35 Burst results for "Schiller"

In a Sizzling US Market, Demand and Prices for Homes Soar

Broncos Country Tonight

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

In a Sizzling US Market, Demand and Prices for Homes Soar

"Speed. The national average jumped in and analyzed 13.2% in March, the latest full month of data from SNP Corelogic Case Schiller It's the biggest and analyzed increasing more than 15 years, and it beats February's 12% rate. But selling it those high prices is getting tougher. Sales of newly built homes fell almost 6% in April. Existing home sales dropped almost 3% that month, but demand is still high and supply low, so economists expect prices to keep rising. Especially as long as interest rates also stay low. PHOENIX prices are going up the fastest at 20% safe.

Phoenix
Housing is on a Sugar High, But Is it in for a Crash?

CNBC's Fast Money

01:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Housing is on a Sugar High, But Is it in for a Crash?

"But we start with a sugar high and housing home sales pulling back in april but because prices are so hot. The median price for a new home soaring twenty percent last month. That is the biggest annual increase in thirty three years and it's not just new homes red hot housing market reinforced today but the case schiller index showing a thirteen percent gain in all home prices nationwide strong demand short supply historically low mortgage rates. All driving prices higher. Check out the move and the builders today names like toll brothers. Dr horton lesnar. Pulse group all moving higher during the session. So is this sugar high going to turn into a sugar crash. Tim weigh-in look. I think the year comps don't make a lot of sense. In terms of prices. I think the affordability has been an issue for the housing market for a long time. I think some of the the migration trends that we've seen of kobe are ones that may on wine but like i said we have a housing bubble. This is a question. I get asked a lot. I was just involved in the conversation earlier today about this Investment in in single family homes is is overall for the sector in other words building out and the man is supply. were still under invested in this country. the fact that these numbers are volatile on a monthly data series again month to month from kobe. Where obviously coming out of kobe. There's enormous pent-up demand rates are as you said. I mean i've been a driver for demand and the affordability dynamics and the inventory dynamics are things that existed well before i just look at annual wholesale seven hundred fifty thousands where we were pre covid. I think we're probably going to settle back into that range. And i think it's fine.

Dr Horton Lesnar Tim Weigh Schiller Kobe
Tim Cook's Bad Day in Epic vs Apple

The Vergecast

02:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Tim Cook's Bad Day in Epic vs Apple

"All about the apple versus epic trial epic versus apple. It's i i was safe backwards. Epic versus apple epics the planet literally the testimony portion of the trial wrapped up minutes ago from you and i are talking. There is sort of fake version of closing arguments on monday where both layers are. Just gonna get asked questions. Bu the judge from what. I understand which is probably going to be way more fun than normal closing arguments probably way more fun also the term. Everyone is using for that. Closing argument is a hot tub ing which is very funny. Laporta will be in the courtroom for the hot tub ing but the actual testimony all the witnesses on the stand all the presentations of evidence wrapped up today. This week saw phil schiller craig. Federici tim cook on the stand. There's a lot to talk about their but wish to start with what just happened. Because the absolute end of the testimony portion of the trial with tim cook on the stand was fireworks. It just went sideways. There was very boring for a week. Lots of experts that we're not even talking about because they were so boring and then the judge kind of just in the tim cook. What happened at he. Yeah so you. A judge yvonne gonzalez rogers who is gonna be writing the opinion on the case and who occasionally interjects with some usually pretty interesting but very short questions. They more or less finished examining tim cook. And then judge rogers two steps in with a question and she's like okay. Well it seems like most of the revenue in the app store comes from games. So what's wrong with telling people that they can go and making purchases elsewhere. And then that just kicks off this ten minute long discussion where she and tim cook this like surprisingly testy exchange over whether it makes sense that once apple put like once a developer put something in the store apple brings enough value that it should get a cut of like whatever happens in that out forever. Yeah and to me. This is kind of the central question at the heart of this. Trial is who is in control of your phone in apple's answer kind of nakedly. Throughout his win we are in control of your phone

Apple Tim Cook Phil Schiller Craig Federici Tim Cook Laporta Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers Judge Rogers App Store
Here’s the Latest on the Epic vs Apple Trial

BTV Simulcast

02:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Here’s the Latest on the Epic vs Apple Trial

"Of the high stakes courtroom battle between Apple and Fortnight maker Epic games, and this week it is apples turn to prove it is not an antitrust violator, with expectations that the tech giant will bring in its most powerful spokesperson, that is Tim Cook. To testify. Bloomberg. Mark Herman has the very latest. So mark, where are we with this trial? Yes. So we are in the probably final week of the trial. Today we've heard Phil Schiller, the former senior VP of marketing and now an Apple fellow in charge of the APP store testifying to Apple's business practices why the APP store operates the way it does. And its interactions with developers. And we've also gotten a few interesting stats about how the APP stores run that there are 280,000 games out of two million total APS and how much it costs Apple to run its annual developer conferences. So talk to us about the case that has been made so far. It sounds like you've repeatedly come out of these hearings. Feeling like epic hasn't really proven Its case. I mean, I'm not a lawyer or anything, but I've been listening into most of the trial on a daily basis, and I have simply not heard any compelling arguments or seriously compelling argument for how Apple is doing something not necessarily wrong. But how it's really hurting developers on all levels. You've heard Microsoft testify you've heard in video testify. I don't think epic has brought any smoking guns to the table about Apple, you know, purposely trying to cross smaller developers. Personally, I think you know, Apple's APP store fees are a bit too high for the year 2021. Given the economies of scale. Maybe 30% made sense where there were very few APS on the store. But now that 30% is generating nearly 20 billion profit per year and spread out across two million APS, you know that 30% is worth a lot more to Apple than it was way back in the day. So I think that needs to change. And even Phil Schiller echoed that when Apple launched its program to slice the fees for developers to generate under a million per year from 30% to 15%, Schiller said, he argued for the cuts be below 15%. So I think this is something that Apple recognizes in some respect, too. But regardless of opinions, regardless of how bad you know, epic thinks Apple behaves Is a contract at stake. And the first thing you need to know about the legal world is if you have a contract, and it's legitimate and all parties have signed it, and there's no contractual issues there. You know, it's pretty hard to argue with that piece of paper with signatures, and that's what Apple for all intensive purposes has with epic at this point.

Apple Phil Schiller Mark Herman App Store App Stores Tim Cook Bloomberg Microsoft Schiller
Metro Atlanta home prices accelerated as pandemic rolled on

AJC Briefing

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Metro Atlanta home prices accelerated as pandemic rolled on

"Metro atlanta home prices jumped nine point six percent from january twenty twenty two january twenty twenty one the fastest pace of growth in seven years according to the latest. Snp core logic case schiller national home price index atlanta was already a seller's market but in the past year as the pandemic wore on buyers flowed into the market while inventory. The number of homes listed for sale fell. We are critically low. Inventory said john ryan chief marketing officer for georgia multiple listing service. And i can't see any time soon where that is going to change buyers often find themselves competing for attractive homes bidding against each other and pushing the prices up. I know of a case in gwinnett where there were sixty offers on one property ryan said

Atlanta John Ryan Georgia Gwinnett Ryan
Chicago Woman Trapped For 10 Hours After Awning Collapse In Schiller Park

John Williams

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago Woman Trapped For 10 Hours After Awning Collapse In Schiller Park

"We're learning more about the rescue of a woman who was trapped under a collapsed awning in the suburbs. They waited. The snow caused the overhang to fall on top of the woman. She was stuck there for 10 hours before she was rescued by paramedics and Schiller Park. There's the Schiller Park Fire Chief, Mike says ready where the collapse came down. It pinned her legs, keeping her body towards her back door, which created that space for our paramedics to get in there and start treatment right away, And at that time our rescue crews crews use heavy. I'll lift equipment airbags and struts to stabilize. That awning lifted up while they're able to pull her back into the woman in her fifties, had gone out to shovel the snow Monday morning when the awning suddenly collapsed. She tried calling for help, but no one was around to hear. It wasn't until a family member arrived home Monday night that she was found

Schiller Park Mike
"schiller" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

08:57 min | 4 months ago

"schiller" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"And wanted to ask to obviously because as you mentioned twenty twenty was a a really wild year to be in your i kind of year since the acquisition in the merger and implementing some of these strategies around your sales I guess can you talk about how ad business was impacted at the same time. I know you guys have launched some pretty unique Sponsorship initiatives around some content packages in ip and things of that nature. But everyone was you know across the board impacted a certain degree when it comes to add Spending so i guess talk a little about like you know. Twenty twenty how that was for group nine. Yeah absolutely Certainly the pandemic threw a curveball. To all as you mentioned from our perspective corporately when we go to market we talk about how group nine has the most optimistic fast moving deeply connected brands that matter now and certainly you can say. Oh that's pithy and that you know that's corporate speak but it really played out in what was wildest of years in a lot of ways. The most tragic of years the convergence of social unrest civil unrest political unrest with the pandemic a once in a generation Experience in so. I think from that perspective. Everything that i mentioned in terms of what defines group nine On a molecular level across the company played in our favor we were able to move really quickly In terms of pivoting for example we launched within weeks following the pandemic. we launched as we've talked about before. Now this had a new franchise Launch call now in this together which was really about spotlighting heroes and And and the helpers in communities during the pandemic and and so that actually happened within two weeks of the pandemic and we have literally sold every episode of that Since july so i would say the thing that we shared in common with the industry was everybody took their licks in acute to that was certainly when on march thirteenth on lockdown. Everything sort of scrambled and the the the prime beneficiary in a negative way was was cute. Too but q. Three we were really able to pick up not just in this together. We launched new. Ip across a variety of brands. But i would say twenty. Twenty was unimaginable year But our brands really focused on finding new and innovative ways to connect with people and i would say adding to that at the same time. Not only was it about all the things that i mentioned but our audience growth was just tremendous until some of that is the acceleration of the shift from in office to at home the shift from digital from linear to digital. But it's also just by nature of who our brands are who they represented. We went from doing around five billion monthly views the beginning of the year to ending around seven billion We saw our tiktok. Audience grow significantly We have now Up to reach over twenty five million viewers across snapped as of q four and so we see tremendous audience growth throughout twenty twenty and the sort of code on that was from nancy sales perspective. Q four mark the strong secure four. We've ever had on record. So i guess like an do wanna ask a little bit more about q. Four as it is the strongest as you mentioned on record but also you know. You're you're for your ad business in particular Was that didn't end up being in revenue for you guys. Yeah so we had a pretty big hit in q two We saw incremental growth. So i kind of look at it as a first-half second-half second half was Was a much different picture. We finished second half up year-over-year We were still for the full year. Closer to flat Just based off of the hit we took in particular based off of our exposure in certain categories like travel through so dependent on travel in that went away and certainly retail. Took a big hit as well but The tale of two halves where q one was kind of like the integration settling and then q two was the double hit of co vid. It was vastly different second half with incremental growth in q three and then q four being the strongest. We've ever had for the company. I think it's also slightly common I've talked to a few publishers. Say that like q four ended up being a very strong. I'm quarter for them. Which is probably their saving grace and a lot of cases But i'm curious so you mentioned that you're doing this very like endemic focus on some of these brands and really wanted to be the authority in as you mentioned the dodo pet care Thrillers travel things of that nature I guess coming out of twenty twenty though. Do you think that that is something that could potentially be. I don't wanna say like mental. But it could to a degree Impact business again like travel ended up being You know put on ice for another year or so You thinking about these. Like endemic focuses While also making sure that your ad business is staying on a growth trajectory. The it's a great question. And i think the example i would give is the dodo Specifically because it's so endemic right. You can say list travel but trout. It's also experienced It's an experience brand food. Drink travel Whereas the more sort of apples to apples is the dodo is a modern family brand. That owns the the the pet space and so the way that we saw the need to find those travel dollars from somewhere else or the retailers for somewhere else came through our strategy of saying we already own endemic on the dodo for pets. How do we own the non endemic of modern family and so we were able to drive new relationships so i guess like a sort of a long winded answer of saying anytime. You're you're backed into a corner. You tend to if you have sort of like the fast twitch muscle fiber thinking. You're able to find new pathways really fast. Some organizations are able to do that others. Just sort of flail. I as i mentioned earlier we move fast ethos but also an operating guideline and so from our perspective with the dodo. We were able to then. Hey look the doda was truly on. Its way to being in the same category as disney neck. Modern family brand family save brand safe also safe on social which became an issue and so we were able to open the aperture of client partners on the dodo and get brands like craft. Get brands like close. Get target So our strategy is certainly to leverage the power of the portfolio. And if we if we were one brand we would definitely be stuck about. Because we're five. We have that power of the portfolio opportunity to then say. How do we have a relationship ear that can be leveraged over there. Or how do we open the aperture from one category to the next the the g growth on the dodo is definitely emblematic of that. So you mentioned retail and travel as being to those categories that Obviously were down but What were some of the ones that ended up being up this past year a former was up and this is more over the counter not not to direct to consumer specifically Cpg was way up Beauty was was slightly. Up tech was pretty significantly as telecom as well and then financial services. So i think really. We saw pretty significant growth across the board with the exception of retail The exception of travel and then I would say media and entertainment is kind of like a toss up because the the theatrical obviously went away broadcast was muted because of covid production delays and then the streaming wars. We benefited to some extent. But they didn't really heat up until the second half of the year so it wasn't like there was enough room in cute to again to kind of blunt the losses with with streaming but streaming has come on pretty strong in Q four now into q. One and i certainly expect it will be It'll be a growth category for us. This year

Jeff schiller tim peterson kelly this week nine media one Nine media group twenty
Group Nine's Geoff Schiller on his selling strategy

The Digiday Podcast

08:57 min | 4 months ago

Group Nine's Geoff Schiller on his selling strategy

"And wanted to ask to obviously because as you mentioned twenty twenty was a a really wild year to be in your i kind of year since the acquisition in the merger and implementing some of these strategies around your sales I guess can you talk about how ad business was impacted at the same time. I know you guys have launched some pretty unique Sponsorship initiatives around some content packages in ip and things of that nature. But everyone was you know across the board impacted a certain degree when it comes to add Spending so i guess talk a little about like you know. Twenty twenty how that was for group nine. Yeah absolutely Certainly the pandemic threw a curveball. To all as you mentioned from our perspective corporately when we go to market we talk about how group nine has the most optimistic fast moving deeply connected brands that matter now and certainly you can say. Oh that's pithy and that you know that's corporate speak but it really played out in what was wildest of years in a lot of ways. The most tragic of years the convergence of social unrest civil unrest political unrest with the pandemic a once in a generation Experience in so. I think from that perspective. Everything that i mentioned in terms of what defines group nine On a molecular level across the company played in our favor we were able to move really quickly In terms of pivoting for example we launched within weeks following the pandemic. we launched as we've talked about before. Now this had a new franchise Launch call now in this together which was really about spotlighting heroes and And and the helpers in communities during the pandemic and and so that actually happened within two weeks of the pandemic and we have literally sold every episode of that Since july so i would say the thing that we shared in common with the industry was everybody took their licks in acute to that was certainly when on march thirteenth on lockdown. Everything sort of scrambled and the the the prime beneficiary in a negative way was was cute. Too but q. Three we were really able to pick up not just in this together. We launched new. Ip across a variety of brands. But i would say twenty. Twenty was unimaginable year But our brands really focused on finding new and innovative ways to connect with people and i would say adding to that at the same time. Not only was it about all the things that i mentioned but our audience growth was just tremendous until some of that is the acceleration of the shift from in office to at home the shift from digital from linear to digital. But it's also just by nature of who our brands are who they represented. We went from doing around five billion monthly views the beginning of the year to ending around seven billion We saw our tiktok. Audience grow significantly We have now Up to reach over twenty five million viewers across snapped as of q four and so we see tremendous audience growth throughout twenty twenty and the sort of code on that was from nancy sales perspective. Q four mark the strong secure four. We've ever had on record. So i guess like an do wanna ask a little bit more about q. Four as it is the strongest as you mentioned on record but also you know. You're you're for your ad business in particular Was that didn't end up being in revenue for you guys. Yeah so we had a pretty big hit in q two We saw incremental growth. So i kind of look at it as a first-half second-half second half was Was a much different picture. We finished second half up year-over-year We were still for the full year. Closer to flat Just based off of the hit we took in particular based off of our exposure in certain categories like travel through so dependent on travel in that went away and certainly retail. Took a big hit as well but The tale of two halves where q one was kind of like the integration settling and then q two was the double hit of co vid. It was vastly different second half with incremental growth in q three and then q four being the strongest. We've ever had for the company. I think it's also slightly common I've talked to a few publishers. Say that like q four ended up being a very strong. I'm quarter for them. Which is probably their saving grace and a lot of cases But i'm curious so you mentioned that you're doing this very like endemic focus on some of these brands and really wanted to be the authority in as you mentioned the dodo pet care Thrillers travel things of that nature I guess coming out of twenty twenty though. Do you think that that is something that could potentially be. I don't wanna say like mental. But it could to a degree Impact business again like travel ended up being You know put on ice for another year or so You thinking about these. Like endemic focuses While also making sure that your ad business is staying on a growth trajectory. The it's a great question. And i think the example i would give is the dodo Specifically because it's so endemic right. You can say list travel but trout. It's also experienced It's an experience brand food. Drink travel Whereas the more sort of apples to apples is the dodo is a modern family brand. That owns the the the pet space and so the way that we saw the need to find those travel dollars from somewhere else or the retailers for somewhere else came through our strategy of saying we already own endemic on the dodo for pets. How do we own the non endemic of modern family and so we were able to drive new relationships so i guess like a sort of a long winded answer of saying anytime. You're you're backed into a corner. You tend to if you have sort of like the fast twitch muscle fiber thinking. You're able to find new pathways really fast. Some organizations are able to do that others. Just sort of flail. I as i mentioned earlier we move fast ethos but also an operating guideline and so from our perspective with the dodo. We were able to then. Hey look the doda was truly on. Its way to being in the same category as disney neck. Modern family brand family save brand safe also safe on social which became an issue and so we were able to open the aperture of client partners on the dodo and get brands like craft. Get brands like close. Get target So our strategy is certainly to leverage the power of the portfolio. And if we if we were one brand we would definitely be stuck about. Because we're five. We have that power of the portfolio opportunity to then say. How do we have a relationship ear that can be leveraged over there. Or how do we open the aperture from one category to the next the the g growth on the dodo is definitely emblematic of that. So you mentioned retail and travel as being to those categories that Obviously were down but What were some of the ones that ended up being up this past year a former was up and this is more over the counter not not to direct to consumer specifically Cpg was way up Beauty was was slightly. Up tech was pretty significantly as telecom as well and then financial services. So i think really. We saw pretty significant growth across the board with the exception of retail The exception of travel and then I would say media and entertainment is kind of like a toss up because the the theatrical obviously went away broadcast was muted because of covid production delays and then the streaming wars. We benefited to some extent. But they didn't really heat up until the second half of the year so it wasn't like there was enough room in cute to again to kind of blunt the losses with with streaming but streaming has come on pretty strong in Q four now into q. One and i certainly expect it will be It'll be a growth category for us. This year

Disney CPG
USDA Recalls Dips, Salad Products From Chicago's Schiller Park-Based Food Evolution

Ring of Fire Radio

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

USDA Recalls Dips, Salad Products From Chicago's Schiller Park-Based Food Evolution

"Of ready to eat, dip and salad products that contain meat. The effective products were only issued in Illinois. The Schiller Park, Illinois company says the products were produced without the benefit. Federal inspection, the USDA says it's not a class one recall, saying there's a reasonable probability it will cause serious adverse health consequences or death. Christie's auction house is selling off dozens of

Illinois Schiller Park Usda Christie
Coronavirus Stimulus Talks Moving in Right Direction, Party Leaders Say

Bloomberg Daybreak

06:42 min | 6 months ago

Coronavirus Stimulus Talks Moving in Right Direction, Party Leaders Say

"This morning Democrats getting behind a scaled back stimulus toe. Try to restart talks for more. We're joined by Brown University Political science chair Wendy Schiller, professor Good to have you on with us this morning of morning where it seems like stimulus hopes. Spring eternal. But how much hope do you put in Speaker Pelosi in minority leader Schumer backing this bipartisan legislation that was worth about $900 billion it was put forward this week. Good morning, agent. Well, I mean, I think that they recognize that the you know the whole country is being hit really hard by this, but that they're the areas that are you know, traditional sport of Democrats are getting hit again really hard, and they had wanted direct aid for states and cities. They couldn't get it from Trump. They're not going to get from Senate Republicans. So basically someone like Durban and represents Illinois Big City like Chicago has to make a decision system Majority Minority Leader and them hard party and say, all right, we gotta get something you know if we you know, we especially unemployment, either top off or extension or some combination of those things on. I think the Democrats want to get what they can and not turn this into the first battle that Biden have the face once he's inaugurated. Is this about the pandemic, getting to the level that it's at now? Or is this a dose of political reality, given how the election turned out for the house, particularly with Democrats losing seats in November? I do think that the Democrats are not looking at a scenario that they hope to be looking at come January, which was a majority Democratic Senate and then picking up more seats in the house, where they could really, you know, right from ticket with Biden, so given that that's out the window. Even if the Democrats take one or two of US Georgia seats that's still not really a likely scenario you can control the Senate, barely. I have a very razor thin margin in the house now for the Democrats, So yeah, it's a political reality. But I think it's also about what they hope Biden can achieve What becomes president and taking one really big thing off the table before he starts that job, and I think that's a big incentive for them because then they could turn to things like infrastructure, which would also help the economy. Well, what's your sense of what President Biden could achieve. Given the realities of what Senate control is gonna look like either way, depending on how the Georgia run offs turned out, it's going to be a razor thin margin, no matter which way you slice it, and the president elect has said. Whatever gets past if something gets past, but during this lame duck session is going to be a down payment. For something much bigger. Well, right. I mean, this is what you know. Obama wanted a much bigger stimulus than he got in 2009 as well, and he had all three chambers. It's a very hard thing, particularly with it, you know, $3 trillion deficit and rising. So I mean, I just think one of the key factors. Both parties were looking at Tau look towards 2022. Because that's where both parties are looking right now, at least in the Congress side is that suburban voters were willing to split their ticket. And very noticeable voted Republican straight down the line voted for Joe Biden and maybe because it in like Trump. We don't know for sure, but they were willing to do that and then vote for Republicans in other offices, knowing that they're willing to do that means that they're up for Gramps, and I think that's the serve Achilles heel for the Republicans in blocking everything for Biden. I don't think they think they can do that and still safely hold onto the seats they want to defend in 2022, so that's where Biden and the Democrats have a bit of a bargaining advantage. In trying to get moderate proposal through that will help Cove it will help the economy will make suburban voters happy. I'm curious to get your take on how Biden has been starting to fill out his cabinet. Now. There are reports that he plans to announce his health team next week, and one of the names were hearing for health and human services. Secretary is someone that you're familiar with in your home state of Rhode Island Governor Gina Rowe Mondo That Gina Romano has done in an outstanding job in a very small state, but a very, very heavily densely populated state. So she's been dealing with sort of a big outbreak for a long time It subsided. Then it came back. She's been excellent communications and made some missteps very early on in terms of summer management with nursing homes, as other governors did, but generally speaking, has had very high approval ratings and has been thought to make this situation much better than it would have. Then, so she shown leadership in a very stressful time, And she's also communicated really well about why she's doing what she's doing. And I think any pick for HHS secretary has to be an excellent communicator because you have to basically explain the American people why we're doing what we're doing, and when we're doing it, and she's been doing that so consistently, and then it helps bring her state's not complete compliance. Bring her state along in a way that's been relatively successful. Are you surprised at all that, at least so far, we haven't heard any names of Democratic primary opponents on any of Biden's Cabinet shortlists. Well, he can't take. I mean, really. He just can't take anybody out of the Senate. Right? So that takes worn out that takes Sanders out. I know Sanders. People are very disappointed about that on. I think that's what Bernie was hoping for debris Sanders was hoping for, but you just can't take a Democrat out of the Senate. Even the Democratic government still can't do it right now, so that makes sense to me. I think people usually think people wanted him to get something he may still get something There's been talk about veterans affairs. But remember, you know, the Republicans have been relatively accepted to buy these choices so far, except for one choice. Neera Tanden for O M B. I think that's going to hit some some bumps along the way. Probably big bumps. But generally speaking, he wants a smooth Cabinet confirmations, You know process. So anybody who's super politicized more to the left of Biden for a top job. It's just probably out of the question, given the composition of the Senate. Only about 30 seconds left here. Do you think Attorney General Bar is on borrowed time after the voter fraud allegations from President Trump? I think during her borrow, looked ahead to the future and decided does he want to leave the Trump administration with any shred of credibility? And I think this move was designed to show that he wouldn't be try to leave with credibility and confirm the election knowing he's gonna leave anyway. And, you know, thinking about what's next so that he gets fired doesn't get fired. I think what he did was forward thinking for him. Not Miss Ellie and President Trump. Thank you Always could have you on with us. Brown University Political science chair Wendy Schiller with us this morning on

Biden Senate Wendy Schiller Speaker Pelosi President Biden Donald Trump Brown University Schumer Georgia Durban Big City Gina Rowe Gina Romano Illinois Sanders Democrats Chicago Joe Biden
It's Election Day. Take a breath. Here's what to expect.

Bloomberg Markets

06:27 min | 7 months ago

It's Election Day. Take a breath. Here's what to expect.

"Politics. And this landscape in particular, Wendy Schiller joins us. She of Brown University, of course on a friend to the program, and Teo Is the station with the chair of political science again at Brown University. Wendy, What is your base case? No. I just get right to it. I think here's what I think will will know from some congressional races, I think, signaling earlier than even the presidential races. We know that there's a lot of people who are elected in 2018 in what we call competitive swing district like Virginia, for example. Leave Illinois. We have a couple of races in Texas that look really tight and are surprisingly competitive. We have a couple of Minnesota, you know if things start to swing in congressional district sooner. For the Democrats. Then you start to think, Okay, maybe buy will have a very good night. But, you know, we'll know about Florida will know about North Carolina will know about Arizona, and we'll know about Georgia, probably, but before midnight tonight, and if all of those swing for Trump If Trump looks really healthy in those states and looks like he could win, then I think things get very, very dicey for Biden, so that's a big sort of vomit or buying only when one of those states You know, one of those four states or look like he's in the lead in a considerable lead in one of those states for him, that sort of have a more relaxed night. But if he if Trump wins, all of Omar looks like he's going to win all of them, I think that that tells us that this sort of blue wave we thought might emerge isn't going to emerge the same way. So, Professor. How do you think the Senate will shake out is there in fact, you know the market's kind of suggesting here today that a blue wave may in fact be in the cards? How do you think that might go in the Senate? That that that's a great question, Paul because you think about the Senate, and you think you know Mitch McConnell is totally immune. This time, you would have thought if there's a big blue wave. You know, The guy has really been the poster boy for the campaign against the Republicans controlling the Senator Mitch McConnell. He's goingto probably breeze to reelection, some a little suspicious of that big blue way for the Senate. Iowa looks neck and neck. You know, we had a recent poll. That's very credible that looks like Joni Ernst can pull it out and stay. You know if Cal Cunningham can win in North Carolina That suggests probably that the Democrats might get 51. If they can win Maine as well. Probably away in Arizona. Probably gonna win Colorado and lose Alabama, so they're looking at probably minimally a 51 49 Republican, or 50, 50 51 49 Democrats. So I think that's where they you know, we don't know. And I think that's where North Carolina becomes so important, even even if we don't know by Trump. You know, it's Cal Cunningham looks like he's really gonna win that race that suggest better things. The Democrats across the board for the Senate Say some of that again. When do you say Arizona is definitely going to go Democrat Texas? What did you say about Texas? And then also, I think, Arizona for Mark Kelly. I think he's been polling very consistently ahead of Martha makes alley. But you can imagine, let's say people voting for more. Kelly, a former astronaut. You know and not voting for Joe Biden. You know, voting for Kelly because they want him over more than Sally and they voted for Trump in Arizona. You didn't see the Democrats winning Senate in Arizona but not winning the presidential race. Then Texas is, you know, shocking right? The turnout in Texas has been absolutely shocking. And but it looks like John Cornyn comfortably ahead of head guard that the challenger there, But I think the issue is that Trump is only basically one point ahead in Texas, which is just you know, if you think about politics, just stunning. Same with Georgia. George will be interesting because it does not get 50% or more against us off. Then you've got to run off elections in Georgia in January, and I think that's really going to be some interesting voting dynamics, so it's possible the Senate Democrats could ultimately end up with a 51 of 52 majority, but I still think it's a bit of a long shot. So Professor if the presidential election becomes contested, what is your kind of base case for how it may play out? I think we could be faced with an unprecedented historic situation. I think you know if we have a tie, for example, if in the Electoral College in December's actually a tie, it goes to the newly elected house, which is expected Thio more Democratic. However, the Republicans still control more votes in state delegations than the Democrats, and that's Probably isn't going to change so you could conceivably have literally the house electing a re electing President Trump but in the Senate. If it's 51 49 with the new Senate and its new Democrats, then they may like Tomahawk. Advice. I mean, really, quite stunning. It's really stunning thing. So I think so many things have changed already in 2020 weather, Trump gets reelected or not, is obviously monumental. But even if he gets reelected, I think the Democrats have shown they know how to mobilize voters, and I think they've shown some of these states have changed a lot in terms of demographics, and they are going to be more competitive, moving forward. Which changes the nature of politics going to 2022. If we know that politicians look at the next election the minute this election is over, and so when we start to think about what the balance of power might be in the Senate house in 2022 these gains the Democrats appear to be making among voters in the states. Changes a lot of dynamics, which will probably change some of the policies coming out of Congress. Yeah, I mean, it's really the African American gold, right, Wendy and how much more of that will see? We're already seeing, you know, a lot more engagement. Yeah. So I think African American who has always been key in North Carolina and Georgia had about 64% African American turnout in 2016. It wasn't enough because those numbers were not hit in in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania among African American voters, and they, you know they may or may not get there. If they get there, I think Biden winds relatively easily. But what's interesting is suburban white women. Of all educational levels seem to be really vehemently at the moment against Trump in the polls, and it could be that instead of the black vote really being key in the Midwest, it ends up being white women. Which would be really interesting shift, you know, mirrors 2018 when white, the majority of white women voted for democratic candidates, But it would change the nature of the Democratic coalition. If that were the deciding factor, So that's what I'm looking for. I'm looking for turnout, particularly in particular counties in Michigan. Well, we still have. A lot of people are gonna vote in person and certainly in Pennsylvania when you were really out of time. But I am desperate to

Senate Donald Trump Cal Cunningham Arizona Texas Brown University Wendy Schiller North Carolina Senator Mitch Mcconnell Joni Ernst Georgia TEO Wendy Biden Mitch Mcconnell Kelly Omar Mark Kelly Minnesota
How to Buy in a Hot Housing Market

Money For the Rest of Us

04:46 min | 8 months ago

How to Buy in a Hot Housing Market

"I recently got an email from listeners listening about six months or so has listened to well over one hundred episodes of the show. He writes that he's relatively new to investing. He's been investing for three years now, as he graduated from college in two thousand seventeen. He's been saving for his first home purchase in Austin. Texas. He writes the Austin Housing Market is very hot at the moment arguably one of the hottest markets in the country even with the recent effects of covid nineteen. He points out the median sales price in Austin has increased over eleven percent since this time last year, and there are forty five percent fewer homes on the market now versus a year ago he would like to buy a house in early twenty, twenty one. But after seeing the market conditions, he's worried that he might be entering the real estate market at the wrong time. He has heard of stories from realtors in home buyers about individuals and families putting offers of ten to fifteen thousand dollars over the asking price for homes that aren't even on the market yet only to find out, they did not win the bidding war. In short, he continues I'm wondering if you could offer some. Rules of thumb to look for as a first time home buyer in I. Hot Market such as Austin. I'm conflicted because I don't want to buy at the wrong time and potentially lose value in my home only after a few short years however at the same time if this market to continue at this pace for several years to come buying in the near future, I think might be the right move. He points out he's tired of handing over his money to landlords and would like to start building equity in a home to diversify his current return drivers. Austin is not the only hot housing market. There are a number of them in fact, nationally in the US housing is on fire. In August of two, thousand, twenty, there were five point nine million homes sold on a seasonally adjusted annual rate. That's the highest number of home since two thousand six and it's being driven because the average thirty year fixed rate mortgage at the end, of August was two, point, nine, four percent. The median single family home price in the US is up eleven point seven percent in the past year ending August twenty twenty. That's the biggest annual increase in twenty thirteen. Sales of newly built homes are up forty, three percent year over year the highest increase since one, thousand, nine, hundred, two. There have been about one million new homes built in the past year highest level since two, thousand six. The market is being driven because of the low interest rate, which is pushing up the value of all assets. Plus there's a desire for many given covid nineteen to move out of their city, for example, out more into the suburbs or the country. So increased demand and reduced supply because of concern regarding the pandemic. Some. People don't want potential buyers traipsing through their homes. Others don't want to sell because they're not sure they'll be able to find something to buy. The frenzy to purchase homes has pushed up valuations if we look at the value of household real estate. So the total value of houses and condos as a percent of economic output in the US GDP, it's a hundred and fifty eight percent. Total value of all houses divided by GDP is one hundred and fifty eight percent that's up from hundred and forty percent at the beginning of the year the all time high was one, hundred, eighty percent in two, thousand, seven, and the recent low was in two thousand twelve of one hundred, fifteen percent. This is data from Ned Davis Research. The. So the value of the housing stock relative to GDP is approaching that all time high of two, thousand seven, and then if we look at the case Schiller Index, it has appreciated since nineteen fifty-three on a real net of inflation basis of about point seven percent per year. That's the trend line. So we statistically create a trend line again, data from Davis research that trend line increases at point seven percent per year, and then we can see well, how much do current prices differ from that trend line and right now we're fifteen percent above the trendline. In two thousand, six, US home prices were forty percent above the trend line and then by twenty twelve, two, thousand, thirteen, they had fallen two point, nine percent below the trendline.

Austin United States Ned Davis Research Texas
Beethoven's Symphonies

Classics for Kids

05:32 min | 10 months ago

Beethoven's Symphonies

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin Fransius of Haydn is known as the father of the symphony because he took that form of orchestra music and perfected it. But no one changed the symphony more than Ludvig Fund Beethoven. The First Symphony Beethoven wrote definitely sounds like it was influenced by Haydn's music. By the time Beethoven wrote his second symphony tragedy had struck, but you'd never know it from the music. The Summer Beethoven wrote his Second Symphony was the summer he realized he was going death. Instead of letting his misery out in his music Beethoven put it all into a letter at the end of which he said he wasn't going to let deafness stop him from being a musician. When Napoleon Bonaparte started conquering Europe Van was a huge fan because he thought Napoleon was going to help ordinary people. Beethoven planned to dedicate his third symphony to Napoleon. But then Napoleon. Crowned himself emperor proving that he was more interested in power than people. Beethoven was furious and changed the name of his symphony number three to ero- Ika the heroic symphony. Beethoven's Fourth Symphony has some very dancing music. Sometimes. The fourth kind of gets lost in the shuffle between the Aurora and the even more famous symphony that came next Beethoven's fifth. Avenue. The man who wrote the first biography of Beethoven claimed that the composer meant the opening at the to be knocking at the door. But a student of Beethoven's thought his teacher had nothing more faithfully mind than a bird call from a kind of sparrow a yellowhammer. Whether or not Beethoven included a bird in his fifth. He certainly put birds and a lot more nature into his six, which even has a nature nickname, the pastoral or pastorale symphony. No birds at all in Beethoven's symphony number seven just rousing music. In Beethoven's Eighth Symphony something is clearly ticking. More about that next week, which brings us to Beethoven's ninth a piece that completely changed how people thought of symphonies. No one had ever used singers in a symphony before, but Beethoven put plenty of them into the last movement of the peace in his famous. Ode to Joy, with words by German playwright. Friedrich Schiller. I one person seems it. And eventually a whole chorus joins in. People all over the world know and love Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. When the Berlin Wall came down, they celebrated with a huge concert featuring Beethoven's ninth. I've been sung it in China where audiences went crazy next week the mechanical object in Beethoven's symphony number eight and a lot more pieces of music describe inanimate objects

Beethoven Ludvig Fund Beethoven Napoleon Bonaparte Haydn Naomi Lewin Fransius Ero- Ika Friedrich Schiller Berlin Wall Pastorale China Aurora Europe Van
Beethoven's Symphonies

Classics for Kids

05:23 min | 10 months ago

Beethoven's Symphonies

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin Fransius of Haydn is known as the father of the symphony because he took that form of orchestra music and perfected it. But no one changed the symphony more than Ludvig Fund Beethoven. The First Symphony Beethoven wrote definitely sounds like it was influenced by Haydn's music. By the time Beethoven wrote his second symphony tragedy had struck, but you'd never know it from the music. The Summer Beethoven wrote his Second Symphony was the summer he realized he was going death. Instead of letting his misery out in his music Beethoven put it all into a letter at the end of which he said he wasn't going to let deafness stop him from being a musician. When Napoleon Bonaparte started conquering Europe Van was a huge fan because he thought Napoleon was going to help ordinary people. Beethoven planned to dedicate his third symphony to Napoleon. But then Napoleon. Crowned himself emperor proving that he was more interested in power than people. Beethoven was furious and changed the name of his symphony number three to ero- Ika the heroic symphony. Beethoven's Fourth Symphony has some very dancing music. Sometimes. The fourth kind of gets lost in the shuffle between the Aurora and the even more famous symphony that came next Beethoven's fifth. Avenue. The man who wrote the first biography of Beethoven claimed that the composer meant the opening at the to be knocking at the door. But a student of Beethoven's thought his teacher had nothing more faithfully mind than a bird call from a kind of sparrow a yellowhammer. Whether or not Beethoven included a bird in his fifth. He certainly put birds and a lot more nature into his six, which even has a nature nickname, the pastoral or pastorale symphony. No birds at all in Beethoven's symphony number seven just rousing music. In Beethoven's Eighth Symphony something is clearly ticking. More about that next week, which brings us to Beethoven's ninth a piece that completely changed how people thought of symphonies. No one had ever used singers in a symphony before, but Beethoven put plenty of them into the last movement of the peace in his famous. Ode to Joy, with words by German playwright. Friedrich Schiller. I one person seems it. And eventually a whole chorus joins in. People all over the world know and love Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. When the Berlin Wall came down, they celebrated with a huge concert featuring Beethoven's ninth. I've been sung it in China where audiences went crazy

Beethoven Ludvig Fund Beethoven Napoleon Bonaparte Haydn Naomi Lewin Fransius Ero- Ika Friedrich Schiller Berlin Wall Pastorale China Aurora Europe Van
"schiller" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

AppleInsider Podcast

08:42 min | 11 months ago

"schiller" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

"Great monitor comes with it. Apple's decisions around this update just. Screams there's something else coming because again, they they changed the naming scheme for. No real good reason other than to bring it in line with the rest of their naming right you get a thirteen inch macbook pro life or a twenty-seven Mac. Now, instead of the five K.. So right moving away from resolution two inches maybe they want to acknowledge that the next generation maybe there's a redesigned big screens they want you to see that in the naming scheme instead of just being another. Five K. Yeah, you know it's interesting to if you go to the apple store APP on your iphone or Ipad you know they're really pushing the new twenty seven inch Mac is really being the new product. They're not even saying that twenty one and a half inches necessarily new. There's just the new tag on the twenty seven inch and honestly it's kind of. Hard to find the I mac pro until you really scroll down and go down to the the more options. So anyway, if you were in the markets, you know, Tim, Cook said we have Intel MACs coming down the line even after their apple silicon announcement ww DC and it looks like this at least one of them maybe this is the last. Intel. Mac. Coming out this year, but it's they're available. So check out all the links. Again, we have that comparison to the twenty, twenty verse Twenty Nineteen I'm Mac that's a good comparison year-over-year and the comparison of the five thousand dollar twenty seven inch compared to the five thousand dollar I mac pro twenty, seven inch. So check out those articles the links are in show. Notes and on apple insider dot com another big news that came out this past week was Phil Schiller. It was announced that he is going to become an apple fellow and Greg. Joswiak will actually be promoted to senior vice president of marketing. Now, maybe in a moment, you could tell me exactly what the term fellow means. In this regard, they're saying Phil Schiller. Is still going to be over the APP store at least overseeing the the APP store operations and things like that. But a jaws or Greg Joswiak will be over of the marketing. Schiller, was over for longtime. You have some other fellows listed previous apple fellows even I didn't realize that Steve Wozniak was listed as an apple fellow but for Steve I don't think. Apple Fellow really has any kind of meaning in a sense of running of operations in the company I don't think Steve Wozniak involved with that, but it seems Phil Schiller is and you know feel Schiller's words were you know he turned sixty this year and this was a planned change in a career in lifestyle and he wants to spend more time with. Family friends and doing other things. So you know it seems like a very amicable planned thing for a while but do you know any more about that term apple fellow? Well, this is all new to me and I. It's strange to be such a person like invested an apple and have seen a lot of the history and looked at some of the writings. And the about the early days, and this is the first time. I've ever seen this term right a little bit of searching I found a description online. An apple fellow is a person who's been recognized by apple for their extraordinary technical details or leadership and contributions to personal computing while at the company. So like Steve, Wozniak obviously being a CO founder and now. Moving onto Phil. Schiller having been there for ages as this s VP, the term doesn't seem to have any special meaning at doesn't offer any specific like thing other than they're given a part of the company as a bonus unless I guess they already hold it outside of that the what they get out of it or what? Responsibilities. They have is dependent on the person. So obviously feel Schiller is going to retain a hold of the APP store and Apple Events of as oversight, but everything is moving to Greg Joswiak. Interesting move. I saw a picture kind of going around and it was I don't know how many years ago but it had Steve Jobs Phil Schiller Scott forstall was in the picture and it was basically all these apple executives and the only one that is still an executive as of this announcement is Eddy. Cue from the time of Steve. Jobs, and so he's he's the last one from that picture that we've kind of seen around I'll put it in the show notes. So people can take a look at that, but you also had found or you listed some of the other apple. And effort some of these names but any points of interest there these names sound familiar no I've heard of Bill Atkinson. Yeah. But like yeah rich page apparently, he was around for graphic development a Guy Kawasaki Hughes Marketing Specialist I. Guess He might have been behind that nineteen eighty-four at a little bit. There's no through line or connection and. All these people seem to have just disappeared off the face of the earth since leaving apple. So some of them running their companies or just living in the money that they've earned from being a part of the company but Phil Schiller seems to be the only apple fellow that is at the company with an active role. It brings the question what about Johnny I've and why's this role avoided him? and. That's you know he went in Jive left he announced he was going to be starting that design firm in the UK I forget exactly the name was going to be love from I. think that's right. Yes love from and honestly I have not heard a single thing about his new endeavors that company or anything coming out of there. So I'm not sure exactly what what he's doing. He's trapped in the white room still that's right. Sharing the room you know it's kind of funny when at WDC when they announced a macos big sewer and all the design changes, they were really trying to mimic those kind of voiceovers. Johnny I've used to do as they showed all design cheese and stuff and I was like you know what? Find. A different way to do that. Now that you've you've played that card for a long time, it can you can do a different. It's okay. So some other news that came out about the iphone twelve and I was fourteen, the iphone twelve this is actually something that came out Thursday. It's a rumor it's a supposed-. Picture of the new iphone twelve old led screen, and typically when we come close to the announcements in September, we'll see leaks like this of screen sizes or body cases, and so we'll put a link in shown on that but you know it looks like it could be the new iphone. Twelve screen. Some people noted that this photo think when you're talking about has the same notch size, the same face ID components as the current models. So maybe that smaller notch rumor isn't coming up to snuff. Also in regards to Iowa's fourteen. This was already announced that W WDC or we've covered it, but that apple is going to allow Third Party apps for web browsing and email to be set as the default APPs. So come Iowa's fourteen you'll be able to set say g mail or outlook as the default email application. What that means practically is if you were browsing the web and you click a button that's Auto populates an email I assume it could mean that it can pull up g mail. Now, instead of the stock mail APP, which is what comes up by default whenever you click an email like that, and also that you can set a web browser as defaults and apple has kind of laid out very specific terms for these different APPS, if they want to be eligible for being set. As the default, they have to meet a lot of different requirements. Again, they're all there in the article, but you know back to the different APP store policies in upset or kind of shown or developers that are kind of showing favoritism. It'll be interesting if they make Google abide by all the same stipulations and rules that they make hay, dot com or spark email APP and all that. Just. Different things that you know they can't be doing any kind of tracking behind the scenes for third party web browsers. It has to function like when a user clicks a link has to bring them to the page they're expecting and not go to something else probably like splash screen or advertisement I for web browsers there has to be away for the user to enter a url upon the. APP launch so you can't like hide the address bar think behind a bunch of other screens. So again, it'd be interesting to see if any APPS get denied that ability to be set as default for third party or if there's kind of favoritism shown, it's just funny to watch this wall slowly erode between official, apple APPS and third party APPS I mean if you look back at started with. Your L. Schemes Apple Saying, Oh, well, if you want to integrate an APP that links outward to a different APP, well, you can do that yourself. So if you're Google G. Mail and you want to open chrome, well, email can do that by default but you know as soon as you leave that APP and go anywhere else you click a link, it's GonNa, open safari and it seems apples finally..

Apple Phil Schiller Greg Joswiak Steve Mac Steve Wozniak Johnny Phil Schiller Scott forstall Intel Google Phil Bill Atkinson Steve Jobs Guy Kawasaki Hughes Marketing senior vice president of marke Iowa
Phil Schiller Moving on to Become 'Apple Fellow'

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

02:53 min | 11 months ago

Phil Schiller Moving on to Become 'Apple Fellow'

"Talk about retired Phil he's just he's got a glow about him. Phil Schiller has decided to call it quits at apple and I can't say that I'm surprised he hasn't really been front and center for a while and seeing how they had steve jobs transition and Johnny. I have now transitioned out of their roles. This seems to be the game plan. You just stop showing up on stage appearing in the. People kind of forget about you but you're still there you still doing your job they quietly transition you out of your role, and then they quietly announced that they're leaving and they become an apple fellow, which is what happened to Phil. Schiller. He's now an apple fellow you WanNa take this story here. Lewis, I'm not like sure when the whole thing. Yeah. Sure. Yeah. So he a fill is going to continue to report directly to apple CEO Tim Cook in the new position as apple fellow, and he's going to continue leading the APP store and Apple Events Greg Jaaz Joswiak is fronts Joswiak I like that name as Joswiak Josh. It's actually very bizarre. Isn't it? That would go from Wozniak Joswiak? It's almost like a a word jumble. Quite odd. Anyway, Jaaz is going to take over a shortage previous role over the years. You know he's had a lot to do it apple and he's been there for like you think what? You say eighty seven he's like he's been there since eighty seven checkout this quotes. been a dream come true for me to work apple and so many products I love all these great friends, Steve? Tim. and Sony More I. I started Apple when I was twenty seven. Wow this year I turned sixty. That's a long time to be at the same. So, what is I? Guess that's thirty three years I. Guess It is Chess Wild. Yeah. And what did he say? He said I'll keep working here as long as they will have me I bleed six colors but I also want to make some time in the years ahead from my family friends and a few personal projects I care deeply about. Some people were saying that last statement personal projects. I. Care Deeply about. It's an interesting time to say that because right after he said that. John Processors Youtube Account was hacked. Right. I'm sure that a coincidence. Alert. Blocked John Browser on twitter and finally he's likes. Just a project in mind crack. And he just started typing loudly with two. He only uses two fingers. It's two index fingers, right? Because he's owed sees old school. But he was sitting there looking down to this keyboard looking back up at the screen and he just John Prosser got what was coming coming to him. Took a write down what a bitcoin scam.

Apple Greg Jaaz Joswiak Phil Schiller Wozniak Joswiak Joswiak Josh Lewis John Prosser Tim Cook Johnny Twitter CEO Steve Sony Tim.
"schiller" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

08:15 min | 11 months ago

"schiller" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"Let me let me fill you in on Greg Joswiak who is now the apple s vp for worldwide marketing got his start. Early he got a degree in the Bachelor of science in Computer Science in nineteen, eighty six and even then they said. His nickname jaws was a combination of Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak he was destined to join apple joined apple in eighty, six, two years after the Macintosh launched in Apple's newly newly-formed, Support Organization for the MAC. So he has his roots deep in the Mac was running that group within two years Then he led calms for the Apple Developers Groups. So his good relationship with developers, I always like to see that. That's a very important thing at apple to understand the users, but also understand kind of the second most important group. Reports into him. Now I mean, that's a big part of the marketing organizations worldwide developer relations right in nineteen, ninety, seven, he led product marketing for new powerbook line eventually, all pop portable products eventually, all hardware products including in two, thousand, one, the Ipod, and then. Of course, the IPHONE and the IPAD. So he really has been in a marketing role kind of. Product marketing role forever and ever, and they're very different than a lot of marketing people because I my job when I was in product marketing, a lot of people talk to sales people who would just tell you whatever you wanted to hear like please by my widget, it will do any. Oh, you want it to pour coffee does that you want it to fly a plane that does that by my widget and if we've talked to fill or jaws, they will explain the silicon they'll explain the memory substructure they will explain the manufacturing process they'll explain how the software and they are mostly engineers very very. Very. Bright in a way. This met my opinions and upgrade 'cause jaws really isn't engineer Phil Schiller BS was biology I think Phil was more Classic Marketing Guy, who loved the product loved the engineering. Jaws. Is An engineer from from the way back classically. Educated. GM. Exactly I mean that's a that's a you work at apple that at such a high level that that that's much better on a resume. Then we don't have a degree in engineering, but I was a senior executive. Fire. But I underscore what said about John I haven't I haven't had I only have one briefing with Phil had many withdraws and he's not only I've and I've also had those briefings with like marketing executives gets where there is this. There is the script where we're trying to implant these phrases in your head There's times when with when I when I had a briefing and I saw like draws In the room. It's like Oh this is great. We can just have like a forty five minute conversation about like every single note that I have and everything that I don't understand about technology or anything that was unclear and even if it's something, he can't talk about he will figure out what I'm really trying to ask and find a way to get. It was always a very, very deep conversation so. I'm very very he. He's. He's on that list of a of apple people where I've known them for so long and have had such good times with them that like I can't. Retire so we can hang out and become actual friends because we have to I can. I can't ask you like out for a drink at a trade show because that would be wrong a soap. Has Been at apple one year longer than Phil Schiller but he's. Not much younger than Phil Schiller, which is kind of interesting Phil turned sixty this year. So it's kind of you know apple doesn't say stepping down. They the press release sounded like he was stepping up. But really he's stepping down right? He's semi retiring sideways sideways he's. He's. He's sees these no longer over clocking his CPU. The quote from the quote from the statement is I I started apple when I was twenty seven. This year I turn sixty. It's time for some planned changes in my life as somebody in his sixties I understand. That usually means taking a little more time to enjoy life You know he's been there a long long time and he's done a lot of things. He's probably worked as you say a really really hard but boy, you really have to say that with the exception of Tim Cook there have been some massive changes Johnny I've is gone. Angela has gone Steve Dowling has gone. We dealt more with dowling perhaps. Than the general public because he was their internal PR guy and then Phil Schiller who is absolutely the figurehead second only to Steve Jobs of for this company for a long long though because it's because they're executives stays along that. When they change, it's a bit like you like you watch a lot of events at a lot of technology events and it's different people every couple of years and the people you deal with are different almost continuously like especially another company absolutely the CMO chess. Such a big thing happened. The been there for thirty years yeah. So Chris Espinosa. who was like one of the original Mac guys tweeted congratulations on being promoted to apple fellow joining here the other apple fellows and this will give you some idea of where in the Pantheon fillers ending up Steve Wozniak Rod Holt who is a engineer on Apple Two alcorn same bill. Atkinson who designed quick-draw was very involved in the design of the early. Macintosh. Steve Caps and other Macintosh engineer rich page Gersh Ron's to do Gary Stark. Weather Alan Kay who is As close to a God and personal computing as you can get Don, norman and Guy Kawasaki, those of the Apple Fellows Ladies and gentlemen legends so many I. Hope I. Hope they have. An embroidered smoking jacket. Orange like what is it green? Jacket. A nice color anyway six dollars. Might be. Yeah, and the other thing about Phil. We always knew is his hobbies. He was. You know he's great photographer right? They always showed off his time. he was a scuba diver He his I didn't know car aficionado cars. Rum's huge was. In. Marine. Late in Iraq very briefly a progressive rock prog rock fan all his twitter bio. So he's not going to be. Sitting, on the roof having lunch. Both vessels? Interesting about the longevity of the executive careers at apple because my experience with people who are working at that kind of a level I'm talking about like mentally is that they get very very restless after time where at some point they They do they did everything that they wanted to achieve at certain company? They are the really envious in terms of what they've accomplished, but then they're like, but I really really want to be the really really want to be the first people the first one to photograph this presumed to be extinct species of bird, and then suddenly that's all they want to or. Not WanNa make movies now or I want to I, want to be a phone truly become a therapist as opposed to I want to tide some of my money in a in creative ways. It's it's always been very interesting to me that people who tend to people who get to apple ten at that level tend to stay at apple again, they have these ten, twenty, thirty year careers seems like you know it's like it's like being the the first the the number one that on the enterprise you're not gonNA dynamite we'll take we'll blow reicher out of that seat and you wonder how long it's GonNa take for other people to advance up. So. That's just one of. A dozen big stories today. Already the other big story that happened this morning and I got the press release on my I have bought that follows the apples pr. And there's No for book club. Oprah's book club is also in that..

apple Phil Schiller engineer Steve Jobs Steve Wozniak Greg Joswiak developer Steve Dowling vp Tim Cook Steve Wozniak Rod Holt senior executive Iraq GM Support Organization Steve Caps
"schiller" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

06:02 min | 11 months ago

"schiller" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"Laura. Gill I would like to join the fellowship of the ring. please. She's also a fellow ship. Of the ring. Actually, all that comes from an announcement. Early, this morning that Phil Schiller is moving upstairs fill of course, who was in charge of marketing and apple for how long. Ever. Twenty-seventh. It was with Apple for twenty seven. He's he's he's been in marketing for twenty seven years is head of marketing for I want to say fourteen, Fifteen I. I see. So long that I can't remember who is predecessor was he? A fixture there you think you think about a Mount Rushmore of apple meaning that these are the four or five people that you see at every single keynote that represent like the face of apple who know all of the stories deep deep deep back into the Steve Jobs era who also are part of the brain trust that factor all the decisions when the fact that he has marketing and title implies that he's choosing colors for posters. No, he is like deep deep deep like waist-deep and every single decision reruns about. Exactly. Has the S in biology from Boston College, he was at macro media and San Francisco. Yes. Vp I didn't realize that people product marketing. We must have just you know bay almost crossed paths at that point at apple he has been pretty much as you say, any part of every major apple announcement of the past decade and a half. Worked on the format formation and marketing of I MAC macbook macbook pro ipod MAC OS. He's credited with coming up with the idea for the click wheel interface on the original ipod. He worked as a support supporting role best best supporting actor to Steve Jobs famous keynotes for both the IPHONE and the IPADS. In fact, wife I won the what. He's turned off your laptops. Remember, he hit a jumper something with the with the laptop while Steve. was trying to be a signal like some of those are just so classic like a rerun. He he wouldn't jobs is on medical leave. He gave several teenagers, keynotes, himself including apples, apples last keynote at macworld two, thousand, nine, the WWE DC keynote in two, thousand nine. He announced the macbook pro line, update the three GS new versions of life and I worked, but he's best known for one word. Courage. And not innovating anymore. My Ass. Both of which didn't age well. No but I mean like they're the memories that we live with Leo. Unfortunately you get kind of painted with that brush, he is still at Apple, he will be an apple. What does that even mean? Oh thank goodness Leo because. I actually lifted a PDF. Nice. Still couldn't figure out how that relates to what Phil Schiller we'll be doing it apple. Yeah. There's no title between Senior Vice President like apple doesn't have presidents they don't have anything else. They have a very. eneg matic structure and he's basically going to keep control. So he just kept getting more and more things. If we've noticed over time like Steve Dowling hasn't been replaced you know his job is just being done by others Angela errands wasn't replaced. Her job is just being done by. Some people are not at apple anymore. No as this troupe in. Silicon Valley where they go up to the roof and they just hang out and have lunch because they don't. Know. Why they promoted jaws to begin with and now he's GonNa. He's GonNa keep APP store he's going to keep the events because the events are going to be a challenge the next year it's still and jaws is going do all the marketing guests. So that's the second half of this announcement is that the very highly respected Greg Joswiak often called jaws. He. Was will now be senior vice president of worldwide marketing effectively taking Schiller's post. So Phil will continue. This is the quote from the apple press release continued to lead the APP store and Apple Events. Does that mean he's going to lead events or he's going I mean what does that mean? To remains to be seen. But another thing that should be pointed out is that other a google and other companies when we when we find when there's announcements about well, the the senior executive has decided that he wants to pursue lots and lots of additional goals until I in addition to is wonderful twenty or thirty year career, and so he's being elevated to a position that is kind of vague and undefined that often means that they lost. Their product launch. Failed and they're being knows out or there is another reason why they are. He's being offered a we want we can't you're you're too big for us to fire you. So let's just give you an opportunity to fade out gracefully. This is absolutely not that sort of thing. So basically it. Remains to be seen what it means but. I bet it means that he's still in the meetings. He's still part of the email list. He's still part of the slack. Channel As far as November has jaws is living is you have these amazing people like you? Cayenne grants who's just been promoted to vice president of iphone product marketing and where where do they go? They're all working at apple but they just don't have titles and Phil's been working there a long time he's got. He's got money forever and his family sometimes wants to spend more time with him and the money. How these things we'll see we'll just see my guess is he'll still have some stage time but how much operational role is another matters was mansfield right and we happen to Mansfield. Though because nobody could do Bob Mansfield job. Well. So are you saying that jaws will start an ill-conceived? Apple hot? Tub. The amount of aluminum expensive for anyone else to sign for definitely sign off on and then filled will come to come back and say you fix our outdoor party..

apple Phil Schiller Steve Jobs senior vice president of world head of marketing Senior Vice President Bob Mansfield Laura. Gill Boston College Steve Dowling Leo Vp Mount Rushmore Greg Joswiak WWE
Phil Schiller advances to Apple Fellow

Techmeme Ride Home

01:01 min | 11 months ago

Phil Schiller advances to Apple Fellow

"Super late breaking news here. Phil, Schiller is stepping down as apple senior vice president of worldwide marketing to be replaced by his deputy Greg Joswiak quoting CNBC, Schiller will continue to work at apple as an apple fellow the company said and will continue his role as the boss of Apple's APP store and company. Events Schiller will also continue to report to apple. CEO Tim. Cook Schiller has worked at apple since nineteen, eighty seven I'll keep. Working here, as long as they'll have me, I bleed six colors, but I also want to make some time in the years ahead for my family friends and a few personal projects I care deeply about Schiller said in a statement Schiller's departure from his formal role on Apple's leadership team comes following several other notable departures over the last couple of years including head of design Johnny. I've PR, boss Steve Dowling and retail boss Angela errands. But apple also made an addition to its exact team in that same time period with John John Andrea the head of artificial intelligence and quote.

Cook Schiller Apple Senior Vice President Of World Greg Joswiak John John Andrea Cnbc Steve Dowling Phil CEO TIM Angela
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 11 months ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
The origins of the 'Subway Tile'

Young House Love Has A Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

The origins of the 'Subway Tile'

"Would you guess is the origin of subway title well? I lived in New York for a while. They have all these little tiles on the wall. Sometimes in the really pretty stations, they even have you know like the street written entirely on the wall like it's a beautiful thing and a lot of older restaurants and older buildings in New York have that tile like I would assume it's just an old wall treatment that keeps things that might get wet or dirty protected, so you've described tile. And? You said you originated mainly in the New York subway subway. Maybe so this article says that is maybe a little bit of a myth did a bit more research and I'm not sure she can debunk it entirely. What the author this article says is that the idea of white porcelain tile is something that predated the New, York subway system because in the Victorian era, which is like mid eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds. White Tile was a staple in middle class Victorian homes. Because it was hygenic, it was easy to clean dirt was easy to spot, and it was almost a contrast to the more fanciful or colorful tiles that were used on fireplace, hearths, or fireplace surrounds like if you've seen those old houses that have really pretty like per lesson, Greens up around the fireplace. Fireplace those so this author says it was the designers that New York. Subway system that carried the function of hygienic white porcelain tile when they were designing the subway stations in one, thousand, nine four. That's when New York City subway system began, and they said they chose it for the same reasons that would make the subway stations look and feel cleaner they. They feel brighter and that's where the subway Kinda took off. This author says that no one is quite sure how term subway tile coined or win got coined. Allow historian, not really historian. Sherry Peter Sake to take a stab at this. There are lots of things that occur for a while in design and don't have a term and then someone mainstream and. And it gets term so I. believe that what happened is a lot of people were like well. Basic White Tile doesn't need a term that's what will use in kitchens and bathrooms for awhile, and then when the entire New York subway system started using that basic white tile. It became known as SOA job. Yeah, but I think I wasn't clear the subway. We're the ones who popularized the three by six tile that sort of to buy one rectangular shape that is placed in a running bond pattern. See you're saying that wasn't in kitchens and bathrooms and the subway designers were like hey. I got an idea bricklayer pattern. Yes, I thought the history of this particular part was a little fuzzy, so all linked to some of the other articles I read in preparation for this segment, actually did a little bit of research whether I'm conveyed inaccurately here who knows? But the other interesting thing about the subway tile discussion was she was talking about how it became popular more recently, and why we see it so often, and they said part of this more recent history subway tile is because in the nineteen nineties, more artisan colorful statement tile became very popular, especially like for back splashes, and in response to that people started going back to the subway tile, the clean white porcelain tile as a way to make a nod to more historic or timeless or classic designs follow question You keep saying porcelain, but isn't subway tile ceramic. Do I! Yes, I think it is ceramic. I, meant polished I. Think Read My own word. Word as polished White Tile Porcelain, why twenty eight ceramic tile has generally what's used? Yes, the other note was interesting on this. They said part of the reason. It's become more popular in these last couple of decades is because of the design of Schiller's liquor bar or restaurant in New York, city I love that place. We've been there together. It was like actually know that place. That was a favourite of my sisters when I lived there, so I've probably been there three or four times, and yes, it sticks out in my brain is a place where I I sort of saw subway tile used as designed feature like the same way you see rooms. Rooms now they have Florida sealion subway tile, maybe sometimes in a bathroom, surrounding the entire four walls of the room like that's kind of how Schiller's liquor bar took subway tile. Even the bathrooms are fabulous. Please go tell me how much you love it. Yes, it's a gorgeous place. I felt so in the know when I read that. It was like I have been there. There are probably like ten percent of things that we used to go to New York that are still in New York 'cause we've been out of New York for like fourteen years, but that's a classic. Let's move on though from subway tile to the fiddle leaf big. Ooh, what? What are we going to learn about this? It is a native plant of western

New York Sherry Peter New York City York Schiller Florida
How Stories Go Viral and Drive Economic Events

Money For the Rest of Us

04:56 min | 1 year ago

How Stories Go Viral and Drive Economic Events

"I recently celebrated a birthday with a good day peaceful. What I didn't have was a birthday cake and we did not seeing the Happy Birthday Song Robert Schiller in his book Narrative Economics and which today's episode title comes from the Subtitle of his book wrote that the Happy Birthday Song. Maybe the best known song of all time he mentioned. It's not particularly admired for its beauty or grace. It grew unplanned and uncontrolled he writes. There is no history of a government edict requiring the song to be Sung or a marketing campaign promising lifelong popularity for those who sing it or have it sung to them. The song spread like an epidemic in the nineteen twenties and thirties fell back a little bit during World War. Two and then it began again Warner Chappell. Music had a copy rate from nineteen thirty five collected millions of dollars up until two thousand sixteen when it was determined. That happy birthday to you was very very similar to an eighteen. Ninety three song titled Good Morning To all sounded exactly the same and so they lost the trademark. The Happy Birthday Song went viral. Like an epidemic. We have all become more familiar. I think with the mathematics behind epidemics. One of the first theories was proposed in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven by William or guilty KEROUAC and Anderson Gray. Mckendrick KEROUAC was a Scottish biochemist Kendrick. A Scottish physician. It was as simple model. It was called the Sir model where they divided the population. The percentage of the population that is susceptible to a disease the percent of the population that is infectious and the percent of the population that is recovered and they add up to one hundred percent. According to their model an epidemic ends when the percentage of the population that recovers and is immune is increasing to such a level that leaves less people that are susceptible and those susceptible people are then less likely to be exposed to those that are infected. Now there are much more complex models. There's what's known as compartmental model called Se. I H F R or s this for susceptible e is exposed is infected. H is hospitalized. F is dead but not buried and our is recovered or buried a lot more complexity there in this episode we're going to look at how narratives stories impact financial decisions and they act very similarly to a disease virus in terms of how they spread and then fall back and the epidemic ends now that the global economy has been shut down for a month or more government officials have to decide. How are they going to restart the economy and as citizens we have to decide? How actively are we willing to participate in the economy in terms of going out in public again? There are several scenarios that very much depend on what percent of the population is susceptible versus having recovered. It's possible there are millions millions. That were ASEP dramatic and so we have heard immunity or perhaps not the economy could be opened up again to let the virus spread. There could be a second wave. And there's the risk of overwhelming the healthcare system so that there's a spike in death because a large percentage of the population is still susceptible or the economy could open up and deaths don't spike because the virus has been spreading for months and a large percentage of individuals are already immune that would mean that the overall mortality rate is much lower closer to that of the flu because so many people have had it and we know approximately how many people have died or and this is probably what's going to happen. We're going to open up. The economy gradually and see how things evolve. There's a great deal of uncertainty before we continue. Let me pause and share some words from one of this week sponsors policy genius. There's things that we look back on and think how could I be so wrong? The truth is we're always going to get things wrong. That's just life but there are also things we can get right on the first try like shopping for life

Mckendrick Kerouac Robert Schiller Narrative Economics Warner Chappell Kendrick FLU William Anderson Gray
"schiller" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Curve. And when we see a widening of the spreads that has an impact of flattening the yield curve flattening the yield curve. In other words, imagine the short-term fed funds rate was three percent and the ten year treasury was three percent and the twenty in the thirty year. Treasuries were three percent. We'd have a flat yield curve. Now, the problem with that is that one of the ways. Banks make money is by lending against the spreads. But if they have a flattening yield curve, then lending would almost certainly slowed down, and you could force a recession just by the fed raising interest rates too much too soon. A second reason that we're going through this current bear market cycle, and that any reasonable person probably should have foreseen. This is the valuations. Sometimes it's just that simple. Sometimes the valuations are too high many of my clients have heard me talk about price to earnings ratios. They've heard me talk about the Schiller PE ratio. The Schiller price earnings ratio who was Robert Schiller. Well, he was a Nobel economists Nobel award winning economist, and he's got a price to earnings ratio that is cyclically adjusted. It's it's sort of a moving average takes into a ten year period into consideration. When calculating the price to earnings ratio. If you wanna learn more detail, you can read his book called irrational exuberance. I think it's good for investors to understand, but the valuations had become really high in recent periods. I've been talking about this with my clients and reviews, I've been talking about it at my workshops. I've been talking about it on my radio shows on my television appearances that the valuations have gotten really high in recent history. In fact, they hit over thirty three times earnings earlier in two thousand eighteen what does that mean? What is a price to earnings ratio will magin.

Robert Schiller Treasuries Schiller three percent ten year thirty year
"schiller" Discussed on Connected

Connected

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on Connected

"No. What happened to it a loss. Dagga whenever gonna it whenever gonna sit that is my my bowl prediction app. How will never exist? Yes, it is completely something horrific happened. I think a lot of things caught on fire is what I think happened because that really feels like the like what would happen to mean that this product will go from getting significant time to never appearing. And I think stuff was overheat and like it was just a technical disaster is what they had on ends. And I think we're gonna see that right now. Like I think it's it's dead instead. So we should talk about that a little bit. It is still on the website only on the air pods page. I spent a lot of people out that pods page is outdated in a bunch of ways like it's there's a lot of products on that page like old apple watches, and I phoned sevens. And yeah, it's like there's that page could do with some some TLC because I think there was there. Like they've held off on an epic update because of this because of this. So here's the deal, you promised a prize. So what are you getting yourself in me and not Federico. I don't know. See that's how it works year to are the co founders really just you just assign points to each other. You talking about, you'll you talking system is rigged against madness. What are you talking about. Like this. We did stop from conspiracy against. I just texted Phil Schiller. Hey, man. I need you to hold off on this because I want you to around the company in the side how to assign point. You are the one who wanted a prize in the first place really discussing prize because you did a trophy. Apprise, which I still I have nothing. I have nothing for a prize, but look Federico. You did a good job. You got fifty percent of your stuff. Right. Didn't get as many things correct. Even it's more like I would say it's more like sixty percents because really I work is doesn't really Utah six things. Three of them were right. I know what you want from me. I work and I work update for Islas twelve. What would it even include? Like what is new? And I was twelve that would support. You wouldn't understand you don't use US. Yeah. What are they gonna? Do they gonna shortcuts. The MAC, hey, hey, Siri at a row to my table do on the budget. Suport touch screens going in an direction. I didn't expect by out of the why we're in this situation. We're in the situation because migrating needs to be higher. It's fifty percent. It's lik six sixty percents because the things I got wrong are like accessories to the. He got sixty percent. You got sixty percent Stephens like seventy five or eighty one boys boys. All right. Okay. I'm I'm gonna share before you got none of Stephen. You got eighty percents of stuff ferry got sixty percent. I got the works. End it we're done. There's probably going to be an episode next week, but if there's not, then we love you. I've quit quit. If you want to read some links articles, we've linked to some reason. You haven't seen pictures of the new iphone. They'll be linked in there to relay.

US Federico Phil Schiller apple Utah Siri Stephen Islas Stephens sixty percent fifty percent
"schiller" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"On the program the email address elrushbo eibnet dot us you wanna hear a weird story trump's ex dr his former personal physician at longhaired maggotinfested looking guy what's his name bornstein what is his name i think it's i'm not sure it's named i think this guy is saying his office was raided by trump's bodyguard and top lawyer and cnn can't keep their pants up over this cnn is going bonkers nbc broke the story everybody's running their version of it now i'll trump's doctor sat on this for a long time and this doctor is estranged from trump this doctor has not treated trump in years but he was at one time trump's personal lawyer and the information he provided at one point showed trump to be in perfect health now herald bornstein is is trump's exeter and when he says that that it was keith schiller trump's bodyguard will keith schiller was fired shortly after komi was fired keith schiller was the former new york cop if you remember during the campaign this guy was the first off the plane everybody thought he was secret service he was trump's personal bodyguard been with trump for a long time and he was always on stage was just never more than five steps away from trump burkhart graham just a mountain of a guy you had.

bornstein cnn exeter keith schiller trump komi keith schiller nbc
"schiller" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Eight eight two if you want to be on the program the email address elrushbo at eib net dot us you wanna hear a weird story trump's ex dr his former personal physician that longhaired maggotinfested looking guy what's his name bornstein what is his name i think it's i'm not sure is named i think that's anywhere this guy is saying his office was raided by trump's bodyguard and top lawyer in cnn can't keep their pants up over this cnn is going bonkers nbc broke the story everybody's running their version of it now i'll trump's doctor sat on this for a long time and this doctor is estranged from trump this doctor has not treated trump in years but he was at one time trump's personal lawyer and the information he provided at one point showed trump to be in perfect health now herald bornstein is is trump's exeter and when he says that that it was keith schiller trump's bodyguard keith schiller was fired shortly after komi was fired keith schiller was the former new york cop if you remember during the campaign this guy was the first off the plane everybody thought he was secret service he was trump's personal bodyguard been with trump for a long time and he was always on stage was just never more than five steps away from trump burke cut gray just a mountain of a guy you had you look at this guy and you knew that he was solid steel bodyguard anyway keith schiller was given the letter to james comey announcing it was fired and told to deliver it to calm his home which he did but komi was not home he was in los angeles in fact soon to get on the airplane they come back to washington he was an la fbi office meeting when he got the news on tv that he had been fired shortly after that schiller was no more i don't know why don't know what precipitated it but this doctor is claiming that schiller amitav lawyer rated his office and took with them trump's medical records well schiller hasn't been around for over a year now so i don't know when this supposedly happened but you get used to drive is going absolutely a over it for for all of the predictable reasons will there must have been something in there that trump.

bornstein cnn exeter keith schiller trump keith schiller komi los angeles washington nbc burke james comey schiller
"schiller" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Eight eight two if you want to be on the program the email address elrushbo at eib net dot us you wanna hear a weird story trump's ex dr his former personal physician at longhaired maggotinfested looking guy what's his name bornstein what is his name i think it's i'm not sure his name i think that this guy is saying his office was raided by trump's bodyguard and top lawyer and cnn can't keep the pants up over this cnn is going bonkers nbc broke the story everybody's running their version of it now i'll trump's doctor sat on this for a long time and this doctor is estranged from trump this doctor has not treated trump in years but he was at one time trump's personal lawyer and the information he provided at one point showed trump to be in perfect health now herald bornstein is is trump's exeter and when he says that that it was keith schiller trump's bodyguard will keith schiller was fired shortly after komi was fired keith schiller was the former new york cop if you remember during the campaign this guy was the first off the plane everybody thought he was secret service he was trump's personal bodyguard been with trump for a long time and he was always on stage was just never more than five steps away from trump burke cut or just a mountain of a guy you had.

bornstein cnn exeter keith schiller trump komi keith schiller nbc
"schiller" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Eight eight two if you want to be on the program the email address elrushbo at eib net dot us you wanna hear a weird story trump's ex dr his former personal physician that longhaired maggotinfested looking guy what's his name bornstein what is his name i think it's i'm not sure it's named i think that this guy is saying his office was raided by trump's bodyguard and top lawyer anc an can't keep their pants up over this cnn is going bonkers nbc broke the story everybody's running their version of it now trump's doctor sat on this for a long time and this doctor is estranged from trump this doctor has not treated trump in years but he was at one time trump's personal lawyer and the information he provided at one point showed trump to be in perfect health now herald bornstein is is trump's exeter and when he says that that it was keith schiller trump's bodyguard will keith schiller was fired shortly after komi was fired keith schiller was the former new york cop if you remember during the campaign this guy was the first off the plane everybody thought he was secret service he was trump's personal bodyguard been with trump for a long time and he was always on stage it was just never more than five steps away from trump burke cut or just a mountain of a guy you know you look at this guy and you knew that he was solid steel bodyguard anyway keith schiller was given the letter to james comey announcing it was fired and told to liberate tacoma's home which he did but komi was not home he was in los angeles in fact soon to get on the airplane to come back to washington he was an la fbi office meeting when he got the news on tv that he had been fired shortly after that schiller was no more i don't i don't know why know what precipitated but this doctor is claiming that schiller antitrump lawyer rated his office and took with them trump's medical records well schiller hasn't been around for over a year now so i don't know when this supposedly happened but you get used to the drive bys are going absolutely a over it for for all of the predictable reasons will there must have been something in there that trump.

bornstein cnn exeter keith schiller trump komi keith schiller tacoma los angeles washington nbc james comey schiller
"schiller" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Princeton presidential historian julian schiller gonna talk about the domestic side but i wanna do i talk about two other things the middle the way he handled the middle east fascinated me because george bush was impulsive got messianic and this guy was rational thought about it incredibly took all this time and i think he's ended up getting more screwed up than bullshit well i think there is a case to be made he clearly had a different approach to the region and this is a place where he was hoping that restraint in some ways would be a better solution but what he saw was just how messed up the situation was in syria it was as if every move for example that he made was the wrong move and he saw total collapse there of the situation with iraq and afghanistan inherited terrible situations he did try to alternately withdraw us involvement but those areas were so fragile they they you know they are in pretty bad state and so withdrawing wasn't necessarily improving the situation and obviously with with israel for example the trajectory before him and after him continues to be toward more confrontation so i think that's one one area of policy where right off the bat there is the most criticism and most questioning of of the steps that he made an african americans now it doesn't appear that that he was driven to make that a huge focus a lift up and i think part of it is is you and your folks say that he was so policy pragmatically focused but do you think he did enough even symbolically for african americans.

syria iraq israel Princeton julian schiller george bush afghanistan
"schiller" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"To like it was in the tech wreck in 2000 a bunch of stuff that i really don't agree with maybe the broadbased market but certainly not the individual parts of the market that that we like to be in but one of the questions schillers' a a you know wellknown the'must economists nobel prize guy in in he created the essentially the schiller p ratio and it looks over a period of the market of ten years and and so we try to compare the p the schiller index today is the commercial or index last year that edita or case you missed it and the last twenty years spent a lot that's happened you don't want in my career since forming the financial hands we group at ninety seven with john hudson we have watched a market rise incredibly high into white uk that didn't happen right like the tech wreck it started in march of two thousand we watched bush changed the dividend tax code march 9th of two thousand and three and look at a chart the market never looked back right new tax code change market was entirely different alloway up until october of oh seven then you went into these uh the await '09 recession that happen the when marked a market was changed essentially we know we knew it was going to be changed march 9th of two thousand nine that's when the market took off again right so now we just had another major tax change joke we don't have a ten year period of time to be able to compare and contrast to say what valuations ought to be that you simply doesn't exist right and so i think when you when you understand what's going on you have to throw a lot of these longterm standing gauges outdoor net other mean throw caution to the wind and jump in with both feet it just means understand that we are in a different world in a different time we don't live in a vacuum a you're listening to consider this i'm joe clark along with sherry contos don't forget to visit is your life after work dot com we'll take a break and be right back hi i'm joe clark host consider this a managing partner of.

schiller index john hudson uk bush alloway joe clark sherry contos managing partner nobel prize twenty years ten years ten year
"schiller" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"The day's events case get found flew show gene nick welcome welco these don schiller misses the tom schillers' show just got off the set of kennedy i'll be on the night kennedy on fox business eight o'clock eight o'clock is it is can you on at eight or nine eternity repeated twelve midnight katie pavlysh on the panel and we time talking about everything we will talk about today talking about tax reform today taxes doesn't side exciting does it when you when you say all let's talk about tax reform that sounds kind of political of political details which i i like to think bigger usually but this thing is interesting because right now we are coming down to another bill that republicans can't seem to get together on we get the house we get the senate then they got to marry the two bills you know how that happens and donald trump is he's thinking positive he's doing what he does he say that the uh these are going to get their work together they're going to get a bill passed i do believe him listen to donald trump on the tax bill and we're going to be bringing back into this country probably in excess of four trillion dollars four trillion which will immediately be put to work in this country so i think the tax bills doing very well and i think the are going to be very proud of it okay i want to get your thoughts on taxes three eight five two four eight six six and why you think this republican congress why the house why the senate they have majorities slim as they may be why can't get it together yet something past they failed on obamacare day what was the other big failure before before this they wanted to get obamacare down they wanted to get taxes done and uh you know they're coming into this they're still squabbling amongst each other and they are going to fall prey as usual to the democrats their song is always the.

don schiller tom schillers kennedy katie pavlysh the house senate donald trump congress democrats obamacare four trillion dollars
"schiller" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The but she went on was this professor schiller wendy schiller yet a time she said the governor can be tonedeaf she's not the type of person wants to engage the media schiller said he's basically saying i'm really busy trying to get rhode island back on track and i don't want to spend time explaining myself are much time explaining myself in the media because of their failure to present both sides and wendy schiller says she doesn't want to spend the time filling in those gaps but that is really that that is the reality for the 2017 politician and then when i asked raimondo about the critique this is the boston globe she ticked off a menu of venues in which he makes himself available to the media put yourself in my shoe she said i want to educate people school construction it's a huge problem in rhode island huge problem if all i did was rely in the providence journal i would be leaving out so many young parents who have a huge vested interest in engaging on the issue so i've got to do social media this is governor raimondo to the boston globe i've got to do the newport daily news i've got to do radio yet right i've got to do the projo i've got to do all i've got to do it all to try to reach the rhode islanders who are affected by this major decision all right how much he comes on i put out another invitation today i do it all the time isn't that assessment the rhode island governor says she wants if that's what the editor of the biggest newspaper says she he remains determined to deliver so she's eu stays can are going after the media in her own way again this time with the boston globe and they fell for hook line and sankar the rhode island governor begs for a stronger media yeah i'm sure that's at the top of the list how about answering some emails four three eight nine seven seven six raise in providence this morning high ray hurt pera or i'm kournikova scared reeker christian group could earn circle cruiser hurt gert there's so many new are here to create greater word o hundred governor kirk clear or maybe you're not really doesn't make one bit of sense in the.

wendy schiller rhode island social media governor raimondo newport daily news rhode islanders editor pera kirk professor boston eu one bit
"schiller" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on KOIL

"Thompson are you doing mr schiller good good first of all let me premise cliffs where i am a legal naturalized american sworn in as un editon august eighteen nineteen quick gatot while purity pm i love it okay and i of my country okay now you're there's over four hundred daca people serving in the military let them standing military and get their natural day that way okay they're doing it the right way yeah but it's bars the ones that are here in the country illegally i don't give it to to bam if they been here who cares illegal illegal if i can come here sworn in as american citizen do my homework like my mom tom did and all the other legal immigrants who has country do it that way i don't care i really don't i there's no time for compassion we have thousands of people that are suffering in texas and soon to be florida scarring kid our own american children it don't go without medical care we're giving people on daca and welfare boots on a hell no so you think john did the one way for the daca we call on kids but there are many of them are adults to one way for the dreamers to get in to this country and you're talking full citizenship is yellow terry kirby your country you with the right way put your act on the line like i did my son and my wife yet what about some other program like i don't know some other if it was a nonmilitary thing but almost like a peace corps thing where they had to do a service for america would that be another programme or you just saying militaryonly if they're willing to go pray with light the american red cross further salvation army do it the right way how people down in florida in natural disasters may be but that would be happy talk over among the organizations like you were you know like us ovation army me the american red cross but right now my only option iq right now the military yeah okay that's an interesting idea i mean if you go for that if you put both of those out there i haven't heard that proposed yet but the idea of two years with a they a lot of countries israel has two years military service for everybody they got to put it in their two years if you go.

Thompson mr schiller tom texas medical care america florida john israel two years
"schiller" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"I say 34 suggest way 620 wtmj we do not go gently into the good weekend on our friday program lots of ground to cover let's get started we start off today's show like we start off every show three big things story number one does milwaukee county judge circuit court judge have blood on his hands this is a story we talked about when it first happened the outrage just becomes even more aggravating if you haven't followed the story this involves an o'connell walk man with a link the history of drunken driving who yesterday was charged with homicide and various other crimes in connection with a crash who killed a man from canada when he stopped to help bob a motorist on i ninety four in della field that this goes back to ninth in on july eighth according to the reports what happened is you you had a a van that had had a flat tyre and so a van carrying a bunch of kids has a flat tire the freeway by della field the and pulls over it's got a flat tire a guy pulls up behind them to help the people change the flat tire the defendant is somebody named frank schiller according to the criminal complaint frank schuller was loaded when he got behind the wheel following an argument with his parents and then crashed into the van crash occurred about nine pm at night according to the complaint all four of the children that were in the van suffered injuries 48yearold man from canada die died after schiller ran over him with his car according to the complaint the man had stopped to help the driver of the van change the flat tire the complaint says schillers' car struck the van travelling an estimated seventy to eighty miles an hour and hit with such force that the van which by the way contained for kids flipped over and landed about thirty yards from where it was originally parked what happened apparently is then has the flat tire pulls over side of the road kids in the car guy sees what happens the guy from canada he stops he's helping them change the flat by the side of the road schiller.

o'connell canada frank schiller frank schuller schillers milwaukee county bob thirty yards
"schiller" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"schiller" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And you if you watch tv at all in the last eighteen months donald trump you've seen this guy he's older he's got wide here but not much of it it just sticks up a little bit on the top visit he's an older white guy kind tall and he's always next to donald trump his name he's got an am keith schiller and he's got a kind of an interesting chequered past however as to hashtag russia gate here's white keith schiller that guides always at trump's hip whose has been like his bodyguard forever a keys were at least for almost couple of decades keys schiller think about if you're an investigator if you're a lawyer if you're an investigator working for a lawyer put yourself in their shoes look at the world through their eyes if your investigating russian collusion with the trump campaign and you're looking at donald trump and all the people around donald trump and you just looking i'm serious now about all the people around donald trump forget their status where the campaign manager rights stenographers whatever if you're looking for people who are witnesses heath schiller sticks out like the source of sore thumbs this guy was at every meeting he was next the donald trump at virtually every moment i don't know when the guy gets time to pay his bills and all know in a bid says he he seems to be like living with donald trump him he just seems spent all his time so if i'm an investigator i wanna talk to key schiller because i want to say hey keith schiller where was donald trump on such and such a date and key shows going to say well i don't remember although problem we've got documents we cut emails all were fresher rug alleging that won't be a problem at all we just wanna know what you saw will we we can work with the you know you're i don't remember that daytonstyle we'll get that to you but you were there the reason keith schiller is being demanded as a witness not just by the house intelligence committee i suspect the fbi is going to be talking this guy he's a key witness why think about.

keith schiller russia trump investigator donald trump heath schiller fbi campaign manager the house eighteen months