35 Burst results for "Sayed"

New York PD Shoots Man Who Attacked Them With Metal Pipe

The Energy Show

00:45 sec | 2 hrs ago

New York PD Shoots Man Who Attacked Them With Metal Pipe

"Island man was injured when he was shot by police officers at his home Friday after he allegedly swung a metal pipe at officers, according to the NYPD is preliminary investigation. Two officers responded to a call about a person acting radically on Maldon place around 10 36 PM the officers talk to the 45 year old man and got him into an ambulance as he was receiving treatment from the EMS. Police say he left the ambulance pressure's way past the officers and ran back inside a second floor apartment. The officers followed him inside, and that's when police say he picked up a 2.5 ft Long metal pipe. Began swinging at the officer's mess immediately render first aid and transported the mail of Staten Island University North Hospital, where he's currently in surgery,

Nypd Maldon EMS Staten Island University North
Thousands March in Hungary Pride Parade to Oppose LGBT Law

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 3 hrs ago

Thousands March in Hungary Pride Parade to Oppose LGBT Law

"Thousands marched in budapest hungary and today's annual gay pride parade as the bbc's nick thorp reports. This year's demonstration comes just weeks. After hungary's parliament proved a law that bans providing materials that are deemed as promoting homosexuality to anyone under eighteen day. Providence have taken place every year in hungary since nineteen ninety-two but this march has been given extra publicity by recent steps by the feeders government allure pasta in mid june by parliament banned the depiction or promotion of homosexuality and transgender issues. Among the under eighteens the organizers of the pride march say they want to stand up for a diverse open inclusive society against what they call the stigmatizing efforts of the government.

Hungary Nick Thorp Budapest Feeders Government BBC Providence Parliament
Ranging Bull: 'Barney' eludes capture days after farm escape

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 hrs ago

Ranging Bull: 'Barney' eludes capture days after farm escape

"An escaped bull has eluded capture for several days on Long Island New York despite all kinds of attempts to lure him including treats and a female companion the fifteen hundred pound bull escaped slaughter Tuesday Frankie Florida with strong island animal rescue says they've tried a lot of things to capture him starting with a bat and tranquilizer guns effective day we set up nice greeting how dare to attract him you know with the person down in her scent not get more third day we set up a trap I think with it you bring loaded door we put out ballot but we put all type stuff that he would like it treats the radio says the ball is around matter bill and has plenty of fresh water grass and food so likely is staying put but once captured will go to an animal sanctuary Julie Walker on Long Island

Frankie Florida Long Island New York Julie Walker
Ranging Bull: ‘Barney' Eludes Capture Days After Farm Escape

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 hrs ago

Ranging Bull: ‘Barney' Eludes Capture Days After Farm Escape

"The search continues for a bull on the loose in the burbs of New York City he escaped from a slaughter on Long Island to stay in there been sightings lately around matter bill as well as lots of jokes is not being funny about it they can keep their job and felt a bit like you we're concerned about animal safety thank you Florida with strong island animal rescue says ball the ball is not dangerous you wouldn't want to get into a car crash with a fifteen hundred pound animal so the search continues I've been in with optimal placement we have been with our night vision we've been flying drones we've been patrolling the area once found he'll be sent to a sanctuary Julie Walker on Long Island

Long Island New York City Florida Julie Walker
Michigan Resident Says Noose in Window Meant for Politicians

The Money Hour

00:29 sec | 4 hrs ago

Michigan Resident Says Noose in Window Meant for Politicians

"A lot of attention for hanging a noose in a window that he says was a statement about corrupt politicians and had nothing to do with race. Greg Casimir has lived in Grand Rapids for years in a neighborhood with a large black population. He tells a local TV station. He removed the news after a neighbor told him about posts on social media. That described what he did as racially offensive. Police say they investigated but the news was already gone. Hefty fines

Greg Casimir Grand Rapids
Rivian Raises $2.5 Billion in New Funding Led by Amazon, Ford

News, Traffic and Weather

00:12 sec | 5 hrs ago

Rivian Raises $2.5 Billion in New Funding Led by Amazon, Ford

"Day after saying that it's planning to build a second manufacturing plant in the U. S electric vehicle startup, Rivian said on Friday it closed at $2.5 billion funding round led by investors, which include Amazon and

Rivian U. Amazon
Top International Official in Bosnia Bans Denial of Genocide

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 5 hrs ago

Top International Official in Bosnia Bans Denial of Genocide

"The top international official in Bosnia has settled the denial of genocide the move is intended to counter Bosnian Serb attempts to deny that the nineteen ninety five Srebrenica massacre was genocide Valentin in school the outgoing chief of business office of the high representative change the country's criminal code where any denial of genocide will result in a prison sentence likewise any glorification of war criminals such as naming of streets all public institutions will receive the same faith in Schertz said he decided to use his powers off to waiting for years for both news politicians to acts he cited a refusal by the Bosnian Serb assembly to withdraw decorations awarded to three convicted war criminals I'm Karen Thomas

Bosnia Srebrenica Valentin Schertz Bosnian Serb Assembly Karen Thomas
Morgan Wallen Admits to Using N-Word Around 'Certain Group of Friends'

Purity Products

02:09 min | 6 hrs ago

Morgan Wallen Admits to Using N-Word Around 'Certain Group of Friends'

"Star Morgan Wallen quickly rose of fame with his five time multi platinum charge. You know the story already. Obviously, you know, this guy got caught, and now he's trying to get back out there and repair his his image in the in the public sphere. Figure out what it is I'm supposed to do so So take me back to that night. I had some some, You know, longtime friends in town. You know, we kind of just been partying all weekend, and we figured we just go hard for the two or three days that they were there. How did this happen? Out of nowhere? You just Refer to someone with a racial slur. No, I don't think it was just it just happened. You know, I was around from my friends and you know, we just we stay. We stay dumb stuff together. It was In our minds. It's playful, You know, I don't I don't know if that that sounds ignorant, but that's really came from, and I like what you're saying something after it comes out, you're like, Oh, that sounds ignorantly. No, it's actually been doing it for a long time with these people said. We figured three days going hard. We're going to just say what we want, like I've just caused trouble for myself. That sounds but Had there been no video of the incident. We obviously we wouldn't be sitting here right now. This is not the first time he said to wear. This is the word that you use frequently amongst her friends. I would have said frequently. No, no, no. No. Africa ever once in a while, in what way would that use? You know, it's one of my best friends who were all clearly drunk, and I was asking his girlfriend to Take care of him because he was drunk and he was leaving. I didn't mean any in any derogatory manner at all. Because there are a lot of people don't say. Okay, we've been drunk. We never used the word. And when you're drunk, you're certain things you do when you don't do what made you think that the war was ever appropriate to use? I'm not sure. I don't think I think I was just ignorant about it. I don't think I sat down and was like, Hey, is this right? Is this wrong? And do you know the history of the word? Oh, yeah, I've heard some stories in the in the initial conversation he goes on to. I've heard some stories in the initial conversation of the root of the word while he's doing that thing where he's like I've had conversations to try to better myself. And I think he even mentioned at one point he donated money to black lives matter and yada, yada yada. And,

Morgan Wallen Africa
Morgan Wallen Speaks on Using Racial Slur in 'GMA' Interview

Purity Products

01:52 min | 6 hrs ago

Morgan Wallen Speaks on Using Racial Slur in 'GMA' Interview

"And a lot of people thought maybe it would be the end of things for the country music star Morgan Wallen. But despite the fact that he was recorded on a doorbell camera, I think or some sort of camera. Saying the N word after a bender. He's out on the street and is like, yo my end or whatever, to some friends around him. It's caught by this camera. It makes it on the news and his burgeoning country music career looks like it's going to get tanked. But he's a big star. His songs took off his some of his music videos have a 25 million plus views on YouTube. He's been touring still career took, Uh Weird turn. I had never heard. I think the three of us agreed that we had never heard of the day before that. No, I still never heard one of his songs. And but I've seen like shortly thereafter that his song like stayed on the top 10. I knew a part of you kind of wonders a little bit like how much of that was to just stick it to everybody else that wanted to cancel them. Four saying the n word on that. But he did. He did get pulled off of all the radio stations for at least a while, I think And what I'm saying all I mean, they're probably some that just did their own thing. But I recall the radio stations kind of banding together and saying we're going to halt playing Morgan Wallen music. And then everybody goes over to iTunes has suffered his songs, Rocket up the charts, and so now he's finally even went to rehab at one point, But now he's finally breaking his silence on this, and he sat down with Michael Strahan. Let's just peek in. Let's see how this went to the people were going to watch this interview and say, the only sitting down because he wants to clean up his image. It's all a performance Mullet, man. What do you say to that? Understand that, you know, I understand it that I'm not ever going to make you know everyone happy I can only come tell my truth, and that's all I know to line

Morgan Wallen Youtube Michael Strahan
Consumer Prices Shot up 5% in May

Investing Sense

02:00 min | 6 hrs ago

Consumer Prices Shot up 5% in May

"Rose 5% in the month of May alone. That was the fastest biggest increase in a single month and more than 13 years, going all the way back to the credit crisis of 2000 and eight. The real question is this. What's going to happen. With inflation going forward. We have seen dramatic increases in the price of food and gasoline, car prices, housing prices, But is this High rate of inflation going to continue or is that over are we done is okay. Prices are honey er. But are they going to stop rising or are they going to plateau where they are? Might even prices begin to come back down a little bit. We saw that with lumber. For example, lumber prices skyrocketed earlier this year and have tumbled ever since. Well, one way we try to get the answer to that question. Is by turning to the Federal Reserve. I mean, after all, the federal reserve their primary job is inflation and interest rates. And so what does the Fed have to say? What is Jay Powell, the chair of the Federal Reserve Board? Have to say about this. Well. In short, the Fed has absolutely no idea what's going on with inflation. They don't know whether it's going to continue or not, and they don't know therefore whether or when they're going to have to start raising interest rates because of inflation. Continues to rise. The feds key tool to reduce the rate of inflation is by raising interest rates. Here, in fact, is what Jay Powell had to say earlier this week were experiencing a big uptick in inflation bigger than than many expected bigger than certainly that I expected. And we're trying to understand whether it's something that will pass pass through fairly quickly or whether we're in fact, we need to act now. This

FED Jay Powell Federal Reserve Board
Dow Jumps More Than 200 Points, Closes Above 35,000

Money Talk

01:43 min | 6 hrs ago

Dow Jumps More Than 200 Points, Closes Above 35,000

"With the delta vary and certainly rattled the markets early in the week, But we ended up on a positive note right at one time on Monday were down 900 points on the Dow and I never would have thought at that time that by the end of the week, we would have surpassed the 4400 mark on the S and P 500. The 35,000 mark on the Dow for the first time in history. Yeah, that's right, rallying despite these concerns, and you have to say, even though we are having a mini correction, we have seen these rolling corrections go through the market for several months ago. Yeah, it really has. It's been a challenging environment for stock pickers because the tech names that actually led the led the market last year as we recovered from the pandemic close, really languish for a good chunk of this year and were replaced in leadership by reflation trades by that, man. I mean, companies that are more cyclically oriented. They're going to do better as the economy reopens. It had gotten to statistically cheap, so we saw a rotation from those grass stocks. Value stocks and unless you are very nimble trader, it really just demonstrates the need and benefits of a more balanced portfolio that isn't too tilted one way or the other, but just looks opportunistically within growth and value sectors. In fact, about two corrections is they are common. In fact, Having a correction that means more than a 10% peak to trough is very common. We see it on average about every 18 months, and we've gone was almost 18 months, and we haven't seen it. But by the way, that's the definition of a correction. The average correction is about 14% peak to trump. So we counsel our clients and our listeners here today that this is a possibility, but we have been seeing these in sectors across the last several months. This could continue to happen on the indexes, which we haven't seen and most recently, the sector that's been under the most

Thousands Protest Lockdown in Sydney Amid COVID-19 Surge

Planet Money

00:58 sec | 7 hrs ago

Thousands Protest Lockdown in Sydney Amid COVID-19 Surge

"Reported. 176 new locally acquired Covid cases today at third consecutive daily record with nearly all cases in the state of New South Wales. There were protests against a month long coronavirus lockdown in three cities. The BBC's Phil Mercer reports on demonstrators who clashed with police in Australia's largest city. Of Sydney. Wait, What freedom wait, What Greater freedom was the cry As thousands of anti lockdown demonstrators marched through Sydney. Some brought their Children and few were wearing masks. There were scuffles with the police and roads were blocked. Health officials sent large protests in three Australian cities would put lives at risk. The police said the consequences could be disastrous. Sydney has been in lockdown for a month. Yet it's covid 19 outbreak appears to be getting much worse.

Phil Mercer Sydney New South Wales BBC Australia
Search for Bodies Concludes at Surfside Condo Collapse Site

Investor Schooling Live

00:38 sec | 7 hrs ago

Search for Bodies Concludes at Surfside Condo Collapse Site

"Crews have officially ended their search for bodies in the debris of the collapsed Surfside condo building in Miami Dade County. That decision concludes a month of painstaking work, removing layers of debris from the collapsed building. Miami Dade County Mayor Daniel 11 cover says she wanted to make sure she thanked All the first responders have shown the world what superheroes look like. And the crew's been working 12 hour shifts camping out at the site that earned the praise of Miami Dade. Fire Rescue Chief Alan Commence What we just encountered this past 30 days. I mean this this represents what we are. Who we are as a fire service and obviously has a

Surfside Condo Building Dade County Mayor Daniel Miami Miami Dade Alan Commence
Landslides in Western India Kill 47, While Floods Trap More

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 8 hrs ago

Landslides in Western India Kill 47, While Floods Trap More

"Several hundred people have died after heavy monsoon rains triggered landslides and flooding in western India was more than a thousand people trapped by flood waters were rescued at the fifty died from flooding in western Maharashtra states many of those who were rescued was stranded on rooftops and even on top of buses on highways more than thirty people were missing after landslides dozens were also killed in Satara district houses collapse was swept away by raging floodwaters prime minister Narendra Modi's said he was anguished by the loss of lives disasters caused by landslides and flooding are common in India during the June September monsoon season when heavy rains weakened the foundations of stocks is that are often poorly built I'm Karen Thomas

Satara Prime Minister Narendra Modi Maharashtra India Karen Thomas
Thousands protest lockdown in Sydney, several arrested

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 8 hrs ago

Thousands protest lockdown in Sydney, several arrested

"Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in Sydney and around Australia to protest outside restrictions amid another searching cases young must protest system today they marched carrying signs pointing to freedom in the trees police made several arrests of to cross breaks through barriers and three plastic to some plans the protest comes as Kevin nineteen case numbers in the state televising rapidly with over a hundred and fifty new infections in twenty four hours the health minister of New South Wales state route has it says they looked on as necessary what it's telling us is we have a continuing and growing problem great to Sydney has been locked down for the past four weeks with residents any able to leave home with a reasonable excuse New South Wales police said it recognised and supported the rights of free speech and peaceful assembly but the protest was a breach of public health food is I'm Karen Thomas

Kevin Nineteen Sydney New South Wales Australia Karen Thomas
With A Subdued Opening Ceremony, The Tokyo Summer Olympics Have Officially Kicked Off

The Fix-It Show with Tom Feiza

00:18 sec | 8 hrs ago

With A Subdued Opening Ceremony, The Tokyo Summer Olympics Have Officially Kicked Off

"Sources Friday, saying the contract talks between wide receiver Davante Adams and the Packers regarding a long term extension have broken off after months of negotiating, and, of course, those Tokyo Summer Olympics officially underway today's Day two after a subdued opening ceremony yesterday. Those games run through August

Davante Adams Packers Summer Olympics Tokyo
ByteDance's Toutiao Ordered by China to Halt New Registrations Since September

Daily Tech News Show

00:30 sec | 8 hrs ago

ByteDance's Toutiao Ordered by China to Halt New Registrations Since September

"Sources. Say the bite dance owned news aggregated. Jenry to- chow has been blocking new account registration. Since september at request of chinese regulators. It was recently revealed by the wall street journal. Sources that dates indefinitely delayed plans to go public. After chinese government officials advise the company to address data security risks and in two thousand eighteen by dances joke app. Nee hand-drawn z. Was permanently closed over hosting improper content according to china's broadcasting watchdog

Chow The Wall Street Journal China
Search for Bodies Concludes in Surfside Condo Collapse

Townhall Review

00:19 sec | 10 hrs ago

Search for Bodies Concludes in Surfside Condo Collapse

"Firefighters have officially into their search for bodies in the debris that collapsed Surfside condo building. The decision, concluding a month of painstaking work, removing layers of dangerous to breathe at one time were piled several stories high. The Miami Dade County Mayor Daniela Levine, Cava, said she was impressed with the hard work of the rescue

Surfside Condo Building Daniela Levine Dade County Miami
"sayed" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

The .NET Core Podcast

02:17 min | 2 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

"Is you know we created a we created a system where you can have a template and then it can it can show up and multiple different areas right like the command line with donna new or visual studio on windows or visual studio for mac and then and then also those third party ideas and editors have support for it done. you know it's a first class integration. You know if you look at a when you're using visual studio if you create an dot net core project you know that's using the template engine But but the majority of the other templates use. Vs template and user. They can't tell the difference between one or another. I think we've done that in a really kind of first class and a really great way for that. Yeah yeah. I have to agree. It's a wonderful use the template engine and the dollar. 'cause he seem seamless like i said like you said You're in visual studio following your project. It's the year in the command. Line dot net new. It's the yukon. Make it any easier than that. That's right that's where it's at man. Excellent excellent will Thank you so much for taking some time to talk to me today. I really appreciate it. I i think that the listeners are going to get a lot out of this. Because i do know a lot of people who don't net folks using say don't that five and the they're not sure about that. They can even create a template from working so maybe this will spill them onto going crazy new projects and then maybe let you in kathleen. No hey i've created a project to do like three d. Modeling something new knows yeah. That'd be great. You know. I think for i think for those people who are kind of aspiring to create a template. I think those videos are good sort. I think it'd be probably twenty twenty five minutes and they will. They'll know how to not only use dot net new but also create a template from that. And then i and then as they want their attempt to get more and more kind of more and more features they can kind of watch a few more videos and and then kind of deep dive deeper even beyond those. Yeah excellent like. I said thank you ever so much site in spend an absolute pleasure. Thank you for having me same here though was means if you with sciatica me about dot net new three be sure to check the show notes for a bunch of links to some of the stuff we covered and a full transcription of the interview. The show notes as always can be found at.

kathleen today twenty twenty five minutes dot net new windows five first class mac net studio dot net three videos donna
"sayed" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

The .NET Core Podcast

03:38 min | 2 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

"Program dot. Cs i'm going to have to modify the namespace declaration away to won't build any more right like i think they're like percent signs or dollar signs or something but it'd be like percent root namespace percent or dollar sign. I'm not sure i don't remember. But anyways that's never going to build and then the fundamental problem with templates. Is you know you've got your source code and then you've got your template and of those two things differ every time you build a new version of it. You're going to have to go through and do some sort of manual modifications to that right and that is just really a nightmare and imagine you've got you've got you know let's say if you've got five or six templates that becomes a management nightmare bright too. It's really incredible so With the template engine and for those who don't know the template engine is the library that that dot net new sits on top of and and visual studio also calls into the template engine and the same visual studio for mac and there's also some third party adp's also kind of call into the template engine there so yeah the d'amato that the template engine uses we kind of flip it on its head. We say. Hey instead of instead of modifying your cooed to indicate where the replacements are you going to indicate these replacements and a different file called template dud jason. Let's if you had a let's say if you had a project that was called cool web. Yeah we flip it on its head you know and then inside the template dodgson file is where you basically indicates a. Hey and i want cool web to be replaced with whatever the project name is that the user has provided for me. So that's kind of the model that we use but But you know. It's actually lot trickier than what i thought. Because let's let's say you have that string cool web and let's say the cs capitalized. And maybe maybe there isn't. Maybe it's actually.

five two things six templates mac jason
"sayed" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

02:24 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"If ten percent more people had access to healthcare and so on net medicare for all will create jobs. What's going to happen. Is there's going to be a transition. Yes a lot of the jobs that exist denying people their healthcare coverage in in in current Hmo's yes they might be may go away but not as many as you think. Let's not forget. We're still going to need to be able to provide in bill. Health health services for three hundred fifty million people in this country and so a lot of those jobs will stay some of the jobs that exist on the peripheries the advertisement budget the multi-million dollar ceo's that health insurers have Those those may go away. What i advocate for. In every advocate for medicare for all will say the same thing is that we need to just transition. If we know we're gonna lose some health insurance jobs but we're gonna gain tremendously more providers jobs. What we need to do is make sure that we are paying folks to go through the training that they need to be able to take those jobs in the back in the last one. I'll leave you with is a story of for my time on the campaign trail in michigan as rapid up a conversation about health insurance a woman came to me just just at the end of my town hall and she said you know all these things that you're saying about the health insurance industry are true because i used to work for a health. Insurer one of the major ones in michigan and she said i quit the day. I had to deny a woman with breast cancer support for her healthcare and i knew that that was going to put her in bankruptcy and she had no other choice and we is forced the nihar. Anyway i quit. I went to nursing school. And now i take care of people with breast cancer and it reminds us that. There's a true moral cost on the back end of our system to the people. Who do this work whether the healthcare providers who cannot provide the care that people need because those folks can't pay or it's the folks working in insurance industry who have to regularly deny people coverage for the healthcare that they need so. I wanna thank you for writing this book. Because i will admit i was one of those people who didn't really knew i liked medicare for all but i didn't really know what it was or how it would work so it was just a tremendous read and really informative for me to understand The the whole landscape of what. This would look like that are. Can you tell everyone how they can get the book.

michigan ten percent three hundred fifty million pe one multi-million dollar those
"sayed" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:56 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Hey everyone welcome to to produce talking politics. I'm so fi and i'm here with my co host. Kelly hey kelly. Hey sophie and joining us. Today is dr abdul el-sayed. He is the former detroit health commissioner a progressive activists a doctor. The author of the incision on subset in the author of a new book medicare for all citizens guide so welcome. Thank you so much for having me excited to be with you. Thank you so much for joining us. I'm really excited to talk to you about medicare for all it's been really important hurt of politics for a while and it's really important what i do in my work into. I think a lot of people's jobs in health care. But i. I'm wondering if you can just sorta talk to us a little bit about sort of how your book team to be kind of. How did you decide to write about. Medicare for all your. I've been a proponent of single payer healthcare since i was in medical school and you know into the debates about the affordable care act and then thereafter when it was clear that the affordable care act though it did some amazing things for a lot of people just didn't quite capture all of the potential change that we need to achieve the kind of Healthcare system that we deserve in this country. That's more just equitable and sustainable. And i was the health commissioner in the city. Detroit city where fifty percents of our population is on medicaid. Many of those folks Got access to medicaid because of the aca. But we're still a city with one of the highest uninsured and underinsured rates in the country. I ran for office when i ran for office. I made single payer. Health reform in michigan One of my key platform points. Because i do think that it is critical for us to be able to achieve the kind of healthcare system where our bodies are not profiteered off and then i was also a surrogate for bernie sanders when he ran in the primary but through that process. I came to appreciate that. The the policy justification for medicare for all single payer healthcare was that brought me to. It wasn't really where the space of the debate was. Instead we were having a far more politicised debate within the political arena. And so i worked with dr michael johnson on my co author who also helped architect the medicare plan that i ran on in michigan. And we said you know you know it would be great if we were able to de politicize this question In bring this conversation back to the kitchen table conversations that so many people are sharing about their healthcare because one of the ways that the healthcare system benefits is through a positive right. They know that a lot of folks don't really understand how this very complex system works and so they don't connect the broken nece that they feel every day to the broken inside. The system in this book was about doing. just that. And then mapping how medicare for all would solve that To the current system and talking a little bit then about the politics of it hopefully in having a engaged people to see a healthcare for what it was in their own lives Bring them back to the political in in in in ask are we now willing to fight for a system that truly does solve so many of our problems personally talked about the ways in which this at pandemic that we're in right now the covid nineteen pandemic has change is the way people think about health care and health insurance and what that might look like and how we can sort of use this as a way to to really dig into this conversation out medicare for all at the top of the pandemic fifteen million people lost their health insurance and that didn't happen in any other country in the world. Not only that but we were watching our brave nurses in doctors hospital employees trying to care for the sick and dying wearing garbage bags because their hospitals are run on a profit margin. That dictates that they shouldn't stockpile these basic personal protective equipment and beyond top forty seven hospitals in twenty twenty either went bankrupt or shut down completely. That also didn't happen in other countries all of this because we We allow our healthcare system to operate on profit margin both for insurance and also For providing healthcare and together that leaves us paying more that leaves us more insecure and that leaves Our system the most expensive system in the world and all of that doesn't have to exist. And i think cove nineteen each shown a new light on some of the ways that our systems healthcare being one of the principal. Ones have just been so a brittle and so fragile to these kinds of situations and folks look at that and say well copeland nineteen is a once in a century pandemic. That may be true but if it can't protect us in a pandemic what can it do and so. I think that folks are starting to ask these questions in a new light And i think is really important for us to be continuing to have this conversation about why our system is broken in about what we could do to fix it. Take a step back in. We can define sort of what medicare for all is remember back in a primary health care was a huge issue in the democratic primaries for twenty twenty but there was a lot of confusion about what medicare for all actually was and whether what what that actually constituted in what people were advocating. So can you talk a little bit about sort of what you are describing when you talk about medicare for all yeah. Let's simplify the healthcare system into two basic parts. The first is the insurance system. Those are the folks who are supposed to be there for us to pay for our healthcare. If when we get sick we pay for that if privilege enough that private insurance remember ten percent of americans don't have insurance at all we pay for that In the form of premiums that come out of our paycheck and are also subsidized by employers every two week or two weeks or every month and then that we also pay for it in the deductible which is some amount of money that we have to pay to get access to the insurance we already paid for if when we get sick and then finally co-insurance co some proportion of our costs that we paid the point of care that's insurance but then healthcare itself. The part that we mostly interact with Is the providers whether that be a clinic or a hospital You go you get your care. And they bill they bill your insurance.

Kelly Detroit bernie sanders kelly michigan sophie michael johnson two weeks fifty percents first Today twenty twenty ten percent fifteen million people abdul el-sayed two basic parts dr One both forty seven hospitals
"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

06:06 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"You wrote. I mentioned happen pronouncing right article about the war crimes in afghanistan that motti triggered a huge reaction ryan on twitter. There was an article that was written about your article and basically just kind of brought you down to size. That's a nice way of saying we'll try to try to. I mean they tried. They didn't succeed all right. So walk us through that event payback. What did you say in the article. That got people so riled up. yeah it was. It was quite a deal. There are several articles actually the daily mail and another newspaper. Another right wing telegraph. There was just like a like a snow bowl Those basically triggered by an article that i wrote on the engine about the raritan reports which was justifiably angry. You know and i regret it because shit this like if an afghan can't be angry at the light verifiable documented instances of australian soldiers in afghanistan slaughtering up to but probably more than forty six afghans full for fun out of boredom slaughtering. Them like the sport you know if someone like me conga angry. Then it's like who what. What is the appropriate response An i really feel like it was a real insight into how australians are so accustomed and demanding of the grateful. Refugee and that was so shocking. Because i'm not that fuck the colony. I like sermon. Criticisms about israeli government and. Yeah they took our my family in an took other. Afghans in the focal of refugees and immigrants in not enough is still prison island on menace that his you know that that is indefinitely detaining all sorts of refugees. But i guess the point that i'm trying to get out is What i really think triggered the response to the did from all these like right wing. Journalists was the idea that i wasn't a great for refugee. My family had been taken in on humanitarian asylum grounds and the one generation later. Here i was with the goal to criticize australia. And it's like damn right. i'm going to criticize. it's more of us. All of us should be criticizing australia. This like army unit was not only was it like not disbanded fully. But it's like they were. They were awarded were celebrated and there was such a defensiveness around actually acknowledging that there was a structural issue for something like this happened. Either there was oversight and approval from supervisors which is absolutely despicable if so or supervisors and other overseers had no idea. This was happening. And they're like you know soldiers in the atf. We're just like going on killing sprees afghans. Either way it's not acceptable. Whatever the case that should never have been happening and that there was such a cover up over show many years almost two decades. Now i on There's a lot to be. There's a low townsfolk. There's a lot to be held accountable. And so in my article. What i was basically saying is that i was mortified. That the response was Week on behalf of the australian government on behalf of the eighty s and also that at the end of the article there was little section talking about if any members of the australian defence force and families have experienced distress at the reports of the baritone report. Feel free to access these like last line suicide hotline mental health services and. That's what really got me. Cause it's like damn. The australian soldiers can come into ghana's don slow to my people and west entering their mental health. Like you really have to ask some deep hod cutting questions at that point when it's like where is the embassy for us you know where when when are the mental health resources going to acknowledge that australia is home to multiple immigrant communities and always has it And to have placed none of the emphasis on the canister alien community and how they must be feeling and how they west feeling as roosevelt of seeing How dispensable their lives were And how easily you know. Our desk can just be written off to an accident or Poll followed procedure is just yeah. Just tragic fair. That was box save. That's the end of our show. I need to get out of here before. Paul factor jump seen as usual. You can listen to us on three seattle off a au slash the bora blues more. Also an instagram at three. Cr the s bar blues. You've been listening to a podcast produced in the studios of independent community radio station three cr in melbourne australia for more information. Go to all the ws dot three cr dot org dot edu..

twitter instagram three cr afghanistan melbourne australia afghan more than forty six israeli government ghana Paul australian government australia eighty s one generation australian afghans two decades Afghans baritone australians
"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"And the way that i am treated. Because they're actually not interested in that specificity up interested in a conversation about Might relationship or our relationships with god right there telling the story of our people right all the whole narrative around slim's in australia for instance Is one that is articulated. By jenner's it's one that's articulated by politicians. In order to serve political ends justify know military operations and so often. I just feel especially with islam in a post nine eleven world in australia and also in america. It's just like you don't even get a chance to raise your voice because there is there are so many people who are either ready to speak over you or twist your words so that they become unrecognisable and so i really feel that like yeah. I at least for me identifying as muslim not despite my quickness penis but because of was a really important kind of shift in my thinking. Because i really resent the idea that there's like a one authority on islam that can tell me whether or not i deserve to be muslim. The s you know like everyone has their own relationship with god. unlike that's not anyone else's business An honestly most of the muslims in my last way and there's like a mischaracterization of islam as uniquely uniquely transphobic. That i feel like is used to serve political ends. You know like that's that's an intentional mischaracterization that actually like it's really important for us to resist.

america australia islam one nine jenner so many people eleven world muslim muslims
"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

07:20 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"In america. When win was strange to only exist there as afghanistan. When i when i have spent leaves i really formative years in the states. And all my family's in the states now most my family released and then now being america. It's super weird because people think i'm australian and not is really weird because it's like Have you seen my face like if you earn a good. No like the everyday. Australia looks like because it certainly not me right. And and it's like it's weird secondary form of Displacement where i like still men. My cultural identity is lost in that mix so yeah i feel like those questions in his quest for belonging are like. They're like their lifetime questions. They're the things that kind of underlie old. Our decisions I don't think there's any easy answer there on. We hope you're enjoying a conversation with bob. Hawke sayyed we'll hear more from them. After these community announcements more than seventy innocent refugees still being indefinitely detained in detention centers and secure hotels around australia. recent months. many fellow detainees have been released onto bridging. Those remaining a desperate to know why they are still hill is indefinite. it is cool an unlawful everyday. A group of supporters protests. This brutality app said the park hotel at seven. Hundred and once once straight melvin where eleven main remained trapped and whose hearts are fighting and who's mental health is declining. The i'm of the protests is to raise awareness of the situation for the general public but also to show support and solidarity to remain inside it is also for the approximately two hundred refugees still held off. Show place come along anyway. Not at six. Pm or weekend at three. You're listening to the laura blues program produced and presented at three seattle community radio and also add on tuesdays at three thirty pm on sister station. Radio skipper so. We've been talking to writer multidisciplinary community organizer bo box aid. So far apple box shed what it was like growing up in perth and moving to the us as attain against the backdrop of nine eleven in this half of the compensation they discussed the two thousand and nineteen one article and gives us an insight into the fallout from their mention article. A new generation of australian warcriminals. So the reason irish at you was an article that you wrote. That was kind of to read a couple of times because you know the language was like not dense but just not language that i'm familiar with but once i read it a few times absorbed and i was like wow such a powerful pays so i'm kind of hesitant to use their a certain word so i'm gonna just call the f. word so it's a two thousand and nineteen rumpus article and it's called. Terror is f word with hal sausages truck to his chest. So i'd like to discuss a few lines. That jumped at me but before we do that for our listeners. Who haven't had a chance to read this fly to call. Can you give us a quick summary of what that is about and why you decided to ride it. Then yeah i think From memory the idea of trying to kinda like bridge. These divides or bridge these kind of jewel. Tensions in my life which were being queer person being someone like gender non conforming and outside of like the hetero normative structure of of society in that way and then also inhabiting this like post nine eleven buddy which is always already racialized as a threat as like invasion as You know like this savage way of life which is something that actually travels Both australia and mark right this way. The muslims and and you know people are immigrants from from our part of the world like you know as as the muslim ban really kind of brought to bear are. Yeah like a treated as like Inherent villains like we're the villains in the story of the american australian nation and as a consequence Where punished for it right punished for in the streets but were also punished for in The in the ways that That people back home. A trade union That's kinda like in the diaspora in back back on those kinds of discipline and punishment are common threads across our lives. And so i guess. I was just trying to like find a language on Meditate on what it meant to inhabit a body that is like you know that exists outside of those Centers of power and what just quickly like through the lines. 'cause i've picked up three lines that kind of when i read. I was like wow. This is so powerful. I feel like you like really articulated that feeling very wall so the first line i want to look at is. I didn't choose to identify as muslim or not. My identity was projected upon me. So that's what you said a few years ago. What do you stand now. has that feeling change. And what are your thoughts about being muslim and queer and the pressure to choose between one or the other. Yeah i mean. I just feel like so much when i look back on mine. I paused right growing up in australia. Whatever it might be. There's there's so. Many instances where i was treated as muslim you know my family was treated as muslim and and punished for it. You know or mistreated and discriminated against for it and it only the specificity or nuance of like our relationship with a law or the individual differences between my family members. All of that gets flattened when discrimination. All of that is actually irrelevant. The persecution of people like muslims. And so i guess thinking about that and realizing how little consent had in the dynamic ryan how being racialized as brown as muslim kind of happens with without my control and with what consent was really important for me to realize that. Like even i do identifies muslim and of course i have like a spiritual relationship with my god. It's like there's a difference between how i identify on my relationship and.

america australia Hawke first line Hundred Australia afghanistan eleven more than seventy innocent ref bob approximately two hundred refu six three thirty pm two thousand nine three lines two few years ago radio Both
"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

08:07 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"You're tuned into the war blues on three community radio. That gorgeous track that. You heard that. I was dancing around to like a maniac in this room was. Don't you worry by electric fields from their two thousand and sixteen ep in moss spot. I n a so the long easter weekend. Which i'm still celebrating. I spoke to bob. Hawke sayyed alkyl back to introduce themselves but before we do. I want everyone to read their article and new generation of australian war criminals in mention quarterly. It's an essay that got bob hawke trolled and unfairly attacked by certain australian publications all because but bach dead to comment. On the barrington report. Barrington report is a report that outlined allegations of war crimes committed by soldiers serving with australian defence force before burbach shares. What the experience was like in the second half of our interview We want to first of all. Get to know. Becca be who is incredible person that i was so lucky to chatter. Bobek i. I'm a writer editor. On an artist. I kind of previously was a social worker youth worker And still in some capacity. I feel like. I'm involved in his goals. In like community initiatives But like bit differently. Now because i'm not organizationally bound up in a way that wasn't a post on. Which has its pros and cons. I think And yeah and then. I'm currently On a on a novel and as well as just like writing things here and there as well. Wow okay you'll pretty busy. I'm surprised you were able to squeeze in. Bob not gonna lie okay. So let's stop from the beginning like us your third culture kid. I'm not sure if you refer to yourself as such but you've moved around quite a bit where were you born. And how many places have you called home. i think i like the time if they're culture kid. I think you know. It's like one of many second constellation of terminologies unlike phrases that we try to use to approximate some sense of our complex selves right. So i think it's a good one to add to the toolkit yes. I was born in perth In a very tiny afghan community that existed there. We want the first families that moved To perth specifically chain migration So my uncle was the very first And brought along and so they over the decades more and more afghans have gathered there But it's still very small community Especially compared to the you know western sydney And dandenong communities in melbourne and sydney on on the east coast which which are way So i think really early on developed to a strong kinda of like insular island mentality where you kind of acutely aware that you are in short supply in a place like And then and then. When i was For high school. Back when i was about twelve thirteen Moved to the states To kind of be closer to My mom's side of the family To yeah in in virginia as much bigger african community Suddenly i was kinda thrown into a very different a setup where like public school. Everyone's have kind of an. It was cool for different reasons. I mean and i definitely prefer it that way in the sense of like finally being around people and not having that like weird outsider Suddenly like you know in a place like this even though it's kind of still we're not like a major city elements just one of those places like that for for whatever reason A lot of immigrants of of from from afghanistan have gathered. you know It's kinda like michigan. Like loads of arabs in michigan list of somalis in minnesota united. It's like weird and not clear. Exactly why or how it happened. But like it's cool that happened We kind of formed their communities all around. And yeah and then. I came back to australia for a unique when i was eighteen. came back to melbourne so Did you need a couple of more years than building My kind of like artistic practice on a ride early practice. And then i move back to america two years ago You know what. I found interesting. Is i my family. We came here in ninety two so it was my sister and my mom and my youngest sister haven't been born yet so i grew up in melbourne a muslim school. But i always wondered if i had grown up around like other somalis because there weren't that many of us in melbourne at that time in the early nineties i was wondering we had been raised in london or in the us in minnesota. As you said up to the somalis minnesota. I was wondering what my life had been better. And so i ask that question to you because you sort of did touch on that With things a lot easier when you found other afghanistan. I mean it's complicated but i think in some degree in some ways for sure like just having that Legibility you know where it's like. My cousins dislike are everywhere but like at the same time the flip side of that is that you know it means that you know. My uncle's taxi drivers pretty much. Said like suddenly like level of surveillance right. Like if you're out walking around with friends during the mole suddenly like this auntie or that hunting sawyer Travels around like you know the grapevine how it is so so there better be people you get before you even reach your mom's got a few calls you like what the hell iowa and i'm walking around see you i swear to god as you need to make use of the on in let me god i pray that they denver figure that out because if they do they'll be too powerful powerful and its sell us out quick no shade. But i don't want to go there so So as we've said you've moved quite a bit and it sounds like you know there are pros and cons to being around community. Has this made you think differently about what community means. What belonging means other questions that you think about For sure fisher. I feel like so much of the dilemma of of course being third culture kid rise. You're constantly striving or Like trying to find that like alternate place of belonging or that like ritual practice or group of people you can finally breathe easy with but unfortunately like the hajr is about it is the there's no resolution there's ultimate final place final resting bites. You know where where everyone around you will will fully understand those parts of you feel that when i was in australia. I always felt like really weirded out that like people didn't quiet Like all this time.

australia london minnesota america Bobek bob hawke sydney virginia minnesota united michigan melbourne Becca two years ago iowa afghanistan perth second half eighteen Bob first families
"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

03:23 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"The track.

"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

01:45 min | 3 months ago

"sayed" Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"Thirty on three cr community radio produced by welcome to the spoarer blurs at three three shepherd presented on the several land of the injury people of the kulin nation diaspora blues. Also as tuesdays at three thirty pm on radio skid bro a community radio station in sydney. My name's should what if you're listening to us live it. Ease the fifth of april at a time of this recording. I'm still enjoying my long easter weekend. Which means no school nowhere. Just good vibes on the show today. You'll be listening to an interview. I did with pop sade. Bach payback is a writer multidisciplinary artist and community organizer of the afghan. Yes boreham. I had an amazing time with. They were so so generous with their stories and their reflections. We also had a good time gossiping about nosy aunties and uncles. Who keep tabs on us what it means to self identify versus being identified. That's a really important distinction. I feel like they have a lot to think about an officer interrogate in our own lives before we play out interview. Let's get some music from the dynamic duo electric fields with their track dirt. Chew worry.

sydney today fifth of april three Bach kulin tuesdays at three thirty pm duo skid bro three shepherd Thirty afghan sade three cr
"sayed" Discussed on Daily Detroit

Daily Detroit

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"sayed" Discussed on Daily Detroit

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Before, we get into <Speech_Male> the stories, a quick <Speech_Male> things to Carlo <Speech_Male> who joined us as <Speech_Male> a member at Petri <Speech_Male> on dot com <Speech_Male> slash daily <Speech_Male> Detroit, our <Speech_Male> members, power thoughtful <Speech_Male> conversations, <Speech_Male> and local news, <Speech_Male> and if local stories <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that we tell matter <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to, you were bringing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> value to your day <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and you can swing it, consider <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> joining us. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you to Carlo <Speech_Music_Male> and everyone else. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Pontiac <Speech_Male> based on United <Speech_Male> Shore. One of the larger <Speech_Male> mortgage companies <Speech_Male> in the nation has <Speech_Male> been cited by the <Speech_Male> Oakland County Health Department <Speech_Male> County <Speech_Male> Health Officer, <Speech_Male> Lianne Stafford issued <Speech_Male> an emergency order <Speech_Male> Wednesday noting <Speech_Male> that the company allegedly <Speech_Male> has more than fifty <Speech_Male> cases of Corona <Speech_Male> virus connected <Speech_Male> to its headquarters <Speech_Male> facility. <Speech_Male> The health department says <Speech_Male> that United Short needs <Speech_Male> to do four things <Speech_Male> in four social <Speech_Male> distancing rules. <Speech_Male> Require face coverings <Speech_Male> begin <Speech_Male> daily illness screenings <Speech_Male> at the office <Speech_Male> and encourage. Encourage employees <Speech_Male> to work from home <Speech_Male> whenever possible <Speech_Male> not complying <Speech_Male> could be a misdemeanor <Speech_Male> punishable <Speech_Male> by up to six months <Speech_Male> of prison time and <Speech_Male> two hundred dollars a day <Speech_Male> in fines. <Speech_Male> It's also <Speech_Male> a clear sign that Oakland <Speech_Male> County officials will sight <Speech_Male> even the largest <Speech_Male> companies for violating <Speech_Male> pandemic <Speech_Male> orders. Numerous <Speech_Male> sources tell daily <Speech_Male> Detroit that the company <Speech_Male> recently <Speech_Male> told them that workers <Speech_Male> could work remotely <Speech_Male> through the end of the <Speech_Male> year, but did <Speech_Music_Male> not mention <SpeakerChange> the health <Music> department action. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Meanwhile <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the other major mortgage <Speech_Music_Male> player in town rock <Speech_Male> companies, which you <Speech_Male> might know as quicken loans. <Speech_Male> When public <Speech_Male> today on the new. <Speech_Male> York Stock Exchange. <Speech_Male> It was hoped by <Speech_Male> the company that it opened <Speech_Male> at twenty two dollars a <Speech_Male> share. But instead, <Speech_Male> it started at <Speech_Male> eighteen dollars <Speech_Male> taking what was going to <Speech_Male> be a three billion <Speech_Male> dollar plus deal <Speech_Male> down to one <Speech_Male> point. Eight billion <Speech_Male> experts <Speech_Male> say that the issue is <Speech_Male> rocket pitched themselves <Speech_Male> as a technology <Speech_Male> company with a mortgage <Speech_Male> platform. <Speech_Male> But most in the market <Speech_Male> viewed it as financial <Speech_Male> services, <Speech_Male> it also sold <Speech_Male> one, hundred million. Million <Speech_Male> shares when it had <Speech_Male> planned to sell one <Speech_Male> hundred and fifty million <Speech_Male> although <Speech_Male> we spent an episode on this, <Speech_Male> we'll note here <Speech_Male> that how the stock has <Speech_Male> organized. The company <Speech_Male> remains under the control <Speech_Male> of Gilbert and his team <Speech_Male> as well as <Speech_Male> there are clauses explicitly <Speech_Male> aimed <Speech_Male> to keep the Company <Speech_Male> in Detroit <Speech_Male> the total valuation <Speech_Male> of the company as <Speech_Male> trading opened Thursday <Speech_Male> was in the neighborhood <Speech_Male> of thirty, six, <Speech_Male> billion dollars <Speech_Male> founder. <Speech_Male> Dan, Gilbert was present <Speech_Male> at the exchange <Speech_Male> and rang the opening <Speech_Male> bell. This morning, <Speech_Male> the stock will trade <Speech_Male> under Ticker, Symbol <Speech_Music_Male> R <SpeakerChange> K <Music>

"sayed" Discussed on Daily Detroit

Daily Detroit

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"sayed" Discussed on Daily Detroit

"We are in the middle of a pandemic. There's a lot of challenges, but in many ways, it just expose the weaknesses within the system. We already have my feature. Conversation is with Abdul L.. Siad. His views on politics health, and our nation are a fresh take on what the potential of this country could be agree or disagree with them. I. Think you're GonNa want to hear and listen to what Dole has to say, there's a reason this former. Former head of the Detroit health department gubernatorial candidate, and now author has been getting national attention on CNN and a ton of other places. Abdul is out with a new book healing politics, Dr Journey into the heart of our political epidemic. After that, I'll update you on a few things around town. This is your daily. Detroit. For Thursday, August six, twenty, twenty, I'm Jay. Baer stays, and let's get started. DR political epidemic is very appropriate. Especially that word epidemic right now, that's right when I wrote this book. I took a lot of care to explain the Science of Epidemiology. It turns out that I'd be publishing it in the middle of a pandemic when it seems that most people on twitter arm show Demille just now. So there's that. Well and that's the whole thing. There's so much stuff in this conversation, which strikes me as. Shouldn't we have had these conversations in middle school science class? You know one of the real challenges that this moment is bringing up is the fact that we as a society have not done a great job really talking about and teaching about science in in a moment right now, where we're in real time trying to explain epidemic, that is flowing amongst us. Folks don't appreciate that sciences a process. It's not a body of knowledge, and so what science tells us, we ought to be doing to transmission in death to this pandemic. It changes as we learn more study more about a corona virus that's only really been humanity for seven months now, and so you're right. We really do need to do a better job of teaching science generally, but also specifically teaching epidemiology. So folks understand how this works. In what's coming because, of course, you know in a moment where it's our collective behavior that is gonNA shape whether or not. This spreads it how it spreads in whom with breads, and ultimately who it kills. You know this is critical knowledge. One of the themes speaking of collective behavior that I noticed reading this book was there's just various points where it's almost as if you call for a change in some collective behavior, one of the stories that kind of stuck out for me I live in the North End and you talk specifically about an. An example in the north end where you had your gray Ford Focus, you went to an event and it was the most modest car in the lot and you got the advice from someone that you needed to level up or something along those lines, and yet I think to myself in those situations. What about the priorities is the priority about the car like showing off or is it about to me like? Okay. Well, that's more money for your family in allows you to have more financial flexibility although I. Will Admit Great Beets are important. Well, the store you talk about happened. North. Ended at a community event and I was really surprised because we're talking the entire time about basic home affordability and quality of jobs in The kind of policies we needed to uproot party and one of the points that I make with that story though is not you know there is a natural need to keep up with the Joneses right? Even if you can't afford basic set of things, there's something about being able to have a couple of Nice things and also feeling like you want to show that you're not somebody who's struggling in the way. Way that you may be struggling, and one of the interesting things that we found is that has the access to homeownership, which, of course, homes appreciate over time as that access has dropped and people find themselves unable either to afford or have the credit to be able to afford a home, they tend to invest in things like cars because cars are are easier to afford, and they also have substantially lower sort of credit hurdles to be able to have access to. But of course, the car doesn't appreciate it depreciates, and so one of the point of trying to make is that as we move. Move in our society toward more inequality. What that does is it makes the challenge of keeping up with the Joneses so much harder in communities in, and we see that right as preferences for cars versus homes tends to change. But this isn't about you know a set of priorities in people making bad decisions. It's a lot more about our priorities, a society and the opportunities that we empower people to have to have the kind of security that could deserve this epidemic of insecurity that I talk about really is about the fact that we've created a society that show on equal and where the public. Public services that we used to be able to rely on in the systems we used to be able to rely on whether it's a housing system or a healthcare system or an economic system that they've failed US largely because they've been strangle holded in in choke holded by a few very large players who tend to exclude too many to create the kind of profit opportunities that they have, and we see this play out in day to day in sometimes less than linear or direct ways. When you talk about people taking care of each other, those kind of things that this problem of insecurity. You and I both share a family background faith. So you're Muslim, my family was Catholic for me. I was raised with the idea of servant leadership that if you're going to be a leader, you know any US someone else to do, you would be willing to do yourself, and throughout this book, I noticed something that's different about your progressive message than a lot of other things that I've specifically a focus on faith and family and I don't mean necessarily the right wing talking point way, but in a universal way that. The. Vast majority of Americans could agree with frankly look so much how I grew up and how does that tie together for you because I? Think that's a different look than a lot of times what I see when it comes to progressive politics, which doesn't talk about faith and family as much for me about faith and family are are incredibly important and one of the things that I've come to. To appreciate about the both is that for faith to operate in your life, it has to inspire you to have the humility to recognize that you believe in something that's bigger than you. Than means that means in the sight of that thing whatever that greater higher power is that you and everything else on this earth are equal and your value here is about the way that you can empower. Especially, those who don't have the privileges and opportunities that you have and I talk a little bit about the Prophet Muhammad Peace Be Upon Him, and the fact that for him, his entire message was about good character about the way that you can smile somebody in. You can lift them up in that. You speak to them, that empowers them in a blitz them and recognizes that in the end, your message has to be the. The way you carry yourself because you can't be talking about inequality. You can't be talking about a more kind in uplifting society. If you yourself are not kind and uplifting, and so I, try my best to embody that in the way that move in the world and family is one of those conversations that you know when you talk about family values quote unquote talk about this in the book, it is sort of ensconced. ensconced around this perfect mythical family. That sort of exists in this mythos that is also really exclusive of. So many of kinds of families that all of us live in and the point I make in the book is that if you believe in family values than you should be about empowering families to live their best in that means making sure that they have access to good jobs that pay living wages, make sure that their. Their kids go to great schools. Make sure that they can afford a great house. Make sure that they have health care. If they get sick, make sure that if someone is choosing between.

epidemic Abdul Joneses US North End Detroit Science of Epidemiology Dole twitter CNN Baer Ford Demille
"sayed" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"sayed" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Positive cases of covid nineteen have been trending upward nationwide driven by spikes in states like Arizona Oklahoma North Carolina in Texas. The WHO marked the largest single day increase in Covid, nineteen cases more than one hundred eighty three thousand cases globally. More than half from Brazil and the United States. In a new treatment emerges in the fight against Cobra. Nineteen. This is America dissected I'm your host, Dr Abdul El-Sayed..

Covid Dr Abdul El-Sayed United States North Carolina Arizona Brazil Oklahoma America Texas
"sayed" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

11:01 min | 1 year ago

"sayed" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Many of the failures. We're seeing around. The Corona virus response could have been prevented by strong leadership in the area of public health. My guest today Dr Abdul. El-sayed is no stranger to this leadership as a physician and former health director for the city of Detroit. Abdul saw firsthand. How important this work is in the day to day. Lives of Americans. He was a candidate for governor of Michigan in two thousand sixteen and is the author of the new book healing politics. A doctor's journey into the heart of our political epidemic WANNA talk about the differential experience of health. Why is it that some people suffer and other people don't? The goal is to ease the guidelines and open things up to very large sections of our country as we near the end of our historic battle with the invisible enemy. Doctors have calls you. That's a realistic time. You're looking at a time line. We're discussing. The trump administration has decided not to reopen obamacare markets for people who don't yet have health insurance. I'm here today to announce my candidacy for governor of the state. I rebuilt Detroit's health department. We stood up to some of the biggest corporate polluters in the state and we made sure that our kids weren't exposed to in their schools. I learned that in the politicians doors. Don't open for people like you and me runs. My Name is Dr Abdul El-Sayed and I believe we need Medicare for all right now. We're conducting this interview in the middle of the corona virus pandemic. You are in Michigan which has significant hotspots in Detroit. Can you tell us a little bit? What it's like there right now and what's happening in hospitals. Yeah so you're right. This is we've just emerged as the second most affected state by Corona virus. And for me. That's particularly challenging. I ran for governor of the state and I served. The city of Detroit has helped her. I talked to my colleagues both in the city and then on the front lines in the hospital every day and it's pretty clear. The hospitals are getting just inundated with patients who are suffering the symptoms of Corona virus. And I talked to a friend of mine. Who's a clinician painted? A really bleak picture of what this was like because patients are crashing quickly and the symptoms are hard. They're both really really hard to endure. Because you feel like someone's taking your breath away. It's really hard to watch somebody struggle to just do a basic thing breathes and then you that that's happening across the board. It's inundating our hospitals to me devastating and especially when we think back to why this is happening and what we have done to prevent it so it's a challenging moment. I think for a community that has been deeply affected by almost every other really fast challenge. We've had in society and it's hard to see. I HAVE COMPLEX PTSD. I think that everyone is suffering from a pre. Tst Right now. Where people are Anticipating the apex you know. I keep talking to my gp who keeps telling me you need to steel yourself for the headlines that are about to spread over airways you know and it's scary and I have so much respect for the doctors and healthcare workers that are you know on these frontlines. Basically giving their life to protect their patients and with respect that and it's amazing what they do okay. So you're governor Gretchen. Whitmer has been the I guess you would say. Victim of a number of attacks by trump McGovern or suggested on w. w j the feds were purposely withholding equipment that hospitals need to treat patients. This evening she said this and encouraged to procure supplies outside of the federal government. We've been working really hard to do that. We're bidding against one another. It's really not a great system. And once you do have a contract you can find out later. That it will evaporate because You'll be told that the federal government needs some material Michigan. All she does is. She has no idea what's going on or she does say. Oh it's the federal government's full and we've taken such great care of Michigan. The president tweeted about the governor. He said she must work harder. And be more proactive. Do you think that this is on the ground? Impact of the ability to respond. How do you feel about this? No I have to say about him. I ran into primary against the WHITMER. Come I know how she is and I think she's doing an admirable job considering the circumstances especially considering the fact that she's trying to coax any bit of resources that we need to deliver those online that we just talked about from a federal government. That's being run by individual. Who cares more about his sense of himself and feeding his Martius and then cares about delivering people in our state. And so that's the scenario where there's just not enough resources to go around. And because the president and the federal government under him have sort of abdicated responsibility to serve into lead in this moment. Barring a number of really great public officials were trying their best. You've got people competing against each other and so it's a struggle to get those resources and it's showing on the front line so yeah like you stop that. We see on national television playing out for him. It's just a game. It's about being able to gin up some sort of conflict so that he can look like he's fighting which is what can you seems to best but for people on the ground. It's the difference between life and death of playing politics with people's lives in my state. It's been reported that the federal government is withholding shipments of supplies enforcing vendors basically cancelled contracts with Michigan. Mean what the fuck you were a public health policy professional in Detroit. I mean what happens if Michigan does not get these supplies. Well you know the ones that we're doing right now the reason that we're all at home it's because we want to fly in the Kurds. The other part of that though is that we have to anticipate and prepare for the curse and that means stocking up on the resources that we need to get to those lines. And of course as the number of cases continues to increase. We're watching people go without the necessary to protect themselves in clinical settings. When I can tell you it has quickly grown into a war zone. Icu Nurse Diane. K Shot. This video inside her yonkers New York hospital because she says she's so concerned as just a pain to cover all. The lack of personal protective gear is putting her and her fellow nurses at risk no isolation gowns and we are riddled with fear and anxiety. Because we don't have the proper equipment. Take care of these patients. So what we're expendable. That's how we seok but also like ventilators which are just so critical of saving lives in people who are suffering from Cogan and so. Yeah like it's going to look like doctors making choices about who lives and who dies and we hope that we never get there but the absence resources over petty politics in impacted it's GonNa have on people's lives livelihoods here. It isn't you're eating and I hope that coming out of this. All of us are committed to the work that we need to do to take this man out of politics and to make sure that we replace him with. The president was not gonNA put politics over public health. I mean I keep getting that. There is a mean going around of if someone woke up from a coma that they had been in since the election. Twenty sixteen how would you update them on this administration and where we are today it feels like the most surreal experience living through this time? I mean it just lay down in bed with Dave every night and like what. The fuck is happening right now you know. I keep hearing reports of this apex. How much worse is this going to get? Not only just for Michigan but globally end for the United States. It's going to be worse for awhile. I think we're going to hear worse and worse news for at least the next month. Dr Falke predicted the number of deaths to go between one hundred thousand and two hundred thousand and the thing that I just want to remind. Everyone is that nothing all just in a former health. Director distance preventable. It's like a fire if you put out a fire when it's in your toaster it doesn't spread and you know you might have to get a new toaster but that's but if you let them fire burn and engulfs your house and then engulfs the neighborhood you're going to be fighting inferno and right now because we didn't put out the fire when it was in the toaster because we had cut funding for public health because we had an inept federal response early on independent and even now we're fighting inferno and we didn't have to be here those hundred thousand or two hundred thousand lives lost. Those were preventable deaths and we have to make a decision about whether or not we are willing to build out the politics that he's going to prevent that from ever happening again and I think that's all of our responsibility. Moving forward it's terrible. We've got to do everything we can to keep. That number's lowest possible. But we shouldn't have been here in the first place your buck. Healing politics is now available and the book talks a lot about the types of political failures that we are seeing right now and how they really impact people in the world. You tell us all a little bit more about your book. Yeah there's a tragic irony the an epidemiologist who's writing a book about an epidemic. That comes out in the middle of the Macadamia not the best time to publish a book. But we have to make a decision about whether or not. We're going to publish. And I felt like this is a set of conversations that needs to be had in the book. I diagnosed this concept of an epidemic of insecurity. They make the argument that this epidemic of insecurity is about systematic failures in all of the systems that we have trusted provide us with the basic means a dignified life. One that is failure of our health system to provide health care for people a failure of our housing system to keep people in their homes failure of our food system to provide adequate access to healthy foods for people a failure of our education system to provide a high quality education that safe place failure of our economic system to provide people with high quality dignified jobs. The provide a wage provide benefits that provide on with a stable retirement failure political system to fully capture the voice of everybody rather than just voices of corporations who have undue influence on politics right now and together right. The failures are even greater than any of them individually. And our do that. This is what we call them. My Osma by the environmental context within which people get sick and this miasma security.

federal government Detroit Michigan Dr Abdul president director governor Gretchen PTSD Whitmer WHITMER obamacare yonkers McGovern Medicare Dr Falke
"sayed" Discussed on Just Between Us

Just Between Us

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"sayed" Discussed on Just Between Us

"In this house that's not. Lgbtq friendly like how could you expect yourself not to have that reaction yourself? Some slack I one of my favorite things is that like the first thing you think is what you've been conditioned to think. And then the second thing you think is who you really are. So just the fact. That like your response to your potential internalized homophobia phobias. Like Yuck I don't want this. That's who you really are you know. And so don't be so hard on yourself and the fact that like outwardly. Or being supportive of your brother and I'm sure no one else even knows going through your head like just give yourself some kindness and know that like you've been conditioned to feel this way and it's not who you really are how you really feel there's also a thing with siblings about like you're copying me or your or like. I've already done this enough to our parents. And now if you view it that way oh now you're doing this to your your parents like one of you has to take the hit of being normal sort of like my sister and I'll be like I don't want to have kids and my sister we like. I don't want to have kids and I'll be like one of us has to do and I think like you just maybe are dealing with a little bit of that where you're like. Well I came out. Now I'm sorry that I made this easier for you but now like both of us are fucking mom and Dad. Shit in are not. Lgbt friendly home but you have to realize that he's your ally now like you guys are each other's best like best hopes for you know for acceptance together. And I think it's interesting that your final question is how do I go about this? And be supportive of my brother. I think you know how to be supportive of your brother. You know like you vocalise your support. You Act supportive you Say things to your parents that are you know on his side so even if you are battling potentially these thoughts those are just thoughts and what is really important is your actions and how you treat him and that you have complete control over. There's also the difference that between Sexuality Gender So for instance if your Both queer but you are not someone who plays with gender at all You could be reacting to this also internalized sort of gender normativity where you're like. I understand that you're queer but do you need to be doing makeup. Do you need to be doing drag like you know maybe your brothers on some sort of of gender journey to and that something like there's the people that are like oh? I understand Queenie's but like any sort of gender non conforming or trans or non binary ness like us. You know what I mean and So I think you should examine that too as to why specifically you you mentioned in your in your letter The PART ABOUT HIM EXPERIMENTING WITH GENDER. Like that specifically bumps for you. Because that's different like you. You're like we're both. We both have the same sexuality. Why would I be You know having these thoughts but like are you both expressing at the same way. Is there a gender thing on this? You know on this side for him. That's not happening for you. And Are you making room for that? That's a very good point. Thank you I am a professional gay. If you want to meet your international questions and it just between us pot at gmail.com that's just between us key od at Djamil dot com around after the break. We've got a very juicy interview Dr Abdul El-Sayed.

Dr Abdul El-Sayed Queenie
"sayed" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"sayed" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"I can make the difference that I want As a clinician you ran a program. I guess at Columbia for four years of that was public health related. Yes so as I was an assistant professor at Columbia and while I was there I I worked in an area of scientific research that That focuses on the role of systems rather than individual. Risk factors on shaping people's health and also focused on how we bring that kind of analysis to tangible real world. Problems again got a little bit frustrated because a lot of times in the academy especially epidemiology which is an applied science. Our work doesn't matter unless it makes people healthier. We were writing papers. That would only really be read by folks who already agreed with what we had to say. And I I wanted. I wanted my work to have an impact and that's ultimately why I ended up leaving academia one of the things that you did while you were there. That interested me was he wrote an article criticising celebrities like Lebron James and beyond say for promoting soft drinks that you thought contribute to childhood obesity and the General Obesity problem. That's right and that get attention to that. You know got some attention before. Didn't get the attention of the people I wanted to. You know the crazy thing is Lebron. James Influence Mayor Bloomberg right. I don't I don't know that he he would've did exactly what I would have suggested. But there's something about about you've got this. That Lebron Lebron we should say Bloomberg banned tried to ban big goals. That's right Which probably will come up again in this presidential race which will talk about in a bit. Yeah I also wrote an article though against the Big Gulp Bank because I just don't think it's particularly effective. I'd like there's a stereotype that the reason that soft drinks are linked to obesity. Because everybody's walking around with a big Gulp right. That's not the case it's the it's the slow and steady consistent drinking of sugar water in effect. But you think about Lebron James and he graduated high school the same year. I've spent my whole career focus on health in one. Move if he were to say you know what? I'm not going to be a front man for sprite anymore because I think sprite is poison. That's making kids sick. That would do more for public health in America. Then I can do for the rest of my career and Lebron if you're listening I know he's A. He's an inveterate x-files listener. So we'll see if he takes takes you up on this. You went back to Detroit. And you became the Health Commissioner for Detroit at a time. When Detroit had declared bankruptcy the whole health department had what five full time employees? Talk about that experience. You spent four years doing that. Yeah I was there for a couple years and it was one of those jobs that he was just a couple only a couple of years. One of those jobs that you you sort of take because you don't know any better. I didn't know what I was walking into. I was thirty years old. Dad held these. Come to you at a friend that he and I were in the same fellowship program and he was at Yale Law School Had A bunch of offers to go work for white shoe law firms or Go in and be a law clerk for for for a judge and he chose to go to the city of Detroit which was an uncommon. Move and I happened to be in town. Reached out to him and just said you know what made you take this. This move and I'd love to learn more about what you're doing in public health and I brought some. Cv's he said. Look I don't I don't cover health but let me just get this to some people and see what happens couple of weeks later. I get a call from a very rough voice the other end of the line. And it's the Mayor of Detroit Mike Duggan and and he asked me if I'm interested in the public health job and you know it was not like we're having a long conversation and say of course. I'm interested in the public. Not Knowing exactly what that job is a great my schedule or find this time. I fly back to Detroit two weeks later. I'd spent two weeks learning everything I could about health and Detroit and put together a presentation and at the end of this hour and a half lunch where I'm walking mayor. Doug in through the challenges that we face in Detroit. He's a look. You've got the job I said Mr I'd just I actually don't quite know. Chop job is is it well health director and so had to go back home and have a much more serious conversation with the person that really matters. Who's my wife Sarah also in medicine? She's also medicine. She's a psychiatrist and has met at the University of Michigan. We met an Undergrad. We were actually that rare couple. Who got married? She was nineteen. I was twenty one and had friends. Who are like. Oh you're you're robbing. The cradle allows like. I'M IN THE CRADLE. All this script. But we've been married at that point for for some time in. Sarah's just incredibly giving human being who appreciated the value of the work and she had just matched into residency in New York which is where we were so we. We spent a year apart and I moved out to Detroit to take on this role of rebuilding a health department. That had been shut down in two thousand twelve when the city was facing bankruptcy the same austerity measures. That took away the right to self-determination from low-income Black folks in Flint that led to the flint water crisis the consequences in Detroit. Where that they shut down a one hundred and eighty five? Help your old health department In a city with a higher mortality rate than my father's native Egypt where I told you about their families experience and so I walked into an apartment with five city. Employees eighty-five contractors in the back of the building where they pay parking tickets in Detroit and we got to work and I think had I known any better of what I walk into. It probably wouldn't taking the job but I'll be honest with you it. It was the most the most filling exhilarating work I've ever done. Because you have this idea of saying look we know that thirty percent of our kids who get tested for vision. Deficits are going to get a pair of glasses. They're gonNA come back testing positive again next year as kinds of downstream implications for their learning all kinds as a as a as a child of color right. I know what happens when you get labelled bad kid right and that happened to be a lot when I was a kid. Now if it's because you just can't see what's on the board and you're trying to entertain yourself. There's a solution for that. Just get get a pair of glasses and all of a sudden what's happening on board gets a little bit more interesting because you can see it and so you know. Build a program to provide every kid a pair of glasses. And that's something we. Can you get six thousand kids glasses? That's right And I hope that those that little intervention obvious thing has has serious long-term implications for disrupting the the intergenerational poverty that we see that takes hold and communities like Detroit because we assume that in the in the sort of frame of political reasoning where everybody's accountable for their own poverty right that that somehow people are just making bad decisions when in fact we as a society of often just given up on communities and we fail to invest in in very little things that so many other communities get to take for granted that could fundamentally change the trajectory of a life. Use It as a platform to attack the LEAD PAINT PROBLEM IN DETROIT. Older homes with lead paint. That's right profound implications for kids. Got Them to change the ordinance related to to that in retool. These the good news was that there were there were there. Were a community of folks inside the city. We're committed to taking on these issues and thinking about what we could do and for us you know the the flint water crisis was obvious. Terrible outcome of this system of austerity imposed by the state. But it's also left us with this legacy whereby we think about lead poisoning and we think about water but most of the lead poisoning in America is attributable to lead based paint in homes that were built before nineteen seventy eight ninety three percent home in Detroit built before nineteen seventy eight and so we've got ZIP. Codes in Detroit where the prevalence of lead poisoning is three. Fold what it was in the city of Flint at the height of the water crisis. And that's about paying attention to what happens in home. It's a far slower moving but equally disastrous consequences so thinking about how we systematically solve. That was a big part of what animated our work in the city as well you took on the asthma issue air pollution in the city. You did a range of things. Took on the new. The the food desert problem absence of nutrition for his You use it as a very broad platform and that's your orientation of these health issue. That's exactly right is is. It's easy to think about. Health is healthcare but really health is about all of those things that happened before somebody gets sick in the first place and so the question. We asked ourselves at the health department was. What are the things that we can do? That have a disproportionate impact on those health. Outcomes that that that create a pathway for poverty to move from one generation to another so whether it was solving vision deficits or addressing infant mortality in preterm birth or taking on lead poisoning or making sure that kids Were breathing air. That was poisoning them and forcing them to miss a day school. Every two weeks as persistent asthma does all of these things have knock on effect and so we wanted to think broad-based about it. Then that's the thing about public health actually has has to do with all of the things that happen before we get to healthcare and so you've got to be broad-based about about the interventions that you take on as audacious as it was to take on that challenge two years later you decide to run for governor at the age of thirty three why. I was in my in my role in Detroit and we were doing all kinds of work that. I'm quite proud of grateful. I got to do with a community of folks who Who who took it on with me But there was a ceiling on what we do. Because of the politics of the circumstances right it was impolitic to talk about Lead in the fact that the demolitions program the city Detroit was Was potentially poisoning kids in the Era Flint It was impolitic to talk about water. Shut offs and I found myself consistently butting heads with the mayor about whether or not We do work on those issues at the same time. I'm watching that same system of politics Lead to the systematic poisoning of kids in flint. He didn't want to because he felt it. Would he was trying to REBRAND DETROIT? Mi felt these issues. Were just set. That mission back exactly. Nobody wants to move their corporate headquarters into a city where the lead poisoning Prevalence is higher than it is in Flint. You must have considered given our previous discussion the barriers to entry for a young guy named Abdul El-Sayed. So tell me Tell me how that unfolded for you. And how much of a barrier was you walk into politics with the circumstances given right and you're constantly thinking about how to turn those challenges in the strength? I knew I mean the reason. I decided to run fundamentally was was I saw what happened in Flint. I saw what politics were keeping me from being able to do in Detroit Watch. Donald Trump get elected president. And at some point you're saying something really wrong with this. I knew that the challenges I faced as as a thirty-three-year-old Muslim guy named Abdul never run for office. Before would be pretty daunting but also knew that I had a really powerful story to tell about who we are and who we are to be which is at core what the question of our politics are. I also knew that in the state that had become defined by the flint water crisis in the news. Then who better? But a former health commissioner to solve it and I also knew that if we were able to go out and have an honest conversation that was driven by empathy and a conversation with folks about what was wrong that was framed around listening to people instead of telling them about yourself that a lot to get done and I'd spent my whole life in very different parts of Michigan whether it was you know as health commissioner in the city Detroit or spending some of my summer and Montcalm County Michigan every every summer that you know I knew how to listen to folks and I could understand where they're coming from as that's what we did right. We built a campaign around being very very honest about about what we had heard about taking the time to listen and then turning that into really thoughtful policy to solve it and then talking about that in the context of what those policies could mean about who.

Detroit Flint Lebron James Lebron Lebron flint Lebron obesity Sarah Commissioner America asthma James Influence Mayor Bloomber assistant professor Columbia University of Michigan Abdul El-Sayed Donald Trump Yale Law School
"sayed" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"sayed" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Today you hear a lot about health. It usually sounds something like this this morning obamacare back in the crosshairs unbelievably complex blick subject. Nobody knew that healthcare could be so complicated or maybe more like this these dark days of doubt thank goodness for Paul Tro and her lifestyle brand goup without a doubt in my mind I believe vaccinations triggered Evans Autism. You may remember the name Martin screwy Medicare for all. It is all very very expensive. How do you pay. How do you sell it but usually that's just noise decision and even though that noise is really loud? It doesn't make us any healthier in fact. It's distracting us from the real health problems. We're facing my name is Dr Abdul El-Sayed. I'm a physician epidemiologist and former city health commissioner. I spent my whole career thinking about health who gets to have it. Who Does it how we talk about it. When we think it matters and maybe more importantly we think it doesn't and this is America dissected second a new podcast from Brooklyn media together will slice through all this noise and get to the heart of what really matters for our health see real solutions to all these problems are as impossible as all the talkers would have you think but getting to these solutions means. We've got to remember what we're up against and how we've solved all problems like this before and that's always meant to things rigorous science incompetent government working hand in glove off getting it done. We'll talk about the forces beyond the headlines that shape the issues that matter for our health the ways we're failing science the ways that government is failing us and what we can do to get it all back on track together when we cut to the heart of what matters in in America dissected coming soon from crooked media subscribe wherever you get your favorite podcasts.

America Paul Tro Dr Abdul obamacare commissioner Martin Brooklyn