35 Burst results for "Schizophrenia"

Economists See Increasing Possibility of a Recession

The Trish Regan Show

01:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Economists See Increasing Possibility of a Recession

"Start first with this kind of schizophrenic market. I mean, I think that's the best way to describe it, right? This is like a form of schizophrenia here because the markets are suddenly higher despite a lot of the bearish signals that we've seen and both from tech companies and their earnings. You've seen bank reports, Deutsche Bank, recent one this week coming out warning of a major recession. We got the GDP report today, showing that the U.S. economy declined by 1.4%. And as I said, you get two quarters of that, and that is the definition of recession, two quarters of consecutive losses in growth, negative growth. But people seem encouraged and part of that reason may be maybe that they're thinking, well, the fed really can't do what it wants to do, right? I mean, the fed is not really going to be able to raise rates the way perhaps it had hoped in light of the negative numbers on GDP. It's also possible that they're looking at some of the consumer spending numbers and saying, well, you know, consumers seem to be holding up, okay? So maybe we'll get through this. I will say this, if Jerome Powell can pull this off, if we can avoid a recession, then he will go down as the greatest fed magician in history.

Schizophrenia Deutsche Bank FED U.S. Jerome Powell
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:27 min | Last month

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"It was such an evocative thing because this was the start of the industrial revolution or mid, and it was where really industrial strength looms and weaving devices were really kind of the emblematic of the most complex, powerful technological achievements of the time. And so that was the explanation available to him to explain how his body was seemingly moved without his volition. And these days, of course, people with schizophrenia will have more technology appropriate interpretations. They'll have delusions of satellite or alien control or beamed information very, very common to have this delusion of a government agency sending electromagnetic or radio frequency information to control their limbs. But it's the same thing. Whether it's a thread from an industrial revolution loom, or RF radiation, it's the same thing, just adapted to the moment, explaining, trying to explain the world they live in in their relationship to the world. But unconstrained by sort of the thing that's socially acceptable, which is both refreshing and dangerous. Yes. I wrote down a question, why do we cry? Our tears a window to some depths that we ourselves don't know. I'm almost want to make fun of myself for that question, but you do talk seriously about crying in the book. In fact, the whole first chapter really, really tussles with crying as why do we do it? What does it mean? Why is it involuntary? It seems like a weakness, right? It's because it's so involuntary and it's reflecting something true and inside. At the level of the individual, that seems like a problem, right? Wouldn't it be better if we could control it if we could not show that emotion when it's not useful, show it when it's useful, but it's not. It largely involuntary. And so there's a value to it, I think, as an honest reporter of a need of hope and frailty at the same time..

schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:00 min | Last month

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Can take someone who's actively hallucinating, actively paranoid, put them back in a completely normal state, and some people stay that way. Indefinitely. And so you can bring people back from that back to the other side and have it stitched together. More typically, you'll end up in some intermediate state where there's a symptoms are reduced powerfully, but there might be still something there and you've got a dropdown in functioning that may be persistent for a while. But concepts, what physically is going on, one idea is that it's communication within the brain. One part of the brain is not able to tell other parts of the brain what it's doing. And so the auditory hallucinations are very interesting in this regard. They often have this conversational inner monologue, like quality, as we're walking along the street, we may have an inner monologue, thoughts about what's going on. If we see somebody we don't like, we may have a thought out, wish somebody would punch that guy, something like that, or maybe I should punch that guy. But these are so far below where we would ever act or even think of acting, but they're just things that come up and people with schizophrenia, those inner thoughts, that inner monologue is not recognized as the inner monologue of the self. And so it's perceived as something coming from the outside. Or from inside, but from another entity. I thought you meant like another room inside the same building. Another room inside there, yeah. And so it could be conceptualized as a communication within the brain problem. Notifying what another part of the brain, what's going on. And there's some evidence consistent with that. I don't know if you can help with this, but I sometimes talking to quite a few homeless folks recently, just that's what I do is I hang out at night..

schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:00 min | Last month

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Can take someone who's actively hallucinating, actively paranoid, put them back in a completely normal state, and some people stay that way. Indefinitely. And so you can bring people back from that back to the other side and have it stitched together. More typically, you'll end up in some intermediate state where there's a symptoms are reduced powerfully, but there might be still something there and you've got a dropdown in functioning that may be persistent for a while. But concepts, what physically is going on, one idea is that it's communication within the brain. One part of the brain is not able to tell other parts of the brain what it's doing. And so the auditory hallucinations are very interesting in this regard. They often have this conversational inner monologue, like quality, as we're walking along the street, we may have an inner monologue, thoughts about what's going on. If we see somebody we don't like, we may have a thought out, wish somebody would punch that guy, something like that, or maybe I should punch that guy. But these are so far below where we would ever act or even think of acting, but they're just things that come up and people with schizophrenia, those inner thoughts, that inner monologue is not recognized as the inner monologue of the self. And so it's perceived as something coming from the outside. Or from inside, but from another entity. I thought you meant like another room inside the same building. Another room inside there, yeah. And so it could be conceptualized as a communication within the brain problem. Notifying what another part of the brain, what's going on. And there's some evidence consistent with that. I don't know if you can help with this, but I sometimes talking to quite a few homeless folks recently, just that's what I do is I hang out at night..

schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:40 min | Last month

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Just too much information just coming in through the eyes. And to keep up with it, to know, you're going to be expected to keep up with it, first of all, so there's that aspect. You know, you've learned socially that there's going to be an expectation. If you're making eye contact, people are going to think you're keeping up with it. And, you know, want to because you want to focus on other things and make progress in other dimensions. Yeah, and so then there's a strong desire to look away or to close the eyes because it's overwhelming. It's a distraction and it's going to cause errors of understanding. And of course, our eyes, that's part the way we use our eyes as part of the human communication sense that can be aware of that element of it. So yeah, but it's fascinating. You should be aware of your own self in those little characteristics, whether it's whether it's classified on some aspect of autism spectrum or just in general, whether it's eating, whether it's depression, whether it's even like schizophrenia that would, I hope we get a chance to talk to a little bit. Yeah, but those things are all made up of different symptoms and characteristics and use them as a superpower. I suppose is the best we can hope for in mild cases. I guess. And I do think both brain states can't coexist at the same time the way of dealing with something unpredictable and dealing something predictable. There's a different ways of being here's a huge opportunity for very creative model building in theoretical neuroscience and linking that to these data streams we're getting across the brain that we talked about earlier. These immense datasets of activity across the brain, here's where I think there could be a real convergence of theoreticians and experimentalists to say, okay, given what we know about wiring of the brain,.

schizophrenia autism depression
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:40 min | Last month

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Just too much information just coming in through the eyes. And to keep up with it, to know, you're going to be expected to keep up with it, first of all, so there's that aspect. You know, you've learned socially that there's going to be an expectation. If you're making eye contact, people are going to think you're keeping up with it. And, you know, want to because you want to focus on other things and make progress in other dimensions. Yeah, and so then there's a strong desire to look away or to close the eyes because it's overwhelming. It's a distraction and it's going to cause errors of understanding. And of course, our eyes, that's part the way we use our eyes as part of the human communication sense that can be aware of that element of it. So yeah, but it's fascinating. You should be aware of your own self in those little characteristics, whether it's whether it's classified on some aspect of autism spectrum or just in general, whether it's eating, whether it's depression, whether it's even like schizophrenia that would, I hope we get a chance to talk to a little bit. Yeah, but those things are all made up of different symptoms and characteristics and use them as a superpower. I suppose is the best we can hope for in mild cases. I guess. And I do think both brain states can't coexist at the same time the way of dealing with something unpredictable and dealing something predictable. There's a different ways of being here's a huge opportunity for very creative model building in theoretical neuroscience and linking that to these data streams we're getting across the brain that we talked about earlier. These immense datasets of activity across the brain, here's where I think there could be a real convergence of theoreticians and experimentalists to say, okay, given what we know about wiring of the brain,.

schizophrenia autism depression
2 officers indicted in death of man shot 76 times during 2016 raid

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 7 months ago

2 officers indicted in death of man shot 76 times during 2016 raid

"Two cases against Georgia police officers accused of killing black men have ended with very different outcomes in Fulton County a grand jury handed up an eight count indictment against a member of the U. S. Marshall service and a Clayton county policeman Eric kinds and Christopher Hutchins are charged with felony murder and lying about the twenty sixteen shooting death of Jim Marion Robinson a former college football player he was shot seventy six times when police went to serve a warrant in connection with the weapons case in a different case in Washington County Georgia a jury has deadlocked in the trial of three former sheriff's deputies accused of murdering Yuri Martin during a twenty seventeen suspicious persons arrest the fifty eight year old black man was shocked repeatedly with stun guns and died Martin had a history of schizophrenia authorities say he had taken an aggressive stance hi

U. S. Marshall Service Eric Kinds Christopher Hutchins Jim Marion Robinson Fulton County Georgia Clayton County Yuri Martin Washington County Football Martin Schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Serial Psych

Serial Psych

07:41 min | 8 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Serial Psych

"With a dixie cup after that after that dog was saying you know what they call them. No don't make. i'm not making fun. I love don't enforce sabbath or abbott r. p. rip sabbath hashtag r.i.p sabbath even with this delusion about blood. Richard knew something was off any normal person would know something was off so he actually went to a psychiatrist. Who's neighborhood thought. He was normal until the blood came out of his fangs. Oh god this psychiatrists told him that. The most common cause of impotence was suppressed anger toward women. Fuck the patriarchy no. He's basically blaming women for impotence. Gotta aim it in the right direction. Richard along with the delusions also a pathological liar and a thief which he had no remorse for the episode three episode three pathological out guys pathological In nineteen seventy at the age of twenty. Richard moved out of his parents house and into apartment with two girls that he knew photo. That's him yes wow. He certainly changed highschool twenty. He wouldn't get an he wasn't enough. Blood has died on that apparently by the way he's still dirty in refusing to shower. Well shows it as an unmedicated. Schizophrenic the two girls were called him as being putrid refusing to shower or wash his clothes. So how did the two girls not kick him out sooner. i guess we're seen him an independent. I guess it was the late it was the seventies and richard was a small time. Drug dealer always doing drugs. Yeah he dealt. We'd and acid release with and often got high off his own supply which is drug dealer rule number one. Because i looked it up. I looked up drug dealer rules. You never get high off your own supply scarface said. Don't get hang on y'all up apply. I never saw that movie either when he was living with the girls. His drug use became extreme because of the girls or no just just just while he was living there did. Yeah in it to win it But a lot of people with schizophrenia. drugs or alcohol to kind of suppress their symptom coping mechanism. Yes unhealthy coping mechanism. Although we'd is not unhealthy just saying so. That explains independence. All these people know going around the square now the vampires no trying to cope now. They do meth. Which brings psychosocial. And i've never seen a single animal on the square. The lights going on. Everybody know being like i said don't encourage him. The two worlds are actually terrified of richard. His drug use schizophrenia and just plain weirdness. Just was not fighting after a while of living with richard instead of asking him to leave the to curls. Just abandon the apartment. Late i not. I wouldn't tolerate little. I just thought that was funny. Like they just left one day headed out. What year was that. Nineteen seventy is when they when he moved in with them. I don't know the year when they left just wondering how long they stayed with him. I have no idea. I wish i knew. I wonder if he did. The living room routine will probably i mean it was one of his favorite pastimes like playing. You know brought home a date tradition. Everybody oh they're there On the floor there is my friend. Okay no around this time. Richard began having delusions about his body. Not just blood and he had a lot of anatomy books which penetrated perpetuated. That's the word his delusion. He believed that his heart stopped beating every now and then his stomach was put in backwards and bones were growing out of his head. Who'd gone after the two girls moved out. Richard began going back and forth between his parents until settling with his grandma for about a year dirt. Poor grandma's house just moving around mom dad mom dad mom dad grandma and then those two roommates no they they they they don't wanna sequel no during all this time. Richard was in and out of psychiatric hospitals as well. He was seen by professionals and basically was released with a diagnosis of weird He hasn't is that true. Yeah no you say you're weird now. And then but he he was just released with. No real diagnosis is. He hasn't been diagnosed with schizophrenia yet. You must've went to concentre in. Nineteen seventy three or seventy four. Richard went to the american river hospital claiming that his heart and kidneys stopped working his pulmonary artery had been stolen and his blood had stopped flowing. This is when he was finally diagnosed with schizophrenia. But the doctors determined that he was not a danger to himself or others. The fuck is wrong with these doctors. Richard didn't mention the killing of animals or drinking their blood ages talked about his delusions while He then started complaining to imaginary friend that his mom was poisoning him and controlling his mind. Persecution was the name of the imaginer for. I don't know. Probably some stephen stevie yeah his parents then thought this would be a perfect time for richard to start living by himself and get his own apartment. Him and steve. Yes heaven steve. The best remain ever. He didn't complain about richard's stinky nece. Even though quite a few doctors recommended that richard be supervised yes while living on his own he bought. Many rabbits killed them and drink their blood or eight them. Raw i. I don't know how he did not get banned from pet stores because it was a lot of rabbits a search of his home after his arrest found a blender with blood and other types of of animal. Megan suck and rabbit smoothies. Yes that's just that's never going to be sold at panerabread. Horrible jokes keep coming is. Oh fucking gross. Yes rabbits movies by his own account. He was doing.

Richard abbott r schizophrenia richard american river hospital grandma stephen stevie steve Megan
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

Discovered Wordsmiths

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

"And sad, we don't have family members that can't understand your illness or help you. So anytime we talk about little illness to his dad, he just doesn't get it. So we just don't even bother talking and he still takes his meds and, you know, and my boyfriends have seen way I am, and he has to take he's on this closet pen as well as he has schizoaffective, you know, plus bipolar, he takes the class of p.m. two, you know, he's on the scene when I am in, you know, he's doing very well too. Right. Well, you know, I appreciate you taking some time talking to everybody about this. It's a tough subject for people sometimes. And they don't want to talk about it. Right. And also, there's still it is a lot of stigma like I had one of my boyfriend's neighbors found out that I had schizophrenia and that I wrote a book and she read it and she was like, oh yeah, it's a great book. And I asked her, I guess she knew someone who was blogging like doing blogs, so but she told me she says, if you call my friend to discuss doing blogs, she said, don't say that you have mental illness or schizophrenia and just say you want to start a blog. So right then and there that was stigma right there. Because she read my book and then she turned around and said, you know, if you ask my friend about blogging, you know, don't say you have a mental illness. Right. Yeah. So I was like kind of a very upset about that. It was almost like she had a stigma too, you know. Right. So, and she was kind of just a stranger, reading my book because I guess she came over and my boyfriend's apartment and saw my book on the desk and then that's when she wanted to read it. But you see what I'm saying how even now after I've written the book, I'm still having experiences where people are have the stigma, you know, like don't mention your mentally ill. You know? Right. So you see, you know, you see what I'm trying to say. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Like I said, I've got some family members dealing with a few similar issues. Not schizophrenia. And it's rough with that too. No matter what it is, you know, people look at you different, treat you different. So yeah. Right. And that's the main thing is how do you disclose your illness because sometimes when you tell people to still, you know, if they don't know you like, if you tell someone to stone like strangers and stuff, there's definitely some people that are actually scared of you. Yeah. You know, they don't know how to take it when you tell them that. Yeah, I bet. But that's my goal is to get rid of the stigma, but the main thing is medication because you just can't have a.

schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

Discovered Wordsmiths

04:57 min | 9 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

"And do you have any plans for a follow-up book? No, I think I'm done. I think I'm done. I mean, every day I still run into experiences and my life would stigma and stuff. You know, like, you just have to be like, really careful how you disclose your illness. Because a lot of people, when they hear the word schizophrenia or schizophrenic, they just like, you know, they treat you differently, you know, so there is still a lot of stigma. You know, in the book too, I mentioned that, you know, my first book, what is a schizophrenic supposed to look like? Is that how do you know who has schizophrenia just by looking at them? You know, I mean, it could just be someone in a crowd. And it's like, the only way that you really disclose your schizophrenia is when you talk to yourself in public, like if you're not on medication and you were to talk to yourself, that would be like a clue that you would have schizophrenia. But even then I was even then I would think that's not a definite. You know, I mean, I've been known to talk to myself and I've never been diagnosed. It's just sometimes, you know, I'm thinking about something. So I think part of our problem is sometimes people want to self diagnose others and then they have a stigma attached to them when it may not even be true. And I assume there's like different intensities or levels of schizophrenia. Is that correct? Well, some people are actually more high functioning than others. And that's because maybe the doctor is not the greatest or maybe that there's different antipsychotic pills you can take. I'm on the end of psychotic clozapine. Which is the best of the best. Okay. So, you know, because I've tried all different kinds of antipsychotics and that's the only one that worked for me and gave me my life back. You know, but there's many and I psychotics out there is just finding the right one for your chemistry.

schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

Discovered Wordsmiths

04:32 min | 9 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

"Wordsmiths, welcome to fall. I can't believe summer's over. Hopefully all your writers out there got all your writing goals done in all your readers, got all your reading goals done because, hey, we're into the end of the year now. We've got Halloween Thanksgiving and Christmas and then new year's all coming up. Bam, before you know it. I know that's how the summer kind of went from me. Bam. So today we've got a special episode. Earlier in the podcast run, I had someone on ran who talked about mental health. And dealing with mental health and had written a book. This time I've got another author who has been dealing with schizophrenia. And she has written a book about it to help others and her life struggle and what she's learned from it. So it's a hard subject in a lot of times people don't want to deal with it and talk about it, but that's what we can do with our writing. We can bring these subjects to light, we can bring them out and help others learn and become more comfortable about it because if you're more comfortable about it, you can talk about it. So Lori has a lot to say about her book and schizophrenia in general. We have a good discussion about it. So before I ramble on for too long, here's Laurie. Laurie, welcome to discover wordsmith podcast. How are you doing today? Okay, how are you? Good. And just of note to everyone that's watching the video, you're at the local library. They offer rooms and you can rent to get video meetings and do these types of things. So I'm a big proponent of pushing the library. So it's good to see some things that the libraries do that people may not know about. So they have meeting rooms and all sorts of great things. Right. Lori, tell us a little bit about yourself. Who you are, where you're from, and what you like to do outside of writing. I am from I was born in Warren's fellow Ohio I lived east and.

schizophrenia Laurie Lori Warren Ohio
Exorcism: When Modern Science and Psychology Is Not Enough

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:31 min | 10 months ago

Exorcism: When Modern Science and Psychology Is Not Enough

"But you must understand that your unfortunately something of a rarity not just in the roman catholic church but in christendom. There are many people who don't go near the stuff they will send you to a psychiatrist as though and by the way. Most psychiatrists unlike you. They don't have this category they. They don't say well. We tried this this this. It looks like it's they don't even have that category so there are people dealing with. Maybe it's diagnosis schizophrenia. This is that there is a demonic element and they don't even know who might be able to help them with that. Well some things. Are i think in some circles. Darden to chase pope francis actually has the vatican's ask every diocese in the world to have an exorcist. Now they don't i think in the us we probably have maybe one hundred some odd exorcists so maybe half the diocese had them but so there is this growing awareness. But right and there's a lot of people say well we've got me on this because modern psychology and science can can explain everything but the reality is some things that happened or not says them. You can't explain. Naturally i mean. Look i have been in the room within I've been right next to people who have been manifesting demons and when you see it. It's very hard to believe that the person's making it up or they're just generally crazy. It really does seem like wh what we're talking

Pope Francis Christendom Roman Catholic Church Darden Schizophrenia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

"Today. We have the great honour of speaking with dr nick matthew. He has a very long title. But here's it's a little bit about him. Dr matthew completed in addiction psychiatry fellowship at yale university and forensic psychiatry fellowship at the university of british columbia. He is board certified in addiction. Psychiatry addiction medicine and forensic psychiatry. He's a clinical associate professor at. Ub see and he is currently serving as the medical director of complex mental health and substance use services at the provincial health services authority who that's quite a mouthful. We are so honored to have you. You're joining us from your home in vancouver bc and we understand. Your kids are playing in the background so we might hear a little bit of noise from them. Thanks for being a multitasking dad and for joining us today. Welcome to the show. So let's get right into it cannabis. We talked about it. We smell it. It's everywhere and there's even some people that are saying now that it's being used as a miracle drug. It's helped them immensely. And it's actually good for you and perhaps even a substitute for medication. So i'd love to get your perspective in your thoughts on this. Can cannabis be useful as a medication. We think of cannabis as a drug is cannabis. Medicine will it is. I mean there's a lot of Good uses for canvas and candidates But we have to get an idea of the effect size of these things. Are there other alternatives better. So if we're looking at mental health. They've looked to things like depression. Ptsd anxieties that causes to rats. And they really haven't found good outcomes using thc out for any of those things with the term anxiety. It's pretty nonspecific. So if we drill down to the positive studies for candidates the things that has been used for one performance anxiety. The second thing is using cd for the treatment of anxiety caused by. Thc so we really have to drill down into the terms when people say this friend side. But what exactly do you need. They have used it for psychosis and what they found. Thc can actually worsen the sentences psychosis so dr matthew. You talked about cbd and thc you touched on it. But i would love to hear number one. What is b. d. n. Thc if you could just give us a little elevator pitch and number two. What is the connection between thc and severe psychosis or severe mental illness. Such schizophrenia so the more psychoactive compound within the cavs plant is team. See and so this is the compound is going to cause the intoxicating effects of cannabis. The opposite compound would be cd which helps attenuate some of the psychoactive effects of your over time so overtime plans have been bred with higher amounts of thc lower amounts seating so for people who have severe mental illness the higher potency plants higher team in mercy or more likely to cause negative mental health issues in those patients. I'd like to delve into the connection with mental illness. I think it's so valuable to hear from such as yourself with so much knowledge in this area to to really dig into the link or the possible links between a drugs like cannabis and serious mental illnesses. Such as schizophrenia allotted times when people have severe mental fits franny of bipolar. Depression tends to be that using canvas will worsen the progression of these illnesses. As far as if something's a risk factor or causative so risk factors can be something that can tradit something occurring and it can also be constant and those to the same things so for example if you're looking at breast cancer being not marry predicts having breast cancer but it's not causing the bronco one genes genes are both predicted and causes of breast cancer. So when we look at the link between candidates and schizophrenia. There's four main theories that the first theory is that it's a component 'cause so what does that mean that means that it's something that can cause gets a french but is not necessary for schizophrenic. The other link between schizophrenia and cannabis is that it can speed up the depew of symptoms of people who already get schizophrenia. Then the third thing is common genetic vulnerability as somebody. Who's going to get schizophrenia. I already have a predilection to using capitals. And then the fourth thing is that people might be self medicating chromosomal stanton. So we don't really know which. Israel which combination of these causes or the link between cannabis. It's friendlier are true. We're not seeing a flood of increased schizophrenia at a population level depending on cannabis use. It doesn't seem to be related. And even in hospitals in psychiatric wards suddenly being flooded by people using cannabis even though there's more cavities operation and there's creative potency of cannabis so my suspicion is out of the foreign causes. I think you might be some combination of.

Today today yale university first theory four main theories matthew vancouver bc Israel both fourth dr university of british columbia second thing third thing nick matthew Dr schizophrenia one health services Ub see
When Crisis Strikes With Dr. Jennifer Love

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:51 min | 1 year ago

When Crisis Strikes With Dr. Jennifer Love

"Hello everyone welcome to the addictive mind. My guest today is dr. Jennifer love arthur of when crisis strikes jennifer. Please introduce yourself. Hi thanks for having me today. My name is dr jennifer laugh. And i am a psychiatrist. Also word certified in addiction. Psychiatry and addiction medicine. I'm in a large group practice outpatient and so my sweet spot medicine is the overlap of psychiatric symptoms anxiety stress insomnia etc with either substance use disorders or behavioral addictions and. Treat everything from trauma to schizophrenia. You name it. I do it in the brain. I love got while also a ton of ton of knowledge and a ton of experience. It sounds like Too many years of higher education will leave that. I think that's going to be good. Because i have a ton of questions as we were talking a little bit earlier before we started recording. I have a ton of questions about anxiety stress in the brain and you know win were in crisis and especially this last year of cove it all of that anxiety and stress so if a ton of questions about that but first i want to know a little bit more about you and what motivated you to write this book and and put it out there so i met my co author. Idaho wrote when crisis strikes with a norwegian clinical neuropsychologist and we realized how different our backgrounds are but there is a lot of overlap. And when i decided i wanted to start writing

Dr Jennifer Jennifer Insomnia Schizophrenia Trauma Idaho
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

"Risk factors into account a meeting. We had a list of twenty different variables that we were looking. We looked at smoking looked at obstructive lung disease. We looked at High blood pressure and history of heart attacks in all of these things and the fact that we increased risk after controlling for all of these medical conditions. That disproportionately affect people with schizophrenia. was really quite surprising. What made you delve into this on a personal level and you touched on it earlier that you said that you do have family history with schizophrenia. Do you what role do you think that played in your decision to pursue the study. I think schizophrenia is one of the most poorly understood and fascinating illnesses out there. It's a patient population that i really love to work with clinically. It's one that. I really want to understand better. And it has just really blown my mind that despite decades of research trying to better understand what underlies this illness in how we treated better that so little progress has been made so. Can you paint a picture for us as to what it was like as neuro psychiatrist to be surrounded by cove it especially with the population that we're talking about right now you know we were just so blindsided when it happened..

cove twenty different variables one decades schizophrenia
Dr Randall White: Hearing Voices

Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Dr Randall White: Hearing Voices

"Today. I'm very happy to introduce you to dr randall. White doctor white is the medical director of community mental health in vancouver and the clinical director of the bbc's psychosis program at ub hospital. He is also a clinical professor of psychiatry. Ub and on the medical advisory board of the schizophrenia society and dr white is also being awarded the status of distinguished fellow by the american psychiatric association. This year randall. Welcome to look again so you know before we really get into things. I want to kick things off by sharing some thoughts from our panel. We're going to hear from some people with lived experience about what it's actually like to hear voices. So let's take a listen now. I have experienced auditory hallucinations and olfactory loose. The nation's physical hallucinations i don. I was in labor ban. That was very interesting to say. The least i need to say go to the hospital. My family were with me and they said is just a your imagination which i accepted and then old factory hallucinations where i smell things. I started hearing audio auditory loose nations again and actually work van hallucinations of actually one of the segue. And i don't know if you already know. And i don't feel like i've not to listen to this this nations so but yeah i did have them anyways just them so i went to the segue. Go put on where medicine do much better. Yeah there's really really anxious. When i checked myself were dr white. We just heard from people living with mental illness and the fact that many of them hear voices. but not all people with schizophrenia. hear voices in your clinical experience. How prevalent is this symptom. Hallucinations are one of the five main symptoms listed in the diagnostic manual. We use to diagnose schizophrenia. they're very common. But as you said. They're not universal. I would say that. Probably three quarters or more people with schizophrenia experience. At at some point it can be episodic so at a given time somebody with this diagnosis might not be having that. But then when they have relapsed to their muskets worse it may come

Dr White Dr Randall Ub Hospital Medical Advisory Board Of The American Psychiatric Associati Randall Vancouver BBC White Schizophrenia
Man Accused of Deadly Boston-Area Library Stabbing Found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity

WBZ Overnight News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Man Accused of Deadly Boston-Area Library Stabbing Found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity

"A Winchester man charged with fatally stabbing a woman at a public library and 2018 has been found not criminally responsible because of his mental illness. Here's WBZ skimped on a cliff. The judge on the bench trial found Jeffrey out not guilty by reason of insanity for the 2018 stabbing death of medical student dance striker Inside Winchester Public Library. He was also found not guilty on the charge of slashing a 77 year old man who came to strikers aid both of Prosecution and defense presented reports from three medical experts who examined now and determined he was suffering from paranoid schizophrenia at the time of the attack and was not criminally responsible for his actions. Defense attorney Jay Carney said. Yeah was being tormented by harassing voices in his head. And it was the voices he was fighting against when he walked into the library and stab striker 20 times from

Winchester Public Library Winchester Jeffrey Paranoid Schizophrenia Jay Carney
Poly Styrene Documentary

Bigmouth

09:49 min | 1 year ago

Poly Styrene Documentary

"Today. Polystyrene i m cliche is directed by both her daughter. Celeste bell and documentary maker pulsing charting the rise of marian elliott as she was born. She saw yellow pages ad became polystyrene and formed punk band x ray specs as we know in this foam. Celeste goes through her mother's archive and visits. The places of hutch halted. So let's listen to the trader to get a feel for it. Some people think little go should have. But i think my mother was punk rock icon. People have asked me if she was a good mom. It's hard to know what to say your rebel. Today's society paulie had our own ideas. Student full fully trends. She was a woman of color in. Dc full of white middle class. men was singing. polly was singing about. I fell in love with her. I fell in. The news actually started singing. Because right we will dive right in nora snaps point. He was a big personality but as we see her life was extremely complicated on. This is as much. Her daughter's journey as police starring life story. Was that a good way in. I think definitely I think by this point. We also board like punk defecation. This point know the way. The bbc fool punk document generation. That watches him in the in the same way. That like my dad and grandad generation. What war documentaries old thing again and again and I think it's focus the that it's kind of deified in such a like i wasn't like incredible and radical umbro which it was in some ways but also rian just reinforced the status quo in other ways. Like the thing. I think is really great why i feel like the rohbock of this narrative restarted with like the vowel between book which From a couple of years ago when she you know really gets to the kind of watson order of it in a way that is much more punk than saying like. Oh we great you know like sex pistols type branding and i thought that this documentary was like a really peaceful continuation overseas. Not done by polystyrene by her daughter. And i think it's testament polystyrene like complexity and also to her sensitivity. But then i'll say for her callousness towards adulterer as well. I think it makes were much more well rounded portray of somebody and also no. It doesn't just a pain releasing on her. You know she has her own issues but it looks at how they're exacerbated by the society around like a mixed race woman in london at that time in the punk scene. There's a bit wet don. Let says that she goes and shaves her head while she's a party jordan lydon's house and when winter comes back down they just love her releasing. That seem horrendous. In retrospect i'm sure we're just kind of par for the course in in the seventy s and the other thing i was gonna say i think is important is she wasn't postponed. She was punk like she's really part of the the formative dna not very easily gets forgotten. Like when i was a teenager Bought three for twelve pounds. Buzzcocks clash kind of burundi's wound go from and see a whatever it was but it took a lot longer. It's come across x ray specs and to hear them kind of debt day fight in the way that they deserve She had a rough up. Brixton upbringing. shoes booted at school. Punk rock was a place for outsiders is the cliche but actually you see that. It's inevitable that she is going to get drawn to something that's so creative but also that she can break whatever more that she feels that she has been put into yet absolutely I think one thing that's really striking by the way that she Shared her images. While is the like. Obviously i don't want a undress will. The sex pistols did two like bridge society but fundamentally that kind of just like a boy band put together by iron. Witten really edgy branding. And that whole thing is is about dog individualism. When really it was really nothing the saw. And i think that you know. Even the police die polystyrene style for rewards more individual. She recognized herself as a cliche. And she played with the idea of like branding and identity in a way that i find much more interesting than just like sticking a safety pin on it And i think we have to use it. Today were authenticity. It comes from a very real place whether the sex pistols Taped on summertimes travis. The problems with poly seem to stem from x ray specs residency. Cbgb's in new york when they went over us punks hauled coal. There were a lot more into drugs. And i think that london it seems to say. Was this the breaking point for the band. Is this the kind of crux in the film. I think so. I mean i mean. That's the argument fuel. Makes the About what happened to the u k Members of the dolls came over an introduced heroin to the to the uk seen quite quite a heavy way otten Concur with everything that lord said about film. I think The framing the fact that it has selected celeste stories. Her as she's dealing with navas legacy in some respects her mother had had semi other people's expectations about what she should be being Star as in and being mixed race being hauled somali in britain and she's just so in the clips that they use the archive clips which from most of them from a a great arena documentary from nineteen seventy-nine he was she's just so alive him sparking intelligence on which me a very funny and in most What she's doing. I think you know how easy it is to get coal topping to the move Nexus these achieved up by the film. I descend Points about the breakdown. the failure in a way to work out. How will she is. She's diagnosed with schizophrenia. Kind of putting for bit. has serious by disorder Move into harry christmas On also in places you alluded to neglect which she treats celeste points during the spirit journey and was pursuing a common all and happened. How different thoughts regarding way with the male and female office Think about lockdown about. How much care women having to take on board and also agree with. I think that when another book that i would put in the frame is what is alvin. Is is kathy. Adams was drafted memoir of juden in other key. Figure the kind prison to look look upon pumpkin kind of liberating. It wasn't how you think about kind of male violence. Where is actually to the nearly point it was it was quite at transgressive sexually A lot of the gay pubs and clubs were up with the next to solve it. I'm so i can imagine that. The film doesn't does kind of raise interesting questions. As well as celeste father is interviewed in it on one of us and absent biggest because he died. regional manager. And pau falcons stewart. Now again. Severi seventeen seventy six. He was quite a bit older than when they get and how much care and they seem to hide it to a certain extent as well a friends didn't really know whether they were going out with each other or not. We just didn't look particularly cool Strangely enough this film from that era with hangs connor in it could breaking gloss than nyein and strangely seems to be almost so the police story in way which becomes this incredible figure And has sta machiavellian manage aaron and has this breakdown and so on so until daniels place. This full manager boyfriend Is i think it's really five documentary. Actually i think you mentioned he was a guest. Shot means the fact that one of zoe's earlier books whose how's your dad's some which is a an account to of stars children's. She's absolutely perfect for collaborator. On this end coming book as other as good as andrew. Did you like this a did. I really liked it because as as long as it's very fresh indifference it's a dream like quality. This is very much not your friday night documentary. Which begins with the stock footage of the miners. Strike rubbish piling in the winter of discontent. Yeah i've always about acronyms because hatches and didn't stop not your kind of off the pex tickets sold. It's it is a personal journey. It's quite slow and quite like i say quite dreamlike and which i found very refreshing change from the usual stakeouts poke documentary. I remember when i was a kid. I thought i thought police really disturbing because i lived in a very white suburban middle of nowhere type place and you just seems so odd and the fact that she but were shut brace on top of the pops and i now say that that is really good thing that it should be disturbed a little. You not white kids in places where i lived in in middle. middle class. spices. To encounter is person who didn't look like a boss didn't like pasta but was absolutely transfixed thing

Celeste Bell Marian Elliott Jordan Lydon Paulie Rian Celeste Polly Nora Burundi London Brixton Witten Watson BBC Cbgb Otten Navas Pau Falcons
How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

WSJ The Future of Everything

13:28 min | 1 year ago

How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

"Depression. It can be a difficult mental illness to pin down. It can feel different for everyone and even those who struggle with it can have trouble identifying bought. It is a mostly came to understood that. I had depression through talking with my friends for the longest time. I kind of system that everyone felt this way. Like weird just like general malays for this twenty nine year old. Depression surfaced about six years ago and began as a feeling of being disconnected with the world. I didn't want to eat because they didn't feel like i deserve to eat. I don't know. I didn't hang out with friends because i didn't feel like i deserve to see my friends. I didn't feel like i should be punishing them by talking to them seeing them. This person uses they them pronouns. They're a maryland resident and work as a software tester. They sought help for their depression. Trying numerous types of treatments may visited a bunch of different mental health professionals and tried different types of arby's In different types of medication but it always kinda felt like things were getting worse and worse and a current really find someone who has really helped me understand what was going on like. I still didn't even believe that. I had depression. All the while the depression advanced it felt like being alive and lake wanting to die rolling constantly fighting over like the resources in my mind then. Their health insurance lapsed in two thousand eighteen making the situation worse a surprise solution appeared while they were scrolling on social media and a posting from johns hopkins university researchers and then one day i was kind of like clicking through facebook and i actually found this ad four like this little simon. Study silla simon. That's the psychedelic drug found in magic mushrooms. And i thought it was fake remarks. I didn't expect there to be you know like a a legitimate study showing up on like facebook ad but they had no insurance basically they were out of options so they called wanted to have hope again from the wall street journal. This is the future of everything. I'm janet babbling today on the podcast. How the hallucinogenic compounds silla zyban once associated with nine hundred sixty s drug culture is making a comeback and giving people suffering from depression and other mental illnesses. Hope for this twenty nine year old study participant. Depression was not something that happened in their family. My family's from the caribbean and lived in america probably for about lake in years. We came here in ninety nine. It's kind of interesting because where from like a place that doesn't really view mental health. The that like america's mental health. It took me a while to realize that. I was having mental health problems that i was kind of experiencing depression. Depression affects a staggering number of people hundreds of millions worldwide according to a study published in the peer reviewed journal the lancet in two thousand eighteen. The pandemic didn't make things any easier. Last june about a third of people who responded to web based surveys said they suffered from symptoms of depression or anxiety disorder. Those results were published by the centers for disease control and prevention the protocol for treating these conditions hasn't changed much in the past few years. What we've been using is typically one of two things either a medication that people take every day or we have psychotherapy dr. Alan davis is clinical psychologist and an assistant professor at the ohio state university. He's also an adjunct assistant. Professor at johns hopkins university. A lot of people will improve with either medication or therapy or both to basically have both have a better chance but it doesn't work for everyone. Some studies report between ten and thirty. Five percent of patients suffer from treatment resistant. Depression and davis is that similar to what he's found in his own practice working with veterans suffering from substance abuse trauma and other mental health issues. So he began looking for alternative treatments present and welcome to psychedelic science. Two thousand and thirteen in twenty thirteen davis attended a science conference and came across a study exploring the use of silla. Sivan a chemical compound found in specific varieties of mushrooms to treat cancer patients with mental health conditions. The compounds documented facts include feelings of heightened awareness ecstasy visions and changes in the perception of reality for researchers say one of the most useful qualities is its ability to dissolve the ego to allow a user to observe oneself from the outside in the study of cancer patients. The drug was able to alleviate some of the anxiety and depression that can be associated with having a life threatening illness. I was just inspired by that word. I thought gosh this really could have a strong impact in the areas that i'm working with veterans and with others davis became part of a team of researchers at johns hopkins university that put together a randomized clinical trial. Twenty four participants. They were administered. Silla sivan with talk therapy to treat their depression. Enrollment for the trial took place in two thousand seventeen and twenty nineteen and the results were analyzed in two thousand twenty. Most of them had had chronic depression meaning decades of experiencing depression though not some had had it for shorter amount of time but this study was a weightless control trials so some people came in and started treatment right away. Others had to wait eight weeks before starting treatment so we had a comparison group. The study subjects received an extensive intake examined questionnaire to confirm. They were suffering from symptoms of depression. Participants were screened for schizophrenia. And drug use as these conditions can interfere with suicide and treatment. The big worry many people have about psychedelics is what's often referred to as a bad trip. Mary negative hallucinations. That can be scary and this is kind of trip that can go bad. Martissant received hefty doses of these drugs. The doses are based on weight and they vary slightly but patients receive around twenty milligrams in the first session a bit more in the second session to minimize the risk of a negative experience. Davis says researchers focused on controlling. What's called and setting. They work ahead of time to ensure the volunteers current mood and surroundings while taking the drugs. Remain as calm and comfortable as possible and so we spend about eight to ten hours with people before they ever get the drug talking about what the effects are talking about. What may or may not happen when they have this experience and that's why we have to train professionals there with them not only to prepare them for that but to help them through the experience when it happens because a lot of people have anxiety coming into the session. The person we spoke to the twenty nine year old participated in davis study group in august of two thousand eighteen. They had no prior experience with psychedelic drugs and didn't know watch expect basically went in kind of blindly. I don't have any other options. So that's kind of my thought process at the time was just basically kind of sticking anything to the wall and hoping it would work after fasting the previous night the treatment can cause nausea. They were placed in a small tranquil room fitted with a comfy couch. The whole room was a really really cool in very comforting because like they had like these statues like imagery in their end like. I think one of the muslim dowa tibetan model. I wanna say this and like there was like this nice lamp. It's off this really. Soft light psychedelic assisted. Therapy participants are encouraged to bring in objects from home to make them feel more comfortable. Some bring in ten bears pictures of family. The twenty nine year old brought a lightness of an ancient sumerian goddess. Soon nana once they were settled in the room. They were given two pills in a wooden cop the therapists top that the sivan would take fifteen to thirty minutes to start working. In the interim they were told to put on ice shades and headphones. That would play a selection of music they choose from classical tibetan chanting african drumming and modern music too. Once the drug fact the participants says the first session became a kaleidoscope of mental images and sensations. I remember being in lake. Felt like mount olympus the fall of the gods like oval the clouds and suffering them. And then one of my god's up to me and she gave me a key fell through the clouds. And i felt all the way down through the earth and i ended up in hell which is really strange because they don't remember being scared even though i was in hell and i remember asking like hey you know why am i hair And it was like haiti's leading me through hell kind of just like showing me around for life this very cold and desolate last. He was like of course. This is where you would come like. This is where you've made your home. The self revelations continued throughout this long session and turned intensely personal. I remember like hearing like the beats. Come on and i felt myself in like this place like all of my ancestors were and i was really close to my grandfather when i was a kid. And he died. Probably around when i was like four and i saw him kind of materialize And he walked towards the youth like these. She'll bananas which is what he's doing her then he handed one to me and i always kind of was afraid that if he was alive he would be disappointed in me and i remember asking him you know. When am i supposed to do like if my family like my parents and lake my siblings can accept me and he said that he'll always be there for me and my ancestors will always be there for me and i like that scene just like it. Metsu in mental to me after about seven hours than drugs started to wear off when it was over. You know you're still kind of like feeling it but just not as intensely so just basically like this really happy kind of floaty failing and we couldn't drive so like i had to have a sister pick me up. They ended the experience hungry and exhausted as for the depression not much appeared to have changed then. They tried the silla sivan trip once more this time with the stronger dose and after that these say they experienced to palpable shift. It felt like i was back into the world again like i was in reality. A lot of people said that not only was there. Depression differently felt like they had come out of dark hole that they've been in for years but a lot of people regardless of whether they're depression was gone or or reduced said that there was something really meaningful different about how they view their life initial results for the study reviewing outcomes from up to a month after the sessions were completed found that silla sivan plus therapy was more than four times more effective than other treatments. Such as medication alone at one week. Fifty eight percent of the sample were in complete remission from depression that actually lasted up to four weeks. After fifty four percent of people were in complete remission and were now studying those same people up to twelve months after to see how long that remission lasted the rest of the participants in the study. Were not in remission they were still experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms researchers have yet to publish the results of longer term outcomes for all the participants their condition up to a year after treatment and this was a small study. Just twenty four people. Some scientists remain skeptical of this kind of treatment not just of silla simon. But of the validity of the data an outcomes for all studies involving psychoactive substances

Depression Johns Hopkins University Silla Simon Silla Zyban Peer Reviewed Journal Centers For Disease Control An Davis Substance Abuse Trauma Silla Sivan Arby Facebook Martissant Alan Davis America Sivan The Wall Street Journal Anxiety Disorder
Tips For Staying Sane

Mentally Yours

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Tips For Staying Sane

"Welcome erica stevens mentally yours. Thanks very much for joining us so we has just about your book even together. The guinness guy tucson sannoussi Why did you want to create this. I had. I've always wanted to write a book about my experiences with psychosis but i kind of felt that it would have more to offer offers a book if i listed the help of a co author. He was a professional in mental health. An augment stephen a conference on and it was about schools. New routes tibet to catholic schizophrenia. anti newell basket sphere. Its area of expertise. Less ask him. let's ask him and he was for. And so we started writing this book together But just felt the kind of just mike spirit. Just the expert by experience will lived experience on and maybe wouldn't hold water. I thought that it would be much better. Talbot's that too. What about east stephen so obvious similar oversee from a professional perspective. So as okay said. I have kind of specialized in researching schizophrenia for twenty five years and look after any large number of patients with illness and other and had wanted to write a book that would be accessible to them and to a wider audience. But also one. That wouldn't be too dry rocket dynamic and around about the time. I'm i'm erica. I also told by various agents event. If i wanted to write a book like this. I definitely need to get Lots of people stories in it so lots of people with lived experience contributing Beating erica was a very happy coincidence and from there took us a while to get going but i think we broke during two eighteen and then finished off in nineteen before publishing of this year. And who would you say that. It's forty anyone with schizophrenia. And anyone is interested in like working schizophrenia. Or care and put some moments schizophrenia. Like a friend or a loved one. Yeah i think. I anyone who's got Or any other type of psychotic illness. This a few different types of psychotic illness Bipolar disorder for example People often have psychotic symptoms of that and other conditions. That are less common so anyone kinds of problems. Anyone looking off to them girlfriend. Mother father sister brother hawks would also. Perhaps anyone is our cassette. Just interested in knowing a bit more about psychosis genuine schizophrenia in particular so one of the psychiatry senior trainees kindly read the book. drafts and coming to the drafts to improve the readability. Apparently who has no connection health connection was he apparently likes reading the extent. For at least it's it's worked. It's an interesting one for me. Because i was now hundred solder and i had psychosis so it would have been lucky to have a ham but like the i think when i i have my my first bit of mania because the thing is it happens and then you get back to normal source of reading. I what's happened to. Why as happened what to do next radius. That's almost as bad as well as just happened in a way. That kind of Mystery around it. Will this fair around it. You're right to tell us a bit about your experiences again our. We've always had you on the poco before that was a while ago. now so you're right to tell we re to go right to tell listeners about your experiences psychosis first episode. Was rhinos on about twenty two Fourteen hours say it's been about two decades of living with psychosis Something i can manage quite well with medication and different therapies But it can be quite terrifying when you have a psychotic episode and there's definitely more at the start of the illness later on and i think the police spying on me. I think i've committed really henious cry and all much like a burglary or you know so of a monkey or something really say area slight blowing up canary war types areas And i just really believe. It's true. And i might start to think the The songs i hear on the radio have been written especially for me to kind of condemn more behavior or the tv might be talking to me in subliminal messages and is terrifying united states ironic to me how much fear or inspire notice when they hear a half psychosis when the reality is you know. I'm just terrified myself. Really in a housebound when it's happening.

Schizophrenia Erica Stevens Mike Spirit East Stephen Erica Psychotic Illness Bipolar Diso Psychosis Tucson Talbot Tibet Stephen Okay Hawks United States
28: JEREMY BAMBER Murdered His OWN FAMILY - burst 2

A Psych For Sore Minds

01:00 min | 1 year ago

28: JEREMY BAMBER Murdered His OWN FAMILY - burst 2

"Tie like go from a different angle because my area of expertise is forensic psychiatry. Which is the crossover of mental defending offending. So i picked a specific angle related. This this is without question. The most gruesome at cold-blooded bernstein said jeremy bamber third fine members and family called blood. Then try to frame it on his sister who has schizophrenia. I should say has. She's vixen sheets mud at the age of twenty eight and a two twin boys secure. So this will happen in essex the uk so foreign friends essex as a county northeast of loaded when women have a reputation of being very friendly. So i'm going to answer questions in these episodes including how realistic was it for jeremy. Bamba try to frame his sister and what john

Jeremy Bamber White House Farm Murders Sheila Caffell Bernstein Essex Schizophrenia UK Bamba Jeremy John
Why Reddit is the unlikely to key to solving the mental health riddle

The 3:59

09:04 min | 1 year ago

Why Reddit is the unlikely to key to solving the mental health riddle

"For mit and harvard have long sought to find connection between language and mental health. So where better. Look than read it. Chang daily charge with these is an carson took a look at this topic so what exactly where researchers from mit and harvard looking at when going to read it. So you know there these researchers who have been interested in this idea that there is a link between language and mental health issues. And maybe we can do is detect issues by examining the language that people use so essentially what they did is applied machine learning algorithms to about eight hundred thousand Posts disease they detect any patterns about mental health during the beginning of the pandemic. It's a funny place. It's a funny concept to get your mind wrapped around because it's it's read it and you know it's sort of known as place for while. Am as it's known for a lot of random conversations so why why was Deemed an ideal place to look for these kinds of connections. There's a few reasons here for one. It's real time data about you know what's going on that's of concern in people's lives. The researchers were able to use it to go back into time Spar back is january in this case to get an idea of how things were progressing as the pandemic started and they were also able to look at specific sub reddit that are devoted specifically to like certain mental health issues. Whether it's depression or schizophrenia. And then also look at. It's that are more like general advice for topics like parenting your finances Is if there are any any other kind of broader trends. There were popping up along the way they made this point with me that for a lot of people read it is a place that they turn to for advice and support in community and whatnot and also it's something that for them could be relatively anonymous as they were gathering this data and it's no secret that anxiety levels in general has risen this year. Thanks to the coronavirus. Thanks to well everything. This dumpster fire for years. So what would exactly they find. That was surprising right so from one. They found over time that the language that was being used across different sub reddit including the general advice ones started to become more similar to particular sub reddit devoted to health anxiety and the folks that generally have been on the health anxiety. Separated are the ones who you know for. Example will really concerned about coronavirus is far back as january before. A lot of us were really. That concerned The also found that a lot of people were talking about. You know stress relating to substance use in alcoholics consumption and that was another trend that was kind of popping up not just in separate devoted specifically to topics like addiction or alcoholism in terms of these different sub. Reddit it's like. How did these researchers determine which wants to go to and which one's religion yet so part of part of that is kind of interesting because that this sort of ties into this decision that they had to make between using read it and doing something like using clinical survey data which in some ways the clinical survey data would be more valid. Because the folks taking those surveys would be people who were clinically diagnosed in chris with the read it. You don't know for sure that the people who are on that read it have a clinical diagnosis or should've with the with the specifics. Their their cases are but they went for very large sample size. And so they're thinking. Was that kind of balance things out. somewhat but yeah. That's an interesting concept idea that volume and just the the sheer numbers will override the concern that some folks are saying may not be legit or a relaxed sufficiently. How unusual is that approach that you know going for these law of numbers as as opposed to going for us more traditional Clinical research work. I think it depends a little bit sort of of Like a case by case basis for this group. This is a very early steppingstone. They're hoping that people are gonna use this research in pick up the baton and move forward and and for the purposes of what they wanted to do. They decided that read. It was gonna be the better fit. You know partly kinda like i mentioned there was the real time aspect if they hit us clinical survey data it would have been a lot more limited in scope because there would been questions the people would have had to answer That would not have just been like kind of a broad ranging overview of what people are living in their lives in the timeframe would have been shorter is as well. And so you know for this. They're they're pretty open about what they're possible. Research limitations were. But i think in general for them. They're hoping that this is something that's going to kind of peak interest for other researchers and Another folks we able to take this forward. Hey you there was a lot of data of asleep taken from Both that what what do you do with it. How do you take this information and use it to benefit mental health research so they relied on machine learning algorithms in. This is something. That kind of pops. Every step of the process you know. For example early on with redoing his finding posts that had language it was specifically related to the pandemic. So you know. Words like respirator. Virus lockdown all. That sort of thing they were also able to kind of view the data in different ways using algorithms so in one case They were kind of looking at all. The language used and placing it in these topic. Clusters and of removing the individual sub. Reddit is kind of a factor in how they clustered the topics so they were able to look like across the board at at things like Topics like loneliness or suicide doubled. Kind of in the time frame that they were looking at they also saw the emergence of a cluster on panic attacks allen so so partly this kind of helps than being able to look at the data in a lot of different ways in terms of that data that it's a lot that they've got just curious how or how they're tapping into the fellow this information. What are they doing with it too. I guess whether it be more proactive in terms of treatment or directed the direction of where mental health research goes. What what are they doing with. The data part of their broader hope is that this is gonna be information that will be useful to clinicians You know when you think about situation like global pandemic. This is something that is stressful for all of us. But they have this theory that for certain groups of people. they're even more vulnerable. You know stressors are exacerbating Some issues that people are already have in the best of times right in. So how do you identify those people who need the most help. Who are the most vulnerable in. Make sure that they're getting the resources that they need and partly. It's it's an awareness thing for for clinicians yet as a counter standard. Serve the idea that were this helps us recognize how severe a problem certain mental health issues are right that that this is a surreal lens into that that a traditional clinical trial wouldn't be able to give us right. Yeah i mean that that's basically the idea that maybe you could look at specific groups of people whether it's folks who are suffering from schizophrenia. Depression or you know etc etc and like. Hey the folks in this particular group seem to be having these specific issues. You know like heightened during the pandemic for example so these are people that we need to pay attention to these people that we need to to get help. So yeah that's the basic idea is sense. It's fascinating erin. Thanks for your time

Reddit Chang Daily MIT Harvard Carson Schizophrenia Depression Chris Allen Erin
Hip-hop's history with mental health in Black communities

Q

08:29 min | 1 year ago

Hip-hop's history with mental health in Black communities

"TV. Here's a conversation you might remember. I think it's important for us to have conversations about, you know, open conversations about mental health, especially with me. Being black because we never had therapists in the black community. We never approached like taking medication with Kanye West on the show, Jimmy Kimmel live. He's talking about how mental health and simply talking about it. Has a stigma in black communities and their numbers to back that up. In one study out of the United States, 63% of black respondents said that talking about mental health was a sign of weakness and You could see the stigma reflected in hip hop and rap. Mark Anthony Neal is the James B. Duke professor of African and African American studies at Duke University. He's also the co editor of That's the Joint the Hip hop Studies. Reader. So before we get going heads up with this conversation includes topics of depression and suicide, which may be triggering to some professor Neill joined me to talk more about hip hop's long history with the topic of mental health and mental illness. Fester. Neil, Thanks so much for making the time today. Thanks for having me It's a pleasure, So I have a whole lot to get with you today. But just let's start very broadly. How would you describe hip hop's overall track record when it comes to mental health and mental illness? You know, I think hip hop reflects where the conversations about mental health are with black communities More broadly, and particularly with black men s 01 of the real breakthrough was in recent years was, you know Jay Z's 444 You know his own kind of bourgeois way. It was a recording that talked about the significance of actually sitting down and talking with a therapist, right toe work through all kinds of notions of trauma. And you know for someone like Jay Z. You know, part of it's because now he's older, right, but it's also a break with the way that black men have often dealt with mental health. You know where we just man up, right? And and instead of, you know, seeking therapy, you know, clinical psychologist, you know, you find all these different moments reflected in hip hop of black men basically inviting. You know marijuana weed Percocet? Of course, there has become kind of the painkiller of choice in recent years, And this is all you know, young black men responding to a mental health crisis that they're having in their daily lives, right? And if I'm reading it correctly, What you're saying is that you know what we see in hip hop. Is ultimately reflective of the larger historical stigma. Mental health has in some black communities, and there's no question right and it is not just mental health, right? I mean, we're having the same conversations with in black communities and definitely within hip hop. About just things like going to the doctor on a regular basis, Right? Regular kind of preventative health care are the kinds of things that you know if you feel pain, you just, you know, Hustle passed, right. You just grind past it because it takes up time, right? And time is money and all these kinds of you know things that we here in Montrose and circulate within, You know, black masculinity. In hip hop culture, right, so mental health becomes, you know on their team Continuing well, part of what we're doing here today is looking back at some of the pivotal rack records that have explored mental health. So take a listen to this me cause I'm close to Doug Etch. I'm try again not to lose my head. So that's a bit of the message from Grandmaster Flash and the Furious five relation 82 Mel Mel, who's rapping in the Verses. Don't push me cause I'm close to the edge. I mean, incredibly legendary, You know, line in hip hop. I have to admit I had never thought about it in the grander context of mental health before. Right, because it's rage, right? You know, how do I control the rage of my experience in the hood and all the things that are going on right that you know that are both continuous and cyclical. And and we can't seem to get out of this cycle if you will, And so the only thing to express their some sort of sense of rage and again. We typically don't think about that in the continuum of mental health or emotional health, right? But the point is, how do you manage what's going on in your life so that you don't You know, I have this moment We have another clip taken. Listen to them, But I go in. Not without a fight. See, Every time I close, I start sweating and blood starts coming out my nose. It's somebody watching the back, but I don't know who it is. So I'm watching my back to get her boys with mind playing tricks on me. Classic rap record back in 1991. Hear paranoia. You hear anxiety, You know? What is it about The ghetto boys take a mental health care that sticks out to you. You know what's important about a song like that, you know, unlike the Grandmaster Flash, and here is a part of example that you played You know what we see this kind of outward expression of what's happening emotionally and mentally. This is one of the first songs I think really dealt with the interiority of mental health crisis, right? It's the stuff that might be there what it's probably not. But it's so internalized that I can't see my way out of it on by think that particularly resonated for many young black men listening to hip hop in that period of time. You know, because of this kind of stoicism. That's that was expected right that you have to keep everything inside. But you can't let people know how you feel right. And what's going on What pain you're going through, You know, So you internalize so much of this, and I think that song does a great job of capturing what's going on in the mind literally of these men in the soul. But let's talk a little bit about treatment. You know, there have been Rap artists who have argued that they don't need professional therapy because the form itself because the music itself is inherently therapeutic. Listen, I'm not here to deny anyone's truth, I'm not here to get in the way of anyone's treatment path. What were. What do you make of that? I understand this on on several levels, right? There has long been a concern, but then black communities about what we see as Western forms of therapy, you know their feet. It's not connected to the live realities of what it means to be black in America, or even you know, black and African In the world. Um so I understand why you have been expressions of suspicion around clinical psychology right in that context, But I think you know I fall down on expertise right folks who were trained Clinically to address whether it be paranoid schizophrenia or or depression or or the whole range of emotionality is that they're contribute to what we think of as as as mental health. On guy think there's no replacing that expertise and where, at a point in time now, you know to the earlier point, you know that their candidate need made about there, not being folks in the community. Well, we know that there are in fact, you know African American therapists, right? In fact, they're thriving in this period of time, largely because you know, because of folks like saying Jay Z and another, you know, producing black woman writers and artists. Who have talked about the significance of finding a therapist, you know in their life, and so I think it has to be more of a both in right, definitely finding a community find folks that you can work the would talk through. You know who can be that first line of intervention? You know if you are suffering through, you know, anxiety or other forms of the mental health crisis, But But there is an expertise there that that folks need to pursue and again. Jay Z was so critical in this moment because, you know, he basically said, I went to see a therapist, right? If I'm going to be the Ogi of hip hop right, then it's OK. Can you elaborate on how a skepticism of psychotherapy could be related to anti black racism in our society? I mean, it's just that right the fact that we have the largest society that has never understood You know the black frame if you will. The Black is first in this country and I have tried to apply normative structures that come outside of the everyday experience of black folks, too. You know how black folks are working through their their mental health? You know, there's also the larger question of the way that that mental health care is connected to generally health care in America and general suspicion right of the medical profession. When it comes to issues of race. We could just think you know the Tuskegee experiments right? And it just think about those men for a second, right to on the one hand are subjected. You know to physical problems because of the experiments, but at the same time, Ah work into all kinds of levels of schizophrenia and depression, you know, based on the physical sense that they're also is not being addressed. You know, in the context of that movement, if you're just tuning in

Mark Anthony Neal James B. Duke Hip Hop Studies Jay Z. Jay Z Doug Etch Mel Mel Jimmy Kimmel Kanye West Neill Duke University Depression America Neil Montrose Paranoia Schizophrenia
Words On Bathroom Walls Blu-ray Review

After The Show Movie Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Words On Bathroom Walls Blu-ray Review

"So it is saturday november. Twenty eight th. This is after the show. Six hundred sixty one or navy review podcast and The media will not. This week is woods on bathroom walls. So twenty twenty movie such on blu ray now you can pick it up. Pg thirteen friends at lionsgate centers. The blu ray for review so settle you give the you give us the synopsis and i will give you the one of the box and see if it is the same thing first of all. There's not a lot of words on bathroom. Walls can put that out there right off the bat It's a story about Coping with mental illness. And i'll give you the one off the box. Here we go you read Is ready. Autumn is a weighty introspective eighteen pursuing his dream of becoming a chef when autumn is diagnosed with a mental illness. He lives in fear of being exposed until he meets. Maya and outspoken and famously intelligent go inspires him to open his hot not be defined by his condition with it's inspiring journey of love acceptance and hope words on bathroom. Walls is a triumphant story of overcoming. Life's challenges and embracing who you are. Yeah extra sappy woody at the wording mo- vote and it isn't i mean it's not accurate spoiler alert. It's not about her telling him that to be. who is. it's more about him figuring that out from self all right. So that's a synopsis. Let's get onto the movie sitter words on bathroom wall. I really liked it. Well you know. Sometimes you just like i mean i appreciate the effort. Yes some people are gonna probably watch this. And maybe even in some of your one-star reviews and say oh you know mental health. Can we just dogging about it. All that kind of stuff but i actually find it really uplifting that instead of like everybody seems to think it's ok to do a movie about serial killers right multiple movies about people who murder people and all that shit but then to actually examine someone like this teenager who has a mental illness that could potentially and probably has in human history right lead a person to commit horrible crimes because it's a terrible mental illness right to address that i find i really appreciate that. I don't know anyone with schizophrenia. Do you have you ever know that. I'm aware of anyway. I find it really. I like the idea of addressing it on a like. I actually liked the way they handled it. It's not like overly grim doc. An all the time there is like hope and i. It doesn't go away. I was sometimes these. Things are a bit like sanitized. Yeah happy ending and all that. Yeah but this actually deals with the drugs. He's been given and what they can do to you and you know it feels. It feels realistic in a way but then is obviously i will say this. I've never known schizophrenia. But have lived with a man before. I ever met you darling. Who was manic depressive. And so taking his medication or not taking the medication you never knew. I never knew if i came from work. And there'd be trash bags on the windows and him in little darkness and you just knew to stay away or everything's open and he's making music. He was like a musician. He's not dead or anything. And everything was fine. And it was like super mannequin like super productive. Or you're going to be in the bottom of a ditch emotional you know so addressing that and it all did depend on the different medicines and the balance and all that kind of stuff. So that's why i really appreciate their addressing it in a way that wasn't like oh happy endings. This person's just basically a danger to society and we have to lock them away. Because that's kind of how we've always yet because everything's

Lionsgate Centers Navy Maya Schizophrenia Woody
Police: Man accused of punching Rick Moranis attacked others

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Police: Man accused of punching Rick Moranis attacked others

"Authorities in New York have released more details about the man arrested in connection with an assault on actor Rick Moranis now that an arrest has been made it appears the person in custody for slugging the honey I shrunk the kids actor had no beef with him and it wasn't a one off attack authorities say the suspect thirty five year old more keys than tour is a suspect not only in the attack on Rick Moranis but also in other unprovoked attacks in New York City prosecutors say mentor is charged with five assaults on strangers in the past six months authorities say after he sucker punch Moran is on October first in Central Park he attacked a liquor store owner in lower Manhattan an attorney for Ventura says his client has been diagnosed with schizophrenia a judge has ordered him to have a new psych workup I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Rick Moranis New York New York City Moran Central Park Manhattan Ventura Schizophrenia Oscar Wells Gabriel
A Call For Equity In Genomics Research

Short Wave

02:58 min | 1 year ago

A Call For Equity In Genomics Research

"So before the break we talked about. How do i noticed. A lack of diversity into nomex. He was working with these databases and noticed a lot of minorities communities were left out and as he began to interrogate that he made two key rations. One of the reasons is more around comfort and convenience. It's like if you are Western european ancestry. Doctor it's much easier to for you to recruit white people within your network right and then on the other side of the coin. It's really hard to recruit communities of people who have historically been exploited exploited by the medical and scientific community traumatizing experiences with lasting impacts. Like what happened to the have a super tribe from arizona so back in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine researchers at arizona state university and the havasu by agreed to partner up to determine if there was a genetic reason behind the really high rates of diabetes that have plagued the tribe for decades but when arizona state turned around and question to have a supine nations origin. Story tried to look for genetic associations with schizophrenia. And getting mutations that are associated with interbreeding it naturally pissed off the community. Because that's not the arrangement and the consensus that they built not only to the researchers not get consent to look at those things some of those questions in themselves deeply disrespected the tribes most sacred beliefs so that resulted in the sort of ripple effect or domino effect with many other tribes in the united states of america pudding a moratorium on genetic research which stands to this day. Here's the other thing. It's become more and more clear but a lot of times. These health disparities like diabetes and have a suit by tribe aren't really even because of genetics. They're more about socio. Economic factors like access to healthy food and healthcare a lot of the times when an indigenous populations or brown black and underrepresented populations that people are recruited into studies. It's under the guise of reducing health disparities and sort of pandering towards this narrative that there's an innate nece to why our communities have higher rates of common complex disease right and that's highly problematic and i have sold that grant narrative in so many grants and papers and that's how i've kind of come to this position of questioning it and being skeptical of what the actual benefit

Arizona Arizona State University Diabetes Schizophrenia United States Of America
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. . Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. . York Times. . Magazine. . Bob Welcome to the show. . Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. . Your book is non-fiction. . It's a true story. . I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. . Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. . Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, , you met the Galvin family. . That's right. . My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. . So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, , this is a family that's been through so much. . Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. . But when they were children, , six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. . The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. . But before that happened, , there was tremendous amount of denial, , a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, , and so it became clear that by telling their story, , maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, , which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. . I'm horribly bad at math, but , they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So . there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. . It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, , blaming bad mothering, , and then of course, , the medical treatments, the , pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. . So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, , Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad . Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, , but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. . It's not parent to child it's not recessive. . It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. . What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. . But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. . Perhaps, , we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. . Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. . Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, , they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. . They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. . Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. . Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. . It doesn't necessarily add functionality. . They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, , and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You . didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. . Is that true? ? That's right. . I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. . Personality which is. . Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. . So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, , but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. . Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, , it means being paranoid and in fact, , that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, , which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. . Syndrome. . It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. . And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about <hes>. . There is such a thing as schizophrenia. . It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, , we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, , and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. . When doing your research for the book? ? Obviously, , you spoke to the family. . Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? ? Yes. . Absolutely. . My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. . But of course, , in the back of my mind I was thinking well, , how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this , might happen all the time. . So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. . To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, , but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, , have you heard of this family? ? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? ? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? ? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? ? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? ? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. . So in terms of the numbers, , they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. . Way So. . There's a lot of hope in this story as well. . Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. . This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, , one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, , which is families with more than one perhaps many instances <hes> six mental illness, , not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. . Nineties was to collect data on as many. . Multiplex families as possible. . So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

schizophrenia Galvin family Schizophrenia Galvin New York magazine Mimi
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 1 year ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
New Schizophrenia Guidelines

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

03:44 min | 1 year ago

New Schizophrenia Guidelines

"Lot has changed since 2004 when the APA the last road practice guidelines on schizophrenia this September and twenty-twenty. They updated those guidelines and here's a few of the key changes. There's less emphasis on divorce pushing between the conventional or first generation antipsychotics and the second generation or a typical perhaps because the Katy Trail put an end to the notion that the newer ones are better tolerate or the older ones are more effective, but the guidelines do Place greater emphasis on clozapine. They recommend clozapine after a patient has failed to respond to two trials of a guy psychotics and they Define failure of response meaning less than a 20% response and unlike the 2004 guidelines. They don't require that one of those trucks. Else be with the first-generation antipsychotic. They also recommend clozapine first line for a number of patients, which when you think of it is a lot of people with schizophrenia, those are people with suicidality problematic aggression and potentially with tardive dyskinesia. That doesn't respond to other options. The guidelines do go into great detail on how to treat side effects to antipsychotics. They list metformin as first-line for weight gain and metabolic syndrome and they list the vmat2 Inhibitors two of which are like ft approved and one of which are not all is first line for tardive dyskinesia. That's one area where I might differ from the guidelines they seem to emphasize these FDA-approved treatments, which actually have a fairly poor number needed to treat and not-so-great tolerability and are extremely expensive at $80,000 a year and they give real short shrift wage. Other options for tardive dyskinesia things like ginkgo biloba extract Keppra and amantadine which were actually given more emphasis in the neurology guidelines wage in several places. The guidelines give Credence to the idea of checking blood levels on antipsychotics to see if the patient is actually taking them a lot of authors of advocated for this and the fact here is that you just don't know if the patient is taking it even though the blood levels of most antipsychotics don't correlate with any therapeutic level except for clozapine where the therapeutic effects are greater above blood levels of 350. It's still useful to check them before moving to clozapine because you don't know if the patient even took the medication that you gave them too often. They don't and perhaps the biggest and most welcome change here is the emphasis on psychosocial therapies while they were recommended in a more generic form in 2004 here they recognized A whole host of specific psychosocial programs for people with schizophrenia so they can get their lives back. Here's one that was striking to me. They recommend that all first episode page be treated and something called a coordinated Specialty Care Program. These are things that have been researched since 2004 and shown to improve outcomes. They are team based programs incorporate both medications along with education resiliency training family therapy and vocational rehab sounds like a full pallet of what people need when they're going through them first episode too bad. These programs are hard to find but they're starting to Institute the more public Mental Health Centers and some academic centers have them but helpfully the guidelines do give you a reference to free resources where you can train your staff to start one locally

Clozapine Schizophrenia APA Katy Trail Metabolic Syndrome Mental Health Centers Amantadine Metformin
The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | 1 year ago

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

QuaranTEEN

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

"To Anchor FM to get started again anchored. Get started now. So to talk about. Delusions and hallucinations. We are taking some sorry. I'm moving some information from SICOM. Dot Net's. Read their their entire Article 'cause. I'm just too lazy to try in changed off, so hallucinations and delusions are among the most common symptoms of schizophrenia, those are considered positive symptoms meaning they are not seen in healthy people. Hallucinations. Hallucinations are defined as experiences and sensations that are not comprehensible to others to the person experiencing them. They may seem real urgent in vivid. Roughly seventy percent of people with schizophrenia will experience hallucinations. So auditory hallucinations are most commonly experienced people with schizophrenia and may include hearing voices, sometimes multiple voices, and other sounds like whispering or murmuring voices may seem angry or urgent, and often make demands on the hallucinating person. Visual hallucinations involve seen objects, people, light or patterns that are not actually present, visualizing deadlocked ones, friends, or other people they knew can be particularly distressing perception may be altered as well as resulting. As well, resulting in difficult judging distance. Olfactory hallucinations involved the sense of smell or taste, most good or bad. That are not actually present. This can be particularly dangerous if a person believes he is being poisoned and refrains from eating. tactile hallucinations are feelings of movement or sensation on your body that are not actually present such as hands on your body or insects crawling around or inside you. Hallucinations don't necessarily indicate schizophrenia people with mood. Disorders schizo affective disorders in other physical or mental health conditions may also loosening hallucination me occur when under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Delusions! Delusions are defined as beliefs that conflict with reality. Delusions are one of the most common in schizophrenia Dece beliefs made include persecutory delusions when a person believes a person group organization is mistreating or harming them despite contradictory evidence. Arrow tint Say That we're Aero Tow mannix delusions woo when a person believes, another is in love with them, despite no evidence is off, other person is often a celebrity or person in power. So Matic delusions when a person believes they haven't illness or their body is affected by strange condition despite contradictory evidence. And then the grandiose delusions why a person when a person believes they have superior abilities or qualities like talent fame wealth despite no evidence. Sometimes a person will experience a recurring theme in their delusions over a period, which makes them seem more convincing to the individual experiencing. Hallucinations are sometimes categorized as secondary delusions if they have a false belief in the voice that they are hearing or any other sensation that they are experiencing. So, I mean sounds pretty rough to have all of these things going on. But. Why might somebody have that stuff happening? Well? Of course, schizophrenia but nobody really understands why schizophrenia happens, so nhs says the exact causes of schizophrenia are unknown. Research suggests a combination of physical genetic psychological and environmental factors can make a person more likely to develop a condition. Some people may be prone to schizophrenia in a stressful or emotional life event may trigger a psychotic episode. so obviously. This is pretty rough You know it's not not a fun thing to have and.

Visual hallucinations schizophrenia Dot Net nhs mannix
"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

QuaranTEEN

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

"Diagnosed with schizophrenia. Early onset schizophrenia occurs before age eighteen very early onset schizophrenia in children younger than thirteen is extremely rare symptoms can vary in types and severity over time with periods of worsening in remission of symptoms. Some homes may always be present. Schizophrenia can be difficult to recognize in the early phases. talking more about phases. There are like three phases of schizophrenia. So the IPC talks about this, they say schizophrenia has three phases, pro drome, oil, or beginning, accused or active and recovery or residual. These phases tend to occur in order in cycle throughout the course of the illness. People develop schizophrenia may have one or many psychotic episodes during their lifetime. So as we early said earlier, it is chronic, so could last a lifetime, or it could be shorter and I think for phases occur in both but especially in the shorter when you're more likely to see the recovery period. Moving on, so we're GONNA talk about hallucinations versus delusions. Hey guys. We're GONNA. Take a quick break to talk about. One of our amazing sponsors. KNOCKBACK knockback is creative video game designed for one to four people in which you attempt to get rid of zombies as the owner says it knocked back as a physics sandbox that challenges you to ask yourself. How many ways can I store this? Ambi- go ahead. Play with fire. Throw him into a building or a smash with a log rolling down a hill one a sucks. zombies into type zapped with lightning. You can do that. Rain down. Sticky stones of fire onto their heads got you covered? With with a giant rolling stone, that bold down on the bodies go for it knock..

schizophrenia hallucinations IPC Ambi
"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

QuaranTEEN

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

"A psychiatric diagnosed me with early onset schizophrenic schizophrenia at the age of eleven. I didn't understand that word. Schizophrenia was the thing that I've been controlling my thoughts and haunting me since I was a young child. It had been an on and off. Since being released from the hospital, the first few years were tough, isolated myself from everyone else I felt like an outcast. No one I knew was going through what I went through. As I stressed about my social life school in other after school activities I began to neglect taking my medication around this time I was in middle school. Puberty was hard enough to to. Puberty was hard enough, but being a preteen with severe medical health Puberty was hard enough, but being preteen with a severe mental health diagnosis made life even harder for me to deal with. I was thirteen when I first attempted to take my own life. As, I look on it. Now I am happy. I survived, but it landed me another month back in the hospital. The doctors told told me how important was take my medication. I took that advice to heart I. NO longer wanted to be the victim of by diagnosis. I wanted to survive. It took a while, but I began starting to start taking my medication. Mainly because I did not want to relapse again. I wanted to fight this with the help of my parents therapist in school counseling stuff I am able to live with schizophrenia. Instead of letting it control my life I began to interact more with my peers, I no longer felt alienated and I no longer let the hallucinations take charge of my life. I began to make more friends migrates increased, and I wasn't afraid of my own mind anymore. After develop graduating high school, I went to college to study not only visual arts, but also early childhood development I. Feel like regardless of a few setbacks. I am a recovery story. If I would have to speak to myself at Asia. I would say you are a strong young woman. Don't let fear consumer, bright, young mind, get the help. There is nothing to be afraid of adults and professionals will help you through hard struggles. Do not isolate yourself. You are not alone. So. Woo that was long I know. It was very moving though I think that that's super interesting to hear how schizophrenic attacks occur, so we'll talk about that right now..

Schizophrenia relapse Asia
"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

QuaranTEEN

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

"Welcome to today's interesting episode. Schizophrenia I know a lot of questions. Come to mind when I say that, but let's see those for later right now. We're going to begin the episode with woman of headlines to update you on the world around us..

"schizophrenia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:55 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on KCRW

"What is schizophrenia really is it only a psychiatric condition or does it have its origins in something else who is more susceptible to it and why these are the questions at the heart of a new book about an extraordinary family writer Robert Kolker the bestselling author of lost girls tells the story of the Galvin family they seemed a model for baby boomer America twelve children with a military dad in a strict but religious mother growing up in Colorado in the nineteen sixties but over the years six of the boys were diagnosed with schizophrenia and now their journey is transforming the science around the mental illness the book is called hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family and Robert Kolker joins us now from his home in Brooklyn New York welcome to the program thanks a lot hello we can't get into every story line in this incredibly detailed and richly reported book but a generally tell me about the gallons and the time that they were living in well they really lived in the grandest period of the American century they were married at the end of World War two they raised a family in the fifties and sixties through the Cold War and through the American prosperity boom and their children really where the baby boom the oldest one was born in nineteen forty five and the youngest one in nineteen sixty five and there were twelve of them so they were famous wherever they lived as this very large family that outwardly seems perfect in every way let's talk about why schizophrenia has been such a mystery there was this a debate that you discuss initially a nature genetics or nurture that something in the way someone was brought up triggers schizophrenia what was the debate about well the very beginning of psychiatry most people who were giving schizophrenia named believe that it had some sort of physical quality to it and that it might be hereditary but Sigmund Freud disagreed he really believe that in mainly it was something that was inherited not inherited in a genetic sense but inherited in terms of childhood trauma and and this nature nurture debate continued for some time and in fact the nurture people the psychoanalyst's really held sway throughout the twentieth century at least in America at all suggesting that some people who had schizophrenia and lived in a world that the therapist had to penetrate and that with the right kind of therapy the problem might be solved in the person might enter reality again and this completely ignored the genetic aspect of it now we're living in a world where everything is seemingly about genetics but we're back to a nature nurture argument because we believe that schizophrenia and other complex diseases are just about genetics better about genes that are impacted or affected by the environment explained it well it's always been known to be a syndrome as opposed to a disease it's not like influenza where you can identify what it is in terms of its you know chemistry schizophrenia is really a collection of symptoms that are defined and then treated based on the symptoms sue you in the book I talk about a woman called Linda Lee C. and her work she believe that families like the Galvin's held the key to understanding schizophrenia that's right a doctor Lee C. was a pioneer at the time she was one of the top researchers at the National Institute of mental health and she became fascinated by the idea that if you started a family with a large incidence of schizophrenia and that you might be able to find some sort of genetic silver bullet inside it that could help us understand how the condition takes shape in the general population but she had went on to assemble the most numerous a collection of what she called multiplex families and to the gallons for one of those first families and they were the largest family and it was through the study of those families that with a lot of twists and turns she ended up once the human genome was sequenced to actively demonstrate how families like the gallons can help us understand the condition and how it takes shape yeah and let's talk about what was uncovered through looking at families like the goblins because it was a mystery right at the heart of this about the way the brains of schizophrenics function that's right and her belief was that this definitely was inherited that environment had nothing to do with it what they found was in fact a genetic mutation that might be unique to this family but is so vital to brain function that it might help us understand how schizophrenia works and that's really how families like the garbage can help us going forward we can look at them and their particular genetic mutation that might be at fault and while that mutation may not exist elsewhere you can help us understand the disease and how it affects others in their models for this with other diseases so possibly might be neuro developmental is is what they came to sort of believe yes in the eighties the new wisdom about schizophrenia was that it was a developmental disorder which is to say that even though so people came down with that at the age of twenty or twenty one that didn't mean that they suddenly got bitten by an insect and had schizophrenia or it meant that there was something with in their genetic makeup that they had from before they were even born that gave them a vulnerability a special sensitivity whether was the inability to filter out certain stimuli or difficulty and brain development that only manifested itself in the final stages of brain development which as we know now is adolescents you come across the gallons a mutual friend of mine and Lindsey Galvan introduced us Lindsay is the youngest of the twelve and he had known them for years and that the two sisters there ten brothers and two sisters Margaret and Lindsey and the family had been talking for years about trying to let the world know about their family stories and finally they decided they needed an outsider and independent journalist who could take the story wherever it led yeah now that their story is finally being told what do you think we should take away from what they went through well I mean these are challenging times independent of mental illness I think that this is an example of a family that really experienced not just one but two or three or four different horrors all at once and came out the other side it's about not turning inward when when the worst happens in life it's about reaching out to each other and understanding the value of family and the value of not closing yourself off to possibilities I really believe there's a lot of hope and inspiration in this story that people can take away from it independent of mental illness issues rather call government is the author of the new book hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family thank you very much thank you letter they're two world renowned musicians from two very different parts of the world Grammy Award winner Abigail Washburn plays one of the most popular instruments in Appalachian music the banjo Fay.

schizophrenia