34 Burst results for "Scandinavia"

Sound Of The River

Sound Matters

07:46 min | 4 months ago

Sound Of The River

"This time a story a story about a river a very special river. It's the river you can hear flowing in the background through a forest somewhere in New Zealand. The river you can hear is the Wanganui River. This recording was made recently by this woman. My name is heike like hope and Mima Danish audio storyteller documentary-maker Pica held a spent a lifetime making documentaries and stories in sound documentaries and stories in sound at a full of characters places events but almost always in our work there are also the sounds of nature like stories. That have this ECO. Centric quality where it's not necessarily humans that are in the middle where where there's When Nature Plays Part? I've always had since I was a kid. I've always had this feeling that nature sort of reflected itself into me I I would feel like a mountain I would feel like make I would feel like it's three and I've had since early childhood SLA very strong sensory experiences from Mater. I think sound is fluid. It spacious like nature is so there's something that's always been something about working with sound that mirrors this perception I have of the world and that mirrors may and can connect them like bay sometimes in sort of pristine moments also connect within me emotionally or as ideas. It's something that affects you when you're there. So how can you tell a story where whether it comes across where it's not just backdrop or pretty picture but it's actually a strong force a character almost in the story documentaries and stories come from very remote places very often places like the far north of Canada Greenland places all around Scandinavia and across the North Atlantic islands? But her latest project takes back to a place where she spent time growing up. I've just started working on a project. Actually it's a liar. I feel like I've been working on it for a long time of wanted to work on it and it's been on my mind. It's a project about the Wanganui River. It flows from the center of the North Island of New Zealand to the coast to the task. Mansi three hundred kilometers or so the river special to me because I grew up in New Zealand lift by this river and my family immigrated to New Zealand in the seventy s and we lived in in Wanganui which is the town that where the river flows into the sea and all trading station built by European settlers. So for me. It's it's personally special. And then I learnt that one canoeing river have gained legal status as a as a human entity which means that it has the rights and duties and liabilities of a legal person the Wanganui river now a legal person or legal entity one of the first natural places in the world to be given this sort of legal standing accepting a river as illegal person presents. Many challenges to the way we think about the world and it presents challenges to documentary-maker how can a documentary portray the river itself as a character as a person as an entity? Where do you begin? Did you know that the river is a human being to us? We've always had signed from the mountain to the say I the river as May. So how do you tell a story whether whether river is the main the center? I'm not sure how to that practically you know. How do I connect with the river and and figure out why didn't want to say

Wanganui River New Zealand Wanganui North Island Mima Danish North Atlantic Mater Documentary-Maker Pica Canada Greenland Scandinavia Mansi
Minneapolis development to use groundwater to heat and cool buildings

Climate Cast

03:51 min | 4 months ago

Minneapolis development to use groundwater to heat and cool buildings

"Gas A. Minneapolis Development Project will use groundwater for heating and cooling. The technology is called. Aquifer Thermal Energy and the city of Minneapolis seems to be embracing it as an alternative. To greenhouse gas emitting natural gas but how can aquifer work as an energy source in? Minnesota's frigid climate. Nina Axelson is the vice president for sustainability and outreach at Evergreen energy they are partners in the upcoming tower side innovation district. Hi Nina Hi Paul Geothermal energy one. Oh one I. How does it work? So a lot of folks are familiar with using the energy stored underground whether in our soil or in our water to heat or cool and Minnesota are aquifer systems in our hydro. Geology are really special and lend themselves well to this. Type of geothermal is counting on the energy stored in the water in the Aquifer to help heat and cooler buildings. What's the water temperature in the aquifer that this project will be tapping for the city of Minneapolis? I think we'd be looking at about a forty to fifty degree temperature as a starting place and then as the technology goes into US. You're actually removing heat from buildings. Between let's say May and October and storing it into a part of the Aquifer that allows for a reserve of heat in that Aquifer so that in the winter that part of the Aquifer that you're extracting from the heat is going to have higher temperatures more capacity and is that able then to generate enough heat or cooling for the buildings. It wouldn't be able to do it alone so this is under the trend that folks here about of beneficial electrification. Which means you're GONNA pair electricity in this case heat pumps with that geothermal capacity in the aquifer to either extract heat from the building during cooling season or to increase the heat enough to be used for heating the spaces in the building or for a hot water uses so this project in Minneapolis. How many buildings are planned to be heated and cooled with this project in the tower side innovation district which is part of the Prospect Park neighborhood of Minneapolis and also the saint. Anthony Park neighborhood of Saint. Paul there is been a lot of development The Green Line surly and the University of Minnesota and the public private investment into that area. So right now out of the gate for this coming year. There are four buildings that are interested in connecting to the first phase of the system but the capacity of the system is fairly limitless so once it's infrastructure is in place all new development in that area would have the potential to connect how new Issaquah for thermal energy and as Minnesota and early adopter in the US. So it's actually been around for at least over twenty years. Most of the applications are in northern Europe Netherlands Scandinavia where? There's over a thousand sites there are not A lot of these in the US so this is absolutely a place for Minnesota to lead that combination of are forward thinking policy on clean energy. The city of Minneapolis has made huge commitments to decarbonised the city and are looking at ways to get away from natural gas as their biggest carbon contributor so this technology is going to be A little bit newer for the country and a little bit newer for Minnesota. But the replica. Ability is really high so once we get the tower side project up and running there are actually three other projects being studied in the state of Minnesota because that Geo

Minneapolis Aquifer Thermal Energy Minnesota United States Nina Axelson University Of Minnesota Vice President GEO Prospect Park Anthony Park Europe Netherlands Scandinavia Issaquah Paul
"Balls & Strikes"

Hysteria

07:56 min | 5 months ago

"Balls & Strikes"

"Hello hairless. I have a question for you. Yes Erin have you ever solved a mystery? I want her to in my time. Like a kid mystery or like a like a murder she wrote mystery. I mean I'm talking like clue in the crumbling wall. Nancy drew mystery well. This might be a good. Nancy drew mystery free to solve okay. I'm GonNa read you. Some results from primaries from specific demographic in two thousand sixteen and Twenty twenty and I want you to help me solve why there was a difference. okay okay. So the demographic is white men in Michigan now in two thousand sixteen white men voted for Sanders over Clinton sixty two percent to thirty seven percent. That's Hillary Clinton in two thousand twenty white men in Michigan voted for Sanders over Biden. Forty nine to forty six percent. So that's a pretty big swing right. It's a pretty big swing. Okay another demographic Whiteman Missouri in Two Thousand Sixteen Sanders was The victor over Clinton in that demographic sixty one percent to thirty eight percent in twenty twenty Biden actually beat sanders forty nine to forty five percent. Can you help me solve the mystery of why that happened? Erin I'M GONNA go with one of my take on one of my favorite old. Nancy drew books. Okay the secret in the old vagina. I don't think I ever. It was like a limited edition. One I don't think I ever read the PG thirteen yeah. I mean it appears. Just that's one stat and I don't. I hate when people totally Cherry picking so. I admit that I'm doing something that I sometimes eight when other people do it but I think it's really telling because it confirms a lot of things that I feared on two levels one that people would not vote for a woman for president just because she was a woman even if they were moderates and to my vision of the progressive movement that Bernie had built which was somewhat bolstered by his success in the Mid West. Like in in Michigan in Wisconsin and Minnesota Was actually me attributing sexism to the progressive movement false? I mean though. Let's let's add like a smidge just a spring call a sprinkle of I don't even know what it would be a sprinkle of but a sprinkle of like at least the one thing we have to remember is lake the threat of Lake the threat of Donald Trump back then seem so preposterous that maybe people really were. I mean I don't know I mean like maybe now it's just like fuck. Donald trump is so terrible were surrounded by cooties That could be very bad for us and people are just lake. You know what I don't know I mean I think you're right. I'm just trying to find reasons for sort of to not be true Because it's a real fucking bummer. I mean it just. It looks to me like given the choice. Those demographics as hall will choose a man over a woman and then also given a choice. Those people the same people will choose a white man who is not Jewish over a Jewish man or a real progressive or a socialist and it just even though like the issue is that he's supporting aren't really social so no they're they're normal Europe stuff like he's doing like Scandinavia Shad. He did his call. It rebrand himself instead of a democratic socialist. Call him a every other civilized country in the world est yes I mean low. Maternal mortality rates. Yeah I mean listen. What are we gonNA do about the white men? What are we gonNA do about them are any of them? Okay I some men are okay. I think some minerals are okay. Let's put that on his shirt. I'd wear it I would wear to know. I think that it's I don't want to lump people together completely. I mean obviously we're a country made up of individuals but big groups of those individuals that fall into the same categories seem to be haven away that that's a I mean. Is it fair for us to say not really coming out of the closet so to speak but we are fundamentally Democratic Socialists? I mean I wouldn't go that far but I I also like hate. I don't like labeling myself I sat at A. is that at all the lunch tables in high school. You know I was in every click. There's forty kids in my class. There's one click but it was. I think that my the issues that I support a line in in almost all cases with issues that people on the very progressive end the Democratic Party support. I will say that But here's the thing Elissa. Do you think that we're all talking about electability and all these people worried about? You know WHO's electable? Who's not who's not. Do you think they were just kind of sub tweeting? The fact that they knew that white men wouldn't support somebody like Elizabeth Warren. I think there's a little bit of that. There's a little bit of that. How are you doing with her dropping out? I was very sad. Like really truly sad. I mean the thing is it's like because I've been on so many campaigns and because I think I have a A string of what's called hyper empathy. Which is like I feel other people's paying too much which like isn't a compliment. It's actually may be some form of nurses really nervous during the national anthem at sporting events. Because you're worried they're going to mess up sometimes. Yeah I like. I'm not like worried I'm like I'm like hoping for like you can do it. You've got this you've got but you know so I of course feel bad in. It's like you know it's also a symptom of who you follow online. You know I'm like a very big supporter and enjoyed following. The Warren organizers out in Iowa New Hampshire because he was so fucking plucky and an energetic in fucking positive and into their shit that it made me sort of believe in her I think even more But no it's like looks for me like if I were to lay all my policies out in what I believe in what I hope for. Which is that you know. We have a government that wants to see. All citizens thrive have the tools to thrive at least You know I definitely fall. In the Bernie E. W. Bucket. But like I think she just had like you can understand how taking all the drama about two thousand sixteen how people could feel somewhat polarized towards Bernie right. There was really like no reason for that I mean for Fuck Sake W even endorsed Hillary bag man so I really. I thought that she was the more perfect messenger And so when people were like actually you have plans and you're doing a good job so we're not here for it Which is really ex-. She didn't do anything. Yeah it's I mean. I think the people like she didn't she didn't do anything to precipitate her. There wasn't like a moment or a gaffe or huge failing that sort of precipitated. Her decline Yeah it was just that sort of that sort of thing where it's like we'll never really know. The full unquantifiable extent that sexism played in the failure of the campaign of Elizabeth Warren. Not Failure but the The end of the campaign of before and we'll never know and we'll never fully know like weather people's decision to support Bernie over Hillary in two thousand sixteen and then Biden over burning twenty twenty. Had more do with sexism than it did to do with Fear of change and just wanting to get back to normal

Hillary Clinton Bernie E. W. Bucket Nancy Elizabeth Warren Biden Michigan Erin Sanders Donald Trump Twenty Twenty Murder PG Europe Mid West Democratic Party President Trump Whiteman Missouri Scandinavia Shad Minnesota Lake The
An Interview with South African Golfer Erik van Rooyen

No Laying Up

11:48 min | 5 months ago

An Interview with South African Golfer Erik van Rooyen

"Want you to tell me absolutely everything. You can't about golf club that CHAPULTEPEC because I love watching this golf course I promise. There's not one detail I went to get by about playing it. Used COMING OFF A T. Three finish I just want you to kind of walk us through some of the considerations that go into play in that course because they talk about the altitude of course on the broadcast. It's not a direct translation of like. Oh now my eight iron goes this far because of all the different heights and stuff so right. What kind of adjustments do you make before this tournament? It's interesting because usually so I grew up. Bob Played logoff in Johannesburg South Africa and the difference is about ten percents so when a plan Janice Burke I play straight meters and it works great. Is that your stock yardage? Won't you play here play yards so say my nine goes one hundred and fifty eight hundred fifty five meters in Johannesburg. It goes one hundred fifty five yards here interesting so it's pretty close. But then we get to Japan Deepak. And it's like okay bowls going even further than Giannis books on the Tuesday. We hit every club in the bag. Just write it down straight. How is it going and track men track man and that's it? He had all the numbers in each Irish book. And I was like okay. How far is it nine? Ongo again or the eight on well about one hundred and eighty seven. Here's a. But then if you are if you're hitting a ninety five percent nine iron. Is it a direct? Does that really change how much it's going to fly compared to a regular golf course like? What are those kind of adjust? I try to not over. Think it too in the fate happened on even back on Sunday. A sixteen I was in between it was either a full wedge but the braves is a little into us. I think it was a hundred and fifty one of the pen and sixteen in a massive slow behind it. You can use a slip if you want and so we decided on taking a little nine and I was like okay but I've got a little bit of this. How am I doing that again? So it okay. But I think if you've gone over think it is going to get quite complicated yet but it's interesting. I don't feel like we see a golf course on tour where we see more guys get more mystified on the distance. The balls go right. I mean we're watching your shot into seven on Sunday. I think it was Sunday right. Excellent we watched guys go long on that day we tell people hitting the tree and everything like that but it just seems like it's a golf course that makes you guys at. Maybe not you finished tied for third. Maybe not may be the guy to ask about this but makes people uncomfortable. A little bit does does especially. If you're not in use it you know and it's funny I think when you get to sort of the mid irons seven six eight nine. It almost takes a little bit more because at ball gets up a little bit and we spoke about We do WanNa hit the high one just account for that little bit extra orage. Because it's GonNa go that extra bit further. You just had to get comfortable with it. We see every almost every year this tournament. Guys that hit it really far succeed. And if you adjust for altitude the courses equivalent of like sixty four hundred yards doesn't play. That long doesn't play that long. But why why would long drivers succeed there? I don't know it's a good question. I just think it's a golf 'cause again at its it's similar to courses in. Johannesburg and I grew up on us. I was very even lossiemouth system applied comfortable then. I think it's a golf course. It looks really tight but take whole four for example. Huge dog laughed. If you're going to hit drave got left because it's fairly simple punch out to the green and every holes Kinda got aside like that You know eight for example you have to miss it right dog right up the hill. If you left screwed you gotTa Punch out so you know which sites here driver wherever you want to. You're going to have a chance at least punch out to the green or get it around the green somewhere seeking up and down for par. But if you're going to play conservatively and you then mess here in trouble so I think part of the reason why we love watching so much is it feels a lot like the experiment of if if the the best players in the world are GONNA play. What of course that kind of looks like our local Munich overgrown yeah and just kind of weird bunkers around the green but guys seem to love playing and obviously you've had success or whatever. What is it about that makes it so fun to play? I think it's GonNa mix of everything you've got the short hauls you've got one which is really exciting. You know Gaza him to on on the green three woods and yet dot abounds right there to the left if you miss it too exciting long-hauls like eight really good par threes seven. It's going to be one of the baseball threes we play. Oh yeah I mean after you? Great show say tree. You wouldn't have been settled. I hit the tree. Freakin covers like off of the It's a tricky one. It's got a lot of everything it gives you know Sunday. There's a lot of pens. We can use some slopes and get a close with a whole lot of exciting stuff. What's IT I mean? So Co again. We're talking about of course the you're playing plays very differently than the rest of the courses you've been in pressure situations before and but now you're playing golf course that has this weird altitude factor In a high pressure situation Sunday did that feel any different than the other high pressure situations. You've been in on Sundays now. Pretty similar of you know if I think back in Sweden last year I was more nervous on Sunday in Europe and then I was This this this last week on Saturday I was actually the drain. Hundred was all over the place and then Sunday was quite calm. Funny Enough I shot four under this adds. There's all one hundred Sunday so I think I did. Okay and do you do anything differently? At altitude you set out when you start out the week. Are You hydrating better? I believe you've had. He got hit with food poisoning. The Eagles screwed bring that on himself. Are you what do you do with food wise? Like how do you make sure you don't get hit with what hits a lot of people in Mexico You know we went to a nice restaurant in the hotel tippin. Yawkey good Japanese food. He says it was shrimp. That we all eat the shrimp. I think he went back and add something different afterwards but yeah he was out. Thursday he was went back to the Italian sleep the whole day so actually at my trainer on the bag and heated. Okay Club the club me. Bad Club on AIDS or sixteen holes. He gave you a bad club. Is it three would drive? And he's like Nana hit. The driver and I hit it laughed. I wasn't supposed to go gave him the guy but we did okay in the end. It's all good well. This is perfect timing because we tease you before. We going to do our Calloway ad for you. We're GONNA make you add Lib it but the one thing I was adjusted to ask about was the maverick three would you? Yeah what's your feedback on that? I loved it the minute I got up behind. A bowl think it sits really good. It's kind of like a classic three would for me and I'm kind of an old school guy like I don't have any persimmon clubs but I'd love to have some one day. I love a good Blade Iron. So that looks like just a classic looking through it. I like it. One of our guys is claiming that the jaws wedges mart should be illegal. They should be illegal because the grooves are so good on them and they're literally wanted me to ask you about whether what you think of the grooves on the switches. I spoke to You. Think he should have been disqualified for using illegal. I don't think so spokes Rodrick Cleveland about and he's not working for callaway at the Genesis obviously got so much knowledge and they've actually got little miniature groups in between the actual cruise. You know I didn't know that you do get a lot of spin on them. It was context as that. That was the frightening part for me. Was sometimes I would get crazy. Good Spin but what are you? That concludes the AD portion of this much of a tinker with equipment. I mean how often will you do you consider? Where do you fall in the spectrum? I guess when I probably prefer not to change obviously I think like any golf perfect. We all love getting. You couldn't love seeing the latest stuff but if something works for me I'm GONNA I'm GonNa keep it in the bag. Don't really like to change unless I see significant improvement. Yeah what. What is the feedback on the joggers? Somehow I knew this was go. Of course I can't believe I made this is Ed's is really all over the ballpark to be honest people. It's so polarized what people get so worked up about it. I'm very okay. It doesn't bother me. People either love it or absolutely hates that have gone some meshes instagram. So on lady in Lee Massachusetts says surely got enough money to go buy some property tie for the conference and then I get guys at say absolutely love it wake and I get it. So it's no middle ground extra comfortable like what is really cockney appeal of the convenient at the same time you know. I think I think they look good. Yes it's different and people probably done like that too much but what in Golf? No Way people love. The sport is so good at the time so I think I don't know I don't mind the fact that it's a little extending are just a little bit but then again I'm not a huge fan of those loudmouthed pants. That are all these different kinds of colors. Were those the two options you were. But I think I think it's. It's it's a little different it at the same time. So neat and clean well. I honestly do think it's underrated. Part of the highest levels of pro golf. That you have to wear pants eighty-five in hot is new. And it's truly not comfortable to play golf in that paints have come to. I know that sounds stupid to save. It could even looking at some of the. We're with Brad Faxon. They're looking at some of the old cotton shirts. Right Hands Right. Yeah the idea of wearing pants and eighty five degree heat. I know that there's a lot that comes with a minor thing to deal with a right but it is like when you're playing poorly in your pants and your hot Yeah new European they. They made a rule now. If it gets above a certain temperature they allow you to wish awards but I mean just make it across the board. I mean why not yes. I'm not quite sure I can only go back to something you said earlier and not feeling super nervous on Sunday. A couple of things one. I'm curious how how how to how it different from Scandinavia like you're talking about and then three like there's a lot on the line for you personally stars like where you're GonNa be playing how much you can walk up all that kind of stuff. It's a lot of questions I think about all those things. I just any other little four foot writer. That you've got going is going into the week or going into Sunday. What what are those things that are on on your mind? Music like special temporary membership and that kind of for how I it's it's in the back you mind. I'M GONNA TRY THAT. I'm trying to get my PJ to card But I mean. I've been doing this for quite a while. Now. And if that's going to be at the forefront of your mind going on Sunday you're definitely not going to be ready to go win major tournaments. You've got kind of put it in the Freezer. You know until you're done so it's not easy. Obviously wing then golf tournament was forefront of my mind throughout the whole day but if God just go do your job as well as he can so what. Walk us through kind of that that we were talking about trying to get your car right. So let's catch people up that people that are not as familiar with your career to this point and I want to go

Golf Johannesburg BOB Japan Deepak Braves Janice Burke Bad Club South Africa Aids Brad Faxon Writer Drave Lee Massachusetts Munich Europe Scandinavia Baseball Eagles Calloway Mexico
Last month was the hottest January on record, say scientists

Ben Shapiro

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

Last month was the hottest January on record, say scientists

"With winter barely showing any bite so far this year in the Charlotte area and really many other places for that matter this news from federal scientists shouldn't surprise to many baby it's hot outside a new report by the national oceanic and atmospheric administration claims global average land and sea surface temperatures last month we're more than two degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the January average that's the hottest since record keeping began back in eighteen eighty and parts of Russia Scandinavia and eastern Canada temperatures were nine degrees higher than average the warm January follows the second hottest year on record in twenty nineteen tomgram fox

Scandinavia Charlotte Russia Canada
Scientists discover DNA of woman on 5,700-year-old "chewing gum"

PRI's The World

03:35 min | 8 months ago

Scientists discover DNA of woman on 5,700-year-old "chewing gum"

"Juicy fruit it aimed but there was gum in olden times in fact about six thousand years ago a young woman in what is now southern Denmark tossed a lump of chewing gum made from birch tar into a shallow lagoon fast forward to the present some uh-huh researchers who found the gum during an excavation have used it to reassemble the woman's entire genetic code. Hana Schroeder is a molecular anthropologist and associate to professor at the University of Copenhagen he's one of the researchers who studied the ancient gum. What does this? DNA actually tell you. What did this young woman looked like? We found out that the individual who chooses piece of Birch pitch was female that this person lived about five thousand seven hundred years ago in Denmark. Southern Denmark had this striking combination Asian of dark skin and dark hair and blue eyes was fairly common in stones Europe. At that time we found that she was more closely related genetically to what we call Western hand together as from Continental Europe then too and together as who live just a few hundred kilometers further to the north and central Scandinavian Sweden who have another type Evatt mixture and. She didn't have that so that tells us something about how southern Scandinavia was first settled by humans. So yeah you can get a lot from a single genome. Well let's get back to this gum part of the story. What is Birch Tar right? So Birch pitch or Birch Tar as you say it's a black Brown substance that some produced by heating up Birchbark and then you obtain this residents kind of substance and that solidifies on cooling but then you know it can be made available again by chewing it and we know why the fact that often these pieces of Birch pitcher found with tooth and prints that were indeed chewed and then they would have been used for having stone tools for instance. So you know if you have an Arrow shaft shaft for instance wouldn't want and you WanNa put an arrowhead made of stone on that Arrow than you would use this substance in order to have the stone arrowhead onto the Arrow shaft in the same with the other types of tools and implements. Yeah it was kind of like a real purpose glue. If you want your a kind of an adhesive I mean what did this wad of gum look like when you found it and had did you figure out it was something akin to modern chewing gum. They're really inconspicuous. So they really small lumps maybe a centimeter and a half in size and often they're found with tooth tooth imprint. But this one didn't have any to imprint has all the other hallmarks of these falls and things that you can see and so Then we just thought OK. Well maybe maybe there's a in there and we tried and yet to hold. We've got a complete ancient human genome out of it which was Quite astonishing and it wasn't stuck on the bottom of some ancient shoe wasn't was it wasn't no no is just found in that site. The fact that you are extracting valuable information from six thousand year old piece of Gum does it also opened up the possibility hillary that there are other things. You haven't thought of yet that might contain ancient DNA. Yeah absolutely. I mean you know actually while earlier this year we published a paper. We got ancient. DNA from not quite that old only two three hundred years old from pipe stem in Maryland. We tell a lot about that individual's ancestry as on just from that DNA. But yeah I mean there are probably other types of objects that we might be able to get human. DNA From and possibly even you know microbial DNA as in this case but having said that you know these objects are quite special. So due to the fact that they weren't shoot and this was kind of part of the toolmaking process so that means that we have a chance of recovering ring this human DNA and and also the microbial DNA which might not be the case with other types of objects. Hana Schroeder is a molecular anthropologist at the University of Copenhagen. Thanks very much. Which thank you pleasure?

Birch Tar Hana Schroeder Denmark University Of Copenhagen Arrow Shaft Birch Europe Professor Continental Europe Scandinavia Maryland Birchbark Evatt Scandinavian Sweden Hillary Five Thousand Seven Hundred Ye Two Three Hundred Years Hundred Kilometers Six Thousand Years
Biomimicry - Nature Shows Us the Way

The Sustainable Futures Report

08:59 min | 8 months ago

Biomimicry - Nature Shows Us the Way

"We do to our world we're GONNA and a half to live in it and it's important to make the very best of it. There are lessons we can learn from nature. I recently had a presentation by Richard. James mccown Hound who is the founder and managing director of Bio Mimicry. UK In the conference brochure. It said Richard is a real estate consultant and designer having worked across Europe on projects from billion dollar asset transfers to new developments his passion for all things bio mimetic and problem solving started wanted in his youth and it has never stopped since then this has led to unexpected clients and opportunities for the BBC luxury hotels and even running a workshop in a nudist colony in the Balkans. You never told us about that and the presentation but I was able to catch out with him later and we discussed a whole range the things I want to give our bio mimicry by a mimetic spy openings by affiliate all these words which became cross presentation last week but some have also caught my attention because you were doing a presentation in the context of sustainability is you set in your introductory notes. Most organizations have now adopted the use of sustainability as the best of the worst. Yeah Yeah because I think a lot of it has come to stunning St L.. Ability really is the kind of adopted thinking precip Armenta agenda ignoring five for the QB still in slavery densify chip or even into the workers and five understudying the not taking a whole by looking all the sustainable development goals angles or even simplified version of looking at the environment so the economic and social aspects. And that's the big thing. People think is ensure soot. Everything's connected we have agreed supply-chain its strength is the weakest link. Yeah so tell me a bit more about buying mimicry. I've I've looked at the website and I realize that there's an awful lot more than you had time to tell us about last week and the by it is an international movement. Is that right. Yes really comes to forefront night because we're understanding biology more. We've got confusing power over to analyze it really into even dented quantum level and giving as an undergraduate or understanding of how things are working so then that therefore saliva scientists to write more research into than there's alive and then be transferred into your Zaydan Engineering and materials science. You're seeing it slowly but surely coming through there's a lot more people actually came to the processes well because for designers they need to sell the process to continually develop new ideas and sexists coming with the one. Hit wonder right now. Is this another name for nanotechnology or as part of it. Well that's part of it but there's so much more newly systems uh-huh processing for computers new materials Nano scale and then to process in chemical engineering all the way author and then all the way through the building work in architectural sense right. So if I do something correctly you're looking at how nature accomplishes structures structures and other things and looking to see effectively replicated harnessed for what we want to create hibernates yourselves problems Overcome who is overcoming that. Not just one species found a way to do that but multiple than those overseas a very strong success strategy there and if you look at our designing problems that we have we solved it once you find one way of solving a problem. Multiple people do that as well. You look at mobile phones and smartphones. Everybody's jumped the symbolic Mike. And but if you think of it that multiple publishers and hundreds of thousands of species of sea salt streamlining onto the water or flight. insys save example. Then you look at the ones of salt in the way that can be most easily replicated for your To Saint Challenge Right. Yes you mentioned mentioned tights as a natural three D. Printer and three D. Printing of course is becoming more and more common and the range of materials that we we can use in three broadening. The thing about that sort of technique is that we find this material previously used to be block of metal on the out of it. Now we just get the material we need and we deposited so those sorts of things that you would take from. We'll definitely because he can and start learning from the not. Just hopefully construct for building technologies passive ventilation but yet into three D. printing as well because effectively. Millions of termites are like three D.. Printers very little information. But they're building an outing best together and taking bits where they don't need it so it's affected program ground. There was even some crazy research coming out. It's where they're actually look incorporating three D. printing on termites together see how they work not see the usefulness of at the moment but it's understanding this kind of clobbered ation between nature and technology. They might show a wave. How the work? Because actually create these structures that flew to move right and with a key ingredient being the light especially numidian turbines late eighty percent humidity controlled to that humidity level. Certain from this area though are highs in the nest sorry that stopped sped up other ones. Now I've seen from Woodstock you work with a wide range of organizations so you've been and and building instruction what other areas have you applied to bio two one area and the exploring with university partners. An looking at Jordan Technology microns based in Dundee lines and flip through the air. So you don't you can micro. Jordan doesn't have an engine to drop these oversee areas of a a war nuclear disaster even looking into weather patterns as he drove number hurricane. And he's very very small sensitive lunar writing in the Travel Vaas assistances and checking the weather. Because I you know some instances of and Donny Lighting burs flew all the way from Scandinavia to the U.. UK Effects. If you take off the seat at the Boston these things cannot shake foot float through their almost forever because the creative Gortex they are above them smoking and it's just sits above those rela. NBC and depression to float around mind replicate the actual. The does love Bradley and manufacture including micro sensors for corrective applications right. We've got a client cautious of the moment. How do you see this sort of thing helping us to deal with these? There are two aspects of courses grosses mitigation to try and sort of getting worse. But something which people aren't talking quite as much almost equally important is adept action in other words dealing with the problems switch you already built into the cloud system you see by mimicry. Is Giving US assistance in those areas. I mean one of the big areas. I'm really I pushing. The loss of other people practice by mimicry. Regenerative design through architecture and agriculture. On in business practice How can you do regenerate areas that you're working in whether it's upstream or downstream supply chains or the building sits and you by looking to the natural world you can learn using low cost solutions using less material because in the natural world energies expensive and they have to add considerable as much as possible? I'm amusing materials and a more resilient monir so instead of paying multi materials if you look right into review our and look at multiple tiers of single the functions imagine creating buildings of one material but does different things depending on the thickness. Ohio's used we can do that. And the circular of cutting me. We'll do it cannot be wasting list. You've topping into this much. Free Energy is possible. Time you're bringing national world whose ability of your living building aloys not nature to be part of it is a big thing recruiting. The moon is dead zones for new insects and Barton cities right so we can building building building has got green roofs or green walls but having small spaces it's start thinking

UK Richard Founder And Managing Director James Mccown Hound BBC Europe Ohio Zaydan Engineering Woodstock Consultant Boston United States D. Printer Dundee Jordan Technology Jordan NBC
Food Neighbourhoods: Edinburgh, Leith

Monocle 24: The Menu

07:50 min | 9 months ago

Food Neighbourhoods: Edinburgh, Leith

"A few miles. North of Edinburgh's Old Town on the coast of the birth of fourth. You'll you'll find historic port of leaf. Area was made up of several medieval settlements which by eighteen thirty three had grown into a burr and in nineteen twenty that Burr was merged into editor. Lee has quite the history. It was Scotland's main ports of trade and was the final stopping point of the Royal Yacht Britannia. And if that doesn't ring a bell maybe this will choose good health look cholesterol and dental insurance. Choose fixed interest mortgage repayments choose. I just thought it was the site of the old leaf station. Gave Birth to the title of Irvine. Welsh's novel trainspotting. Lead has more recently become one of Scotland's hottest food destinations traditional pubs fantastic food markets. Lead has something and for everyone and feeling a little more fancy. It's worth mentioning that. It's also home to a handful of Mitchum starred restaurants Scottish menswear menswear designer was born and bred in Edinburgh and today overlooking the water of Leith. You'll find his flagship store at custom lane is also casting and his wife. Gemma brand directive cast in hair call home leaf for us as a really lead by area. And it's a really good sense of a creative community that doesn't really exist elsewhere. In Edinburgh on I think that there is a level All of collaborative economy in customs. Wharf where you've got lots of different studios from lots of different disciplines which we can tap into which is really important for us. We've got photographers before graphic designers. There's jewelry makers architects so it makes for a really interesting dates day experience and you get pulled into lots of different projects acts that can enrich the whole the whole vibe so from a food. Point of view was really pioneering particularly within the high level Mitchell and star level with them. Food Leaf has always had sort of. It'd be more Mitchell and stars in any square mile in the country than it has been previously ICU with Castanon Jr and and to get the inside Info on leads top food and drink hot spots. And we're better place to start with breakfast. I think for for me it it's an everyday Place to go but definitely Bros bagels. I think on lethal walk. They they've been around nine maybe about a year. They've saw set themselves up at the sleepwalk which is really been a pretty bold move because it's been quite a kind of color full area going in there one of the first progressive food retailers really going. Mr They've always got a selection of probably maybe about ten different types of beagles. The E can pick from with all their different fillings. And it just delivers every time. Yeah you know. If you've AH ten minutes to get Beagle have not about better. Yeah Okay and then I wanNA smoke lunch. Where you'RE GONNA IF WE'RE GONNA quickly to nip how we probably we probably and Commons? They have an amazing onsite bakery. So it's always smells great and the sourdough bread is perfect and you can pick up. Take your breakfast I the next day. They do really good who pastries and sandwiches and soups. But if we're taking clients I there's some place called the shore which is an old school leaf beef establishment. It's slightly art deco inside. It's a really beautiful bar and kind of smooth mirrors and then you can have a really nice. Does beautiful fish sughrue fish restaurants along along. The waterfront starts with fishers. And then there's the shore and ship and kings wore when they're they're all really really great fish restaurants fishing japes leaf has got one of the best fish and chip restaurants in probably Scotland. It's called the new haven fish market on generally at key there for an hour in the summer chips and then coming into dinnertime. Where would you go for more laid back than a little favor of ours? The shafts are young. There's a love entrepreneurial. Young shafts are delivering amazing modern Scottish cuisine and I think they do a lot foraging. They've got low bar and quite often. When you're walkin there you can see what Lebron foraging origin? Four place on the bar. It's a really nice intimate experience. Bara is another one. That's literally just over. The water are really dynamic. Husband and wife you who they just you know when you can tell them their heart and soul into it and it's nice to go somewhere has set many but that it doesn't feel stuffy. There's new white tablecloths but there's really nice are on the walls there's good music play is a good atmosphere and the feed is really exciting. And it's actually very good value for money shifts would come from the Martin wishaw Autom- kitchen the training of these places. All they've been you know the Venus Scandinavia and working with or come back to you know. Add Marin started up their own restaurants in in small affordable places in Iran leaf. And I suppose that's the great thing about leaf it's been you know affordable for people to come in and and whether it's startups in in restaurants or in menswear or whatever is given a home in an incubator to showcase the best of en route can do do and then once you've lied to stomachs going get some drinks. Let's start off maybe with just sort of an old fashioned goodall pint buys your a favorite baiser Lee is really good for old fashioned boozers. And it's almost like the fish restaurants that this run along the waterfront nobles is probably one of the most famous ones. It's probably got some real stories to tell the history of the years you know particularly when the sailors were coming in here to darker think There's been in a few few stories told in some of these boozers. Sophie's another great boozer rose. Leaf is a is kind of almost I suppose our our local. Um I'm who also do great great from pub food the dreadnought is also quite like going to the treading on when we moved up here. I find it difficult to find a proper purpose. That wasn't just an old man's Poppin dreadnought really laid back by an which we really like clearly has a low competition your favorite boozers. If you want a glass of wine where you're GONNA go. I really liked the shore. Just feels I think. Because it's quite art deco in there and it's it's very atmospheric. It just feels really relaxed taxed. That's probably for me my favorite for glass of wine. You know some of the good restaurants like the Chop House of Great Barr beside them which is maybe a little bit more like a wine bar or kitchen kitchen restaurant and bar there as well? It's worth mentioning that you don't fancy the key see for a Bagel or dressing up for Mitcham Star. Dinner lethal also has a pretty spectacular food market called the pit and was never really had a kind of food market is such so started in effectively car park in with a garage next door to a and a couple of guys who had trucks maybe had restaurants and tyrone came down and just started up doing great food at really good prices and and then live music then started up by people guitars or saying kind of spawned into whole whole kind of music program and you know many better places for people to go in on a on a Saturday in the pit and the monarchial Cairn Banerjee and what better way to play now than with the track by Scottish music legends the proclaim. There's no awards here for guessing. What inspired this track his sunshine only

Scotland Edinburgh Leaf Station LEE Mitchell Burr Great Barr Trainspotting Royal Yacht Britannia Editor Martin Wishaw Autom Commons Irvine Mitchum Mitcham Star Welsh Castanon Jr Lebron
Russia Identifies 4 Radioactive Isotopes From Nuclear Accident

Democracy Now! Audio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Russia Identifies 4 Radioactive Isotopes From Nuclear Accident

"Questions are still swirling over a mysterious nuclear the accident in northern russia august eighth seven people including five nuclear scientists died in an explosion which caused a radiation spike mike and the surrounding area possibly as far as scandinavia at least two of the deaths have been linked to radiation sickness u._s. Experts suspect respect. The explosion was caused during test of a nuclear powered cruise missile russia initially denied a radiation leak had occurred and four russian nuclear monitoring stations went silent after the blast but earlier today russia's state weather agency confirmed radioactive vice attempts have been found in test samples near the military test range. Russian agencies have also given out conflicting information about what was happening at the time of the explosion.

Russia Scandinavia
How Young Animals Leave Their Homes

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

How Young Animals Leave Their Homes

"Hey Don why the sad face oil. I'm beginning to think my son will never move <unk> out of the basement. I wouldn't worry natal. Dispersal is a perfectly natural thing mittel what natal dispersal that's what happens happens when young animals leave home to make a life for themselves birds leave the nest mammals leave their home territories. Do we know why believe scientists. I think there are a number of reasons why young animals leave home by doing so they avoid competing with their relatives for resources they avoid competing with each other for mates and they also avoid inbreeding which can lead to less healthy offspring Hsueh. Do all animals disperse not all but let's let's take bears as an example scientists kept track of bear dispersal in several parts of the world. Most bears left their mothers territory before they reached. Sexual maturity at age five in Scandinavia Ninety four percent of brown bear males and forty. One percent of females left their natal territory. Eh in Canada grizzly bear males and females left their mothers territory but males left in greater numbers and traveled farther than females in Virginia black. Bear mothers encouraged their young to move away at one year of age and males even swam across rivers to find a new home. Hm You don't seem convinced oh I'm convinced then what is it through. Scientists say anything about charging rent to encouraged dispersal. I think that just might work for you. On this moment of science comes from Indiana University with production support from the office of the provos bulls. We're on the web at a moment of science dot Org. I'm Ya'LL CASSANDRA arm dangles.

Provos Bulls DON Scandinavia Canada Indiana University Virginia Ninety Four Percent One Percent One Year
Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

BrainStuff

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

"Brain stuff lauren Bogle bomb here in two thousand ten. A woolly mammoth carcass was discovered in Siberia near the coast of the laptev sea nicknamed Yuka. This specimen of the long extinct beast died around twenty eight thousand years ago yet her body was astonishingly well preserved complete with patches of reddened for brain that was largely intact and nucleus like cell structures so how did her body lasts so long without rotting away the short answer is Yuka was frozen but not inside some glacier iceberg after death you can became encased in a layer of what's known as permafrost. Let's break down what that is as we know. Water freezes at thirty two degrees Fahrenheit four zero degrees Celsius permafrost is any ground materials such as soil sediment and rock that remains at or below freezing temperatures for at least two consecutive years. It's about twenty five percent of all the land area in the Northern Hemisphere is known to contain permafrost. It was American paleontologist Simone W Mueller who originally coined the term permafrost appointment two of the words permanent and frost despite that name permafrost doesn't last forever thanks to climate change. It's been been thawing in large quantities. This has serious ramifications for the environment and the economy generally speaking permafrost tends to occur in places where The average air temperature is zero degree Celsius or lower every year. According to the national snow and Ice Data Center most of the Northern Hemisphere's permafrost sits between the high high latitudes of sixty and sixty degrees north Siberia Canada Alaska and parts of Scandinavia are loaded with this frigid turf further south permafrost tends to be found in high elevation areas like the Tibetan Plateau and this was elps permafrost isn't as widespread below the equator but it does underlie parts of New Zealand the Andes Mountains and Arctic adjust as its locations vary so does its composition. It's not uniform. Some sections are ice-free while others are made up of more than thirty percent ice likewise the depth age and extent of permafrost. Ken Vary widely oftentimes permafrost permafrost sits beneath an active layer of ground that is a layer that thaws and re freezes seasonally. The permafrost itself can measure anywhere from less than three feet. That's one meter thick to more than five thousand feet or fifteen hundred meters thick and it can get Patchy Northern Alaska occupies a continuous permafrost zone that means permafrost underlies more than ninety percent of the local terrain but at lower latitudes. It's a different story pretty much everything south of the Brooks mountain range sits discontinuance tenuous permafrost zone here permafrost resides under a smaller percentage of the land surface. That's partially because as counter intuitive as it may sound snow. Snow is a really good insulator so when thick blankets of snow stick around all year long they might keep the ground too warm for permafrost likewise in spots. That's where permafrost already exists insulating layers of surface level snow are liable to heat it up but while snows and impediment. Pete is a boon widespread in and around the southern Arctic. Pete is a kind of ground material. That's made up partially decayed organic matter like mosses or swamp plants by and large the. Ground beneath it is kept cool shielded from solar heat this pete safeguards permafrost evergreen forests lend a helping hand to their thickly thickly needled branches pine trees limit the amount of sunlight and snow that hits the surface in the process the evergreens help keep permafrost thawing so permafrost is common below the clustered pines and high elevation high altitude areas the arrangement is mutually beneficial since liquid water can't sleep through hard permafrost. I it acts like a drainage barrier unfrozen water. That's absorbed into the active layer gets trapped. They're barred from travelling deeper into the earth. This water sustained some of the plants that live at the surface although not all permafrost sticks around more than a couple of years some is quite old at minimum. The permafrost in prudhoe Bay Alaska is thought thought to be five hundred thousand years of age and some of the permafrost beneath the Canadians Yukon territory could be more than seven hundred thousand years old inside the ladder scientists. It is found in ancient horse leg complete d._N._A.. Samples Permafrost can keep all kinds of organic matter preserved over long periods of time in two thousand twelve Russian scientists is regenerated live plants from ice age fruits that have been encased in permafrost for about thirty thousand years unfortunately as permafrost thaws the trapped organic organic material decomposes releasing carbon and methane into the atmosphere those gases exacerbate climate change and the bad news is according to a twenty nineteen can study published in nature communications various permafrost deposits around the world have warmed up by a couple of degrees between the years two thousand seven and two thousand sixteen right now approximately one point seven billion tons of carbon is trapped in permafrost scientists. Don't know how much of this will be released into the atmosphere. If current trends continue continue or how quickly it will In the city of New Orleans gresh alone more than one hundred residential buildings have been damaged because the one solid permafrost beneath them is softening the warming permafrost has has also triggered landslides drained lakes and torn roads apart. It's yet another reason to be concerned about our contributions to climate change but to end on a positive note remember the woolly mammoth Yuga found in Siberian permafrost in two thousand ten. She was so well preserved that an early twenty nineteen scientists were able to extract eighty eight eight nucleus like structures from her cells an attempt to coax them back to life. The team injected the nuclei into mouse ovarian cells and while the cells never fully divided divided they did complete the process called spindle assembly which is a step where chromosomes attached to spindle structures before the parent cell breaks into two daughter cells. Perhaps as genetics progresses will be able to help the process

Northern Hemisphere Yuka Pete Lauren Bogle Siberia New Orleans Northern Alaska Alaska Simone W Mueller Ice Data Center Prudhoe Bay Alaska Andes Mountains Brooks Mountain KEN Siberia Canada Tibetan Plateau Scandinavia New Zealand Thirty Two Degrees Fahrenheit
"scandinavia" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"We have information on your own Scandinavia. Oh, I think I'd wanna hear you want that kind of interference in our elections have information. I think I'd take it if I thought there was something wrong go, maybe to the FBI, if I thought there was something wrong. Here's the thing with Trump. You're going to get whatever he feels on the inside. He going to give it to you on the outside. Other politicians would say, no, that's wrong. And they've been doing it all day. It's wrong. It's bad. It's evil. I never do that. Just about everybody who have an opportunity to get information about their opponents. Now, they may call the FBI but you've been dammed share. They're gonna take a look at see what's in there they're going to take a listen. They are doesn't make it right. Not committing a crime. But that's the reality of politics. It's ugly. Trump tells you the truth, even if you don't want to hear it, but I somebody who's trying to back away who's trying to get as far away from the Russia scandal as possible. This is not a good look. This is absolutely not a good. Look. I just shook my head and said, are you kidding me? Really? Then he doubled down today saying I said it, and by the way, I talked to foreign countries and leaders all the time. Anyway, it is what it is. He is who he is. There is nobody different. Nobody like him. He is completely different than anything we've ever seen in politics. He really is for for, for better at times, and for worse this right here, I thought was a swinging amiss. I really did if people saying, well, you know, George Stephanopoulos really goaded him into stuff. No, he didn't. You don't have to answer every question just because you can't doesn't mean you should. Just because you can doesn't mean you should the thing that I was surprised about and has talked about it is access with the president surreal to tell you the truth. I mean I I've interviewed a lot of presidents. I've worked in the White House. I can't believe that we got the kind of access we got over two days interviews inside the presidential limo on Air Force One in the Oval Office in the residents outside the grounds of the White House as well. The president was extraordinarily generous with his time. Yeah you us I mean, he got like on fettered access. Like you couldn't believe like, hey, let's have fun. Let's hang out. Two days, hanging out talking about all kinds of stuff. One thing about Trump is he's going to give you access for all of the all the things he hides and all this other stuff. He'll talk to anybody immediate doesn't matter. It's crazy. It is. But this right here when you want to get that Asterix removed from your last election. And you hope you win the next election, you're praying that the economy stays good. You think you've got the path to victory because you look over, and you see twenty four people that you feel don't have a chance against you. You're worried about your poll numbers, but you're saying to yourself, self got this, and I want to get away from that I want to be a legitimate president and everybody's eyes and I'm not right now. And then you say something like this, like, yeah. Sure, I'd take foreign. That doesn't help it doesn't don't make a good look. Look the left out there saying, I can't believe you said that. Yeah, I can't believe you said it either politicians because we're so used to politicians saying, whatever they want you to hear that is politically expedient to get the point across, but isn't going to hurt them. But don't tell me that Hillary Clinton if she had the chance to change places with Trump and could have got something done that could have gotten some information from some foreign land that could have hurt Trump tremendously like she tried. That she wouldn't take it and run with it. I said it earlier day when I was on Jim Sharpe, she would eat her own literally. If she had a chance to be president and I don't think Trump thinks he didn't anything wrong. I think he thinks we're just is what it is this feel. I take the information maybe I call the FBI, maybe I wouldn't. And you know, but I think anybody would you look at it whether or not you use it to different story. But I think most politicians given the opportunity would jump at some that they thought would hurt their opponent, three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow, Twitter, tweet at us, she's leaving. We've been through a lot together she's tough. But she's good. You know, you also have toughened bad, right? She's tough. And she's good. She's great and she's going to be leaving the service of her country. Yep. She's leaving the service that is Sarah Huckabee Sanders. She's going to be out of here. She's leaving three and a half years. She's been there. Now, remember originally? With spicy. Right. We've had a lot of people just run through it. She's been with him people like, well he's not at present. No. She was with him before he became president all the way through. She's going back to our Kansas, the opportunity for her to do something. She gives you the stat answer that you give everybody which is what? Family, because that's what everybody says, but, you know, I don't think she's going to be like a lot of other she may have a book in her, but it's not going to be negative, like a lot of other people, I wonder if she's going to do the top show circuit. And what's next may she run for, for office possibility is there, but she is out of there, and this is Trump's biggest supporter, and remember, these jobs, whether you like her, or the president, whoever the president is, they all have sell-by dates. It's exhausting. Now take what she does anyways, wrap it up with social media tenfold comparatively to what it's been in the past. Then put Trump there, and multiply that by a million, and you have how tough that job is because by the time you finish a sentence. Guess what? He's contradicted you exhausting. Indeed, but she seemed to enjoy it. It's one of the greatest jobs, I could ever have. I've loved every minute even the hard minutes. I've loved it. I loved the president. I love the team that I've had the opportunity to work for. So we'll see who's next. I don't know who's next. I know something me. I do know that what I was trying to think who's next who's next up. In that. That cl- that rodeo show. I wonder three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow Twitter. Tweet at us law heard from age kids, what MBA baby. You see the blues last night. Well hockey goalie. Wow freak. So I don't know if you know the story but the blues on January fifth of this this year so Stanley Cup. They were the worst team in the NHL, and they went from worst to first and hoisted the Cup last night, there New Year's resolution had to be to become the best team in the NHL, right? Something something. And so what that means, though, is you never know. And I was talking to Lukla Lipinski today, and I said, hey, Luke. This time next year. You get a hot goalie you get a team that comes together. You get a little physical, get some pucks. Debenture way coyotes could be sitting somewhere. You just don't know. They had a decent year. They didn't make the playoffs. They the last team, I think eliminated for the playoffs, but they you just never ever know three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow. Is your Twitter. You can tweet at us talk a little Kiana Reeves talk a little homelessness here in the valley. Talk about that guy wants ten million dollars for having his legs swept. Let me give you my take on that might not be popular. But you know what? At least I'm throwing it out there. Hey, every day, thousands of dogs are euthanized. While at the same time we'll lose twenty Veterans Day. Think about that. I'm working with a company called wounded paw project what they do is they go in and rescue shelter dogs. They're going to be euthanized train them to be service, dogs and then partner up with veterans first responders in their family. It is amazing. But the need your out the each cash, and if you don't say cash, I do you have an extra car an RV at truck a boat. I don't use it. I was going to trade it in. I was going to sell. It's not worth the hassle. You can have you're gonna get a tax deductible right off and that money is going to go to.

president Trump FBI Twitter Chadbensonshow White House Scandinavia George Stephanopoulos Hillary Clinton NHL Sarah Huckabee Sanders Oval Office Jim Sharpe Kansas partner Russia hockey Kiana Reeves
Ancient Gum Gives Archaeologists Something to Chew On

60-Second Science

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Ancient Gum Gives Archaeologists Something to Chew On

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. You're probably not too interested in what some people call. ABC gum already been chewed, but for archaeology such gum as long as it's really old is genetic gold mine. It's bit. Like, I guess Jurassic Park Italia. 'cause Shuba a graduate student in archaeology at oops. Ali university in Sweden, she's referring to that famous clip from the movie about how Jurassic Park scientists extract blood from a mosquito trapped in amber being Dino, DNA, except in this case, it's human DNA and it's not trapped in amber. But inside exceptionally old chewing gums found at the site of an ancient hunting, and fishing village on the west coast of Sweden. The samples look like chewed up wads of modern day gum, but don't think Wrigley's, this detritus is black sticky. Tar distilled from birchbark 'cause Shuba has tasted modern day version sin isn't eager to try it again. Liz, I'm faith for it. So why chew on something so unpleasant? Maybe because they're gum wasn't for fresh breath. It could use it to seal your boat or like seal your thoughts. So it's kind of everyday use substance, many of the gums have teeth marks too. So perhaps, they chewed it to help shape it and intern develop. A habit despite the taste that today's tobacco chewers might relate to 'cause Shuba team extracted and sequenced DNA from the ancient gum, and they found genetic evidence of three different gum chewers two women and a man. It's the oldest human DNA found in Scandinavia dating to about eight thousand b c and because it more closely resembles the DNA of hunter gatherers from western Europe than from eastern Europe. It also provides hints about how people ended up in what's now Sweden the results are in the journal communications biology. The gum could still hold other clues about ancient diets or the bacteria. These people had in their mouths so given that we can learn so much from chewing gum. Is it really that bad to stick it to the bottom of chairs and tables, you know, for the benefit of future? Archaeologists still think that one should not without any place just like that. So I think you should definitely throw it in the but I won't blame these guys who who spent as out to those years ago. They did a good job. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Sweden Christopher Dodd Yata Shuba Jurassic Park Italia Jurassic Park Christopher Don Wrigley ABC Ali University Europe LIZ Intern Graduate Student Eastern Europe Scandinavia Sixty Seconds
Who Is Viktor Orban? The Far-Right Leader Who Sat Down With Trump

All In with Chris Hayes

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Who Is Viktor Orban? The Far-Right Leader Who Sat Down With Trump

"It's a great honor to have with us, the prime minister of Hungary, and Victor Bonn has done a tremendous job in so many different ways highly respected respected all over Europe. Probably like me a little bit controversial. But that's okay. That's okay. You've done a good job the little bit controversial Hungarian prime minister who was hosted and praised by the president today is in fact, a lot controversial the right wing. Ultra nationalist is overseen. What many see is a backsliding away from liberal democracy consulting, the free press, even kicking vaunted university out of the country. He is also according to critics and outright anti Semite. In fact, last year, he gave a campaign speech framing migration as an existential threat and blaming it on George Soros, the Hungarian-born financier and holocaust survivor who orbin alleges is trying to undermine his country. Sound familiar these speech reads in part like a textbook intruding intro into antisemitic? Insults I'm quoting here. The translation we are fighting an enemy that is different from us not open but hiding not straightforward. But crafty, not honest, but base, not national, but international does not believe in working, but speculates with money does not have its own homeless. Land. But feels it owns the whole world. Could God told me now talk more about orbit and what to make of his White House? Visit his Franken four staffer the Atlantic whose latest piece is titled Viktor Orban's war on intellect Franklin. How big a deal was it for the president to invite Victor Orban over it's a huge deal. We talk about normalizing things here with Donald Trump. Donald Trump in effect was normalizing Viktor Orban's or bond is somebody who should be roundly. Denounced by the western democracies of the world, the Europeans have had a mixed record in denouncing him as he's gone about decimating, the civil society of his country, and we're bond craves getting wrapped in the legitimacy of the president of the United States. And here he was basking in the reflected glory of this relationship. It was something that he was begging for he was angling for in fact, sucking up to Trump in order to get this meeting and it hadn't happened in here. Was one of the most disturbing things he's done, and you chronicle part of this and your story is just kind of using the power of the state to wage war on independent sources of thority. Whether that's the press NGOs and universities. What what what has he done with the power that he has in Hungary? So the state of the art autocrat doesn't need to resort to violence doesn't need to resort to surveillance or midnight knocks on the door or bond is trained as a lawyer, and he's used the legal system and rewritten codes of law and used Kronius stick connections corruption to remake the press hungry was was a success story coming out of the Soviet era. It developed robust media it had robust universities. And there were there was a there was an adversarial political system, but under Oregon, that's all disappeared. His cronies have bought up. Most of the media because the state controls advertising universities, which once were very very high quality, especially relative to the rest of the region. Now have a chancellor embedded in them. And the chancellor dictates is appointed by Orban's indictates spending decisions research which used to flow through an independent and very prestigious academy is now doled out by a crony up a hack in Orban's government. What I find really chilling are the parallels between his obsession with by Gration with immigrants and scapegoating them. And particularly this idea, which you you get on the American right that like this foreign Phoenix here Jewish financier. George Soros is funding immigration, the US to undermine the country that the belief of the synagogue shooter the tree of life in Pittsburgh avowedly before he committed his mass murderer how central is that story to Orban's. It's it's. Two thousand fifteen there was a migration crisis. You had lots of refugees fleeing the Syrian war flee North Africa going through Hungary to points, north in Germany, and in Scandinavia and Orban's saw that as a huge political opportunity to try to remake himself as the leader of the European national nationalist populist, dick movement and his his big

Viktor Orban Victor Orban Donald Trump Hungary President Trump George Soros Prime Minister Victor Bonn United States Europe White House Chancellor Oregon Franken Pittsburgh Kronius Scapegoating Franklin Gration Germany
Top 2 Ways to Learn English

All Ears English Podcast | Real English Vocabulary | Conversation | American Culture

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Top 2 Ways to Learn English

"So the number one way for sure I would say movies. I remember, I don't know if I've told the story on the show before, but I was living in Amsterdam for a little while in my twenties. And I met this dude from Norway, and he was like completely fluent in English. Like, he spoke as if he had grown up in New York like interesting the accent and everything, and I was like have you lived in the states, and he's like I've never been to an English speaking country, and he wasn't even a good student. He didn't like study English in school or anything. He just watched movies like movies constantly all the time. And that's how he learned his fluent English. So work south really interesting, and yeah, you see that in. Yeah. Definitely in plate like in Norway and Scandinavia different parts of Scandinavia. People seem fluent basically a hundred percent. I went and. Yeah, that is amazing. If you're because it's really like being immersed in English in a sense, your entertainment is immersed in English for. For sure for sure I just want sort of out of the box recently as far as movies go and watched an action movie called den of thieves, and I absolutely loved him. You know, just the heist film with a bunch of shooting. And I, you know, I appreciate the action genres, and I know a lot of listeners like action. So I recommend den of thieves. I love it. I love it. So that is our number one recommendation. So that is that number one and number two is right in that. Same order is watching an English Serey or multiple series. And the reason I like this personally is that you get like I said before you can kind of get invested in the story and the characters over a longer period of time. So I feel like your fluency kind of carries out over time. So it's kind of it becomes a bit of a project to come back to the show all the time and spreads spread it out in a sense rather than just two hours of intense immersion. It's over weeks. True. Yeah. And it's easier to consume if it's like twenty minutes on like, the good place or something older like cheers or Frazier. I still like those old ones too. And so it's easy to fit in like even on a lunch break, you could watch an episode. But then also with these prestige television sort of series like the one I mentioned the leftovers or. Like, the very first one the sopranos stuff like that. You get to know these characters and how they talk, and they do have like sort of catchphrases or quirky things that they say all the time. And so I think this little bit of repetition along with getting really comfortable with how they talk that accent. And you just understand more and more at every episode, and you do forget, you're learning at all because you get so like you said like invested in the story and what's happening. That's so true. That's so true. Does. I mean, I know a lot of people like friends, and that's great. It's awesome. If you guys like friends, we love to recommend other options to kind of branch out from that for sure I know on another episode. We mentioned the marvelous MRs Mazel that is only auch. Yup. I love it. I just finished watching a British one called the flowers, which is also amazing Livia Coleman is in it. She won best actress for the favorite. She won the. Oscar this year, and she's she can do comedy drama everything. And this is I would say a drama. It's a mixture of comedy and drama, so the flowers. Yeah. Something is one that. I like is the good doctor. So the acting is not amazing. I feel like what I've despite what you just said Jessica about the hang award that the person one I almost feel like with so many kind of series out there. Now, I feel like the acting is maybe not as good. But maybe kind of the story lines are interesting. You know, they're kinda there's there's a certain quality to a lot of shows. And it's not always in the acting. Sometimes it is though, but I like the good doctor. So it's a story of a doctor that has autism. Really interesting story. So that's one that I would recommend you guys. Yeah. I think because the good doctors a network show. Right. So we're talking like ABC NBC. Those. Yeah. That's right. So, but you are definitely following. You're coming back every week in your following a story line. So it's essentially it's the same thing. Yeah. That's awesome. And then so those are the top two, I sure and I really like the sixth one that he gave where you make yourself speak out loud. Every day you have to listening to half of it. Right. You have to take what you watched. What you listen to and use it somehow. Right. So definitely find a website like just Google conversation starters. And there's so many websites like two hundred and fifty conversation topics more than enough right for you to just

Livia Coleman Norway Mrs Mazel Scandinavia Amsterdam New York Google Frazier Oscar Jessica ABC NBC Hundred Percent Twenty Minutes Two Hours
SAS pilot strike grounds more flights across Scandinavia

AP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

SAS pilot strike grounds more flights across Scandinavia

"Scandinavian Airlines has cancelled virtually all of its flights following the launch Friday of an open ended pilot strike after the collapse of pay negotiations. Seventy two thousand passengers are affected in ports throughout Scandinavia SAS. Toughest and yellow vests helping stranded passengers to revoke or obtain refunds the pilots negotiations that started in March mainly centered on salary increases and working hours. Details of not been released, but the union says it won't salaries to be in line with the market rate. Well, SAS negotiators have cooled the requests unreasonable and

Scandinavian Airlines Scandinavia
Study: Universal Basic Income Won't Make People Work Less

Slate Money

03:32 min | 1 year ago

Study: Universal Basic Income Won't Make People Work Less

"In Finland and give them an extra five hundred years. And I think the Emily or right? The headline result here is it's good. They are happy. They are healthiest right. It's not necessarily getting them to work. And I do think that was. The initial point of the study and while it's still very early. So it is entirely possible that this could change as we move forward. I guess this is where I wonder if you are going to get the benefit that we have seen a little bit in poor countries where you see more business development and people this actually does kind of spur people on in terms of job growth, which I definitely we haven't seen that. And I I wonder if that will actually be the case I wanted to just say, I am so happy that this is the frame of discussion that the frame of the discussion this if you give me if you give people more money, they more like to work, or are they more likely to because it wasn't that long ago. The if you talked about giving people money, everyone will say, well, if you give people money they're going to be less likely to work because they'll be like, why do I need to work if I'm getting this free money? And no one is saying that no one is even like that whole hypothesis has been has been completely rejected. I do think it's important just to note a little bit that in the seventies in the US. When we did have a little bit of like kind of negative income tax. There was an effect on employment, especially women. No, no, no, no. There was a reduced. No. There was definitely was definitely mega that was by stopped it now. I don't I agree with you. I do think that more and more data. We're seeing now it suggests that if you give money at doesn't necessarily mean that you're going to reduce labor force participation. But I just want to clarify that the other thing I was gonna say is in addition to the benefit of better, health and happiness, there was this were these other interesting results about trust in government, and civic society. And I feel like this is a very very positive results considering right now, we're in sort of this democratic crisis where people don't trust the government, and there's populist uprisings, and you know, real threats to democracy. It's it's interesting that the social there's a social benefit that the government could do that would make people more attached. About cash ran sets from the government in general is the if you realize if you'll on social security, Medicare, Medicaid, and you'll, you know, receiving substantial amounts of money from the government, you generally like those programs, and you like the people who are giving them to you. And you know, that there we had sort of take you'll government hands off my Medicare types. But like, those those people, you know, notwithstanding I think that you do find absolutely right insofar as the government is performing redistributive function, and is giving money to people who need money that makes people like government. Yeah. I mean, the only thing I would say is that Scandinavia has notoriously high satisfaction with government. So I do wonder how much we can extrapolate there. But it's it's possible. And I do agree with you that I think when government programs work well people like. I mean, one of the reasons I guess they're scaling back in Finland is because they already have great benefits ready, very college. It was a change in Korea healthcare. They went from. They went from a more liberal to a more conservative guys, but still again free college free house free. They're paying. Axes, but I pay a lot of taxes too. And I don't get again free college free health care to save for it.

Finland Emily United States Scandinavia Civic Society Medicare Korea Medicaid Five Hundred Years
Sweden's Cashless Experiment: Is It Too Much Too Fast?

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Sweden's Cashless Experiment: Is It Too Much Too Fast?

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox ING and instead of closing this holiday. The UPS store is doing another ING altogether. Opening the UPS store every ING for small business. And of course, shipping cash maybe king, but there are more ways to buy and sell and store our money than ever before. We're looking at what's beyond cash in this month's all tech considered. For a glimpse of what the US economy might look like in the future we head to Scandinavia. No country is dropping cash as fast as Sweden. Just thirteen percent of people there reported using cash to buy something last year. But as Mattie savage reports from Stockholm some Swedes or concern that things have changed too quickly next to the cinnamon buns and open sandwiches at this restaurant has launched new sign with the English word cash. Cross doubt notes and coins stopped being accepted here a year ago off staff noticed most people will be using them. Superiour bites. Eight five percent something like that. And the restaurant was using cash. That's general manager Christopher Lert who's been keeping an eye on. How customers have responded probably been any reaction almost everybody has felt tentative payment method. And it's good for both the guests. He says scrapping cash saves time at the till and helps protect against theft. That's been a worry for many Swedish businesses since a string of high profile robberies in the early two thousands as strong digital infrastructure, and a small tech savvy population have also encouraged the cashless trend here, but there are growing concerns. Not everyone is benefiting. I'm interested not to obey. I'm the president of the national pensioners organization. I'm seventy five years so in Sweden. There are about one million inhabitants of ten millions. Who are not familiar to use the dictator way, she says the majority of this group are over sixty-five. But it also includes people with certain disabilities and newly arrived refugees Jimmy did in many ways for restaurants shops, would you are going to park your car, then you should all. Zeus app or a card. So that's making a lot of difficulties. She says even going to public toilets can pose a problem. They often cost ten kroner, which must be paid by card. Another concern is that most banks have stopped letting people take out or pay in cash over the counter Sweden's central Bank. The Rix Bank has been pushing local branches to keep notes and coins in circulation. Hello. Signal will come to the Rix Bank. We would like to see the banks continuing supplying their customers with cash services getting Sweden thought things were going to go. This quick. I think most of us has been taken by surprise by the speed of this development. Most counties are pushing digital technology, and if you are successful, this will how consequential for cash the security of digital payments is another issue for the authorities but Klay Ingram bogus post doctoral researcher at Stockholm school of economics says that in general sweets, have very high levels of trust in banks and institutions ordinary Swedes are not concerned tall, the convenience of having your Bank account your money at your fingertips and increasing the on on your smart watch vastly outweighs any concerns that they have about security or about being tracked back. At Irvine deli restaurant. The copies haven't stopped flowing all day. Most of the customers here in that twenties thirties, and it is hard to find anyone with major worries about the cashless trend a hassle free love to use digital taxi apps. Like Uber don't have to hassle with Kathy. That's blumquist another customer Fabian, est. N says he would even support a future notes and coins and phased out completely nor you still more. So it's just easier to just get rid of it. But even in this innovative country. It seems most Swedes on not ready for a completely cashless future. A nationwide poll says seven and ten still want cash to stick around for now. For MBA news. I'm Maddie savage in Stockholm. This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Sweden Stockholm NPR Rix Bank Comcast Mattie Savage Maddie Savage Fabian United States MBA Stockholm School Of Economics Theft Scandinavia General Manager Christopher Lert President Trump Irvine Deli Jimmy
"scandinavia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"So people raise the issue of Scandinavia. You don't need capitalism. And you don't need religion look at how great Scandinavia's doing. Scandinavia is disappearing because of the birth rate Scandinavia is ceasing to be Scandinavia because of the vast number of people took in from the Middle East because Sweden feels the Swedes. Have a view of itself as a sort of chosen people that they are morally better than the rest. I remind people that Sweden was. Neutral in World War Two. That's right Sweden. Did not fight the Nazis Sweden helped the Nazis and helped the west. Just for the record. And then Sweden was more than neutral in the Cold War, Sweden was was anti the United States in the Cold War. That I mentioned the time magazine piece. Last weeks. I have to tweet this tweet it out. Last week's cover story or or lead story. I don't know if it was the cover story time magazine. Stated that the United States fought the lead the lead article in time magazine stated that the US fought in in Vietnam. Behalf of capitalism. You.

Sweden Scandinavia time magazine United States Middle East Vietnam
"scandinavia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"There are a lot of furniture fairs around the world. What sets this one apart? Yes. Yes, you're right. There are many fairs, and I think that the stock fair is special in in the sense that it's well, it's obviously certain dot com in Sweden in Scandinavia. So it's a very Scandinavian affair, and I think that's the the main attraction you have, you know, eighty percent of exhibitors from Scandinavia. But of course, you have exhibitors from many other countries as well. But you come in your rive, and you have this sort of, you know, the pared-down Scandinavian elegant look going on throughout the way that the the show is the first lady, oh as well as the products, and and everything so and of course. It's it's become very very important fair and think that buyers and sellers and producers furniture makers brands, they won't be there. And they want to be seen, and it's a very very good event to to network, and it's a strong market here. You know? So I think that it's it's indeed a very very important fair and special as well. Be imagining as I know I am myself some Voss yet tastefully. Furnished hang full of stripped pine goods is is it basically that is it all that Scandinavian aesthetic that you were talking about. Well, it is it is. But you have you know, bits and pieces mixed in with that too. Not everything is absolutely handsome wouldn't say. But of course, there is a lot of word and just that Scandinavian fielded and also actually one of the themes or one of the subjects that the fair..

Scandinavia Voss Sweden eighty percent
"scandinavia" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"Welcome back and high fly has its first eighth HR eighty customer bed. It's not who pretty much anyone anywhere ever expected. So it's not their first wet lease extended wet lease customers. The Jose a rescue operation for Thomas Cook Scandinavia roads passengers in roads were affected by an IT outage. And so they had a bunch of people that they need to get back Scandinavia. So instead of sending eight three twenty one day get any three eighty while. They there was an article in. I don't know where at this point. But basically, we looked everywhere for charter aircraft. We couldn't find anyone. Thanks Norwegians using the rolls. Royce Trent one thousand there are literally no aircraft in the world that airlines can pick up for a quick charter the only thing hanging around was eight three eighty that. Hi fi just put into operation. And so now it's on its way as. As we record on its way from from Copenhagen to to Larnaca that Helvin gauge from Thomas Cook eight three twenty one can you you magin being those people who are like, you know, we're we're second. We're second. Learnt guys love. Oh. By the way, here is and I'm going to be interested. Where did those people sit? I don't water they even gonna do with that aircraft and Larnaca they ever had in. I know they've had three eighty there for a medical diversion, but never regular service. Nobody's soon. They'll do the same thing. I guess but brings him stares over s on some masses in Moga fit in the the x Singaporean first class, and who goes into business classes Thomas Cook. Obviously does not have a first class week. I don't know. I'm guessing you could put them all in economy on the lower deck in the upper deck is just there for funsies. I mean, wouldn't that be awful, though, we, but you know, I it's it's good training for. Hi fi. Because it's not their first extended wet lease. But it still get some experience with actual customer passengers customers yet hope hopefully, hopefully, they let him sit at least in the business class seats. I don't know if you were on board. This aircraft Email, Ian at what's the nothing. Come on. Podcast effort for of it. If you have any insight into how this flight actually ended up being operated, and there's one tomorrow around trip between Oslo in pulmonary yorker that they're running as well. I think the same kind of we needed a bigger plane up gauge thing don't know who will be I extended wet ways of this aircraft be. I mean, it's probably Norwegian. But we don't know that for sure. Yeah. We exactly it's mean, it's Norwegians very safe bet. But but it would be interesting to see plot twist its Singapore. That would be interesting. Speaking of giant planes, the beluga XL I flew since we last since we last met. So now, there's a giant whale. Roaming, the European countries side cool. The thing is massive it is so ugly. But it's massive. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I'm yes, it's ugly. But whatever its massive it is it's doing its thing and by can fly, it's the ugly is the dream lifter. Yeah. No that checks out. But you know. Yeah. I see those side by side, though, why I mean that would be I wonder has that ever happened. So the the original beluga, I believe did not have the range to fly to the US than I guess it could do it. If it makes a bunch of stops. But I won't could be new beluga XL fly nonstop to the US just to show off one day. I do not know that would be fun. That would be fun and bring it to maybe thinking. Bring it to Oshkosh next year that big oh that would be cool. I'm gonna write a letter. Yeah. So hetero, not who somebody. So Oshkosh was last week, and you and I unfortunately didn't have the chance to to make it up there. But over six hundred thousand people did and more than ten thousand.

Thomas Cook Thomas Cook Scandinavia Larnaca Scandinavia Oshkosh US Royce Trent Moga Singapore Copenhagen Oslo Ian Helvin s eight three twenty one day one day
"scandinavia" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on The Bugle

"Reproduce? Can they. One of the problems are Scandinavians tolling birthright in Scandinavia's. Women are happy. It could be more. The men are firing blanks, and they need some Irish men to reverse invade the situation. We're not much to look at all Irish man, but we're up -solutely swimming with you. We are. We are some Jisr heavy men. Science, at least that Samuel Beckett. Well, you're doing in the bucks just seeking. Just got their own little long boats and they're trying to get back. Back over there really right yard. You can make some dirty, which is. Really force knit dirty. It was nothing dirty thought fjords are very navigable. Or were you telling that the monks? Because although they could not, they see, that's the thing that laws of people don't understand is where. They were celebrate. They sell obscene not chastity. Celibacy is you get married. Jesse is you kind of have sex. All of the monks were in fact, very lusty individuals. Day you bring facts here. That was true. I don't think I've ever said a true thing. Fitting in very well on this show under. So. The a huge impact on the country. The extent of the impact of the World Cup run on this country is that a number of British supermarkets have said they will close early on Sunday if England reaches the final and that that was everything in perspective because we do not stop shopping for king anything these days. I mean, all supermarkets would not shot for the apocalypse, frankly, they will be tomato hanging on after the rest of the planet. At ended the four horsemen tap that watches ostentatiously through the window on the stole managed to try to put them off by saying, we've got two for one deal on bags of carrots and sugar. Plums. Maybe a horse would like that you lose here is an important announcement. It seems that none of us know how to brush your teeth probably, but don't panic. Quit is here to save your teeth. Quip is electric toothbrush..

Samuel Beckett Scandinavia Jesse Jisr England
"scandinavia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on KGO 810

"And do we go ahead with scandinavia and trigger more russian provocations or do we back off and say scandinavia you're fine by yourself don't joy yeah i think it would be a mistake to expand nato any further if europe collectively if if turks and greeks and others he'll they want to pledge their lives to defend not only estonians latvians who are already they'd open also sweets and swedes and finns who managed to remain independent and part of the west throughout the entire cold war without joining nato somehow feel the need to join now then that's all fighting did in europe to make that decision collectively i don't think we can make the argument again to those iowa young men and women new yorkers wyoming kids that we need to put their lives on the line you defend these people especially when they spend a pittance of their of their own income on national defense where they ask us to make sacrifices going to agree with you chris gray with you but congress doesn't congress is committed to the the chest pounding and war building that's going on right now the commitment to ukraine is not slight the talk about oh i wa i warning systems on the russian frontier is not slight and these photographs that we have courtesy of nato do indicate reinforcement of the russian forces in kaliningrad congress is going to follow this hawkish path are a deepen the likelihood of conflict your measure yeah you know this this reminds me of when mitt romney says russia's the greatest put gop strategic threat of our time just wasn't so there are a bunch of people in congress who like data they love to take congressional delegations during recesses until their pie holes and have great conversations and wax about the good old days of world war two in nato i just don't think the american people there were suffering now from political driven by yellow journalism except that russia's impact on the twenty sixteen election in russia had no impact on the twenty sixteen election kind of money that they've put into our political system wouldn't be sufficient to sway a dogcatcher election in cleveland much less way the presidential i mean they've always engaged in political warfare it's what they do they had soviet active measures they incidentally argue that we do as well through radio free europe and through this sort of human rights industrial complex in our democracy promotion they're all useless christian you know the radio free europe is really nothing that it was in the nineteen eighties it's a sliver of its former self i think the russian claim is is sort of laughable the same way that their political war efforts are very ham fisted i think easily defeated just by caffeine light on them i think are away probably if we go look now voice of america it probably talks more about you know the the hearing today on capitol hill than it does about what russia is doing so all of this has a degree of force so there is support for nato you're absolutely right i just think know donald trump he causes a freak out but all these doing is saying hey should we really be paying all this and hey should germany really cutting deals with the russians at the same time it saying we need to spend more defending kristen witness state department senior adviser and f for the trump administration and the trump transition he was also in the bush administration at the state department mary kissel the aditorial board of the wall.

scandinavia
"scandinavia" Discussed on Windows Weekly

Windows Weekly

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on Windows Weekly

"Researching our current trip we of course are watching shows about scandinavia's dark no this no there's an episode does of i think it's it's sweden not not just stock on but sweden yeah goes up to some place in northern sweden and he hates it and he literally this is so awful imitates hanging himself in his hotel room oh dear yeah there you know these ends so my wife and i are watching this we're like what mike off of nasty why is that it's awful it's awful yeah because chris as probably most of you know that's how we ended up dying it's just unbelievable a nice still don't you know i was it was in the middle of such a great career i never will understand what happened but everybody but leaves i think the issue with dr right it's exactly and i you know i feel like so i kind of mentioned the right thing the truth is i feel like people in our industry like the technology industry also i think there's like i think this just like a broken personality complex kind of almost on the spectrum kind of thing that i i see a lot and i when i hear about this kind of stuff if you don't have depression if you've never been depressed you don't really understand it obviously but i feel like there's a lot of it out there and i i think it's a lot more common than people the way he describes his kitchen understand working you know it's it's the at casts it's the people didn't fit in in not all points out not all kitchen's like mine but i you know it's it is interesting reading this now in light of what happened and for the signs it's a great jaji but he was a great writer and i don't you know tv shows but nothing frankly tops kitchen confidential i think that's the book that kick started his career star okay now it's time for mary jo foley be less depressing than i was up i have a nice upbeat tip for enterprise picking another one where people ask me this almost weekly they were saying you know back back in june microsoft said the april update for windows ten also known as eighteen three was ready for business deployment but then people would go to microsoft's official website where they have their windows ten release information in their history and if you looked at what it said on there it said it wasn't ready for business and so i kept periodically checking this chart and i'm like nope still they haven't updated it well that's weird they told us it was ready but as of yesterday july tenth they have marked eighteen three officially ready for a semi annual channel deployment so people who have been waiting for this chart to change it changed and what is different is they put the june cumulative update as part of what you need to be designated as ready so take eighteen three plus june cumulative update boom you're ready.

scandinavia sweden
"scandinavia" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on WGTK

"I like i like it so far too but i'm intrigued by it and i like scifi in fact when we do our chief movie review there's a scifi movie right of the four genre science fiction genre sometimes good and sometimes it can be a little too freaky for me when it gets into the paranormal yeah paranormal i agree with that there's something there's something that i've been watching called the rain on net flicks when i get a chance and of course it's not like i have a ton of time to burn up because you get into that bingewatching thing but it's called the rain and it's a scifi drama about survivors of a deadly storm and the whole idea is the rate i mean the rain is what gets to people and i like it it's kind of mixed reviews and but i i don't know i i like it i think there is some there's something about it the whole realizing you need to survive and what's the thing that can kill you and it's the rain and it's it takes place after a brutal virus wipes out most of scandinavia's population so if you're into sifi checkout we just talked about lost in space and the rain both happened to be on net flicks were bouncing over to the other side into the mail bag next on atm a friend knows the song in your heart and sings it to you when you've forgotten the words i found it heart song memory care with that verse in mind to provide compassionate dementia care in a professional secure setting in many ways it's better than home because we provide health care emotional support and social living activities that a family member can't always provide twenty four seven at home.

scandinavia
"scandinavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well unfortunately the issue of climate change is colored by our political landscape i fear and that is probably one reason it wasn't mentioned i will say that the author of the report did make several public statements in which he said warming is occurring and that is allowing ticks to survive in many new places and that's basically what i found in my research of the scientific literature i compared archival data to current situations of in terms of where ticks can live and it's pretty clear that it is a great time to be a tick on planet earth right now takes are moving north not only through the us but into canada which is a new frontier for lime disease they're moving north into scandinavia russia china even australia many many countries around the globe are having a problem with tick borne disease and that means more and more unfortunately lime disease and the other associated illnesses but let me ask you just in general i mean it may be a scandal in many people's minds i think it is that there was nothing in the report about climate change but there's another scandal here and that's a scandal ridden about in your book and i'd like to just outlined this for our listeners you're talking about the way lime disease in the united states is managed you've called it a scanner you call it a moral and legal disgrace i do indeed michael for years this disease has been framed as something that is relatively easy to diagnose and pretty straightforward.

scandinavia russia china united states canada australia michael
"scandinavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well unfortunately the issue of climate change is colored by our political landscape i fear and that is probably one reason it wasn't mentioned i will say that the author of the report did make several public statements in which he said warming is occurring and that is allowing ticks to survive in many new places and that's basically what i found in my research of the scientific literature i compared archival data to current situations of in terms of where ticks can live and it's pretty clear that it is a great time to be a tick on planet earth right now takes are moving north not only through the us but into canada which is a new frontier for lime disease they moving north into scandinavia russia china even austrailia many many countries around the globe or having a problem with tick borne disease and that means more and more unfortunately lime disease and the other associated illnesses but let me ask you just in general i mean it may be a scandal in many people's minds i think it is that there was nothing in the report about climate change but there's another scandal here and that's a scandal ridden about in your book and i'd like to just outlined this for our listeners you're talking about the way lime disease in the united states is managed you've called it a scanner you call it a moral and legal disgrace i do indeed michael for years this disease has been framed as something that is relatively easy to diagnose and pretty straightforward to cure and.

scandinavia russia china united states canada austrailia michael
"scandinavia" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Because of of jason's citing his friend who's who's who was a jew says while i'm really not a jew because i don't practice judaeism so i often say there were two groups that are very confused about the meaning redefinition definition of ju and those groups are nonjews and jews other than that it's clear isabelle why did you is is very clear to extraterrestrials but to terrestrial up at i can explain it i if he asked the right guy jews are both the people and a religion and that since that is very rare in the modern world it was very common in the ancient world but if you if you were in a gilgen might than you you know you're a gilgal might nationally and religiously you had your guilt might god's and so on but that is very rare today the only uh only parallel i can think of dr hindus who are both a member of a nation the hindu nation and the hindu religion um but uh s so police so please understand that that has always been the case so therefore unlike christianity you can't be it at a christian atheist it's not you could be culturally christian you could even our christmas tree an be an atheist uh having to have a lotta christmas trees in russia and a lot of atheist there seoul uh or scandinavia for that matter nevertheless uh that is the that is the way it works it christianity is a religion at judaism is of people that the people of israel israel israel as a nation if the members of that nation may not believe in anything jewish does justice there are americans who believe in nothing american but they're still american they may even hate america they're still american because they're a member of the american people now and by the way the american parallel as a very good one because you can become a member of the american people no matter what race or nationality you come from likewise you you could become a member of the jewish people by converting through judaism so there is a religious vehicle to becoming a member of the people of endures mosher members anybody else a lot of.

jason russia scandinavia america israel
"scandinavia" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"While certainly in our hard left ideas you like this is utopia the once they go you now in sweden day in a filling the bica okay i believe in my view looking for scandinavia the after deck did he say scandinavian i agamemnon sailor go ahead doesn't matter of that area yeah okay why said left alone the it's about uh 221 nurses femaletomale and sort of left alone it's twenty two one engine ears male to female that's in the most of all places in the world when they leave you alone now if you wanna go start trying to get involved with that in mandating that quotas on engineers and quotas on nurses than you can start shifting that around but it gets a little crazy that gets a little scary for the folks that don't like the huge government like myself i would just like is many people who'd like the flowed into nursing do nursing are flowed in engineering do engineering regardless of what it is but i don't need to see the breakdown that'll just be and i assume in scandinavia they're not a bunch of roadblocks two females becoming engineers it's just they're not as interested in engineering as males are and vice versa with nursing i don't know that even and you can go well that's a little job that's a big job i nursing is probably a better job than engineer in terms of consistency and pay i there's a million different kinds of engineers i've never met a nurses out of war in iraq put that we we had some times but lately certainly not now all right so what did you do with your vote wrong i there's there's a lot of things they wanna do that they're very qualified for through certain like graduate school programs and things like that and i just said that ago i'm sorry you you need not apply oh really look at the history here they're not only no no.

scandinavia engineer iraq sweden
"scandinavia" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on The Good Fight

"The labour markets in scandinavia are very egalitarian and remained so so when you thinking about redistribution what makes it we case that just the kinds of salaries would companies payva workers have a much smaller differential in sweden and norway where where were you grew up harshly and many other places bendu in the united states i think the most obvious thing must be the distribution of power right that if workers have some bargaining power than the outcomes will be more favorable to them if power is more equally distributed than probably material rewards will also be more equally distributed that at these fits if you look around different countries where it is easier for lowerpaid workers to demand more they tend to get what so it in a sort of obvious sense except that doesn't get us very far to what can be done about this but just to tell the scandinavian story it was one in which first unions have always been strong and remain strong and where there's been a social consensus around a collaborative muddled where employers organisations and employees organizations unions try to find in our episode a compromise where the state's role is to facilitate that sort of compromise and ever will kind of understands this tripartite division of responsibilities now one speculative thought is that this is in part because of the pressures of globalization so all the scandinavian and nordic countries are small countries open countries very much exposed to globalization this was swings in the global economy and one speculative soldiers that is precisely because they are open to globalization and therefore vulnerable that as societies they have sort of stuck together and say you know let's do this in a way where our conflicts internally don't make us all worse off because we are externally expose we need to survive in a big world right.

scandinavia sweden united states global economy norway
"scandinavia" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on Slate Money

"Is it with this little bit lazy i i still think that there are lots of things that yes you couldn't do hey you couldn't for example in no way they decided to kill off all old school radio news move all digital basically they gave people a year to adjust but then the just did it that would be hauled in the country like no in the in the us relates a v wade had that with tv in uk yep let me say you did it i remember the i think that was pretty controversial at but that was while virtually varia you get you get more pushback well you can do these things i'm with memed my pets peeve is childcare in the u s o for the uk in the uk is well for that matter childcare is something that economically we know is better getting more women out into work view as female participation rate is below japan's now in scandinavia if you want to look at why scandinavia's pretty wealth is pickles cosa will women a working that is a huge boon's actually subsidize will free child case actually something that might pay for itself is something is a samdong i think most people in the us who quite welcome it it's just the implementation yup just drags all know never happens will probably never will happen sadly i have one last question which is about entrepreneurship and it's not the in know no that scandinavia some massive tech hub like spotify notwithstanding but there is a lot of anecdotal storytelling about the idea that if you have a strong social safety net daniel more likely to be willing and able to take risks because you know that there's a good statistical john's the are going to fail but at the same time you know that if you do failed it's not the end of the world in that helps to drive social mobility entrepreneurship at i'll i'll at ronca first by there's actually it's not just an anecdote such a lot of data today they search this issue unnecessary varies within scandinavia a great deal sweden is actually a venture capital hub like it very much as i top10 for percentage of venture capitals porsche the economy that kind of thing i'm and it has a very high startup upright like internationally competitive.

us wade uk japan scandinavia john sweden spotify
"scandinavia" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"The the retention acquisition target that's why that share prices entrusting and so on the good business very profitable yearoveryear little bits of growth immigrate market that adopts called payments really well and in scandinavia they've been quite innovative without being on safe that not on the top of the list of companies that you've heard around preachers unlike hotline payment systems in the us and several others so this is kind of slapbang in the mid lov that nassir a quote unquote finn tech they're an old he will be payments venda put their ineffective warm a what's private equity going to do in a market like scandanavia that has been very very fast to adopt things like swish customer ky see some of the banco de type stuff we've seen over the like what are they going to do i'm really excited to see with private equity cash won't say growth potential are they going to take nets into new markets as a as a payments processor all they gonna look to develop new products for scandinavia i'm going to watch just one closely calls i'm a payments snowed and see what happened where it's interesting that the thin takes that have been spinoff of banks the being the most successful or in that so the vende mode clooney territory swish vips ticky but from abn amro is this almost mortal that people following off actually there is this need for this pits pay payment thing even in pretty evolved territories and banks can get together in order to make that happen pretty quickly.

scandinavia us abn amro clooney
"scandinavia" Discussed on Marketing Today

Marketing Today

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on Marketing Today

"I have my favorite brands i mean i love starbucks and howard schultz and where he thinks about his company in there and expands what it does non there i like i k ah i kia from scandinavia because of bringing down the cost of furniture and appliances and and so on i like of course apple very much for bringing into being so many wonderful products tim cooke seems to be doing a good job and i am dazzled by jeff bezos and his amazon empirebuilding he doesn't stop i mean from books to everything into uh if new ways to deliver products and sean so i follow certain companies and more often in the consumer area i still think i can learn a lot from proctor and gamble but i can learn even more sometimes across from unilever unilever's president coo is paul pullman and paul made a very ambitious so promise in the sense he said i believe that we have to get the climate under control and i believe we got to make the whole world a better place for more people and i've been still make profits for the company doing that i can reconcile corporate social responsibility and traffic making so and i think the recent things see is done with dove in other products in the show kind of a new level of consumer marketing well it it's simply a theme especially trying to confront issues of society yeah yeah and that starbucks as well you talk about treating employees well i've heard stories and read a lot about how they do that themselves and yes there are outstanding in a sense uh this is a on question to ask them like you're so but where do you see the future of marketing there i hope it goes more digital and yet not all the way uh because there might be a clash between mathematical and scientific approaches to building a powerful marketing position and creative.

starbucks howard schultz scandinavia tim cooke jeff bezos unilever unilever coo paul pullman apple sean president
"scandinavia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"scandinavia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"It's one swedish town is proposing to allow sex on government time i love sweden do you a little creepy much like most of scandinavia when it comes to sex this guy named her eric move go it's probably pronounced pair pair eric moscow's a a counselor in a small swedish town is proposing that municipal employees should be allowed a break from their work day to have the sax isn't that was called after work well i mean i think fit when he he's proposing is that that release during the workday me in them productivity how disgusting and creepy and hr call worthy is i'll be back you guys go to have the sachs i think that there last month jail does about that in in sweden let's play that all the way through though okay like you're at work and you're like okay i gotta go have my sex now terrific a me too seem like a good idea does it seem like your water your when garnett guyana here when donny goes home for sex do you do you have to take it to that play i did because you're not taking my point okay you needed me to go to get a reassuring to understand what we're dealing with never in a million years should you ever agree to allow sex break at work i think it sounds like a fun idea but i don't understand how they in four sets so i thought about forcing it it's about giving people the opportunity to take it for usa i'm taking my sex brake now yeah and then like if he wants discuss it they wanted to just be a nap break or a very long live everywhere thinks you taken the sex break but don't we all kind of know that no point during no an average when have you last thought about any of your colors with the exception of one who had severe issues in that department and she's no longer here when have you ever heard about your coworkers having said never but what i'm saying is don't.

sweden scandinavia eric moscow guyana garnett donny million years