis lasts and eventually to immediately get back to work when the crisis is over. It's a tricky strategy to get right but unemployment insurance the money that people get after they file their jobless. Claims is an important part of that strategy. It's a safety net Martha says and normally an economic policy when people talk about the social safety net. People really worry about whether or not providing benefits discourages people from working. And there's an extensive literature on that and that's a whole separate conversation. We want benefits to discourage people from working. We don't want people going to restaurants and trying to work right now. We want them staying home and safe and one way to do that is to make sure that they can get the benefits that they need through the unemployment insurance system and that is partly why the economic stimulus package that was just passed by the Senate yesterday included a temporary increase in the amount of money that workers will get when they file for unemployment insurance. It gives workers more money now that they're laid off but then those extra benefits and later by which point we all hope the crisis will be

Martha United States Department Of Labor Schmidt Futures Senate Official Self Employed
"Your Next Big Idea" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"Your Next Big Idea" Week

"This week's theme is your next big idea. The curator is Daniel Brooks. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says hi. My Name's Daniel Brooks nine. The host of the unlocking creativity podcast theme. I've chosen is. You're next big idea. The reason I've chosen this is quite simply running away from changing our whole lives. These podcasts are going to help inspire you to go in and discover yours. Here are the PODCASTS and episodes chosen by Daniel. Monday's episode comes from the Tim. Ferriss show and is called Eric Schmidt lessons from trillion dollar coach. It's one hundred and four minutes. Long Eric. Schmidt is a technical advisor and board member to Alphabet Inc where he advises its leaders on technology business and policy issues. Eric joined Google in two thousand one and helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader. In Technology. Tuesday's episode comes from design matters with Debbie millman and is called Lisa Khandan. It's thirty six minutes long in this episode. A conversation with artist and illustrator. Liikanen about getting started creatively. Wednesday's episode comes from creative. Boom ranking on big regrets being different and discovering life begins at fifty. It's fifty eight minutes long. Rankin is the British photographer publisher and film director renowned for his portraits of Bowie and Bjork and for being co founder of dazed and confused. We chatted to the fearless man behind the lens about his career. And we're surprised to hear him open up about his childhood. His father his regrets and mistakes. This is an honest delve into the heart and mind of one of the biggest names. In photography Thursday's episode comes from Happy Place and is called. Joe Wicks it's forty nine minutes long in this episode. The body coach himself turns up at ferns door to discuss being a father of two meeting. Your work goals and being named Gq worst-dressed of the year Friday's episode comes from unlocking creativity. And is called. Darren Brown the creative mind. It sixty two minutes long about this podcast. Daniel says creativity is the power that allows us to imagine a world. That isn't our world yet to consider what doesn't yet exist and make it exist. Welcome to the PODCAST. That will help you make that happen. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Daniel. For this week's the your next big idea. Listen in and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a playlist on Pod chaser just had to pod Chaser DOT COM and type in your next big idea into the search bar and the playlists will be right there for your enjoyment joined the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag creativity. This is usually the section of the show where we bring you podcast news since the news is so filled with corona virus and Kobe nineteen lately. There's honestly not that much podcast industry news instead skype. Pillsbury who writes inside podcasting the newsletter? We usually read our stories from is asking for your participation she writes. I'm determined to keep this community connected so while we live through this bizarre moment in history. I'll publish reader submitted issues of the newsletter. I need your help to get this done. Please send me any or all of the following one episodes or podcast that have brought you. Joy provided relief over the past. Few weeks sky will share them in her newsletter and may eventually start a Google spreadsheet where people can add browse information at their leisure. Please include a link to the show and explain why it has been helpful to you during this time two stories about how the pandemic has impacted or not your work as a creator. Feel free to mention your show in the context of your story. Three stories about how the corona virus has impacted your ability to listen to podcasts or your interest in them four requests for help with your podcast need an editor a guest. Anything else. Five any ideas you have for future reader submitted issue you can send sky any and all of your suggestions return on twitter at sky. Pillsbury that's S. K. Y. E. P. L. L. S. B. U. R. Y. You can also reach her by email at sky at inside dot com. We'll be back next week with podcast. News and PODCASTS. That are keeping US happy during the Super Weird time.

Daniel Brooks Eric Schmidt Pillsbury Google United States Debbie Millman Darren Brown Happy Place Twitter Gq Worst-Dressed Joe Wicks Ferriss Editor Skype Kobe Rankin Lisa Khandan Alphabet Inc Advisor
Dow Jones Plunges 1,400 Points

News, Traffic and Weather

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Dow Jones Plunges 1,400 Points

"Outbreak continues to eat away at the stock markets Asian markets slid further on Thursday after the Dow lost six percent closing below twenty thousand on Wednesday and wiping out all gains made since president trump's inauguration Susan Schmidt at Aviva investors and that kind of environment short term valuation tools don't work because there is so much uncertainty in the markets are really stepping back from that I think a lot of investors continue to want to move to the sidelines and stay out of the way she expects a quarter or two at least of negative growth in the gross domestic product

Outbreak Donald Trump Susan Schmidt President Trump
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

11:47 min | 9 months ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Developing impactful products and building engaged teams and now here's your host Kurt Schmidt Ryan thank you for joining me on the show today it's going out there that that's him else want the real him to be the be the what that goes out there because I know it will be received that way it'll be more authentic versus a deer in the headlights you know and so I'm trying to bring out that in other people and I I don't know if I'd call it talent but I I'm usually successful getting them to sound like themselves and to other there's whether their leaders or colleagues and it seems to be working so I'm slowly I you know I don't mind being the face of the brand but I'm trying to have maybe the inspiration of the brand getting other people to have that voice of what the brand is always find it interesting when I'm talking with not just other sooners but people who work in product management or these other types of things where they're very self conscious about sharing their stuff right now and get it like I understand like some people are like no I wanNA keep my instagram on private and do this and any other thing but I do have folks that come to me and say like oh I couldn't do what you're doing thing with the show and and this and that even though I mean it sounds like fun or whatever you know and you know I too like you I try to coach them around owned just put yourself out there and see what happens it's funny I tell the story I probably told that too many times in this podcast gonNa tell it anyways is like when I first launched the show I got all these notes people congratulating me and I'm like I didn't win a prize you know like I didn't I just made I just stuck a stupid microphone in my face and started talking Schmidt right but then my wife catering like congratulating because you put yourself out there and he's like oh I didn't all I see doing something that so many other people can never imagine doing yeah or maybe just can't get over themselves enough to do something right right so how have you coached other people like so let's say I'm listening to show Ryan and I'm like you know I probably could beef up my presence may be unlinked in a little bit personally maybe maybe I'm in sales or marketing but maybe maybe I'm just a lead developer lead designer and I wanted to I want to be more of a thought leader yeah you know we're we're should I start right that's a really good question I do get this question asked a lot I honestly do so so the first thing I like to sort of level set with them and and while there they may be coming to me with that ask which is a good first step I'll usually kind of backtrack a little bit and say first and foremost you have to really ona what you're comfortable with and what you're not comfortable with yeah you might have to step out of your car for its own a little bit like you said you know you had a stick Mike in your face and just do it you know but but you know if you knew that this is something that you're not comfortable with at that moment time but you're willing to to try it and just get started then that's I think a lot of people sort of ignore that like I'm not comfortable with this but I guess need to do this because everyone else is doing this or maybe on social media because everyone else's on social media and started doing in doing into it but they don't realize they're not this is not authentic to them it doesn't come naturally to them it's likely not going to look authentic to the people that are receiving right he's not gonNA look natural to them so you need a I just like call that out if that's the case that's totally fine I'm usually not going to tell people like eating to be all these social networks because they're the most popular social networks out there let's I you know think about linked in what's going to be the best for what you're trying to accomplish and then when they get into the other tip that I'll tell them is you know you typically will want to go.

Kurt Schmidt Ryan
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"How have you seen in ways where you can make that change happen in that story happen, all at once like where, where do you begin like do you just start writing like, do you just start talking to people like, how do you, how have you found success in making that change? Start I feel really fortunate that I have a really good partner in the innovation lab. So Brian Obermann leads the engineering department and he and I are like very different but very similar. And so oftentimes when we are crafting, are y and really trying to get clear and concise on that story. Whether it's for peers, whether it's for teams, whether it's for senior leadership, whether it's because we want to do something getting together to really craft that y and having us be able to bounce things off each other in challenge each other, and it's a fantastic partnership in the sense that we don't often agree. But we're able to come to a consensus and continue to drive forward. And so, and that's what I really appreciate about him. Is that it isn't just a yes. Partner someone that actually continually challenges me to think and and do things differently and vice versa for me is with him as well. And so what comes out of that, as we're crafting, are y or our business case, our use case or are like reason for change. I find those really valuable to do that with another person versus in isolation. Or if needed sometimes time constraints are really tough. So one of us will start with the draft. But then we'll come together and just tear it apart. Rewrite at redo it and then start to shape up the story and usually, it's for leadership, sometimes it's for our partners. But if you can find someone that you can really disagree with that has a very different lens and take on things, but that you can also who find solid consensus and drive forward like. That's an amazing thing to have. And I've been fortunate to have Brian at securing financial, and I had a new, Becky Burleigh and a couple of the other care pay more on a couple of their partners like that at Capella previously, so find my recommendations, find your person, find your person within the company when that challenges you, but that you also work really well, with and oftentimes, you're able to create that rhythm together because I think, in that it's a trust is really important that cause us as humans. Right. I mean I don't mind the idea of being challenged or all that stuff. But I also had to trust that it is about an agenda, some of these push to, like I have to trust that they want to swim the same direction as me. But right now, the thing that we should go left. And I think we should go right? So I think to your point, I would add Unidad like yeah, find find people you trust. But aren't yes, people that. That they want something good, too. But maybe they've got different ideas and find ways to work with them, right? Make that happen. Now, I think that's great advice. I, I would do that in the past to you. I was fortunate working at a large company like I could find a half a dozen people who would disagree with me. I could get him in a room and talk through. Why are you disagreeing with me? What, what are the ways how can okay I need to sharpen this message over here trim. This one here and make this one a bit more descriptive, right? Instead of like. Yeah. Because I think there is a perfectionist nature in us builders like we like to we want to show our work when it's done. Now when it's in progress. Right. Because I can be embarrassing. Right. They can. And that's it's interesting as we've had to as we've looked for team members for the lab. That has been something that we've had to level set across every single resource that comes in so you ex design like really practicing Lee new x believe practicing, getting feedback early and often when you're designs aren't fully cooked when your copy hasn't fully cooked when you're just kind of defining your hypothesis to test it cetera. And so throughout that culture, and having to lead and seek out individuals that are comfortable in that type of environment, not only really kind of formed Brian's in my relationship, because he he's been at securing years and years, and I was new LeBron into the musician. But we had to practice that. And I think. Our team seeing us work through those challenges and work through those disagreements come to a consensus and move forward. Like sometimes that happened very much in our agile scrum teams front and center, also created the environment where we want them to challenge each other, as well. And so that's like a logical safety is a core component of the success of our lab team, which means that we have to be really vulnerable and show up in our ethic selves. Have those conversations own win. We dropped the ball or failed be okay with that and also model how to fail for them. And so, I think those are some of those just key components that as leaders, you have to be really vulnerable and show how to fail and show how to celebrate the successes in the learnings out of the failure and move forward. Otherwise, your team is never going to feel comfortable or confident that they're not going to have repercussions for failure. I want to thank you for joining me to day on the show. I learned a lot as I always do in our conversations and I appreciate you taking the time to come down here. So if I want to connect with they and I want to see what she's talking about or maybe grab coffee sometime. Like where are you? Most active was a great place to find you lean din for my professional network is where I am most active, not necessarily that active. I'm on Twitter, but not that active at cetera. I work downtown Saint Paul. So if people like coming over to the east side, there's some really great little coffeeshops etcetera. Yeah, you're in your offices, there, all newly revenue renovated and part of their then we're yeah. Working through the Clinton floor by floor quite a bit. Quite a bit has been overhauled in his really beautiful. Looks great. Okay. Cool. Well, thank you for taking the time today to come on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you for having this. Thank you for listening to the Schmidt list, if you want to learn more about how dri accelerates innovation checkout foundry makes dot com. And if you'd like me to speak.

Brian Obermann partner Becky Burleigh Twitter Schmidt Saint Paul Lee LeBron
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

12:15 min | 1 year ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"And now here's your host, Kurt Schmidt. Stephanie. Hi, thanks for joining me today. Thank you for having me. I appreciate you being here. I knew you're busy, and I appreciate taking a little time to carve out and come down. And visit so you're US Bank. Tell me about your role. What are you, what are you what's your job these days my job? I love my job in the standpoint that it changes a lot from what we do. The official title is. I'm senior vice president, I run the innovation design group within the US Bank innovation team. What are we doing innovation design? We've got a lot of beautiful diagrams that I could pull out to show you titrate rate and we're really good at process, and in diagramming it, and, and they're better people to explain it, but at the end of the day, what I really think about is our team is there to inspire others inspire selves in some cases. But really, how do we help people get their ideas stated, and then move that idea forward into something sometimes at something, our very own team is doing that. Sometimes it's. A program that we're running like our innovator in residence program were helping employees bring their idea forward. You know there's a there's a lot of momentum behind being innovative right now in banking. So, you know, having a role like this is in a way. It's a privilege, but there's also a lot of pressure on it because of how we have to innovate and get employs to think about that. I've found love that.

Stephanie US Kurt Schmidt US Bank senior vice president official
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"And now, here's your host Kurt Schmidt. Everyone and welcome this week. We're going to change it up just a little bit. My son Henry is here, and he's going to do the intro for the show this week. Okay. Ready to go. This is bizarre. Fifty seven of the Schmidt list today. We're talking to Jeff some snow, and we have to talk to him about the number one whole thing that trips up organized since and teams when it comes to adopting Adra principles and his concept of promise driven design. Thank you for coming to the show. I can't it like a renegade ball. Mr Susta, Jeff. Hi, thanks for joining me today. My pleasure. Oh, it's good to see you. So I wanted to hear a little bit about how did you get into consulting? You started Sussman associates was it seventy years ago eight years ago years ago, congratulations. Thank you. How did you get into consulting and doing the DevOps design thinking that I like in the speeding events like how did that all happen for you? I've been in the software industry for thirty years. And I my background is really broad. I've built systems I've led organizations across the entire development QA and operation spectrum. I've worked for startups. I've worked for Silicon Valley technology companies I've worked for enterprises, but it was about ten years ago that I discovered two things simultaneously that really profoundly impacted my approach to my work. The first was designed thinking, and in particular service design and the second was cloud computing when I put those two things together a lot of people do. I just want to point out. They seem very different. Well, they seem very different. But when you think about it, if you look at modern approaches to IT IT as a service infrastructure as a service software as a service. What's the word? That's in common service is actually a little liberal arts student college. So the idea of design and design thinking didn't feel foreign to me. In fact, the reason I got into softer in the first place was my advisor said go take a class that has nothing to do with what you're doing and I took an artificial intelligence programming class. And I went Ooh, I like this. Yeah. So I came into software through an unusual avenue. And I I did well at it. I mean I worked for apple. I worked for oracle. I did the dot com thing in the late nineties in San Francisco, but I always felt like I had a slightly different approach. I couldn't put my thumb on. And then I read Tim Brown's book changed by design and win. A ha this is me. I'm not a designer, but I am a design thinker. It's how I solve problems. So that led me to service design, and then I put that together with the cloud which was happening right about then. And I realized oh, this is about service also around that time, I was CTO for softwares of service startup and to be perfectly honest. I got tired of having my cellphone by my bed. I. Retirement on twenty four hours a day. And I also felt like my skills were really in not being operational, but helping people improve how their operational so I'm really kind of consultant by mentality. If you will. So I started my own practice here in the twin cities two thousand and ten and my focus is on bringing together agile and DevOps with design thinking in.

service design Jeff Kurt Schmidt Henry Sussman associates Adra CTO advisor Mr Susta Silicon Valley San Francisco consultant Tim Brown apple twenty four hours
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"But until they show me how committed they are to me and our team in responding and things I'm not going to give you those promises because it's a two way street. So I don't try to pin myself into a spot too fast to be able to do that. So if there's a policy you can create around the problem, so it's like, it's not specific to a client or thing. Because you know, you don't wanna tell that one thing. Look, they just gave his money now, you're gonna tell them. No. Because you can't start. Okay. Well, we can pretend to start have you ever worked on a project where you're pretending to start. Right. And then you don't really start for three months. That's terrible. Terrible. It's absolutely terrible. So like, okay, we'll do it one more time and we're done. So how do you get the information you need? You know, how do we set a new procedure to solve this? Yeah. That's really good advice. So we're going to wrap it up here. Tell me about what you got coming up. I'm guessing there's going to be another manage digital this year. Right. There is we are going to have that in the spring looking around may. But I think the best way for folks that are interested in they should go to the website managed digital. I o and sign up for the newsletter. And then we'll let everyone know when tickets are up for sale, but probably be around January, but we're doing the one day event again this year, and we are actually going to pump up the networking opportunities. So that people are doing that as well as giving opportunities for experts in the room like people attending to have more voice than it. Because just because someone decided to get to stand at the podium doesn't mean they that someone in the crowd doesn't also have amazing ideas. So I want to create that dialog a little more amongst the people attending. So that's really kind of my biggest focus, and then I'm working on a blog posts and have a talk next. A month and just kind of do that kind of stuff. So if I want to get some coffee with bland because she's fantastic. And why don't you? Happy hour. Maybe some tea. Where's a good place to find you and connect with you? You can go to linked in otherwise, you can go to my website, which is Lynn winter M dot com. And that's right. I was really slow and getting so I can't move out of Minnesota ever in my life. Perfect. That sounds great. Well except for for vacations, right? Yes. And then you can you can put your share. Well, thanks Lyn. I really enjoyed the conversation. I always enjoy our conversations. But thank you for taking the time today to come in record it. Yeah. Thanks for having me. Thank you for listening to the Schmidt list. If you want to learn more about how accelerates innovation checkout foundry makes dot com, and if you'd like me to speak about establishing a growth mindset at your conference or with your team drop me a note at curt that foundry makes dot com. Oh in the next time, you're on the internet head, I tunes and leave the show review. If you enjoyed this episode, please share with a friend because sharing is carrying like, truly. Appreciate you taking the time to listen to the show. And I hope you have a fantastic week. Going going back back to Kellie jolly.

Lyn Kellie jolly Lynn winter M Schmidt Minnesota three months one day
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt hello everyone and welcome one of the more difficult task product manager has is to influence without a thority today and steiner of deb jam joins me to break down how to be successful doing that and then also we talk about the continuing education of the product manager and of course all things joel as we do so here's my conversation with an i hope you enjoy it and thanks for joining me today on the show thanks for ever make so tell me about how you got into the industry of technology and design and what you're doing these days i cool so as i was coming out of high school i had no clue what i wanted to do man yeah like rare i know but but you know it's funny when i was eighteen i felt like everyone else had it figured out now as an adult i talked to people and we're all still trying to figure it out but you know i i kinda wanted to go into journalism at the time i really liked writing and stuff but i had the opportunity to work at my local newspaper in a very small town and rural wisconsin and i knew that are sports editor with a college degree was making six bucks an hour and oz making five bucks an hour so i figured that might not be a good longterm career path so i decided to major in computer science stead.

product manager deb jam wisconsin editor smith kurt schmidt joel
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt over one and welcome this week kate agnew joins me to talk about the state of education and technology and she also sear experiences of going to school at mit working at target andrine works she also helped build girls intact in minneapolis and that's all letter to a current role as a senior it architect optum it's a great conversation kate is great so take a listen and i'll see on the other side of the show okay kate thank you for joining me today thank you for having me so tell me a little bit about your background how you got into development and what you're doing these days so i studied math and undergrad and wanted to go into event planning just because i thought that would be fun and then i was graduating and and a blurb went through the math department that target was hiring go target that could be cool maybe i can get a discount eventually started they're just after i graduated in their technology leadership development program so went through a few rotations and really got engaged in technology in a way that i never had before i didn't even take any like development courses in undergrad which i kind of regret now but just kind of shows you the ways the times of changed even in the last ten years but then i got engaged with girls in tech kind of around that same time by realizing one how few women there were in technology i think that target was actually more unique because there were a lot of women but once i had done a summer program i was like they're literally no other women in technology outside of target.

kurt schmidt minneapolis smith kate agnew ten years
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt hillary one and welcomed episode thirty one this week we're talking project management with adam hansen adamant i go over at a what it's like to manage onshore teams versus offshore teams how to handle if feel like your team is out of alignment how to also manage people who don't report to you and all the above so it's a great conversation i hope you enjoy it and get some announcements on the other side but for now take a listen to my conversation with adam adam thanks for coming on the show pre sheet it welcome so tell me a little bit about your becker and how did you get into what you're doing these days since you're interesting question that i ask myself sometimes and it's a question that i often ask people that i'm in interviewing right because nobody ever gets out of college and goes i'm going to be a project manager program manager right celebrate i actually have a finance degree and a music performance degree from the university of minnesota started as a financial analyst for a defense contractor here in town like that work it was interesting work but for a while it got to be a little bit monotonous and so i got into consulting with a small consulting firm doing primarily work in the financial services industry was aquisition integration where console a lot of that ended up being very closely tied to technology platform builds for these big financial services companies so i did that for a while new york and and came back to local firm here worked with you for awhile at previous home.

kurt schmidt adam hansen project manager program manage financial analyst new york smith adam adam university of minnesota
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kirk schmidt everyone and welcome to this week's addition of the schmidt list number thirty the big three oh and who joins me it's denise denise middlemen addo coach at general mills on this show we're going to talk a little bit about well we're gonna talk a lot about enterprise agile transformation while it may seem like a dry subject but it is very interesting to listen to the great things that they're doing over a general mills i really enjoyed talking with denise and i hope you enjoy the conversation as well well denise welcome thank you for coming to the show i appreciate it adamy so tell me about your background and your current role at general mills what are you doing on a daytoday basis my background is a project management so i've been doing that for twenty plus years and stumbled on a position at general mills and was lucky enough to then trance for into the agile coach role which i'm in now after i was able to start leading one of their first agile teams and that general mills so it's been kind of exciting to kinda see it evolve that way so day to day right now we are on the brink of our major transformation if you will so i daytoday trying to get that i'll figure out which takes a lot of effort obviously but right now we're trying to hire other people and get it ready to go and figure out how we're going to form these new teams that we're gonna have so a lot of strategic stuff which has been great because that's very different than project management obviously so.

denise smith kirk schmidt
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt hello everyone and welcome to episode twenty nine yes twenty nine of the schmidt list this week i have blair ends author of pricing creativity plus robert nelson one of the co founders at foundry joins me for the conversation as well it's a great but long conversation which could have gone on for much longer time honestly i really enjoyed talking with blair he's great and i really hope you like this episode i it's definitely what i'm going to go back and realism to few times because there's a lot of information in here so check it out and i'll see you on the other side of the show blair and robert thanks for joining me today yeah my pleasure happy to be here right thanks so blair i'm a big fan of your book pricing creativity and that's what i'm hoping we're going to talk a lot about today but to give the audience a bit of background on yourself you know how did you how did you get involved in becoming a writer and and putting out these these books i know you're doing consulting these days but kind of give me a quick what's the background on blair sort of spiel yeah so i'm not consulted i'm recovering consultant nice win without pitching my business was conceived as a consulting practice new business sales in new business consulting to create affirms back in early two thousand and two and then in early two thousand thirteen i began the transition from a consulting practice training company so win without pitching as a training organization we do essentially sales new business training l us l pick the phrase depending on the.

kurt schmidt robert nelson blair writer smith foundry consultant
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt and everyone and welcome to another edition of the schmidt list today i'm talking to elaine chao product manager for adobe xt and anti vitale you ex designed director for polaris indian elaine talk about what good design means to them and then we also talk about what it's like to design a product for these two are truly great so i hope you enjoyed it but first andy and elena thank you guys for joining me on the show i wanted to start with you elaine elaine tell me a little bit about what your role is and what you're currently working on my name is elaine chao and i am working as a product manager on a new product called the dobie xt very cool and andy what's your current role in what are you working on these days sure i'm andy and i am the director of user experience at polaris industries a global power sports company and aside from that i'm the director of design impact for a i g minnesota few things that i wanted to talk about today one specifically around product management now elaine you've got an interesting role because you're not only managing a product but you're designing design product for designers so pressure pressure it's not that those people are naturally fickle or anything like that.

kurt schmidt director polaris andy elaine chao product manager polaris industries smith adobe elaine elaine director of design
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt hello everyone and welcome to this week's show episode twenty two of the schmidt list this week i've got an awesome guy jonathan stark joining me on the show if you haven't heard of jonathan stark you wrote a great book called hourly billing his nuts which it is so you can listen to our conversation here it's a bit of a long one but there is so much to cover in so much to talk about i really hope you take time and listen to the whole thing and if you do make sure you stick around till the end because i've got a few nouncement to share with you enjoy the show tell me a bit about your background jonathan how did you get into the web and then into what you're doing now in in the consulting you're doing a sure i started do i mean i've been doing computers since long long time ago at an eighties or something my dad got a ibm pc that had no hard drive it was just floppy disk and you know we plead zork and ultimately so been a part of my life since sixth grade junior high around there but music was my love i went through music school did that did the you know the sort of regionally touring musician things leaping in vans and whatnot did that for a long time but didn't make much money at it so to kind of cover the bases in between i would be either waiting on tables or doing things like cork express page layout stuff in the nineties late nineties and eventually ended up one thing led to another ended up doing file maker pro systems inside the internal agency at staples.

kurt schmidt smith jonathan stark
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kirk schmidt over mind and welcome to this week show episode twenty one i'm excited for this week we've got a great guest mark jensen director of product management at epi core software today mark and we're going to talk about what it means to be a great product manager and why sometimes product is referred to as the sales prevention department i hope you enjoy the conversation as much as i did and without further ado here's my conversation with mark stick around after the show for some news and announcements mark thanks for joining me on the show today appreciate you stopping by hey my pleasure kurt yeah so tell me about your background and how you ended up in product management and what you're doing these days well interesting story because i'm person who stumbled into product management at got involved in technology going to college did not want to be involved in technology everything that i could to not take the computer classes and then i got into business at that time it was all programming was just not what i wanted to do got into a business applications classrooms like this is wonderful i love this so started off with a company called great plains software up in fargo north dakota technical support and then moved into training and then from there started as is as it was in training learning about these functions of product management product marketing that lead to taking a course with steve johnson at pragmatic marketing and learning a little bit more about product management and really caught.

kirk schmidt product manager steve johnson smith mark jensen director of product management epi core kurt fargo north dakota technical support
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt hello everyone and welcome to this week's episode of the schmidt list which episode is it now let quite sure anyways so this show is one of the ones that i'm very excited about because this year i'm going to try to have more than one guest on at a time for a few reasons one of the reasons why i started this podcast in the first place is because i really honestly i just wanted to learn i wanted to learn a lot more and who better than from some of these excellent minds that share their time with myself and with you so without further ado here's brian and emily talking about the future of user experience and how the user experience processes chain changed over the years i hope you enjoy it all right everyone welcome today i have two amazing individuals i have my amazing wife emily schmidt and i also have a captain of industry brian rowe here to talk a bit about you x process we're also going to dive into if you other subjects brian salo to the audience and tell us what you've been up too late hello audience what i've been up to as of late to be completely one hundred percent transparent the latter half of twenty seventeen i was mr unemployed contrary to recent popular belief that's not necessarily pronounced fun employed as get that out of here so i now have happily found a way to kind of bring that period of transition to a kind of end of phrase sort of closure period and i'll be moving onto blue cross blue shield of minnesota which arguably is one of the only healthcare.

kurt schmidt brian rowe brian salo minnesota smith schmidt brian emily schmidt one hundred percent
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt low and welcome to episode eighteen of the schmidt list on today's show i'm talking to user experience professional and renaissance man jason schneider also with me is dave matthias entrepreneur volunteer and product management specialist we attempt to answer the question who owns the user u x or product spoiler alert it's both but sometimes these two roles can find friction on the product building journey jason dave and i share our experiences in how to make these two important roles work better together i enjoyed this conversation immensely and i hope you do too all right well first of all i want to thank everybody for joining us today today i have dave matthias and i also have jason schneider so dave once you give us a little backstory on who you are and what you doing these days yeah so thanks for having me here off so yeah dave thias i play at the intersection of what i say product management customer experience analytics so that's really where i you know my sweet spot but my background tends to be a little bit more on the product side so that's the angle were sort of that first lens that i put myself under so what i'm doing nowadays little this little that is as good product person rate so right now one of the things i'm working on is putting together a program on critical data thinking and communication at mankato state it's actually in our donald cation so that's actually been kicked off next month so it's something that's taking a lot of time right now but so that's that's what i was working on earlier today before coming here and jason tells a little bit about what you're up to you these days will.

kurt schmidt jason schneider jason dave dave matthias jason smith
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engage teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt hello everyone and welcome to episode seventeen of the schmidt list on today's show i am talking header kelly manager of employee experience at irritate consulting group heather knight talk about what it takes to be an amazing manager i hope you enjoy the conversation and stick around after the show for a few notes elevator okay welcome to the show how you doing doing your background is we worked together as you were a manager of many people so tell me a little bit about how you got into the role of managing folks well i really started as a manager of just a very small hr team it was was kind of weird mix of of roles and through my involvement with working with the other managers in the company i was promoted into a development manager role for the project management when you first started role of being a manager what was some of the things that you did to kind of help get you up to speed about how to be a good manager and what the proper way of managing was because i myself have managed people in the past i never went to management school or i think there is a kind of a a natural yearning to want to be really good at it.

kurt schmidt smith heather knight development manager
"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"schmidt" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Hello and welcome to the smith list the podcast for people dedicated to managing successful projects developing impactful products and building engaged teams and now here's your host kurt schmidt elo everyone and welcome to two thousand eighteen and episode sixteen of the schmidt list i i if i have to policies voice because i am just getting over a sickness on today's show i'm talking to david hustling founder of gem speaker author and all around brilliant individual we discuss how software development has been under enormous transformation over the past two decades and then where it's headed next talking with david was inciteful and i truly enjoyed it so without further ado here's my conversation with david hausmann so tell me a little bit about your background and what deb jam is and how you got basically into software development and then starting a company around it yeah you know actually have had a lot of time to reflect on that in the last few years and i realize abana geek longer than i want to admit when i was a little kid i was writing civil war games on the teletype with the computer at the university of minnesota then i went off and did this rock and roll thing for while which was awesome and then survey came back and i was you know just like oh gotta get a job and i think i'll do this computing thing and one of my teachers always used to tease me she said yeah you thought you'd get a job writing accounting software i was pretty sure that wasn't going to happen so i started out of this really neat place with a kind of the mentor that everybody wants brilliant person completely optional and it was three musicians writing digital audio software and i had no idea how great my job was right including going to conferences and standing there talking to people about our product and turns out not everybody liked it that was the most sobering part zoom forward i ended up accidentally publishing pay.

founder david hausmann deb jam smith kurt schmidt university of minnesota two decades