38 Burst results for "Schizophrenia"

Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

00:44 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on ABA Inside Track

"For whom verbally asking them. It's likely to give you a similar hierarchy. All we need to do is ask yes. Luckily we've established that so we're able to continue on and not have to ask that question over and all right. Why don't i keep going. Because i'm going to talk about another david wilder study. He's all over this. I know actually emailed david while they wanna ask about his schizophrenia research and he wrote back really fast and i told him that at a conference like i was so excited and i think he was a little concerned that was scary person and he was very polite. But i think it was like this guy.

David
Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on Richard Eeds

Richard Eeds

05:09 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on Richard Eeds

"Extra extra excess youth. They will have more youth. When it's legal than the people who are her or having heavy use. It is, um or at risk for heavy use. They will have more and it will be at more risk for them, Um What? And so there are things that can be done to reduce the harm to them, And that is something that I would love to see. New Mexico do that. I haven't seen that. We're really looking at one of the things that would be really common sense is about labeling regarding potency because one of the things that's so with alcohol you can know from hard alcohol. What proof it is, And so that can give you a sense of How like what will be the effect in my body. Right? Standing with a cigarette, like people know what will be the effect of my body. Same thing with if, um, but we don't have that for cannabis. You don't know what you're getting, and a lot of people who, um They think that it will be a very different experience because cannabis has become much more potent, much much, much more potent over the last like 10 20 years and certainly than it was in the bin in the sixties and the seventies. So people often don't know what they're getting, and they don't know how to self regulate that meeting. They don't know how much that they need to get the way that they want to feel and they can end up using a lot more. Also, not everybody knows that. Having like. You have just described that some people can have, um, cannabis use disorder. They can have that it that they develop addiction. And not everybody knows that. So having a public education about that, having also making sure that we have treatments available and also that we have Education of individuals, but also of the nurses and the doctors and the nurse practitioners and the P A about how to treat it. Because not everybody knows that. And then once you know how to treat it, then also that those treatment beds are available. Some other things that other states have done is that they have, um like that. All of the, uh, cannabis is actually sold through state stores and one of the things Sarah's, and it's more highly regulated. And so then there isn't like dirty money that can get into it. In some states. That's the case, but then also one. It's easier to find out. Um it's uh, like I grew up in a state where hard alcohol had to be bought at a liquor store that was read that was controlled by the state. You couldn't just walk into the drugs. Like walking to a pharmacy and get it that was very shocking to me. And the same thing then with cannabis would be in a in a government because it is a more tightly controlled environment. And then also, you can control the advertising. That the advertising isn't miss promising thing. Um, you you asked another great question. I'm talking a lot here. That's alright. That's alright. I think I think that horses is out of the barn already. All right, and people need to know and one of things I was really hoping for the legalization legislation was to take the part of the tax money and put it towards detox alcohol. Recovery and and all of that substance abuse recovery, But I'm not sure that the money is going to go into that the way that we had hoped. Yeah, I wish that we had. I think that you know, in the case of, um, say, like Colorado. It's used to fund I think pre k education and I think that I think that pre K education shouldn't be dependent on getting funding from anything that changes our brains, right. Like so. That includes alcohol that includes. I mean, I just think that we should just fund pre K and I agree with you. But here's the thing is anything that we do? We can always just do better next time so we can introduce provisions right? And particularly also about to reduce the harm to young people. We do know that heavy use among young people and by young people, I mean under 18 and by teenagers, but it does increase that there is among people with heavy use of cannabis. There's an increase schizophrenia that escaped and schizophrenia is a devastating mental health diagnosis. It's very hard to hard to treat very hard to have a, you know, just a very rich, rewarding life when you have schizophrenia. Um, but what we don't know as if It is the cannabis is causing it or if instead the person already has, um, a different brain that so that is the reason why that they are using it, But it does highlight we That there are some risks so we would want to be a and we do know that in Colorado say, for example, that there were there was a huge spike and Children being in poison control center calls and also an emergency department visits because of kids. Getting cannabis and not sometimes they didn't know it like you know, it's gummies something like that, or also because they were experimenting, and so what we want to do is have some learn the lessons from other states that we can Help kids and we can help people, not self Medicaid, like, Oh, they have anxiety or depression. There's better treatments in cannabis for both PTSD PTSD. Canada's actually makes PTSD worse. But a lot of people don't know that so they use cannabis because it seems like it's going to make it better, but it makes it worse. So there's a lot of work that we I hope that the Legislature picks up moving forward. All right, um Been a great great honor and a pleasure to have you on as always. We've been talking about Covid in the past eight talking about drug addiction and drugs to help you get detox and get clean and get sober. But real quickly before I let you go..

New Mexico Sixties Both ONE Covid Sarah Canada Seventies 10 20 Years Under 18 Colorado Schizophrenia Medicaid Things Eight
Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

08:08 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"They're just really have a history of being reinforced for like playing the skeptic. No matter what to the it's even credible like and i've seen some of that with our psychedelic work in. Its come along and again. There's always great. You know great exceptions. But it's almost like the the the the psychiatrists are within the within the field of madison. So those are physicians. Md's and day get shit on for being like not real doctors within the physicians soft audience. So they yeah. Soft within madison air quotes. Get as a psychologist. Which is not a physician not medicine. But it's it's an actual science of the mind or behavior and but but psychiatrists will on psychologists for being too soft because it. That's the it's rolling downhill. Of course you need to pass the buck summer. Yeah right so they put like no. We're not weirdoes psychology. You see this with every I'm from boston. So you have the irish and they're being oppressed and then another minority comes in and then you'd think the irish would be sympathetic to them as an no. They can't wait for another group to fill in the void and go great. Now we'll put you down and we'll lift ourselves up which is so fucked if you're you just being oppressed you'd think you'd be the least likely to oppress but the way dude. I was the heaviest kid my eighth grade class and then in in seventh grade and eighth grade a slightly not even heavier. He was just slightly soft boy came in. I couldn't wait to make fun of him. Because that's all everyone had done to me. So i am also like this. I am also an idiot. It's it's an idiot eric. Pain transfer that. You're just like now. I can be the alpha. The kid was skinnier than i was. It made no sense. It also just made no sense in the sense of compassion or any of the higher human virtues but i was in seventh grade. It's okay yeah we and many of us are still doing. And i think we've probably all do it to a degree you know. But we're all apes like we're all just apes social apes that are social apps that are looking for the pecking order. And you're like oh thank god. There's again this isn't me speaking but someone might be like. I think there's a woman. Here i can be superior to this woman like a woman or there's a short short man short ball demand. Thank god now. I know where i am a fucking apes were apes and we need to. I mean we're back to mckenna stoned ape the leap belief that we've made because of psychedelics has been i mean i i can't say because of psychedelics but it seems like something has helped us along. Let's put it. This way. When i take psychedelics that helps me become aware to these unconscious programs. That seem to be running like the one. We're talking about like this. Need to scapegoat. This need to produce a false hierarchy to like bolster. My self awareness of ego came from study first and foremost but it was certainly reinforced from silla. Simon is that. Yeah talk about a lot of people say this and i think there is some truth. So here's the interesting thing to me. really figuring out this area like wh one or trying to figure out. This area like to psychedelics inherently have a positive effect and that might just be so such a gross way of asking the question that it's you know that's the problem maybe it's meaningless but you know we know that psychedelics do calls they can calls delusions. They can push some people over the edge and not just people. We kind of know a little strongly. That like yeah. People dealing with schizophrenia. They could be made worse than unstable. Made these stabilized and things like but even people with like more. The science hasn't caught up with this. I've known plenty of people that like you. Just impressions like the taken too many psychedelics. And it's not just that they're into weird shit because that's that's kind of fine at one level but you get some narcissists that are really into psychedelics and taking a lot of psychedelics and your senses. It's not coincidence that it's probably made things worse so many people that claim that it's been that it's it's paid them. It's made them less self-focused and i think there's a danger and and there was an too much in the sixties with enlighten manton. Focus on this because like who's ever been enlightened as state that you get to and you're like it's just all about to me moment to moment the better you can be at this moment. The better th the more generous more kind of more kind of aware would enlighten. Where else would enlightenment be. It's it's just a concept outside of the moment so you're you're there is no future you know it's like this. Is this whole idea like we attaining sort of a like a position. Heaven that we stick onto. And like. I don't know i think that's a danger there. But you know that's a digression. A lot of people have claimed that have really helped them be better human beings. And i've done research. I've done survey work. Done a lot of work in the lab where we see under like really careful conditions where we shape things in the right way and provide the support and we screen people out that things might go haywire It it tends to really really positive for people and we not surveys plenty of people. Most people taking seconds just for fun or for exploration. But there's lots of people out there that said. Yeah they took lsd for fun and they realize like why the hell am i. Smoking cigarettes and the quit smoking for the rest of their lives like twenty years ago because they were just on acid for fun like therapeutic breakthrough. While i told you i stopped drinking for three months without trying. I know it's only three months. But i never made a decision i just was like. Oh what am i doing. I stopped in that. That's completely consistent with the type of reports that we get and we we've gotten for it's like this for all sorts of drugs and there's other stories of just everything A from you know. Better family relationships to You know people being better. You know parents to Oh gosh and then i. I've helped with some research that suggests that that people that have used psychedelics in their lifetime. If they're on parole they're less likely to engage in recidivism in other words to engage in subsequent crime and getting go back to jail Something yeah i remember and recipient i get it. I know that's a tough one simple but if you can say it you should say it. That's a good word is recidivism. Recidivism recidivism recidivism recidivism Yes but i want to circle back to what you just said because again do you know shame us know he's incredible. He's he's a real he's done. The mta one hundred times like Not that that alone is like worthy of metal. But like he's very he's great reporter on it like he's giving and he's i think he might be like you and that he says he goes and he has huge arguments with it. Meaning he doesn't go in passive he goes in and something says i'm god and he goes. No you're not you're just something in my mind and the things get upset like they and they try to. Tantalize him with impossible. Like here's here's fifty thousand lives like human lives like i'm showing them to you simultaneously. And then he goes. You always do this. I ask you a direct question and you just try to amaze me. But i'm telling you that you're not god like he's like indiana jones. I don't know who what he's like..

Three Months Boston Fifty Thousand Lives Twenty Years Ago Simon Indiana Jones One Level Grade Madison Hundred Times Seventh Grade Eighth Schizophrenia Many People Sixties People Irish
When Crisis Strikes With Dr. Jennifer Love

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

When Crisis Strikes With Dr. Jennifer Love

"Hello everyone welcome to the addictive mind. My guest today is dr. Jennifer love arthur of when crisis strikes jennifer. Please introduce yourself. Hi thanks for having me today. My name is dr jennifer laugh. And i am a psychiatrist. Also word certified in addiction. Psychiatry and addiction medicine. I'm in a large group practice outpatient and so my sweet spot medicine is the overlap of psychiatric symptoms anxiety stress insomnia etc with either substance use disorders or behavioral addictions and. Treat everything from trauma to schizophrenia. You name it. I do it in the brain. I love got while also a ton of ton of knowledge and a ton of experience. It sounds like Too many years of higher education will leave that. I think that's going to be good. Because i have a ton of questions as we were talking a little bit earlier before we started recording. I have a ton of questions about anxiety stress in the brain and you know win were in crisis and especially this last year of cove it all of that anxiety and stress so if a ton of questions about that but first i want to know a little bit more about you and what motivated you to write this book and and put it out there so i met my co author. Idaho wrote when crisis strikes with a norwegian clinical neuropsychologist and we realized how different our backgrounds are but there is a lot of overlap. And when i decided i wanted to start writing

Dr Jennifer Jennifer Insomnia Schizophrenia Trauma Idaho
Dr Randall White: Hearing Voices

Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

02:31 min | 2 months ago

Dr Randall White: Hearing Voices

"Today. I'm very happy to introduce you to dr randall. White doctor white is the medical director of community mental health in vancouver and the clinical director of the bbc's psychosis program at ub hospital. He is also a clinical professor of psychiatry. Ub and on the medical advisory board of the schizophrenia society and dr white is also being awarded the status of distinguished fellow by the american psychiatric association. This year randall. Welcome to look again so you know before we really get into things. I want to kick things off by sharing some thoughts from our panel. We're going to hear from some people with lived experience about what it's actually like to hear voices. So let's take a listen now. I have experienced auditory hallucinations and olfactory loose. The nation's physical hallucinations i don. I was in labor ban. That was very interesting to say. The least i need to say go to the hospital. My family were with me and they said is just a your imagination which i accepted and then old factory hallucinations where i smell things. I started hearing audio auditory loose nations again and actually work van hallucinations of actually one of the segue. And i don't know if you already know. And i don't feel like i've not to listen to this this nations so but yeah i did have them anyways just them so i went to the segue. Go put on where medicine do much better. Yeah there's really really anxious. When i checked myself were dr white. We just heard from people living with mental illness and the fact that many of them hear voices. but not all people with schizophrenia. hear voices in your clinical experience. How prevalent is this symptom. Hallucinations are one of the five main symptoms listed in the diagnostic manual. We use to diagnose schizophrenia. they're very common. But as you said. They're not universal. I would say that. Probably three quarters or more people with schizophrenia experience. At at some point it can be episodic so at a given time somebody with this diagnosis might not be having that. But then when they have relapsed to their muskets worse it may come

Dr White Dr Randall Ub Hospital Medical Advisory Board Of The American Psychiatric Associati Randall Vancouver BBC White Schizophrenia
Man Accused of Deadly Boston-Area Library Stabbing Found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity

WBZ Overnight News

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Man Accused of Deadly Boston-Area Library Stabbing Found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity

"A Winchester man charged with fatally stabbing a woman at a public library and 2018 has been found not criminally responsible because of his mental illness. Here's WBZ skimped on a cliff. The judge on the bench trial found Jeffrey out not guilty by reason of insanity for the 2018 stabbing death of medical student dance striker Inside Winchester Public Library. He was also found not guilty on the charge of slashing a 77 year old man who came to strikers aid both of Prosecution and defense presented reports from three medical experts who examined now and determined he was suffering from paranoid schizophrenia at the time of the attack and was not criminally responsible for his actions. Defense attorney Jay Carney said. Yeah was being tormented by harassing voices in his head. And it was the voices he was fighting against when he walked into the library and stab striker 20 times from

Winchester Public Library Winchester Jeffrey Paranoid Schizophrenia Jay Carney
Poly Styrene Documentary

Bigmouth

09:49 min | 3 months ago

Poly Styrene Documentary

"Today. Polystyrene i m cliche is directed by both her daughter. Celeste bell and documentary maker pulsing charting the rise of marian elliott as she was born. She saw yellow pages ad became polystyrene and formed punk band x ray specs as we know in this foam. Celeste goes through her mother's archive and visits. The places of hutch halted. So let's listen to the trader to get a feel for it. Some people think little go should have. But i think my mother was punk rock icon. People have asked me if she was a good mom. It's hard to know what to say your rebel. Today's society paulie had our own ideas. Student full fully trends. She was a woman of color in. Dc full of white middle class. men was singing. polly was singing about. I fell in love with her. I fell in. The news actually started singing. Because right we will dive right in nora snaps point. He was a big personality but as we see her life was extremely complicated on. This is as much. Her daughter's journey as police starring life story. Was that a good way in. I think definitely I think by this point. We also board like punk defecation. This point know the way. The bbc fool punk document generation. That watches him in the in the same way. That like my dad and grandad generation. What war documentaries old thing again and again and I think it's focus the that it's kind of deified in such a like i wasn't like incredible and radical umbro which it was in some ways but also rian just reinforced the status quo in other ways. Like the thing. I think is really great why i feel like the rohbock of this narrative restarted with like the vowel between book which From a couple of years ago when she you know really gets to the kind of watson order of it in a way that is much more punk than saying like. Oh we great you know like sex pistols type branding and i thought that this documentary was like a really peaceful continuation overseas. Not done by polystyrene by her daughter. And i think it's testament polystyrene like complexity and also to her sensitivity. But then i'll say for her callousness towards adulterer as well. I think it makes were much more well rounded portray of somebody and also no. It doesn't just a pain releasing on her. You know she has her own issues but it looks at how they're exacerbated by the society around like a mixed race woman in london at that time in the punk scene. There's a bit wet don. Let says that she goes and shaves her head while she's a party jordan lydon's house and when winter comes back down they just love her releasing. That seem horrendous. In retrospect i'm sure we're just kind of par for the course in in the seventy s and the other thing i was gonna say i think is important is she wasn't postponed. She was punk like she's really part of the the formative dna not very easily gets forgotten. Like when i was a teenager Bought three for twelve pounds. Buzzcocks clash kind of burundi's wound go from and see a whatever it was but it took a lot longer. It's come across x ray specs and to hear them kind of debt day fight in the way that they deserve She had a rough up. Brixton upbringing. shoes booted at school. Punk rock was a place for outsiders is the cliche but actually you see that. It's inevitable that she is going to get drawn to something that's so creative but also that she can break whatever more that she feels that she has been put into yet absolutely I think one thing that's really striking by the way that she Shared her images. While is the like. Obviously i don't want a undress will. The sex pistols did two like bridge society but fundamentally that kind of just like a boy band put together by iron. Witten really edgy branding. And that whole thing is is about dog individualism. When really it was really nothing the saw. And i think that you know. Even the police die polystyrene style for rewards more individual. She recognized herself as a cliche. And she played with the idea of like branding and identity in a way that i find much more interesting than just like sticking a safety pin on it And i think we have to use it. Today were authenticity. It comes from a very real place whether the sex pistols Taped on summertimes travis. The problems with poly seem to stem from x ray specs residency. Cbgb's in new york when they went over us punks hauled coal. There were a lot more into drugs. And i think that london it seems to say. Was this the breaking point for the band. Is this the kind of crux in the film. I think so. I mean i mean. That's the argument fuel. Makes the About what happened to the u k Members of the dolls came over an introduced heroin to the to the uk seen quite quite a heavy way otten Concur with everything that lord said about film. I think The framing the fact that it has selected celeste stories. Her as she's dealing with navas legacy in some respects her mother had had semi other people's expectations about what she should be being Star as in and being mixed race being hauled somali in britain and she's just so in the clips that they use the archive clips which from most of them from a a great arena documentary from nineteen seventy-nine he was she's just so alive him sparking intelligence on which me a very funny and in most What she's doing. I think you know how easy it is to get coal topping to the move Nexus these achieved up by the film. I descend Points about the breakdown. the failure in a way to work out. How will she is. She's diagnosed with schizophrenia. Kind of putting for bit. has serious by disorder Move into harry christmas On also in places you alluded to neglect which she treats celeste points during the spirit journey and was pursuing a common all and happened. How different thoughts regarding way with the male and female office Think about lockdown about. How much care women having to take on board and also agree with. I think that when another book that i would put in the frame is what is alvin. Is is kathy. Adams was drafted memoir of juden in other key. Figure the kind prison to look look upon pumpkin kind of liberating. It wasn't how you think about kind of male violence. Where is actually to the nearly point it was it was quite at transgressive sexually A lot of the gay pubs and clubs were up with the next to solve it. I'm so i can imagine that. The film doesn't does kind of raise interesting questions. As well as celeste father is interviewed in it on one of us and absent biggest because he died. regional manager. And pau falcons stewart. Now again. Severi seventeen seventy six. He was quite a bit older than when they get and how much care and they seem to hide it to a certain extent as well a friends didn't really know whether they were going out with each other or not. We just didn't look particularly cool Strangely enough this film from that era with hangs connor in it could breaking gloss than nyein and strangely seems to be almost so the police story in way which becomes this incredible figure And has sta machiavellian manage aaron and has this breakdown and so on so until daniels place. This full manager boyfriend Is i think it's really five documentary. Actually i think you mentioned he was a guest. Shot means the fact that one of zoe's earlier books whose how's your dad's some which is a an account to of stars children's. She's absolutely perfect for collaborator. On this end coming book as other as good as andrew. Did you like this a did. I really liked it because as as long as it's very fresh indifference it's a dream like quality. This is very much not your friday night documentary. Which begins with the stock footage of the miners. Strike rubbish piling in the winter of discontent. Yeah i've always about acronyms because hatches and didn't stop not your kind of off the pex tickets sold. It's it is a personal journey. It's quite slow and quite like i say quite dreamlike and which i found very refreshing change from the usual stakeouts poke documentary. I remember when i was a kid. I thought i thought police really disturbing because i lived in a very white suburban middle of nowhere type place and you just seems so odd and the fact that she but were shut brace on top of the pops and i now say that that is really good thing that it should be disturbed a little. You not white kids in places where i lived in in middle. middle class. spices. To encounter is person who didn't look like a boss didn't like pasta but was absolutely transfixed thing

Celeste Bell Marian Elliott Jordan Lydon Paulie Rian Celeste Polly Nora Burundi London Brixton Witten Watson BBC Cbgb Otten Navas Pau Falcons
How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

WSJ The Future of Everything

13:28 min | 3 months ago

How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

"Depression. It can be a difficult mental illness to pin down. It can feel different for everyone and even those who struggle with it can have trouble identifying bought. It is a mostly came to understood that. I had depression through talking with my friends for the longest time. I kind of system that everyone felt this way. Like weird just like general malays for this twenty nine year old. Depression surfaced about six years ago and began as a feeling of being disconnected with the world. I didn't want to eat because they didn't feel like i deserve to eat. I don't know. I didn't hang out with friends because i didn't feel like i deserve to see my friends. I didn't feel like i should be punishing them by talking to them seeing them. This person uses they them pronouns. They're a maryland resident and work as a software tester. They sought help for their depression. Trying numerous types of treatments may visited a bunch of different mental health professionals and tried different types of arby's In different types of medication but it always kinda felt like things were getting worse and worse and a current really find someone who has really helped me understand what was going on like. I still didn't even believe that. I had depression. All the while the depression advanced it felt like being alive and lake wanting to die rolling constantly fighting over like the resources in my mind then. Their health insurance lapsed in two thousand eighteen making the situation worse a surprise solution appeared while they were scrolling on social media and a posting from johns hopkins university researchers and then one day i was kind of like clicking through facebook and i actually found this ad four like this little simon. Study silla simon. That's the psychedelic drug found in magic mushrooms. And i thought it was fake remarks. I didn't expect there to be you know like a a legitimate study showing up on like facebook ad but they had no insurance basically they were out of options so they called wanted to have hope again from the wall street journal. This is the future of everything. I'm janet babbling today on the podcast. How the hallucinogenic compounds silla zyban once associated with nine hundred sixty s drug culture is making a comeback and giving people suffering from depression and other mental illnesses. Hope for this twenty nine year old study participant. Depression was not something that happened in their family. My family's from the caribbean and lived in america probably for about lake in years. We came here in ninety nine. It's kind of interesting because where from like a place that doesn't really view mental health. The that like america's mental health. It took me a while to realize that. I was having mental health problems that i was kind of experiencing depression. Depression affects a staggering number of people hundreds of millions worldwide according to a study published in the peer reviewed journal the lancet in two thousand eighteen. The pandemic didn't make things any easier. Last june about a third of people who responded to web based surveys said they suffered from symptoms of depression or anxiety disorder. Those results were published by the centers for disease control and prevention the protocol for treating these conditions hasn't changed much in the past few years. What we've been using is typically one of two things either a medication that people take every day or we have psychotherapy dr. Alan davis is clinical psychologist and an assistant professor at the ohio state university. He's also an adjunct assistant. Professor at johns hopkins university. A lot of people will improve with either medication or therapy or both to basically have both have a better chance but it doesn't work for everyone. Some studies report between ten and thirty. Five percent of patients suffer from treatment resistant. Depression and davis is that similar to what he's found in his own practice working with veterans suffering from substance abuse trauma and other mental health issues. So he began looking for alternative treatments present and welcome to psychedelic science. Two thousand and thirteen in twenty thirteen davis attended a science conference and came across a study exploring the use of silla. Sivan a chemical compound found in specific varieties of mushrooms to treat cancer patients with mental health conditions. The compounds documented facts include feelings of heightened awareness ecstasy visions and changes in the perception of reality for researchers say one of the most useful qualities is its ability to dissolve the ego to allow a user to observe oneself from the outside in the study of cancer patients. The drug was able to alleviate some of the anxiety and depression that can be associated with having a life threatening illness. I was just inspired by that word. I thought gosh this really could have a strong impact in the areas that i'm working with veterans and with others davis became part of a team of researchers at johns hopkins university that put together a randomized clinical trial. Twenty four participants. They were administered. Silla sivan with talk therapy to treat their depression. Enrollment for the trial took place in two thousand seventeen and twenty nineteen and the results were analyzed in two thousand twenty. Most of them had had chronic depression meaning decades of experiencing depression though not some had had it for shorter amount of time but this study was a weightless control trials so some people came in and started treatment right away. Others had to wait eight weeks before starting treatment so we had a comparison group. The study subjects received an extensive intake examined questionnaire to confirm. They were suffering from symptoms of depression. Participants were screened for schizophrenia. And drug use as these conditions can interfere with suicide and treatment. The big worry many people have about psychedelics is what's often referred to as a bad trip. Mary negative hallucinations. That can be scary and this is kind of trip that can go bad. Martissant received hefty doses of these drugs. The doses are based on weight and they vary slightly but patients receive around twenty milligrams in the first session a bit more in the second session to minimize the risk of a negative experience. Davis says researchers focused on controlling. What's called and setting. They work ahead of time to ensure the volunteers current mood and surroundings while taking the drugs. Remain as calm and comfortable as possible and so we spend about eight to ten hours with people before they ever get the drug talking about what the effects are talking about. What may or may not happen when they have this experience and that's why we have to train professionals there with them not only to prepare them for that but to help them through the experience when it happens because a lot of people have anxiety coming into the session. The person we spoke to the twenty nine year old participated in davis study group in august of two thousand eighteen. They had no prior experience with psychedelic drugs and didn't know watch expect basically went in kind of blindly. I don't have any other options. So that's kind of my thought process at the time was just basically kind of sticking anything to the wall and hoping it would work after fasting the previous night the treatment can cause nausea. They were placed in a small tranquil room fitted with a comfy couch. The whole room was a really really cool in very comforting because like they had like these statues like imagery in their end like. I think one of the muslim dowa tibetan model. I wanna say this and like there was like this nice lamp. It's off this really. Soft light psychedelic assisted. Therapy participants are encouraged to bring in objects from home to make them feel more comfortable. Some bring in ten bears pictures of family. The twenty nine year old brought a lightness of an ancient sumerian goddess. Soon nana once they were settled in the room. They were given two pills in a wooden cop the therapists top that the sivan would take fifteen to thirty minutes to start working. In the interim they were told to put on ice shades and headphones. That would play a selection of music they choose from classical tibetan chanting african drumming and modern music too. Once the drug fact the participants says the first session became a kaleidoscope of mental images and sensations. I remember being in lake. Felt like mount olympus the fall of the gods like oval the clouds and suffering them. And then one of my god's up to me and she gave me a key fell through the clouds. And i felt all the way down through the earth and i ended up in hell which is really strange because they don't remember being scared even though i was in hell and i remember asking like hey you know why am i hair And it was like haiti's leading me through hell kind of just like showing me around for life this very cold and desolate last. He was like of course. This is where you would come like. This is where you've made your home. The self revelations continued throughout this long session and turned intensely personal. I remember like hearing like the beats. Come on and i felt myself in like this place like all of my ancestors were and i was really close to my grandfather when i was a kid. And he died. Probably around when i was like four and i saw him kind of materialize And he walked towards the youth like these. She'll bananas which is what he's doing her then he handed one to me and i always kind of was afraid that if he was alive he would be disappointed in me and i remember asking him you know. When am i supposed to do like if my family like my parents and lake my siblings can accept me and he said that he'll always be there for me and my ancestors will always be there for me and i like that scene just like it. Metsu in mental to me after about seven hours than drugs started to wear off when it was over. You know you're still kind of like feeling it but just not as intensely so just basically like this really happy kind of floaty failing and we couldn't drive so like i had to have a sister pick me up. They ended the experience hungry and exhausted as for the depression not much appeared to have changed then. They tried the silla sivan trip once more this time with the stronger dose and after that these say they experienced to palpable shift. It felt like i was back into the world again like i was in reality. A lot of people said that not only was there. Depression differently felt like they had come out of dark hole that they've been in for years but a lot of people regardless of whether they're depression was gone or or reduced said that there was something really meaningful different about how they view their life initial results for the study reviewing outcomes from up to a month after the sessions were completed found that silla sivan plus therapy was more than four times more effective than other treatments. Such as medication alone at one week. Fifty eight percent of the sample were in complete remission from depression that actually lasted up to four weeks. After fifty four percent of people were in complete remission and were now studying those same people up to twelve months after to see how long that remission lasted the rest of the participants in the study. Were not in remission they were still experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms researchers have yet to publish the results of longer term outcomes for all the participants their condition up to a year after treatment and this was a small study. Just twenty four people. Some scientists remain skeptical of this kind of treatment not just of silla simon. But of the validity of the data an outcomes for all studies involving psychoactive substances

Depression Johns Hopkins University Silla Simon Silla Zyban Peer Reviewed Journal Centers For Disease Control An Davis Substance Abuse Trauma Silla Sivan Arby Facebook Martissant Alan Davis America Sivan The Wall Street Journal Anxiety Disorder
Tips For Staying Sane

Mentally Yours

05:16 min | 4 months ago

Tips For Staying Sane

"Welcome erica stevens mentally yours. Thanks very much for joining us so we has just about your book even together. The guinness guy tucson sannoussi Why did you want to create this. I had. I've always wanted to write a book about my experiences with psychosis but i kind of felt that it would have more to offer offers a book if i listed the help of a co author. He was a professional in mental health. An augment stephen a conference on and it was about schools. New routes tibet to catholic schizophrenia. anti newell basket sphere. Its area of expertise. Less ask him. let's ask him and he was for. And so we started writing this book together But just felt the kind of just mike spirit. Just the expert by experience will lived experience on and maybe wouldn't hold water. I thought that it would be much better. Talbot's that too. What about east stephen so obvious similar oversee from a professional perspective. So as okay said. I have kind of specialized in researching schizophrenia for twenty five years and look after any large number of patients with illness and other and had wanted to write a book that would be accessible to them and to a wider audience. But also one. That wouldn't be too dry rocket dynamic and around about the time. I'm i'm erica. I also told by various agents event. If i wanted to write a book like this. I definitely need to get Lots of people stories in it so lots of people with lived experience contributing Beating erica was a very happy coincidence and from there took us a while to get going but i think we broke during two eighteen and then finished off in nineteen before publishing of this year. And who would you say that. It's forty anyone with schizophrenia. And anyone is interested in like working schizophrenia. Or care and put some moments schizophrenia. Like a friend or a loved one. Yeah i think. I anyone who's got Or any other type of psychotic illness. This a few different types of psychotic illness Bipolar disorder for example People often have psychotic symptoms of that and other conditions. That are less common so anyone kinds of problems. Anyone looking off to them girlfriend. Mother father sister brother hawks would also. Perhaps anyone is our cassette. Just interested in knowing a bit more about psychosis genuine schizophrenia in particular so one of the psychiatry senior trainees kindly read the book. drafts and coming to the drafts to improve the readability. Apparently who has no connection health connection was he apparently likes reading the extent. For at least it's it's worked. It's an interesting one for me. Because i was now hundred solder and i had psychosis so it would have been lucky to have a ham but like the i think when i i have my my first bit of mania because the thing is it happens and then you get back to normal source of reading. I what's happened to. Why as happened what to do next radius. That's almost as bad as well as just happened in a way. That kind of Mystery around it. Will this fair around it. You're right to tell us a bit about your experiences again our. We've always had you on the poco before that was a while ago. now so you're right to tell we re to go right to tell listeners about your experiences psychosis first episode. Was rhinos on about twenty two Fourteen hours say it's been about two decades of living with psychosis Something i can manage quite well with medication and different therapies But it can be quite terrifying when you have a psychotic episode and there's definitely more at the start of the illness later on and i think the police spying on me. I think i've committed really henious cry and all much like a burglary or you know so of a monkey or something really say area slight blowing up canary war types areas And i just really believe. It's true. And i might start to think the The songs i hear on the radio have been written especially for me to kind of condemn more behavior or the tv might be talking to me in subliminal messages and is terrifying united states ironic to me how much fear or inspire notice when they hear a half psychosis when the reality is you know. I'm just terrified myself. Really in a housebound when it's happening.

Schizophrenia Erica Stevens Mike Spirit East Stephen Erica Psychotic Illness Bipolar Diso Psychosis Tucson Talbot Tibet Stephen Okay Hawks United States
28: JEREMY BAMBER Murdered His OWN FAMILY - burst 2

A Psych For Sore Minds

01:00 min | 5 months ago

28: JEREMY BAMBER Murdered His OWN FAMILY - burst 2

"Tie like go from a different angle because my area of expertise is forensic psychiatry. Which is the crossover of mental defending offending. So i picked a specific angle related. This this is without question. The most gruesome at cold-blooded bernstein said jeremy bamber third fine members and family called blood. Then try to frame it on his sister who has schizophrenia. I should say has. She's vixen sheets mud at the age of twenty eight and a two twin boys secure. So this will happen in essex the uk so foreign friends essex as a county northeast of loaded when women have a reputation of being very friendly. So i'm going to answer questions in these episodes including how realistic was it for jeremy. Bamba try to frame his sister and what john

Jeremy Bamber Bernstein Essex Schizophrenia UK Bamba Jeremy John
Why Reddit is the unlikely to key to solving the mental health riddle

The 3:59

09:04 min | 6 months ago

Why Reddit is the unlikely to key to solving the mental health riddle

"For mit and harvard have long sought to find connection between language and mental health. So where better. Look than read it. Chang daily charge with these is an carson took a look at this topic so what exactly where researchers from mit and harvard looking at when going to read it. So you know there these researchers who have been interested in this idea that there is a link between language and mental health issues. And maybe we can do is detect issues by examining the language that people use so essentially what they did is applied machine learning algorithms to about eight hundred thousand Posts disease they detect any patterns about mental health during the beginning of the pandemic. It's a funny place. It's a funny concept to get your mind wrapped around because it's it's read it and you know it's sort of known as place for while. Am as it's known for a lot of random conversations so why why was Deemed an ideal place to look for these kinds of connections. There's a few reasons here for one. It's real time data about you know what's going on that's of concern in people's lives. The researchers were able to use it to go back into time Spar back is january in this case to get an idea of how things were progressing as the pandemic started and they were also able to look at specific sub reddit that are devoted specifically to like certain mental health issues. Whether it's depression or schizophrenia. And then also look at. It's that are more like general advice for topics like parenting your finances Is if there are any any other kind of broader trends. There were popping up along the way they made this point with me that for a lot of people read it is a place that they turn to for advice and support in community and whatnot and also it's something that for them could be relatively anonymous as they were gathering this data and it's no secret that anxiety levels in general has risen this year. Thanks to the coronavirus. Thanks to well everything. This dumpster fire for years. So what would exactly they find. That was surprising right so from one. They found over time that the language that was being used across different sub reddit including the general advice ones started to become more similar to particular sub reddit devoted to health anxiety and the folks that generally have been on the health anxiety. Separated are the ones who you know for. Example will really concerned about coronavirus is far back as january before. A lot of us were really. That concerned The also found that a lot of people were talking about. You know stress relating to substance use in alcoholics consumption and that was another trend that was kind of popping up not just in separate devoted specifically to topics like addiction or alcoholism in terms of these different sub. Reddit it's like. How did these researchers determine which wants to go to and which one's religion yet so part of part of that is kind of interesting because that this sort of ties into this decision that they had to make between using read it and doing something like using clinical survey data which in some ways the clinical survey data would be more valid. Because the folks taking those surveys would be people who were clinically diagnosed in chris with the read it. You don't know for sure that the people who are on that read it have a clinical diagnosis or should've with the with the specifics. Their their cases are but they went for very large sample size. And so they're thinking. Was that kind of balance things out. somewhat but yeah. That's an interesting concept idea that volume and just the the sheer numbers will override the concern that some folks are saying may not be legit or a relaxed sufficiently. How unusual is that approach that you know going for these law of numbers as as opposed to going for us more traditional Clinical research work. I think it depends a little bit sort of of Like a case by case basis for this group. This is a very early steppingstone. They're hoping that people are gonna use this research in pick up the baton and move forward and and for the purposes of what they wanted to do. They decided that read. It was gonna be the better fit. You know partly kinda like i mentioned there was the real time aspect if they hit us clinical survey data it would have been a lot more limited in scope because there would been questions the people would have had to answer That would not have just been like kind of a broad ranging overview of what people are living in their lives in the timeframe would have been shorter is as well. And so you know for this. They're they're pretty open about what they're possible. Research limitations were. But i think in general for them. They're hoping that this is something that's going to kind of peak interest for other researchers and Another folks we able to take this forward. Hey you there was a lot of data of asleep taken from Both that what what do you do with it. How do you take this information and use it to benefit mental health research so they relied on machine learning algorithms in. This is something. That kind of pops. Every step of the process you know. For example early on with redoing his finding posts that had language it was specifically related to the pandemic. So you know. Words like respirator. Virus lockdown all. That sort of thing they were also able to kind of view the data in different ways using algorithms so in one case They were kind of looking at all. The language used and placing it in these topic. Clusters and of removing the individual sub. Reddit is kind of a factor in how they clustered the topics so they were able to look like across the board at at things like Topics like loneliness or suicide doubled. Kind of in the time frame that they were looking at they also saw the emergence of a cluster on panic attacks allen so so partly this kind of helps than being able to look at the data in a lot of different ways in terms of that data that it's a lot that they've got just curious how or how they're tapping into the fellow this information. What are they doing with it too. I guess whether it be more proactive in terms of treatment or directed the direction of where mental health research goes. What what are they doing with. The data part of their broader hope is that this is gonna be information that will be useful to clinicians You know when you think about situation like global pandemic. This is something that is stressful for all of us. But they have this theory that for certain groups of people. they're even more vulnerable. You know stressors are exacerbating Some issues that people are already have in the best of times right in. So how do you identify those people who need the most help. Who are the most vulnerable in. Make sure that they're getting the resources that they need and partly. It's it's an awareness thing for for clinicians yet as a counter standard. Serve the idea that were this helps us recognize how severe a problem certain mental health issues are right that that this is a surreal lens into that that a traditional clinical trial wouldn't be able to give us right. Yeah i mean that that's basically the idea that maybe you could look at specific groups of people whether it's folks who are suffering from schizophrenia. Depression or you know etc etc and like. Hey the folks in this particular group seem to be having these specific issues. You know like heightened during the pandemic for example so these are people that we need to pay attention to these people that we need to to get help. So yeah that's the basic idea is sense. It's fascinating erin. Thanks for your time

Reddit Chang Daily MIT Harvard Carson Schizophrenia Depression Chris Allen Erin
Hip-hop's history with mental health in Black communities

Q

08:29 min | 6 months ago

Hip-hop's history with mental health in Black communities

"TV. Here's a conversation you might remember. I think it's important for us to have conversations about, you know, open conversations about mental health, especially with me. Being black because we never had therapists in the black community. We never approached like taking medication with Kanye West on the show, Jimmy Kimmel live. He's talking about how mental health and simply talking about it. Has a stigma in black communities and their numbers to back that up. In one study out of the United States, 63% of black respondents said that talking about mental health was a sign of weakness and You could see the stigma reflected in hip hop and rap. Mark Anthony Neal is the James B. Duke professor of African and African American studies at Duke University. He's also the co editor of That's the Joint the Hip hop Studies. Reader. So before we get going heads up with this conversation includes topics of depression and suicide, which may be triggering to some professor Neill joined me to talk more about hip hop's long history with the topic of mental health and mental illness. Fester. Neil, Thanks so much for making the time today. Thanks for having me It's a pleasure, So I have a whole lot to get with you today. But just let's start very broadly. How would you describe hip hop's overall track record when it comes to mental health and mental illness? You know, I think hip hop reflects where the conversations about mental health are with black communities More broadly, and particularly with black men s 01 of the real breakthrough was in recent years was, you know Jay Z's 444 You know his own kind of bourgeois way. It was a recording that talked about the significance of actually sitting down and talking with a therapist, right toe work through all kinds of notions of trauma. And you know for someone like Jay Z. You know, part of it's because now he's older, right, but it's also a break with the way that black men have often dealt with mental health. You know where we just man up, right? And and instead of, you know, seeking therapy, you know, clinical psychologist, you know, you find all these different moments reflected in hip hop of black men basically inviting. You know marijuana weed Percocet? Of course, there has become kind of the painkiller of choice in recent years, And this is all you know, young black men responding to a mental health crisis that they're having in their daily lives, right? And if I'm reading it correctly, What you're saying is that you know what we see in hip hop. Is ultimately reflective of the larger historical stigma. Mental health has in some black communities, and there's no question right and it is not just mental health, right? I mean, we're having the same conversations with in black communities and definitely within hip hop. About just things like going to the doctor on a regular basis, Right? Regular kind of preventative health care are the kinds of things that you know if you feel pain, you just, you know, Hustle passed, right. You just grind past it because it takes up time, right? And time is money and all these kinds of you know things that we here in Montrose and circulate within, You know, black masculinity. In hip hop culture, right, so mental health becomes, you know on their team Continuing well, part of what we're doing here today is looking back at some of the pivotal rack records that have explored mental health. So take a listen to this me cause I'm close to Doug Etch. I'm try again not to lose my head. So that's a bit of the message from Grandmaster Flash and the Furious five relation 82 Mel Mel, who's rapping in the Verses. Don't push me cause I'm close to the edge. I mean, incredibly legendary, You know, line in hip hop. I have to admit I had never thought about it in the grander context of mental health before. Right, because it's rage, right? You know, how do I control the rage of my experience in the hood and all the things that are going on right that you know that are both continuous and cyclical. And and we can't seem to get out of this cycle if you will, And so the only thing to express their some sort of sense of rage and again. We typically don't think about that in the continuum of mental health or emotional health, right? But the point is, how do you manage what's going on in your life so that you don't You know, I have this moment We have another clip taken. Listen to them, But I go in. Not without a fight. See, Every time I close, I start sweating and blood starts coming out my nose. It's somebody watching the back, but I don't know who it is. So I'm watching my back to get her boys with mind playing tricks on me. Classic rap record back in 1991. Hear paranoia. You hear anxiety, You know? What is it about The ghetto boys take a mental health care that sticks out to you. You know what's important about a song like that, you know, unlike the Grandmaster Flash, and here is a part of example that you played You know what we see this kind of outward expression of what's happening emotionally and mentally. This is one of the first songs I think really dealt with the interiority of mental health crisis, right? It's the stuff that might be there what it's probably not. But it's so internalized that I can't see my way out of it on by think that particularly resonated for many young black men listening to hip hop in that period of time. You know, because of this kind of stoicism. That's that was expected right that you have to keep everything inside. But you can't let people know how you feel right. And what's going on What pain you're going through, You know, So you internalize so much of this, and I think that song does a great job of capturing what's going on in the mind literally of these men in the soul. But let's talk a little bit about treatment. You know, there have been Rap artists who have argued that they don't need professional therapy because the form itself because the music itself is inherently therapeutic. Listen, I'm not here to deny anyone's truth, I'm not here to get in the way of anyone's treatment path. What were. What do you make of that? I understand this on on several levels, right? There has long been a concern, but then black communities about what we see as Western forms of therapy, you know their feet. It's not connected to the live realities of what it means to be black in America, or even you know, black and African In the world. Um so I understand why you have been expressions of suspicion around clinical psychology right in that context, But I think you know I fall down on expertise right folks who were trained Clinically to address whether it be paranoid schizophrenia or or depression or or the whole range of emotionality is that they're contribute to what we think of as as as mental health. On guy think there's no replacing that expertise and where, at a point in time now, you know to the earlier point, you know that their candidate need made about there, not being folks in the community. Well, we know that there are in fact, you know African American therapists, right? In fact, they're thriving in this period of time, largely because you know, because of folks like saying Jay Z and another, you know, producing black woman writers and artists. Who have talked about the significance of finding a therapist, you know in their life, and so I think it has to be more of a both in right, definitely finding a community find folks that you can work the would talk through. You know who can be that first line of intervention? You know if you are suffering through, you know, anxiety or other forms of the mental health crisis, But But there is an expertise there that that folks need to pursue and again. Jay Z was so critical in this moment because, you know, he basically said, I went to see a therapist, right? If I'm going to be the Ogi of hip hop right, then it's OK. Can you elaborate on how a skepticism of psychotherapy could be related to anti black racism in our society? I mean, it's just that right the fact that we have the largest society that has never understood You know the black frame if you will. The Black is first in this country and I have tried to apply normative structures that come outside of the everyday experience of black folks, too. You know how black folks are working through their their mental health? You know, there's also the larger question of the way that that mental health care is connected to generally health care in America and general suspicion right of the medical profession. When it comes to issues of race. We could just think you know the Tuskegee experiments right? And it just think about those men for a second, right to on the one hand are subjected. You know to physical problems because of the experiments, but at the same time, Ah work into all kinds of levels of schizophrenia and depression, you know, based on the physical sense that they're also is not being addressed. You know, in the context of that movement, if you're just tuning in

Mark Anthony Neal James B. Duke Hip Hop Studies Jay Z. Jay Z Doug Etch Mel Mel Jimmy Kimmel Kanye West Neill Duke University Depression America Neil Montrose Paranoia Schizophrenia
Words On Bathroom Walls Blu-ray Review

After The Show Movie Podcast

04:25 min | 7 months ago

Words On Bathroom Walls Blu-ray Review

"So it is saturday november. Twenty eight th. This is after the show. Six hundred sixty one or navy review podcast and The media will not. This week is woods on bathroom walls. So twenty twenty movie such on blu ray now you can pick it up. Pg thirteen friends at lionsgate centers. The blu ray for review so settle you give the you give us the synopsis and i will give you the one of the box and see if it is the same thing first of all. There's not a lot of words on bathroom. Walls can put that out there right off the bat It's a story about Coping with mental illness. And i'll give you the one off the box. Here we go you read Is ready. Autumn is a weighty introspective eighteen pursuing his dream of becoming a chef when autumn is diagnosed with a mental illness. He lives in fear of being exposed until he meets. Maya and outspoken and famously intelligent go inspires him to open his hot not be defined by his condition with it's inspiring journey of love acceptance and hope words on bathroom. Walls is a triumphant story of overcoming. Life's challenges and embracing who you are. Yeah extra sappy woody at the wording mo- vote and it isn't i mean it's not accurate spoiler alert. It's not about her telling him that to be. who is. it's more about him figuring that out from self all right. So that's a synopsis. Let's get onto the movie sitter words on bathroom wall. I really liked it. Well you know. Sometimes you just like i mean i appreciate the effort. Yes some people are gonna probably watch this. And maybe even in some of your one-star reviews and say oh you know mental health. Can we just dogging about it. All that kind of stuff but i actually find it really uplifting that instead of like everybody seems to think it's ok to do a movie about serial killers right multiple movies about people who murder people and all that shit but then to actually examine someone like this teenager who has a mental illness that could potentially and probably has in human history right lead a person to commit horrible crimes because it's a terrible mental illness right to address that i find i really appreciate that. I don't know anyone with schizophrenia. Do you have you ever know that. I'm aware of anyway. I find it really. I like the idea of addressing it on a like. I actually liked the way they handled it. It's not like overly grim doc. An all the time there is like hope and i. It doesn't go away. I was sometimes these. Things are a bit like sanitized. Yeah happy ending and all that. Yeah but this actually deals with the drugs. He's been given and what they can do to you and you know it feels. It feels realistic in a way but then is obviously i will say this. I've never known schizophrenia. But have lived with a man before. I ever met you darling. Who was manic depressive. And so taking his medication or not taking the medication you never knew. I never knew if i came from work. And there'd be trash bags on the windows and him in little darkness and you just knew to stay away or everything's open and he's making music. He was like a musician. He's not dead or anything. And everything was fine. And it was like super mannequin like super productive. Or you're going to be in the bottom of a ditch emotional you know so addressing that and it all did depend on the different medicines and the balance and all that kind of stuff. So that's why i really appreciate their addressing it in a way that wasn't like oh happy endings. This person's just basically a danger to society and we have to lock them away. Because that's kind of how we've always yet because everything's

Lionsgate Centers Navy Maya Schizophrenia Woody
Police: Man accused of punching Rick Moranis attacked others

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Police: Man accused of punching Rick Moranis attacked others

"Authorities in New York have released more details about the man arrested in connection with an assault on actor Rick Moranis now that an arrest has been made it appears the person in custody for slugging the honey I shrunk the kids actor had no beef with him and it wasn't a one off attack authorities say the suspect thirty five year old more keys than tour is a suspect not only in the attack on Rick Moranis but also in other unprovoked attacks in New York City prosecutors say mentor is charged with five assaults on strangers in the past six months authorities say after he sucker punch Moran is on October first in Central Park he attacked a liquor store owner in lower Manhattan an attorney for Ventura says his client has been diagnosed with schizophrenia a judge has ordered him to have a new psych workup I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Rick Moranis New York New York City Moran Central Park Manhattan Ventura Schizophrenia Oscar Wells Gabriel
A Call For Equity In Genomics Research

Short Wave

02:58 min | 7 months ago

A Call For Equity In Genomics Research

"So before the break we talked about. How do i noticed. A lack of diversity into nomex. He was working with these databases and noticed a lot of minorities communities were left out and as he began to interrogate that he made two key rations. One of the reasons is more around comfort and convenience. It's like if you are Western european ancestry. Doctor it's much easier to for you to recruit white people within your network right and then on the other side of the coin. It's really hard to recruit communities of people who have historically been exploited exploited by the medical and scientific community traumatizing experiences with lasting impacts. Like what happened to the have a super tribe from arizona so back in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine researchers at arizona state university and the havasu by agreed to partner up to determine if there was a genetic reason behind the really high rates of diabetes that have plagued the tribe for decades but when arizona state turned around and question to have a supine nations origin. Story tried to look for genetic associations with schizophrenia. And getting mutations that are associated with interbreeding it naturally pissed off the community. Because that's not the arrangement and the consensus that they built not only to the researchers not get consent to look at those things some of those questions in themselves deeply disrespected the tribes most sacred beliefs so that resulted in the sort of ripple effect or domino effect with many other tribes in the united states of america pudding a moratorium on genetic research which stands to this day. Here's the other thing. It's become more and more clear but a lot of times. These health disparities like diabetes and have a suit by tribe aren't really even because of genetics. They're more about socio. Economic factors like access to healthy food and healthcare a lot of the times when an indigenous populations or brown black and underrepresented populations that people are recruited into studies. It's under the guise of reducing health disparities and sort of pandering towards this narrative that there's an innate nece to why our communities have higher rates of common complex disease right and that's highly problematic and i have sold that grant narrative in so many grants and papers and that's how i've kind of come to this position of questioning it and being skeptical of what the actual benefit

Arizona Arizona State University Diabetes Schizophrenia United States Of America
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 8 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
New Schizophrenia Guidelines

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

03:44 min | 9 months ago

New Schizophrenia Guidelines

"Lot has changed since 2004 when the APA the last road practice guidelines on schizophrenia this September and twenty-twenty. They updated those guidelines and here's a few of the key changes. There's less emphasis on divorce pushing between the conventional or first generation antipsychotics and the second generation or a typical perhaps because the Katy Trail put an end to the notion that the newer ones are better tolerate or the older ones are more effective, but the guidelines do Place greater emphasis on clozapine. They recommend clozapine after a patient has failed to respond to two trials of a guy psychotics and they Define failure of response meaning less than a 20% response and unlike the 2004 guidelines. They don't require that one of those trucks. Else be with the first-generation antipsychotic. They also recommend clozapine first line for a number of patients, which when you think of it is a lot of people with schizophrenia, those are people with suicidality problematic aggression and potentially with tardive dyskinesia. That doesn't respond to other options. The guidelines do go into great detail on how to treat side effects to antipsychotics. They list metformin as first-line for weight gain and metabolic syndrome and they list the vmat2 Inhibitors two of which are like ft approved and one of which are not all is first line for tardive dyskinesia. That's one area where I might differ from the guidelines they seem to emphasize these FDA-approved treatments, which actually have a fairly poor number needed to treat and not-so-great tolerability and are extremely expensive at $80,000 a year and they give real short shrift wage. Other options for tardive dyskinesia things like ginkgo biloba extract Keppra and amantadine which were actually given more emphasis in the neurology guidelines wage in several places. The guidelines give Credence to the idea of checking blood levels on antipsychotics to see if the patient is actually taking them a lot of authors of advocated for this and the fact here is that you just don't know if the patient is taking it even though the blood levels of most antipsychotics don't correlate with any therapeutic level except for clozapine where the therapeutic effects are greater above blood levels of 350. It's still useful to check them before moving to clozapine because you don't know if the patient even took the medication that you gave them too often. They don't and perhaps the biggest and most welcome change here is the emphasis on psychosocial therapies while they were recommended in a more generic form in 2004 here they recognized A whole host of specific psychosocial programs for people with schizophrenia so they can get their lives back. Here's one that was striking to me. They recommend that all first episode page be treated and something called a coordinated Specialty Care Program. These are things that have been researched since 2004 and shown to improve outcomes. They are team based programs incorporate both medications along with education resiliency training family therapy and vocational rehab sounds like a full pallet of what people need when they're going through them first episode too bad. These programs are hard to find but they're starting to Institute the more public Mental Health Centers and some academic centers have them but helpfully the guidelines do give you a reference to free resources where you can train your staff to start one locally

Clozapine Schizophrenia APA Katy Trail Metabolic Syndrome Mental Health Centers Amantadine Metformin
The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | 9 months ago

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

06:04 min | 9 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to inside schizophrenia I'm Rachel Star here with my co host gay powered gape today interesting topic love dating marriage while having schizophrenia is if those three things weren't hard enough. You can see why we waited so long to do this because I've known you for a long time Rachel in all that time, you've never wanted to discuss love dating or marriage euro can't discussing schizophrenia. Yes. But not love dating or marriage. So this is GonNa be fun. Yeah. I'm not a great source for relationship advice because I'm single. That's the end of the story I. You know that's very fair. Yeah, I have been. For a long time and you're happy being single your yeah. Sure whatever. No I mean seriously the are you happy being single I rather be single than unhappy. That's fair. Okay. I'm fine as I am. Let's say that when you find that you are yeah I think the important thing for the audience to understand though is that you're not single because of schizophrenia you don't feel that those two things have any relation you do have schizophrenia and you are single but they're saying what? I'm trying to say if you asked me, could I just find someone? Yes, I could. But you'd be unhappy in that relationship, right? Yeah. I know that schizophrenia wraps around your entire life but you don't feel that schizophrenia is holding you back. You just haven't met the right person and you have very high standards and you're an impressive woman you should have high standards. Another way for high standards is shallow you're shallow. To say, shallow. Nice standards. Shallow. whichever luckily, luckily, we found a married couple. Yes. We found Andrew and Stephanie Downing who are the authors of marriage in Schizophrenia is on the prize I had no idea that this existed but Rachel you've been aware of this book for quite some time even before we interviewed them for the show and what's cool is so andrew the husband he has schizophrenia and they found out and then they got married. So it wasn't like they've been together and then suddenly something happened a few years she went in knowing that this is something that they're going to have to deal with together for the rest of their lives. What was really cool about the interview which. is coming up a little later as we interviewed them both at the same time and I thought they were very very candid. It was really interesting to hear their thoughts on this idea that people with schizophrenia shouldn't get married and shouldn't have kids. Rachel what do you think about that concept that people with schizophrenia either should not be in romantic relationships or will we most often here cannot be in stable relationships? I think people schizophrenia I could do anything relationship wise. That doesn't mean it's going to be easy as is most things in life. The schizophrenia is just something else added on the reason to people break up may have nothing to schizophrenia could be mother-in-law's terrible. Could be there just really annoying. They snore at night and you can't take it. You can only take so many years without sleep you know. So there's like silly reasons and like serious reasons why people do or don't get married or stay married backing off from schizophrenia for just talking about general mental illnesses longtime listener to the show I have bipolar disorder and I have been divorced. Twice and I'm fascinated at the number of people who hear that I have bipolar disorder and here that I got divorced that's it. That's all they know they weren't around when I was married they're just meeting me for the first time I've been happily married for eight years now and they're like, Oh, you got divorced twice bipolar disorder, right? I mean gave I've always assumed you ran off. I understand why people feel that way I do it is an easy conclusion to draw and much in the same way with schizophrenia polar disorder is all encompassing to say that it had zero to do with. It is certainly disingenuous Rachel I feel that following these stereotypes removes agency and responsibility from the people involved and I. Think this gives an opportunity to grow I believe that the divorce is were my fault and that allowed me to be very introspective look into. Myself and grow as a person if I would have taken the company line. Oh, it's because I have bipolar disorder. Then I don't know that I would have improved and I don't think that I would be happily married. Now, how do you feel about people who just blame their love woes on schizophrenia and then don't improve as a person I imagine that that you don't feel good about that because I've never ever seen you use schizophrenia as an excuse for anything. I think if you WANNA excuse you're going to find an excuse. Schizophrenia is a really big one that you could be like no one wants me because of this reason and there's other things like, yes the medication makes you gain weight yes. The medication makes you WANNA sleep most of them have sexual side effects and you can say all of that does contribute absolutely. But at the end of the day I'm responsible for me and it's my job to find a way to love my life. You know because those same things I could immediately flip in like, Oh man I have a really bad job. No one's GonNa WanNa be with me on my hair is falling out mine is so don't feel like I'm just pointing out the guys. You know there's so many things though if you want an excuse, you will always have one that's not the way to look at it, and honestly no one wants to be in a relationship with that. We talked about in preparation for the show and you told me that you were on dating. APPS. Dating APPS, you know high woman living with Schizophrenia Likes Dogs No. If it's someone that I like and we WANNA meet up for a day. I want them to know that ahead of time I rather them know going in hey, she has a mental disorder Blah Blah Blah the meek attached to them and then bring it up three weeks later, and then they leave I rather you leave than me get attached she. Oh, the downside of that is yeah. Probably makes people leave but those.

schizophrenia Rachel bipolar disorder Rachel Star Rachel I WanNa Andrew Stephanie Downing
Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. Kosovo. With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. Dr Dole and welcome to the program. I David thanks so much for having me. Please call me Rachel. While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, of course, the podcast website. In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, thousand seven, the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. Unquote. Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. Regarding off label use of these drugs, eleven years later, Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. How. Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. The report found in two thousand, sixteen, seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, for example, Sarah. Quel. Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, seventy, nine, thousand, long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. Committee. Heard this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. Close quote. This is my third related interview. In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. And in February, eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate neatly into the specifics of the report. What did the report find regarding the extent to which? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. David. So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, has implications for patient safety and and health We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. So that's about two, hundred, Ninety, eight, thousand, six, hundred, fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated So specifically, we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. So that's kind of the. Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, fifteen, twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, seventeen to twenty eighteen, and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. So you know. I. Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, seventeen, twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, can you give an approximation of the cost? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, mean, this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. I don't remember offhand. Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, thousand, twelve constituting roughly three, hundred, sixty, three, million part D plan payments that year and of course, there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. So it's it's fairly substantial.

Dr Rachel Dolan FDA David Intra United States Antipsychotic Trump Administration Nursing Home Facility Dr Dole Us House Of Representatives Dr David Graham Human Rights Watch Kosovo House Energy And Commerce Comm Means Committee Diana Zuckerman America Obama Administration Psychosis Rispler
Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:52 min | 10 months ago

Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

"A grieving process. I'm sure many of you have heard about the stages of grief right I think most of us are familiar with that and we're definitely GONNA dig into those today and I want to work on some perspective around this because you know I am crazy about your mindset in your perspective being right because that so much sets in motion what your experience is going to be if your perspective is good and healthy and your mindset is good and healthy, you're going to have a much different experience all the way around in everything that you do so I really want to dig into some of that stuff too. And as people with addiction, we tend to be very sensitive and we like to blow things out of proportion good things and bad things. But even just the simple fact of being an alcoholic we go it way out of proportion and convince ourselves that our problem is so much worse than other people's problems and no one understands us and we got the short end of the stick and it's so hard to be one of us. And it is hard to be an alcoholic. But it isn't any more difficult than being a million other things. Also what is so hard for one person may not be challenging at all for someone else. So making it seem like your problems are so much bigger or more difficult really doesn't even make sense in it doesn't serve you to have that sort of perspective in that outlook on it. There are so many. Mental health struggles disabilities, special needs that people have where they would love to be in a position to have support groups all over the world where they know all they have to do is show up for free by the way. And their problem can be solved. I promise you people with major illness like cancer or COPD or Ms. They would love the opportunity to just walk into a support group and let people love and support them and have their illness become manageable and almost non-existent. Would love that. Opportunity. I bet people with chronic depression were some people with bipolar disorder schizophrenia. They would love to have a solution so simple that would manage all the symptoms. and. Allow them to live a comfortable and amazing life full of love and community and support. And just think about all of the you know autism all the hundreds of learning challenges and thousands of physical challenges. People get hurt and injured every day and it changes their lives for ever. I would be willing to bet all those people. would. Love to have a challenge where the solution was so straightforward. And required a little personal investment and energy and willingness. Instead of. A lifetime of pain and pharmaceuticals and declining quality of life. You see what I'm saying. As alcoholics, we paint this picture for ourselves that we're so unlucky that we have this thing that is so awful and terrible and Whoa is US feel bad for us because we can't drink alcohol. But when you put it in perspective. There are much bigger challenges you could be facing. And I promise you, you will have bigger challenges in your lifetime because it's just the nature of life life is challenging. Life is hard. I really want you to keep this in perspective. You can't drink alcohol. So what? You only care so much about alcohol because you have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol. Non Alcoholic people do not care about alcohol. They don't obsess over how will they ever have fun again if they don't drink, they don't obsess over not having a drink because their lives in their brains don't revolve around alcohol. There are thousands

Copd Bipolar Disorder
Surviving Suicide

The Chalene Show

06:25 min | 11 months ago

Surviving Suicide

"Hey, there a warning before I. Start Today Show. We're GONNA. Be Talking about some pretty heavy topics. Today will be talking about mental health anxiety depression. And surviving suicide. Parental discretion is advised. In twenty, nine, thousand, nine, nearly eight, hundred, thousand people died of suicide. means, every forty seconds someone was taking their own life. And, suicide is a global phenomenon in certainly their populations, certain people, certain experiences that place. You at greater risk of suicide. But for every person who dies from suicide, it's estimated that there's another twenty. Who attempted suicide? That means for every one person who dies of suicide. There are twenty people who survive it. But death by suicide and suicide attempts are preventable. Now, that is not to say that you. You alone can prevent someone. From taking their own life or from even trying. But. It does mean that we've got to start having these conversations more openly. We've got to remove the stigma. GotTa be able to know the sign so that there's something we can do so that we can intervene. So today because of the pandemic, because of racial tensions because of the world that we live in today, suicide rates are higher than ever. Now, I've heard reports that suicides are up nearly two hundred percent so far in twenty twenty and I did my best to substantiate those statistics. Night can't tell you. I can substantiate the number of suicides is that much higher wouldn't surprise me. I just can't substantiate it when I can tell you is that Google searches Calls to suicide prevention lines and visits to online support groups are up more than two hundred percent since the lockdown began. You should also know that suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the US. In fact, I WANNA lead with some really powerful statistics so that you'll begin to think about this, not just in terms of you or your family members. But your neighbors, your parents, your grandparents, your nieces, or nephews every day. The CDC estimates about one, hundred, twenty, three people die from suicide, and that was in twenty nineteen. It's also estimated that only half of Americans who are experiencing some form of depression or anxiety ever seek treatment. But did you know that between eighty to ninety percent of people who do seek treatment for depression or anxiety find success by using therapist and or a medical intervention? Did you hear that like eighty to ninety percent feel better? An estimated quarter? Million People? Every year are survivors of suicide attempt. In previous years, suicide was the second leading cause of death in the world for people ages fifteen to twenty, four today, it's the number one leading cause of death. And although more females than males attempt suicide. represent. Seventy, nine percent. Of, all suicides in the United, states? Firearms being their most commonly used method and for females. The most commonly used method is overdose poison if you will. Now, let's talk about who is at greatest risk I. It is our LGBTQ plus community. There are three times, more likely special kids, three times more likely than straight kid to attempt suicide Oh nps if you have a sneaking suspicion that your kid might. Be Gay. Bi. Trans. Trust me just accept them and love them if you don't. They feel that. They know that don't assume your Keta straight is what I'm trying to say kids who worry about what their parents and society might think are three times more likely. To commit suicide forty-one percent of trans, adults that they've attempted suicide and the same study found that almost sixty one percent of trans people who were also victims of some form of assault sixty. One percent of those people have attempted suicide because get this lesbian gay and bisexual young adults who come from families where either the belief the notion, the sentiment was that they would be rejected because of their sexuality. Those kids are eight times more likely to commit suicide. Then, children who come from families where they feel very accepted. Each time and lgbtq person is of victim of any type of harassment or abuse that increases their risk of self harm by almost three hundred percent. Those are some of the most at risk populations, the elderly, also a very high risk population. What do I have delivered for I? Don't WANNA be a burden to my children. There's nothing for me to look forward to. Black talk about risk factors regardless of population demographic. The WanNa be on the lookout for these risk factors. Place people at a much higher likelihood of attempting suicide, any previous known or unknown or diagnosed mental disorder. Especially mood disorders, schizophrenia bipolar ast, which is autism spectrum disorder autism, any anxiety disorder, and certain personality disorders. Those who regularly use substances, like you know, drugs, alcohol painkillers, people who tend to be more impulsive or aggressive anyone with a history of trauma, sexual abuse, verbal abuse, physical abuse people who are experiencing a major physical disability setback, chronic illness, those with a family history of suicide, those who have a close friend or relative committed suicide anyone who's in recent job or financial distress. Those, who recently lost a relationship at greater risk for suicide is anyone who's being isolated or who lacks their peers social support?

Depression Wanna Google United States Painkillers CDC United Assault Harassment
"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

QuaranTEEN

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

"Welcome to today's interesting episode. Schizophrenia I know a lot of questions. Come to mind when I say that, but let's see those for later right now. We're going to begin the episode with woman of headlines to update you on the world around us..

"schizophrenia" Discussed on a16z

a16z

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on a16z

"With help from the Galvin's and other families identified another genetic area called. Churn seven and turn a seven is related to the vulnerability theory of schizophrenia. Which is that. Perhaps one is over sensitive or has a sensitivity issue to stimuli. That looks schizophrenia. As a developmental disease one that really begins in utero. Even though it manifest itself much later and over the years he struggled to find a way to perhaps make the area more healthier more resilient and less vulnerable and he has a hypothesis that there actually is a safe. Nutritional Supplement Choline can strengthen brain health generally of the unborn child but also perhaps cross your fingers sixteen times perhaps many years from now prove to make the children more resilient less vulnerable to psychosis and they're doing on all studies right now using choline and if it shows any promise at all he has the Galvin's and other families like them to thank Stephan. It'd be very interesting to hear from your side of the kind of story of the Pharma Industry Attempt to manage this as well. Where would you see those attempts after sourcing? Then where did we go next? And what was the sort of industry response? Where are we today? In the past. There was a quite productive age. Where drugs like Zyprexa were developed. Where we're looking for simply animal behaviors. That were related to schizophrenia. And here is where having sort of a tool kit is quite valuable in a sense. Because if you know for example if there's some odd behavior that an animal is showing that thorazine mitigates then without even knowing the receptors involved. Perhaps you can test drugs in animals for other drugs. That mitigate those behaviors and perhaps don't have side effects so the problem of course is that rats don't get schizophrenia. They don't even have sort of the massive cortisol structures in the folding. That would be we think is where the higher processes that are affected in schizophrenia reside. So to your point about cells dish. I mean it's really a problem of models right. It's a problem of models. How do you before doing a clinical trial in humans? How do you get confidence that your drug is going to work and I think in the nineteen nineties? There were a number of very good efforts. Based on sort of synoptic studies. People have known again going back to some of the early pharmacology. That dopamine was involved. That glutamate was involved. Now we started to identify with the Human Genome Project and just molecular cloning. In general we started uncover what the molecules are that regulate glutamate and regulate dopamine and a number of clinical trials. Were done on these as well but still does stymie. The field today is if you take the overall disease what is your model. What do you tested on? That gives you confidence that you can test this safely in humans and that will have some effect. How do people even do that? I mean are there any other tools before you begin clinical trials in humans when there's a disease that really doesn't present anywhere else outside of humans? Schizophrenia tough one. It's very tough now. Nothing is easy. But for example tumors do grow animals. And you can implant. A patient derived x plan. A patient derived tumor into an animal. And perhaps test therapies there. Or you do have cancer cell lines tumors will actually cell lines will actually grow in a dish and something that kills. Those could reasonably be called to be acting on the tumor and we simply don't have that equivalent for schizophrenia. So what was the next moment where there was something that seemed on the pharmacology side like a real viable treatment that we were you know that people were getting excited about and where are we now. People were excited about Matab Petro Glutamate receptors. That's a particular type. A subtype of glutamate. Which is the main excited Tori neurotransmitter in the nervous system in humans? People were excited about sort of finer manipulations of dopamine receptors and again by reverse engineering. Some of the atypical anti psychotics. You could find out that serotonin receptors also had involvement now. Each of these is going to be a broad family of many many genes. So can you do more finer manipulations of these not every advance in drug? Therapy has to be a totally new mechanism. Schizophrenics and other CNS disorders famous for going off their medications. So if you can perhaps make a medication that is simply last longer and can be given maybe every month or even less duration under a doctor's supervision that's a significant medical advances and this is an engineering challenge. I started life as an engineer and Drug discovery is really biological engineering. I'm not saying it's easy but we do know how to make drugs last longer in the body. There's a very interesting story. In there. With nicotine the receptor that Robert Freedman in Colorado had identified with help from the Galvin family and other families like them was a nicotinic receptor and strictly speaking. That's a receptor that when medicated might actually help with focusing concentration. I mean there's a stereotype of schizophrenic patients. Getting some relief from chain smoking because it focuses their mind and there's a hypothesis related to nicotine. There was for time that if you could somehow drug this receptor a little bit to help it along that perhaps this would prevent delusions or even prevent psychotic breaks and Robert Freedman did try for a while to work on a drug for that and he reports anecdotal excellent results for many patients. But it was a drug that you had to take several times a day and that was something that the pharmaceutical companies couldn't bring through trials to make into a once a day drug so it went away so he decided to go after the nicotinic receptor in utero. You know through Coleen especially in the nineteen nineties. There was a lot of companies and a lot of academic researchers investigating nicotine nicotinic receptors. And again there did seem to be a clear linked to schizophrenia. Perhaps schizophrenics are self medicating by smoking. If so perhaps you can make a sort of sub type of nicotine that gives you some benefit or perhaps even some war benefit and again as Bob said that perhaps last long enough in the body to be practical to be taken as a drug so in this case there was a biological challenge. There no question but it became also an engineering challenge as all drug discovery. Does nicotine is quite a nonselective molecule. While everything hits is called a nicotinic receptor but your body has something like fourteen fifteen genes for individual sub units that together come together for a receptor for nicotine and they all mix and match and very unpredictable ways and ways that still are not well known so. The challenge was quite formidable. People did go ahead for technical reasons. It turned out to be easy to make. Sort of a sub form of nicotine that would only hit seven receptors. Not Easy but not impossible. Either people had good reason to think that this might work no question. It was a huge Downer for patients for the field for everybody when this entire class of drugs just sort of didn't seem to come to nothing but we learned and the negative result often is just as informative as the positive result. We do learn. Can I ask how? Incentivized is the sort of pharmaceutical industry right now to find other alternatives to things like the class of drugs that you know. Sore Zine and some others that you've mentioned I mean those do work to some extent yes to some extent so I'm not a clinician about fifty percent of the patients well to a typical psychotics. But this doesn't touch sort of the cognitive and emotional problems and one of the things one of the many things grateful to Lynn for was really taking me to visit her patients so that I could really see. There's no question something is wrong. Just sort of a very emotionless flat affect cognition is fine clearly. These people are very articulate very bright in many cases but some things badly wrong so to your question. What is the incentive for pharmaceutical companies. It's a huge incentive. I think lots of people would love to do it because schizophrenia is one percent of the population. This is across populations across cultures. So it's a huge opportunity to make therapies that help patients what is not a rare disease for what is not a rare disease and we go beyond that again as Bob's book so amply demonstrates the toll on people's lives it's far beyond that one percent. We just don't know how to do it. Not for the broad schizophrenia. There and this is where I came from my angle to sort of look at. Perhaps there might be sub types of schizophrenia defined genetics where you really would have one particular form of schizophrenia. So Stephan if you as a researcher if you could wave a magic wand right now you know you mentioned better models. What are the things that if you could wish something here tomorrow in the form of a new technology or new capability? What would that be? That would really push us forward into a new chapter all go way afield but if we could monitor the brains of a schizophrenic with sufficient resolution with high resolution right now we've got about a millimeter Vauxhall with the best bold FM experiments while they're actually having a psychotic break. The resolution is still of course could be made finer and finer. We still can't get down to the level of a single cell but now with the blood. Oxygen Level Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging. We can get a measure of function in somebody's brain in real time difficult to do takes. A lot of equipment takes a particular stimulus but one could perhaps hope. This will lead to more insights. Oh my gosh how fascinating that. We've never seen. We actually have no idea what's really happening. I mean consider the logistics. You can't consent somebody and get them to sit in a machine and then wait for them to have a psychotic break. Yeah what would you be looking for? We need mechanism if the field as a whole could say here is a particular area where the excitability is abnormal area of brain tissue that has abnormally excitable or a particular receptor that is abnormally excitable. That gives us a good place to start. That gives us mechanism and then perhaps we could study what to existing drugs due to that. What is missing with existing drugs? That's fascinating it almost sounds like you need like a wearable. Mri very high resolution. Silicon Valley go to it. What about things like crisper? If you do start defining some very specific narrow very entire medic causes that the possibility is so. We'll give a possibility. Say if we knew that a baby galvan or their modern day counterpart babies had a variant in a gene that we thought because families like the Galvin's that we had good reason to believe would make them develop schizophrenia. Can we get in there and change that one nuclear tied to the wild type? It's conceivable but again the challenge here is the engineering challenge. We can do it in a dish but trying to get just that one gene edited trying to get it in just that one nucleotides changed in every cell in the brain and no changes in any other nucleotides in the brain and delivering something that will actually crossed the blood brain barrier. And then doing it on an infant. How would you even test this very very difficult? Bob You describe when Lynn Delisi I met the Galvin family and you write this incredibly profound line. That really stuck out for me as she walked through the door of the house at Hidden Valley road. She couldn't help but recognize a perfect sample. This could be the most mentally ill family in America and you really dove into every element of what that meant for them into this family's innermost suffering and struggles..

schizophrenia nicotine Bob dopamine utero Galvin Stephan Robert Freedman Lynn Delisi cortisol Silicon Valley Matab Petro America Coleen engineer
"schizophrenia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on KCRW

"What is schizophrenia really is it only a psychiatric condition or does it have its origins in something else who is more susceptible to it and why these are the questions at the heart of a new book about an extraordinary family writer Robert Kolker the bestselling author of lost girls tells the story of the Galvin family they seemed a model for baby boomer America twelve children with a military dad in a strict but religious mother growing up in Colorado in the nineteen sixties but over the years six of the boys were diagnosed with schizophrenia and now their journey is transforming the science around the mental illness the book is called hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family and Robert Kolker joins us now from his home in Brooklyn New York welcome to the program thanks a lot hello we can't get into every story line in this incredibly detailed and richly reported book but a generally tell me about the gallons and the time that they were living in well they really lived in the grandest period of the American century they were married at the end of World War two they raised a family in the fifties and sixties through the Cold War and through the American prosperity boom and their children really where the baby boom the oldest one was born in nineteen forty five and the youngest one in nineteen sixty five and there were twelve of them so they were famous wherever they lived as this very large family that outwardly seems perfect in every way let's talk about why schizophrenia has been such a mystery there was this a debate that you discuss initially a nature genetics or nurture that something in the way someone was brought up triggers schizophrenia what was the debate about well the very beginning of psychiatry most people who were giving schizophrenia named believe that it had some sort of physical quality to it and that it might be hereditary but Sigmund Freud disagreed he really believe that in mainly it was something that was inherited not inherited in a genetic sense but inherited in terms of childhood trauma and and this nature nurture debate continued for some time and in fact the nurture people the psychoanalyst's really held sway throughout the twentieth century at least in America at all suggesting that some people who had schizophrenia and lived in a world that the therapist had to penetrate and that with the right kind of therapy the problem might be solved in the person might enter reality again and this completely ignored the genetic aspect of it now we're living in a world where everything is seemingly about genetics but we're back to a nature nurture argument because we believe that schizophrenia and other complex diseases are just about genetics better about genes that are impacted or affected by the environment explained it well it's always been known to be a syndrome as opposed to a disease it's not like influenza where you can identify what it is in terms of its you know chemistry schizophrenia is really a collection of symptoms that are defined and then treated based on the symptoms sue you in the book I talk about a woman called Linda Lee C. and her work she believe that families like the Galvin's held the key to understanding schizophrenia that's right a doctor Lee C. was a pioneer at the time she was one of the top researchers at the National Institute of mental health and she became fascinated by the idea that if you started a family with a large incidence of schizophrenia and that you might be able to find some sort of genetic silver bullet inside it that could help us understand how the condition takes shape in the general population but she had went on to assemble the most numerous a collection of what she called multiplex families and to the gallons for one of those first families and they were the largest family and it was through the study of those families that with a lot of twists and turns she ended up once the human genome was sequenced to actively demonstrate how families like the gallons can help us understand the condition and how it takes shape yeah and let's talk about what was uncovered through looking at families like the goblins because it was a mystery right at the heart of this about the way the brains of schizophrenics function that's right and her belief was that this definitely was inherited that environment had nothing to do with it what they found was in fact a genetic mutation that might be unique to this family but is so vital to brain function that it might help us understand how schizophrenia works and that's really how families like the garbage can help us going forward we can look at them and their particular genetic mutation that might be at fault and while that mutation may not exist elsewhere you can help us understand the disease and how it affects others in their models for this with other diseases so possibly might be neuro developmental is is what they came to sort of believe yes in the eighties the new wisdom about schizophrenia was that it was a developmental disorder which is to say that even though so people came down with that at the age of twenty or twenty one that didn't mean that they suddenly got bitten by an insect and had schizophrenia or it meant that there was something with in their genetic makeup that they had from before they were even born that gave them a vulnerability a special sensitivity whether was the inability to filter out certain stimuli or difficulty and brain development that only manifested itself in the final stages of brain development which as we know now is adolescents you come across the gallons a mutual friend of mine and Lindsey Galvan introduced us Lindsay is the youngest of the twelve and he had known them for years and that the two sisters there ten brothers and two sisters Margaret and Lindsey and the family had been talking for years about trying to let the world know about their family stories and finally they decided they needed an outsider and independent journalist who could take the story wherever it led yeah now that their story is finally being told what do you think we should take away from what they went through well I mean these are challenging times independent of mental illness I think that this is an example of a family that really experienced not just one but two or three or four different horrors all at once and came out the other side it's about not turning inward when when the worst happens in life it's about reaching out to each other and understanding the value of family and the value of not closing yourself off to possibilities I really believe there's a lot of hope and inspiration in this story that people can take away from it independent of mental illness issues rather call government is the author of the new book hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family thank you very much thank you letter they're two world renowned musicians from two very different parts of the world Grammy Award winner Abigail Washburn plays one of the most popular instruments in Appalachian music the banjo Fay.

schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"To give people the real technical information all the details. We know but in language that is super easy to understand so it's called the beginner's guide to understand schizophrenia. You can find it on Amazon. Ultimately it all linked to it on my website at Hidden Bench Dot. Com SLASH SCHIZOPHRENIA book. And it also be the show and this book. Is it more geared towards loved ones friends? Family or people with schizophrenia. I root for both actually so the person I didn't write it for is any sort of clinician or researcher. It's not for them. It's people who don't know anything about mental hall or treatment of no scientific knowledge. That's why I wrote it for so I wrote it for people who are just trying to understand schizophrenia. Whether that's because you have it or you have a loved one. Who HAS IT? Or you're just GONNA curious to know more about it. That's awesome. Thank you so much Dr. Fitch for joining us once again. Very very interesting. And thank you for shedding light on these subjects and we definitely gotTa Check Your Book. Out Rachel as always incredible interview now. I know that you talked to Dr Finch for a couple of hours. And obviously we edit down. Did you learn anything about men with schizophrenia? From her that you didn't know before this interview I learned so much from her and I'd like that she's able to explain kind of that medical side and the way she's able to just explain it so I guess simply unlike a level that me and you can understand gave you know. We're we're not doctors but being able to break that down and I really liked that kind of explaining the homelessness and then of course the substance abuse and all of that playing in more so with the males the she's incredible once again. Thank you Dr French for being here and please if you have a moment pick up her book. She helped us with both episodes and she does it free of charge. She's a great advocate for people with schizophrenia and mental health general so once again hats off to Dr Finch yes Gabe I want to ask you. First as someone who does not have schizophrenia. What is your takeaway from these past two episodes on the gender differences? I was surprised and I. I don't know why I feel like I shouldn't have been surprised. So I feel a little guilty but knowing the way that society treats the genders so heavily. Impacted the outcomes and the treatment for schizophrenia from diagnosis to treatment. Asking for help to getting care that really. Kinda put me on my on my rear little. Because it's just so sad. Both men and women have the same illness and yes. There's variants and the presentations etcetera. But the thing that made me I'm GonNa go with saddest is that the outcomes were different based on how society effectively sees men and women. And it's like. Wow just just wow no. I agree with that completely. We obviously all know the society and you know we have these different ideals in our heads but yet to see how it can really affect people who are dealing with serious mental illnesses. It's definitely eye opening. I say the past two episodes for me have been very fascinating because there are so many factors that are out of people's control and where you're talking about form hormones that the body creates like to how your body actually processes the medications. Learning to thrive with schizophrenia is not as simple as take your pills every day. It's not as simple as make sure you're going to the doctor. You can be doing everything right. You can be doing everything correctly. Be Taking your medication on time. Be going to the doctor religiously and the deck is still stacked against you. And that's frustrating. It's a depressing. Say The least situation to be in in those times. That's when it's time to change the game. I love how Jason hit on how he used to hate it when people would ask him what he did work wise and then he came to the realization. That wait a minute. He's a mental health advocate. He works with veterans. He's leading a council for veterans and he's an author public speaker and it just goes on and on and that's like so much that's amazing like he does all this incredible stuff and I don't know that gave me so much hope gay. It's easy to just kind of look at the negative. What maybe someone isn't doing and not pay attention to all of the amazing incredible things that they are and to your point when you say that it's easy to look at all the negatives in somebody's life and ignore the positives we have to put that on ourselves right. It's it's easy for us to ignore our own positives and only focus on. The negative is much as I would. Love to say that. Stigma and discrimination against people with schizophrenia is. All External. There is an internal components and I agree with you when Jason realize that he was doing all of this volunteer work in his community and Jason was using his experience for so much. Positivity is specially in the veteran community the fact that he can work with veterans and understand both the mental health aspect and the veteran aspect. It makes him a hot commodity and him realizing that obviously paid huge dividends for him so I would put a challenge out to everybody listening. Find the thing that you and you alone are uniquely good at and powerful and and keep that in mind. That's awesome absolutely gave. Well put very cool. Thank you so much for listening..

schizophrenia Dr Finch Jason Amazon researcher Dr French Dr. Fitch Rachel
"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

10:18 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"I'm Rachel Star here with my co host Gape Howard last episode. We discussed how schizophrenia affects women and this episode. We are focusing on the gentleman exciting. We have Jason Jepson. Who's GONNA join us? He is a mental health advocate. Also a veteran. Who HAS SCHIZOPHRENIA? And Dr Finch will return to help us understand the medical side of things that are going on Rachel. I'm looking forward to a great show. I'm excited to gave last month. Rachel we learned how schizophrenia impacts women. You know things. Like motherhood and pregnancy and menopause and aging and. I don't think there's a lot of people were surprised that any illness would impact a female differently than it would a male but we sort of want to open that up because there were some big differences in how schizophrenia presents in males over females and I think that was surprising for us during the research because we just assumed that an illness hits women differently because I think society is conditioned to believe that women go through everything differently. The fact that we hear mentioned over and over is that men tend to get diagnosed far earlier in life than women. Do with schizophrenia. However as we talked about last episode that's not always true especially in families who have a history of mental illness and even amongst like different ethnic groups but due to being diagnosed younger age men often have not attained the same degree of social development as women. Do at the onset of schizophrenia and that can contribute to poor social outcomes during our research. We learned that the reason that menor often diagnosed earlier because men are showing more emotions or boehner abilities and when seen in women as we learned last month. They're just like oh well she's a woman so of course she's being emotional. Where when the exact same symptoms seen in men that like oh? This is a problem but as you pointed out getting diagnosed earlier isn't necessarily the advantage that we think it is in males because stereotypically they're looking at you for all kinds of issues as we're GONNA learn from our guest. One of those issues is violence or rage or anger. My question to you Rachel is. Do you think that men have an easier time with schizophrenia? Or is it just a different time? I would definitely say a different time being diagnosed earlier that in itself and we talked about mini episodes ago where it comes to diagnosing children where that has a huge impact on you. You know if you know earlier that you have a major mental disorder that can change just how other people view you yourself. How your parents view your future? I know that's definitely come up just in my own life. But I can't imagine. Had I gotten the diagnosis in high school. My parents probably immediately would have started wearing like while she can't go to college. Just assuming things so just like being diagnosed sooner. I think is really scary. And then the flip side not being diagnosed until your mid twenties like many women. Are you probably been dealing with this for a while? Had not been able to get help so it's definitely a different situation. I don't think either side is going to be easier anytime. You're dealing with schizophrenia. It's going to be intense across the board. Rachel do a refresh real quick and talk about symptoms that tend to impact men more than women. Men tend to have more serious cognitive deficits more the flat effect we have a monotone voice very dull expression. You don't really react the way that people would normally react in situations blunted emotional responses where it's just kind of. I don't WanNA say chill but you're just kind of you know straight across the board when things happen. Speech reduction and men tend to be less active than women. And of course just because you're male or female doesn't mean that you fit in a nice tidy box right it just just because you're male doesn't mean that you will have all of these and just because you're male doesn't mean that your family will not notice or will notice. We're speaking in generalities when we talk about stereotypically. This is how schizophrenia presents in men. Yes absolutely and Rachel. Of course we love you very much. But you're a woman living with schizophrenia. So you thought it would be appropriate to bring on a male who is living schizophrenia. And that's why we have a great guest who you spent some time with Jason. Jepson as you said. He's a veteran. He's awesome. He's living with schizophrenia. And you did a great interview. You're ready to roll it absolutely here. We go today's guest. Is Jason Jepson? Who also has schizophrenia? Thank you so much for being with us today. Jason Thank you for having me so right away. I what you to tell our listeners about yourself okay. Sure I'm a writer. I started journaling when I was in the seventh grade. I have two books out. I'm also a veteran. I'm a part of the Vet Council at McGuire. Veterans Hospital remained. Sure that veterans don't fall through the cracks and we dragged him to mineral services. It's awesome well. Thank you so much. Thank you very much for serving for US. Thank you so much. So what age were you diagnosed with schizophrenia? I was the diagnosis of schizophrenia. When I was twenty three I was diagnosed in the army. The thing is. I don't know how your schizophrenia is. But my I knew the voices the voices in my head board the other soldiers that fought in California where I was stationed in also friends from Richmond. Virginia because I saw my heaven hear their voices. It took me a little while to Except my illness. Did you have signs that you noticed earlier? Age Not really in high school. I'd mild depression. I saw a counselor for short time but I still was social. Had Friends and I've played Lacrosse in high school. Now do you have visual hallucinations. Also are yours mainly audio then in my twenties it was mainly voices that I couldn't figure out. Where were they will coming from? Stow our episode. Today is focusing on. How men experienced schizophrenia. Different than women? Do you have any thoughts on that? Do you feel. There's much of a difference Well I think everybody's experience for Schizophrenia. Is Different in general. I think we hear voices delusions but the specifics of a different. If that makes any sense okay. It's just important to find the right treatment plant for men and women you know. Find the right medication. Maybe have therapy. How does someone to trust like your parents or your friends and all that takes trial and error for both men and women. I want to ask you this because I think it has like two sides that you see. A lot of men with schizophrenia ended up homeless and I know with you also working with veterans. You hear that a lot too when you have a lot of people coming back with post traumatic stress disorder. What are your thoughts on that? Yes what kills me makes me when attack. This mental health thing for veterans is out veterans actually committed suicide in the parking lot of the. Va Can you believe that? I mean there's gotta be an answer to that. I mean. It took me a while. Ask for help myself. How do we get there? How do we combat that? You know it's just I hope. Veterans Council can reach out to them. we were still a new organization. But that's just need to ask for help and it can be take awhile but be patient. I would say men are typically known for not wanting to ask for help and I can imagine it's been doing you're talking about like soldiers you know the idea of masculinity it being even harder for guys like that exactly what you know one thing. That's helping. There's more athletes coming forward to Lesson to stigma for men. I'm sure you for that. Dwayne Rock Johnson has come out saying he gets depressed. I mean that guy's a famous actor and that's going to do great things for men in my opinion is huge. You think masculinity he's just giant muscle. What has been your biggest struggle as a man with schizophrenia? Well it's the Saudi expectations. The stereotypes gave does this wonderful on the social network but but know why kids job. I used to avoid social situations because the question. What do you do? What do you do for a living? Because I didn't have an answer then. I realized I would make a house advocate and I'm proud to be a mental health advocate when you say you're a minute health advocate that opens the door for education. What is it one in? Four people have some kind of mental illness. You know so if you open up. A mental health advocate well. My my sister has bipolar. My uncle is a schizophrenic. You know it opens it up and talking about it. Like we're doing now is the most important things to bus stigma. What advice do you have for men? That are listening. Right now with schizophrenia. Except your diagnosis is probably one of the most important things I can say when he accepted you. Get on the right medication. Be Patient with medication and It's okay to ask for help you know ask for help. It's it's okay to ask for help so with our veterans that are out there. Do you have any advice for loved ones who worry about like different people coming back from their time military wise. Do you have any advice for loved ones? Let let them know about the options like A. My mom resource my illness before I came home. She she resorts schizophrenia. She was before I came back. And you know how me with the V. A. And everything like that. She won't let me fall through the cracks I would say be patient but you you know you should offer your help. I guess and do your research on if they come back with a mental illness or whatever does support groups caregivers can take it. Just Nami dot org the Pie. Shell you something there or you know if the VA.

schizophrenia Rachel Star Jason Jepson Virginia menopause Veterans Hospital Dr Finch Gape Howard US Lacrosse younger age visual hallucinations Veterans Council menor California writer Vet Council boehner mild depression
"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"And women and specifically what? It's like to be a woman and getting treatment with schizophrenia. It's a great interview and we're going to go ahead and play that right now. Our guest today is Dr Hayden finch a psychologist from Iowa. Thank you so much for being with us today. I'm so happy to be here. Thank you for the opportunity. Our episode today. We're focusing on women who have schizophrenia specifically as a psychologist what issues have you seen? That women with schizophrenia tend to seek help. With what when interesting. We tend to have more emotional symptoms with their schizophrenia than men do so often. They're coming to treatment. Things like relieving anxiety and depression. See that more in women than in men but they also have a lot of trauma. They tend to be victimized quite a lot in their lives and do not often a focus of treatment and then lots of things related to family. Planning and RELATIONSHIPS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA. Across the board tend to be more social than men who have schizophrenia. Why do you think that is? Symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into positive symptoms and negative symptoms and positive symptoms. Don't mean good. They just need that. Something is there. That shouldn't be there so for example hallucinations or delusions whereas negative symptoms are things that aren't there should be a lack of motivation or lack of facial expressions. The men tend to have more negative symptoms than women do do they have a lack of social drive and a lack of social interest whereas women don't have their symptoms as much but also women. Their onset of the illness tends to be a few years later than men and they have a bit more opportunity to develop their personality and their social skills and their twenty s and that will protect their social skills through the rest of their lives talking about the positive symptoms. You just brought up. Do Women tend to have a different type of hallucination than men experience necessarily we see the same types of hallucinations and delusions? Sometimes with women the content will be a little bit different than it will focus on their children a little bit more war safety a little bit more often. They're very similar in Tai Bow. Just the content can vary a little bit. What are the biggest challenges for woman with schizophrenia? Who is pregnant? The most obvious one has to do with medications. So a lot of women with or schizophrenia will stop taking most medications while they're pregnant. Just to err on the side of safety and so when it comes to a woman with schizophrenia who gets pregnant. A lot of them will discontinue their medications for the same concerns about potential effects on the fetus and sometimes those concerns are coming from the woman herself sometimes. We're families times even from her doctor but stopping medications during pregnancy for one schizophrenia increases the risk for relapse so think about sixty five percent of women with schizophrenia. Who Don't stay on their medication during pregnancy will relapse during your pregnancy. So then they have more problems with their mental health during pregnancy. So most women who don't have schizophrenia. Don't report major changes in their mental hall during pregnancy. But women with schizophrenia. Due in part again because of that medication being but then psychosis during pregnancy can affect seeking prenatal care not recognizing signs of labor. Were problems during the pregnancy. They might not even recognize that they're pregnant. Do there can be lots of negative consequences on the pregnancy and on the fetus when the coast develops so? I am a woman with schizophrenia. Let's say that I found out that I'm pregnant. What would you suggest being my next steps? It the situation where you need to talk to your doctor. Psychiatrist about what medications are safest during pregnancy? We do have some information about medications. Anti even that are relatively safe during pregnancy. But it's a balance between protecting yourself and your mental health and the secondary effect that has on the baby. It's a really difficult balance. It's an individual decision arm and it really depends on the particular woman her help her history her symptoms and all of but it's very difficult decision to make with respect to medications. What are the biggest challenges when it comes to being a mother with schizophrenia? All moms are overwhelmed right so you have that regular level of being overwhelmed with responsibilities but then on top of that you're trying to manage your own mental health so you're trying to get organized with postnatal checkups and Pediatrician Appointments Plus Your Own Medical Appointments and mental health appointments. They often don't have as much support as women without schizophrenia. So there aren't as many family members to lean on for emergency childcare on the have extra hands when they just need a break I also symptomatically can have more difficulty reading accused. The baby is giving them so they might misinterpret what the baby is needing or wanting and that can interfere with the relationship that they developed with the baby and a lot of women with schizophrenia. During that postpartum phase will have a pretty significant exacerbation in symptoms now. A lot of women are at risk for postpartum depression. But women with schizophrenia. Especially those women who weren't taking their medication during pregnancy are at especially high risk and that can increase the need for hospitalization. But a lot of women then won't seek hospitalization really truthfully because the majority of women with schizophrenia. Lose custody of their children in my research I found the so many of the women who have children. Who Have Schizophrenia? Also are single mothers and you very often lose custody due to either not being able to afford to provide for that child because the mother or self is having a hard time working and being able to provide or having to be hospitalized. What would you say like if you have someone come into you? Who's in that situation? The biggest thing I think is is asking for help before there's a problem so if you're noticing that your symptoms are making it hard for you to care for the baby if you're getting extremely overwhelmed with caring for a baby or even a child. It's important to ask for help before a problem comes up. Those are the women who have the greatest likelihood of being able to maintain custody versus waiting until there is a major problem. The child is neglected. Or even abused. Then it's very difficult to make an argument to maintain custody. It's a situation where we definitely want to prevent problems rather than try to correct problems and most women if they have a family and they're going through treatment like you're just trying to juggle everything and everybody who has kids and whatnot are just constantly trying to juggle their lives with schizophrenia added. What advice do you have for women? I didn't biggest thing we can all do. Really but especially women with schizophrenia. Or women who are involved in mental health system is to find out exactly what services are available in your area so you can call two one one which is a public line where they'll connect you with services in your area but you can be looking for things like housing for mothers and their children family services support groups for parents with mental illness. Respite care for when you really need a break. There are specialized clinical services for parents with mental illness. There in home services where a provider will come in your home and help you learn parenting skills or learn how to interpret with. The children are needing Even transportation services can be a big help for people who are trying to juggle it all so that's one thing is is making sure that you know what services are available and you take advantage up down but also to the extent? I think it's helpful to integrate. Your family entered the treatment so look providers who are willing to work with you and your child is there. A lot of opportunities were skill development there or invite your parents or your partner do therapy and work on communication there opportunities or integrating it so that you don't have quite so much to juggle and you can actually build skills to make it easier to juggle all of it. Something that surprised me seems to be someone should have said it to me. Long before now but with schizophrenia and women a lot of women don't tend to get schizophrenia. Until they hit menopause or they are not have it and it gets a whole lot. Worse Caminha Poss- time. I had no idea what advice do you have? I mean if I'm already hit that age range and I haven't had schizophrenia yet. That's a lot to suddenly hit. You what is your advice for seeking.

schizophrenia Dr Hayden finch hallucinations Iowa Tai Bow menopause Caminha Poss partner
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Delusions. Sometimes with women the content will be a little bit different than you will focus on their children a little bit more. Were safety a little bit? More would offer very similar entitled just the content can vary a little bit. What are the biggest challenges for woman with schizophrenia? Who is pregnant? The most obvious one has to do with medication. So a lot of women with or without schizophrenia will stop taking most medications while they're pregnant. Just to err on the side of safety and so when it comes to a woman with schizophrenia who gets pregnant. A lot of them will discontinue their medications for the same concerns about potential effects on the fetus and sometimes those concerns are coming from the woman herself sometimes. We're families sometimes. Even from her doctor but stopping medications during pregnancy. For Women with schizophrenia increases. The risk for relapse so think about sixty five percent of women with schizophrenia. Who Don't stay on their medication. During pregnancy will relapse during your pregnancy. So then they have more problems with their mental health during pregnancy. The most women who don't have schizophrenia. Don't report major changes in their mental. Health during pregnancy but willis schizophrenia due in part again because of that medication being but then psychosis during pregnancy can affect seeking prenatal care not recognizing signs of labor or problems during the pregnancy. They might not even recognize that they're pregnant. Do there can be lots of negative on the pregnancy and on the fetus when the closest develops so. I am a woman with schizophrenia. Let's say I found out that I'm pregnant. What would you suggest being my next steps? It's a situation where you need to talk to your doctor. Especially the psychiatrist about what? Medications are safest during pregnancy. We do have some information about medications anti psychotics. Even that are relatively safe during pregnancy. But it's a balance between protecting yourself and your mental health and the secondary effect that has on the baby. It's a really difficult balance. It's an individual decision arm and it really depends on the particular woman her help her history her symptoms and all of that but the very difficult decision to make with respect to medications. What are the biggest challenges when it comes to being a mother with schizophrenia? All moms are overwhelmed right so you have that regular level of being overwhelmed with responsibilities but then on top of that you're trying to manage your own mental house. You're trying to get organized with postnatal checkups and Pediatrician Appointments Plus Your Own Medical Appointments and mental health appointments. They often don't have as much support as women without schizophrenia. So there aren't as many family members to lean on for emergency childcare on they don't have there's extra hands when they just need a break. I also symptomatically can have more difficulty reading accused that the baby is giving them so they might misinterpret what the baby is needing or wanting and that can interfere with the relationship. Developed with the baby and a lot of with schizophrenia mm-hmm during the postpartum will have a pretty significant exacerbation in symptoms. A lot of women are at risk for postpartum depression. But women with schizophrenia. Especially those women who weren't taking their medication during pregnancy are at especially high risk and that can increase the need for hospitalization when a lot of women than won't seek hospitalization really truthfully because the majority of women with schizophrenia loose custody of their children it my research. I found that so many of the women who have children. Who Have Schizophrenia? Also are single mothers and new very often lose custody due to either not being able to afford to provide for that child because the mother self is having a hard time working and being able to provide or having to be hospitalized. What would you say like if you have someone coming to you? Who's in that situation? The biggest thing I think is is asking for help before there's a problem if you're noticing that your symptoms are making it hard for you to care for the baby if you're getting extremely overwhelmed with caring for a baby or even a child. It's important to ask for help before a problem comes up. Those are the women who have the greatest likelihood of being able to maintain custody versus waiting until there is a major problem. The child is neglected. Or even abused. Then it's it's very difficult to make an argument to maintain custody. It's a situation where we definitely want to prevent problems rather than try to correct problems and most women if they have a family and they're going through treatment like you're just trying to juggle everything and I'm going to say everybody who has kids and whatnot are just constantly trying to juggle. Their lives with the schizophrenia added. What advice do you have for women? Beg thing we can all do. Really especially women with schizophrenia. Or women who are involved in mental health system is to find out exactly what services are available in your area. You can call two.

schizophrenia willis
"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"When I was reading this research? Is this idea. That mothers with schizophrenia. They don't have a lot of Leeway. One of the things that you just said is that you would need a lot of help. I would really defy you to find a mother on this planet. That doesn't need a lot of help. Now I understand that if you're managing any illness any not mental own if you have an illness then obviously you're going to need more help. That is understood but do you think that the bar is just significantly. Lower for women with schizophrenia. That if something happens if a mistake occurs if an illness symptom POPs up the dislike. Oh well you're schizophrenic. We got to take your baby whereas with other mothers like oh well you just made a mistake. Mistakes are part of parenting. Everybody does do you think that. That is a factor in some of these stats absolutely and I think if someone has some sort of even genetic disorder. Very few people are like. Oh you shouldn't have a child you shouldn't be over. You know another person's welfare but when it comes to mental stuff it's like Oh you have depression. Oh yeah bipolar schizophrenia. Like no you shouldn't be around children and not even like you shouldn't be a mother. You shouldn't be around children so there is definitely a double standard with that. All where anything mental freaks people out. There's just so much stigma discrimination and misinformation that it makes it very difficult and it's interesting because you know Rachel I love you and I think the world of you but I know what it's like to be sick and I can't imagine having to care for a baby and I can't imagine you carrying for a baby when you're that sick and of me is like. Oh Jeez I don't know maybe that's not a good idea but my mom broke her wrist when she had three children she she was not doing well. That six weeks i. My father lost his job when we were younger. Well that's not a good idea. Either I just I think of all of the adversity that my family faced growing up but everybody was like hey band together. Work IT OUT. You can do it. Nobody said Yeah. This is proof that people named Gary Howard shouldn't be fathers. Oh this is proof that people named Susan. Howard just can't Hack Motherhood we just got through it as as a family and a community and I think that more often than not women with schizophrenia. They just don't get those benefits and I think it's worth pointing out because it is another layer. That makes it very difficult for women with schizophrenia. To lead the lives that they would like and I wanNA put a little note on this over and over I could find so much info about women having children as far as like pros cons mostly cons in just lots of people with opinions and yet next to nothing about men with schizophrenia. Being father's nothing really there was nothing. I don't know just an interesting like how society we view people with mental disorders. Having families. It was just Kinda like women obviously. Yeah they're going to deal with this but not men that is incredible and obviously something that will discuss. More next month on men with schizophrenia. Rachel Shifting Gears from Motherhood we have to talk about the aging process. What's the difference between men and women with schizophrenia? As we get older this is fascinating. We talked about earlier. Age of onset. That women tend to get schizophrenia. Later another thing though is that women can have a second peak of schizophrenia. Is What they call it. And it's usually women aged forty five to fifty who have not been previously diagnosed with schizophrenia. It suddenly comes on and it has to do with pre menopausal stage hitting and they think because the estrogen drops. There's something about estrogen that keeps schizophrenia. More in control and hearkening back to what we talked about earlier with periods and shopping. But men don't have this. There is no second part of life where suddenly a man who hasn't had schizophrenia. Will develop it in his fifties sixties. It's just not sane. In fact men with schizophrenia. As they age tend to get more of a handle on it and women. It's the opposite because you have for some women suddenly schizophrenia develops and there's a lot about that. I was wondering When I looked at the different research. These women already have schizophrenia. But maybe because they were so social. It just wasn't recognizable or did it really just come on at that moment and there is no answer for that but I did think it was very interesting and something that. If you've already been diagnosed with schizophrenia to look out for that it could get a lot worse hitting around age. Forty five if you're a woman so I got a little over ten years their clock's ticking for the second round of fun and it's something else that women have to be aware of that may or may not be as researched or as discussed. Oftentimes I think society does forget. How much educated guesswork there is in a mental health. Diagnosis Schizophrenia is diagnosed by observation. It's treated by best case practices and research and then more observation. There's a lot of self reporting from the person living with schizophrenia and all of that really allows our culture and our society and our bias to influence the end result. We have to be aware of it while it does sound scary and it is. I don't like the idea that men and women get different treatment. Obviously you don't like the idea that men and women get different treatment because it it kind of sounds like women are getting the short end of the stick. It is what we have now and for the women listening to this show this is where advocacy is just so important along with education and Rachel. I'm going to ask you. Would you have known any of this information about being a woman living with schizophrenia? If it wasn't for your job do you feel more educated and more empowered today than you did before the research for this show? And what advice do you have for? Women living with schizophrenia. To make sure that they get the best care taking into account the fact that they're women. I would not have known a lot of the things we've talked about today but especially The way estrogen is thought to affect schizophrenia. Did none of that's ever been brought up to me. You know doctors ever said anything like I said. I'm in my mid thirties and you would think maybe hey just so you know Rachel. You know women with schizophrenia. It could get a lot worse here in the next few years. None of that's ever been said to me. And it makes me realize how important it is to do your own research and I'm not saying to diagnose yourself I'm saying to really know an research what could be on the horizon especially with the pregnancy and things like that. I'm like okay well. I don't plan on having kids so I would. I ever like research. Look into all that. But then that's what led me to finding Alabel all of this which leads the menopause thing and again. It's just not something you you normally see on any of the little pamphlets in the doctor's office brought up at any therapists meeting Rachel. Were you surprised to find out? Just how separated physical health and mental health is because it. It just seems to me like before we started the research for this show that it never occurred to really anybody that your physical health would drive your mental health outcomes and while this is a chronic problem just across the board and Mental Health Advocacy specifically for schizophrenia. The fact that what's going on with your physical body has been so far removed from your schizophrenia treatment. How does that make you feel last episode we talked about the Co Co morbidity and then to go into seeing just how the hormones they do? Everything affects your schizophrenia. And it's all connected and yet having a hard time mental health effects your physical and vice versa. Something else that we as people with mental disorders do need to be aware of and to kind of not be so hard on ourselves. But I've done research and just kind of learned about different statistics. A lot of eggs are normal that I just didn't realize where it's like. Hey It's okay that I have this issue. It's not that I'm being super unhealthy. A lot of women or a lot of people schizophrenia. Also struggle with this. It's good and bad. Let's go with that. It's good bad gave Rachel. Thank you so much for your candor. Now you had the opportunity to talk to. Dr Hayden Fitch who is a PhD in a researcher and UNDERSTAND SCHIZOPHRENIA? From the clinical perspective. And you've got to ask her a lot of questions about will really the differences between men.

schizophrenia Rachel Shifting Gary Howard Mental Health Advocacy Alabel Susan Dr Hayden Fitch Co Co researcher
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

14:01 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"To inside schizophrenia. I'm Rachel Star withers here with my wonderful co host. Gabe Howard this episode. We are exploring schizophrenia. In women next episode going to focus on the men but this whole episode is for the ladies often. We don't really consider gender dynamics in treatment or medication and this is a chronic across. All health. Not just schizophrenia. A lot of medications etc are only tested on men because of risk they don't want to impact a potential pregnancy etc and on one hand. This sounds good. We're projecting pregnancy but on the other hand. This means there's whole drugs that have made it to market. That may not have ever been tested with women so I think that it's exciting to consider how schizophrenia impacts the genders differently. Obviously we want to state unequivocally that if you meet two people with schizophrenia. You've met two people with schizophrenia. Tends TO BE THIS IDEA. That all people with schizophrenia are exactly alike and and we hope that this show has done a lot to dispel that misinformation. If I meet two guys named Gabe. They're probably both different. Probably probably repeatedly you hear the difference between men and women with schizophrenia. The biggest thing is the age of onset. Women are said to develop it later than men on average they say four to six years later than a man would be diagnose. Let's go be diagnosed with schizophrenia. And that's one of the things. They've noticed repeatedly in research across the years. Is that women get schizophrenia. In life later sometimes you know late twenties. They'll even say it's interesting because as you said it's diagnosed with we know from research. That people are born with schizophrenia. So the question becomes and we don't know the answer to this because research is ongoing. Do Men and women become symptomatic at the same time but men get the diagnosis faster or do women not develop the symptoms of schizophrenia. Until later and it's difficult to discover that and some of it is social engineering if a woman is behaving erratically. Well of course she's a woman and this is the kind of thinking that we have to prevent and get over to make sure that everybody gets the best care but it's on one hand it's interesting to think about when we're diagnosing people and how we're diagnosing people but on the other hand it's kind of sad if men and women are showing symptoms at the exact same age but it takes women an extra four to six years to be diagnosed. That's also scary. Yes they do say however that it's less detectable in women which I could totally see because I grew up having hallucinations but I didn't even realize myself that that was weird until my late teens than I that I stopped talking about it so I didn't get a diagnosis either until my twenties so I could easily see. You know yeah. Women tend to be more social. They tend to be more active than men. Who Have Schizophrenia? So yeah probably fly under the radar much longer. It's interesting how you put that Rachel. You said that as soon as you notice that you were having these hallucinations and issues you hit them but you remained social. You remained engaged in talking to the people around you whereas men when they notice them. They tend to retreat. It's that retreating that I think makes people realize that. Perhaps something is wrong you know. Why is this person? Stay in their room. Why does this person not have a job? Why is this person talking to themselves whereas because you remained social people? Don't say well. Hey we like it when Rachel comes over Rachel is Funny Rachel is Nice. She must be hearing voices in her head and experiencing psychosis and elucidations. And and all of the other symptoms of schizophrenia. I I can see how it could mask. It is especially to our friends and family who are not trained psychologists or psychiatrists and the flip side of. That coin. Is FAMILIES THAT SCHIZOPHRENIA? Tends to run in. There actually is no difference in the onset of age between men and women so brothers sisters. And that's because yeah grandma had it if mom has it you know so cousin. Has you tend to be looking for those symptoms and recognize them earlier. Whether it's a boy or girl growing up you send notice that. They have acknowledged that if the family and friends are aware that there could be a potential problem on the horizon. They are noticing it and much much sooner. There's also a study out of India that is found no difference in the average age of onset between men and women and I think that really does speak to the social dynamics between cultures because if people in India are all having the onset of schizophrenia at the same time it would really be unusual to think that there's some sort of genetic difference between Americans and Indians. It's it's sort of speaks to this being a social construct and again research is ongoing. We're not one hundred percent. Sure of any of these things. In a lot of countries having a mental disorder is looked down upon even more so than I would say the Western world. They don't have statistics on those kinds of things because unfortunately it will go. No one is diagnosed until much later in life where they can't function at all so it is interesting when you look like how people grow up. What's expected of men and women? I do think women could fly under the radar longer. Sometimes just because you're not like well a guy eighteen. He needs to get out. He needs to get a job he needs to at. Yeah I feel like my family. They're going to be little softer on the girl in the family and the boy so I can easily see like that flying under the radar to your point Rachel when we talk about the social differences between men and women Which there's a lot I really think of. People who have battled schizophrenia for a long time and when I work with those people they say hey look. I haven't had a job in five years and all of the men very much want to know what to do about their resume. They've got a five year gap of five year gap five year gap and many of the women are like well a five year gap. No problem I was raising kids. I was a caretaker for family. It just nobody is questioning their five year gap whereas people are questioning a male's five year gap and and all of. This is just a tie in that. In some cases the differences between the treatments and the symptoms of schizophrenia have considerably more to do with our society than it does with the actual disease. Now all that said there are disease processes and symptoms processes that work differently in women versus as as we get into the symptoms. The fine saying this you know like well Rachel. I'm a woman and I don't experience it that way or I'm a man I totally have. No no no just like across the board which symptoms tend to flare up in different genders women actually like we said are more sociable so different things like the flat affect pretty much where you don't experience emotion. You have a very dull. Expression is not seen as often in women. Women tend to even have more emotions and I know that's like Oh of course we've been emotional but with schizophrenia. A lot of times people have blunted emotional response so they don't really react the same way quote unquote normal people do but women we come off a still acting more emotional to those around us inside. We might not but we're able to kind of fake it much better. Our speech isn't reduced and I found this interesting. Gabe women with schizophrenia are actually more physically active than men across the board and also under that it can be more hostile. You know past episodes where he's talked about violence and schizophrenia. If you were to picture a violent schizophrenic I don't think anyone pictures of woman not only do I not think that anybody pictures a woman. I think that the way that society response to a male who is being aggressive and a female. Who is being aggressive is very different. And there's a plethora of reasons for this. Listen I weigh two hundred and seventy five pounds. I'm six foot three if I am being extremely aggressive and loud. That's going to look a lot scarier than if Rachel who is considerably smaller than Gabe is yelling. Also people tend to be more willing to de escalate a female than a male and again a lot of these things fall under social constructs and our whole society is set up this way right. It's not just in schizophrenia. Where this is important. We see this in policing we see this in jobs. We see this in you know I could never scream at a server in public. But you know there's a whole Internet trend of calling women who scream at servers Karen and everybody thinks that that's funny but sincerely the humor comes from somebody yelling at somebody in public and because that person's a woman it's considered funny you could never change the Karen memes to John Well Jaundice stands up and starts screaming at a server. People that's not funny. No that's like yet so everyone turns around and it's like robots call the police thinking he's GonNa start swinging. The perception is very very different. And because schizophrenia is an illness that is based on self reporting based on observation based on behavioral patterns so obviously society's perception of what they're observing is going to determine the diagnosis that you receive and to that end because of the different ways that we perceive the genders. Women are often misdiagnosed with schizophrenia. More often than men are when it comes to self reporting. I feel that men and would probably also report different symptoms more often. I don't think I ever went and was reporting. You know I just don't want to go out with my friends. Oh I just want to like stay inside. I talked about depression and that was the initial diagnosis. I got repeatedly was just that I had depression and I was too scared to even bring up hallucinations and delusions. I kind of you get used to just okay. You're just overreacting. Oh you're overthinking so. That never occurred to me certain things. I was having was a delusion it was just Oh yeah. I just soon. I'm over thinking things so I think across the board. It's easy to see. The women would be diagnosed with different things. I do wonder if doctors are quicker to Label Min- schizophrenic that women it's important to point out how difficult it is to research and study this when we exist in a culture that is an actively discussing it and as we've been talking about this whole show culture and society impacts our outlook so when a male is looking at a female patients some of those biases are bound to creep in. I do think that we have made great strides now that more women are in psychiatry because while they have biases to they at least have interjected more understanding of women and I think that's very very good now one of the things that's interesting to me is when we plotted out this. Show Rachel. I was shocked at how much was just society. How did you feel about that? What were you thinking when you were researching the show it made me look back on my own life and kind of think You know how I like self reported you know certain things and then like the way they were responded to and I think back the more physically active in hostile thing. I was very very hostile towards my father specifically when I was in high school and I don't mean I was like trying to hurt him or anything but I would have these breakdowns and he would try and restrain me which just made it worse. You know not necessarily going. What's the best way to deal with someone having a psychotic breakdown and he was still much bigger than me in able to kind of like grab me and control me but I think now had it been my brother who was bigger than my father? There wouldn't have been any controlling. It definitely would have escalated to police or we can't deal with this on our own situation much quicker than it did with me and it just makes you think though. Wow all heck. Yeah if if I've been guy or even just more physically different. My life could have played out. I don't WanNa say worse but it would have had a different impact. Rachel Wallace is an awkward question. Do you think that a female menstrual cycle has anything to do with schizophrenia? And why or why not? Oh I think it absolutely does. I've long thought that menstrual cycles and the woman type stuff definitely affects my schizophrenia. It frustrates me to no end that at least once a month I know for three days my schizophrenia is going to get a lot worse. I'm going to lose touch with reality. I'm going to kind of get more spacey. I have to really be very careful. I get more delusional. I know my hallucinations get worse. I pretty much have to anticipate. These days are coming enduring these days. I need to live in my room as much as possible to avoid potential issues. And it's right before my period and this has happened over and over and I brought it up to multiple doctors and it's not like you can just okay. Well you know up your medication for three days. It doesn't work that way you know. They'll just be like well. You know make sure you track it and do your best..

Schizophrenia Rachel Gabe Howard Rachel Star Rachel Wallace depression India Karen John
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"I don't want to label the child with that and it's like it's not labeled to diagnosis i mean would you label them with some other disease if they had it needed to get treatment i mean i think that's ridiculous. You don't outgrow schizophrenia schizophrenia. Yes that's the kind of thing we're often hit with as parents is they don't wanna diagnose your kids because they're worried about putting it in their permanent record which is so crazy also also wanted because i didn't realize this until you just said that you had another child at that has a physical physical disorder but you said that's completely different. Can you elaborate on that. How it's two different challenges as a parent. My daughter has epilepsy or she also has a former cerebral palsy. It's a little bit different. She can overcome these things and understand it timothy fighting with his own brain and it's very hard to help a child get through something like that when they don't know what's real and what's not i mean for my daughter she had i've challenges with mobility and when she was young you know trying to overcome a lot of physical therapy because she had a lot of challenges coordination and walking and things like that. She's fairly mild cerebral palsy but we had to work with her with therapy but she could. She could understand that she could understand that my legs don't work like other peoples do when i do these special things and i wear braces and i'm learning how to do these things because my legs dillard it's hard to explain into someone who is especially someone who's in the throes of delusions and voices that their brain doesn't work. It's very easy to see with my daughter. When she walks at her gate was not normal with my assign. It was very difficult to understand that you have a very active imagination or is he really hallucinating and you can't parent the same way for a child with the physical disability versus a mental illness. The child has to be old enough or cognisant enough or stable enough to be able to work with you on the therapy you know my daughter could not walk for a week and then go to physical therapy problem. It's tim was in the throes of psychosis for a week. Forget it. We had to figure out how to get him stable. The holy can even work with him on how to cope with dealing with this because growing up. What was your biggest fear for your son that he would strive to be an adult ten to twenty fifth birthday was yesterday and i turn to my mom as we sat across having dessert with him and she said i can't believe it's twenty five and i said i know i said. Honestly i live this long because ten attempted suicide three times times before he was eighteen well. We spent the better portion of his adolescent early adulthood years just trying to keep him alive so my greatest fear was that he would do himself in which which is interesting because conversely as an adult. My greatest fear for him is that someone else will do it. You know i. I was worried about his own brain against it's ten but now i'm worried about what may happen to him out in public. We used to live in chicago. We live in extreme northeastern wisconsin now and we moved here because in chicago it just wasn't a safe environment for him to be able to grow up and be a productive adult. There's too many people there's too much temptation. There's no way to help kind of create a safe environment for him. You know the police there have a history of kind of shooting first and asking questions later especially people with mental illness and i was afraid that something would happen to them externally to end his life rather than than we was a child..

schizophrenia chicago wisconsin twenty fifth
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"With so much between me and my brother okay so both of us and not just like mental disorder to stuff like my my brother has bicycle through africa through eastern europe alone through mexico gotten in so much trouble he incredibly of interest we all all are so they're so stressed out like i think between the two of us he is probably overall in life causing way more stress than me and i carry around a lot of guilt the past year and a half. I have felt so guilty for how much my parents have had to help me and take care of me. Ironically it had nothing to do with schizophrenia. I contracted contracted a rare flesh-eating bacteria that ate its way up my spine into my nervous system out my face. I had to be an isolation hospital and then i was at home. My my mother had to learn how to put the issues in me. My dad had to go to every single. Doctor's visit with me and i feel so bad because i had to really lean on them. Financially just is for all the medical bills but this has nothing to do with schizophrenia and when people hear this about me. They feel so bad for me. They're like oh my god rachel chill and i'll even say hey. My parents have been incredible but they still focus on me. Whereas the minute they hear schizophrenia they focus on oh my god your family has given up so much for you and your i mean i mean a little bit. I mean let's not get crazier but yeah. I do feel like a burden but it's not just just a mental health thing like it really was more of a physical thing you are living with a major mental health issue with schizophrenia. Nobody's denying that and right right now. You're also living with a major physical issue with a flesh eating bacteria that doctors are still trying to get under control so your schizophrenia is by largely managed. You do what you need to do and i'm not saying that you can ignore it or forget about it but it's not the biggest part of your life right now this physical illnesses but the unique position that you're in is you have seen how people respond to you and your family through both ordeals one. A mental illness won on a physical illness and the very fact that it's different does show some of the issues that people with mental disorders and mental health issues and mental illnesses his face because it shouldn't be different sickest sick and families come together to help their sick loved ones and it should be viewed. The same is out to say that like people people brought us cookies and stuff and i'm like no one ever does that. No one randomly stop spy if my mom has told them i've been you know mentally very bad. No one does that but just the thought that i had been sick for so long people were just so worried and it's just interesting though how people feel fine talking talking about something really bizarre is a flesh eating bacteria. That's really creepy and weird but it's almost like that's okay but schizophrenia mental disorders. That's taboo where we're not gonna ask how rachel is about all that even though we know she's bad we're dock and ask and i feel that it should be pointed out that having a flesh eating bacteria is not not common. I know a lot of people rachel and you are the only person in the entirety of my life who has ever had a flesh eating bacteria tyrian so you would think that if the old all-wheel they're fearful of schizophrenia. They don't understand schizophrenia. It's coming from a place of they're. They're not familiar with it. You would think that that would also apply over to the physical illness that you are just unfortunate enough to have but it does show a willingness cygnus to learn probably because flesh-eating bacteria doesn't have the same stigma and misinformation campaign as mental illness does people with flesh-eating <unk> sheeting bacteria aren't accused of being violent and hurting people whereas people with mental illness are which i know we already covered another episode but i think that all of this goes part and parcel parcel into your friends and family are educating themselves about one illness and they're burying their heads in the sand about another illness and it's impacting you and your family people are willing to ask me like a thousand questions about the whole flesh-eating bacteria thing the hospital..

schizophrenia rachel africa mexico europe
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"And that's where it gets tricky. Right. Because nobody is saying that people with schizophrenia have never committed a violent crime. Correct. You're saying that the majority of people with schizophrenia have never committed a violent crime. Yes. When you have people mental illness, or you're specifically talking about schizophrenia. And, you know, the majority of don't hurt anyone like, well, Rachel I mean, but some of you do that still sounds scary but not all husbands beat their wives. Some of them do, but not all of them, and that's not gonna keep me from getting married. That's not gonna keep me and or most people from finding a husband, but when it comes to mental illness, we've decided that somehow that connects that all violence is caused by people with schizophrenia and that connection just doesn't exist in. In any study that's been looked at and it's kinda scary that people are so desperate to believe it. Why do you think that people want to believe this so much? I think one of the main reasons is just being able to say somebody who did this horrible thing has mental illness. It makes you feel safer. Okay. So I don't know anyone personally like that. So I can feel safe. And if I ever met anyone like that, I could obviously tell you know, they're like twitching and screaming and things. That's the person I should be scared of, you know, you hear these horrible stories of like a disgruntled employee who comes in, and unfortunately, does something, very violent at the office and a lot of times, like, well so, and so he was suffering from depression for so long will, you know he was being treated by a psychiatrist? It's never. Oh, he broke his leg last year. You'd be like. What about breaking its leg? And even in the cases of schizophrenia, the very, very, very tiny percentage of people with schizophrenia, that do have a dangerous or violent outcome there. Almost universally uncared for or untreated, guess they're almost always left to their own devices with a very, very, very serious illness, that isn't being maintained or managed and many times, that's unfortunately, being self managed by taking illegal drugs. So that plays a big part in it. Also, we talk about mental health mental health is for everybody. Like that's just a blanket term for all of us in too many people here. Thank. Oh, well, you only need mental health, if something's wrong with your head, and it's not. It's working too much. You know that work life balance with.

schizophrenia Rachel
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"And also to talk about your experience with this, and your experience with medications and all of that sort of stuff. So usually it's gonna be a combination of psychiatry, as well as some other type of mental health support to change gears, just for a moment. You know, your, your YouTube show generates questions in, and you answer them, and it's, it's, it's a very, very cool thing that you do, and we like that because we think that gets a for any as and other mental disorders are are so incredibly misunderstood. So how have you seen social media at YouTube, or maybe just the internet affect the way? Schizophrenia is perceived in any, they're a good or a bad way. I think it's been a complete dramatic shift in its. It's a part of a larger shift that's happening in the world of mental health right now. But I think it's so pronounced for schizophrenia. So for a Lao longtime schizophrenia, the representations of it in media have really been extreme stereotypical often thing bad representations of schizophrenia, and what we're starting to see now in Rachel, you've been a part of this, and I thank you so much for the voice, you've had here in shaping, this discussion is we're beginning to see a range of experiences were were seeing people share their stories of how they were diagnosed of what their life is like, how they coped with schizophrenia and it's not guided by people in Hollywood, who might have a stereotype idea of what schizophrenia is like, but it's, it's a more authentic story in, I think, as, as I was saying earlier such a diverse problem, we're seeing more of that diverse. -versity of experience on social media on blogs on YouTube, and that for me has been incredibly exciting. And it's it's helped me to learn more about what schizophrenia is like I it's been one of the most exciting developments in, in my career and I like tag..

Schizophrenia YouTube Rachel Hollywood
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"I mean i am calm and when i think about it now i think how did i not notice this but i didn't i had no ability to see it at all the next question that when asked you is many of our audience members they don't know what schizophrenia is it all they know what they've heard on the news they know what they've seen on television they know a lot of the stereotypes in you know we have certainly done our best to explain it but normal to hear it from you a person who lives with schizophrenia what's a good lay persons definition of what schizophrenia is how would you explain it to somebody well there's different types of schizophrenia i can't speak for all different types of schizophrenia but i have paranoid schizophrenia diagnosed with and so what happens with me is that always think negative thoughts any motions like people are always trying to harm me or people always saying bad things about me behind my back and some makes me become more like withdrawn and depress of a lot of anxiety from an paranoia you know and so like what happened to me when i was really brought down with the illness that i would get stuck in a way to where i would just sit there and just not say anything not communicate you know kinda just hide myself away from my own feelings because it was it was too much for me you know i was like i was just sitting there coma toasts or having some type of psychosis because i couldn't accept the way that i.

psychosis
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"In logic because even your thoughts and memories she believes even your loved ones could be manipulated by the mysterious they according to her beliefs she has seemingly become more intense with her desire to warn me she believes her implants in her body and probably in mine and almost everyone else's she doesn't want me to see the doctors have my kids vaccinated and even cautioned me about having my mom watch my kids alone she believes she may play a part in implanting these mind controlling devices please help i do not know what to do in the situation i don't blame the arc i am not a doctor i mean very important that i say this and i don't know this person's ongoing only off what is in your letters if if this were me and somebody were i loved we're telling me this i would be deeply concerned about this person's mental health i don't know how old your sister is if she is a younger person this is when diseases like schizophrenia and paranoid schizophrenia appear and they can cause you to have these belief systems that are impervious to logic because they take away all the things that logic is composed of induction like free thought all those things that make for a reasonable argument it outstrips those arguments and you can never argue with them if i were you have to say in this situation if it's as bad as it sounds here i would contact you know when i worked on a a suicide hotline essentially they had references you could go to one of them was called the national alliance on mental illness and.

schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"Her own experience with schizophrenia and so i'm writing from an interesting place where i am i have skits affective disorder i am also fairly high functioning especially for somebody with a form of schizophrenia um and so i felt like writing this book was really important to help people learn you know what does it mean a basic hotic like what does it mean to have us a four of the schizophrenia is is also not just about me like i talk about how to people treat people with schizophrenia in colleges lake wow does the administration deal with that uh stories about violence um a written essay about a man who was murdered by his uh sister and mother because they were scared of him he had schizophrenia and they didn't know how to deal with him and they ended up shooting him like in the middle of the night on a deserted road and they dumped to the side of the road and left and so yeah they're all these stories that i to tell and wanted to tell it i just turned in one of the final drafts the book it should be finished soon so get butts that's what i i've been working on for the last year or so but also just it's been really wonderful for me to have had written a book while being sick because it reminded me or not reminded me but it let me know that i could do it was possible tradeable i love this idea that you were able to bring this book to fruition because you knew you've done it before and it comes back to that idea of resilience and then the book itself is you know i think it's going to be impactful i think that comes back to this idea of of legacy him i guess i'll just bring it back all the way and say that obviously creativity goes into that but with this book in in this conversation you're trying to have i'm curious what is your hope for what the future looks like for people who have some form of schizophrenia what does the.

schizophrenia