38 Burst results for "Savannah"

Fresh update on "savannah" discussed on H-sana

H-sana

02:10 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "savannah" discussed on H-sana

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Hanley Huron Thomas Montreal Lasala Dom Mottaki Ilan England Orla Mata Elliott Donald Bank Orla Semi Thessaloniki Gavia Cossio Cassano Stan League Davao Savannah Salikh Acura Kenya Stein Orchestra NFL Merrick Kuan Pass Jessica Walks Puerto Rico Santo Galway Meri
Atlanta - 7-year-old Savannah boy is Georgia's youngest COVID-19 death victim

Dana Loesch

00:19 sec | 3 d ago

Atlanta - 7-year-old Savannah boy is Georgia's youngest COVID-19 death victim

"Positive Corona virus cases nears the 205,000 mark statewide and the death toll is now over 4000. Georgia is registering its first child death. A seven year old boy from the Savannah area succumb to the illness. The Health department says he had no preexisting or underlying health issues.

Health Department Savannah Georgia
Fresh update on "savannah" discussed on POW! Samsung Developer Program

POW! Samsung Developer Program

00:56 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "savannah" discussed on POW! Samsung Developer Program

"Pride myself in being a little crazy. You know you have to be in this crazy world. And I love surprising people with designs to like one second. Yeah. You'll have a butterfly that looks realistic landing on your on your watch and then the next moment you know you have some zombies that are appearing with your step goal biohazard Z.. That's A. Great One. Yeah, definitely. So we were fortunate actually to come out and visit you at Savannah College of Art and design where we came in hosted a session with your students teaching them all about theme designing for phones in in watch faces in that connection actually came through. So that was my opportunity to come out to Savannah and get to meet you in person what a beautiful city I mean it really in in the campus itself to is pretty unique because from what I understand Savannah College of art and design the like the number one occupancy of buildings in downtown is that correct him as far as the other campuses put together? Yeah it. Seems like it's every other building and it's really amazing what they've done for Savannah. They encouraged a lot of businesses to move in as well to cater to students and they really played a huge role in where savannah. Is Today you know we get millions and millions of visitors every single year and schools to to thank for a lot of that just the the restoration projects and encouraging restoration, and then of course, we have a great historic preservation society alone just in Savannah being the oldest plan city in America in a genius plan to just how it integrates with all the giant oak trees that are in all the squares and and really jealous of those those treason. As person living there I always try to make sure that I go out and do it. The visitors do just to remind myself. You know what a beautiful city it is, and then you know just going to school in those historic buildings as well. It just it helps with the creativity and yet the location definitely helps with the whole artistic.

Savannah Savannah College Of Art And De Savannah College Of Art America
A 7-year-old boy in Georgia has died of Covid-19, the youngest victim in the state

Kilmeade and Friends

00:42 sec | 3 d ago

A 7-year-old boy in Georgia has died of Covid-19, the youngest victim in the state

"As the state's Corona virus. Death toll surpasses the 4000 mark. Georgia is making its are marking the death of its youngest victim. It's a seven year old boy from the Savannah Savannah area. area. Janet Janet two's two's Justin Justin will will font font says says there there isn't isn't much much known known about about the the boy's boy's illness illness or or death. death. Coastal Coastal Health Health Department Department is is releasing releasing little little information information about about the the boy's boy's death. death. But But did did tell tell me me in in a a statement. statement. Every Every Coben Coben 19 19 death death we we report report is is tragic, tragic, but but to to lose lose someone someone so so young young is is especially especially hard hard braking. braking. We We know know that that older older individuals and those with underlying conditions are at a higher risk of complications. But this is a disease everyone should take seriously. The Health Department says the child did not have any known underlying health conditions.

Coastal Coastal Health Health Janet Janet Justin Justin Georgia
Fresh update on "savannah" discussed on POW! Samsung Developer Program

POW! Samsung Developer Program

01:42 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "savannah" discussed on POW! Samsung Developer Program

"To start selling watch faces on the galaxy store and has become one of the most successful along the way he's inspired many other designers to start creating for Samsung with his willingness to share his knowledge and expertise. In fact, it was video I. Saw Chris Inspired. Me Start. Designing Watch faces which eventually led me to my Gig Samsung. So it is an absolute honor to bring him on the podcast and let me warn you Chris and I'd love to talk. Then sometimes we go off and a few tangents talking about how his house was not only featured in an episode of ghost hunters but was also used in a big time Hollywood movie. Of course, we talk a lot about designing marketing APPS for Samsung. Enjoy. I am super excited to have on the podcast today Chris show from Infinity Watch faces. So let me I actually start by asking who is Chris Chamo-. Hey. Tony. Thank you so much for having me on the show. Who is Chris Chamo-? I'm I'm a lot of thanks, Hamid, designer, which you know initially when someone is a designer, they can be corky they can be geeky sometimes they can be introverted sometimes where they can be outgoing. It depends on my mood and the time of day I can be a little bit of everything. But you know I can be the shy person in the room, but you don't get me talking about something that I'm interested in and then sometimes you can't get to shut up. So I can absolutely relate to that. You've pretty much have described my personality. Definitely you know being a fellow designer and that's why I'm really excited about this podcast is we can kind of Geek out a bit as we're talking design. So how did you first get your start in graphic design Oh Jeez? I guess it goes all the way back to when I was a little kid I'm always had me doing artistic projects for school actually I would always find a way to make some sort of artistic project if I could for for homework I would always go the art route was a lot more fun, and then in high school, I did a project, it was a penny drawing of the Shakespeare Globe theatre and I did it for an English class and I decided to take an art class as an elective and Mrs. Martin my art teacher in high school she asks for some examples of my previous work and Out of my book bag, I, took out a folded piece of paper and then I dislike unfolded to this this gigantic poster size of the Shakespeare Globe theatre was that that artist drawing I did and she said, okay, lesson number one do not fold up your artwork. So that's how I kind of got started and that drawing was was pretty awesome and she kinda excelled me through she. She put me into the the higher level art classes of real quick the kind of me a couple of classes and I want a lot of awards of against other students and some regional awards in the area, and then afterwards, I decided to art school and my my brother discovered Savannah College of art and. Downs manager and So yeah, I attended there. Wow. So. For. Good while to almost like van wilder experienced multiple degrees. Wonderful again, I can relate to that I definitely took the the long through a through college. So straight out of college then did you work for a large company? Did you start your own your own Gig what did you? What was your first step coming out of college? Okay. Well, I graduated with my Undergrad in computer art with a focus on Three D. animation and that was in two thousand and five and right after I interviewed. For some companies and I just really do not want to be stuck in a cubicle just for the jobs that I was offered. So I ended up taking a job for a contractor in helping build a house from ground up allow and after that I decided I was interested in architecture and I put together a portfolio and Scott gave me a portfolio scholarship to come back and they paid for the masters and I got my masters in architecture. Wow, I did not know that. Anna many secrets, I guess. Some hidden talents there But I did graduate after the economy crashed and it was really hard to find a job in architecture. So I started a website design company. And from there I just kind of you know word of mouth and just kept on gaining clients until eventually I had clients all across the East Coast. So you went to school in Savannah. Georgia are you currently in Savannah is that where your offices based out of Yes Savannah's where my heart is I I love the city and and actually president of the neighborhood. Association for the neighborhood that I'm in and it's one of the largest neighborhoods in Savannah and southern living magazine actually ranked number one neighborhood to live in the south as well. Right before all the craziness this year, we got the nation. So it is quite interesting because there's so many local businesses and residential neighborhoods in this neighborhood. So just dealing with everything from alcohol licenses and giving our blessing and zoning issues and Just figuring out what's going on with crosswalks and trash cans and all that kind of stuff you know it's interesting. So I actually heard a very interesting note about not just the neighborhood but the house that you live in. Yes. You told me that it is actually haunted. In his haunted and documented on a ghost hunters episode. Believe it's two thousand and ten homes where the heart is. Okay. Yeah. It's all about current family that was living there and their experiences with the ghost. They say, they've seen this ghost this little girl. Apparently. Her name is known Clark and she's been appearing. I guess for the past. or well, the previous owner assault or two hundred times. That's what they said two hundred or more times. And Ghost hunters did believe that they were entities in the house as well. Okay well known Clark she is the daughter of the guy who built the house back in eighteen ninety six and he owned a lumber mill and he inherited this lumber mill from his father when he was twenty six years old and he he built a house. Known he was one of his daughters and apparently she was one of the first women to receive a pacemaker for her heart in that led to her dying. Somehow I, don't know what happened to it. But she died when she was in her fifties but supposedly, she's coming back like a twelve year old girl. I've never seen her I've had some strange things happening house doors slamming things disappearing from one place to other place. Not My imagination other people have experienced things too. But how she was identified is that the lady across the street had apparently. A recognized the description of the nightgown that she appeared in. He told she had made that nightgown for her when she was young. So getting little co chills thinking about it right now. But. It is interesting but I don't feel scared in the house. I think the House accepts me I've never had this budget or whatever you call it or try to clear spirits out of there. But, it's an interesting story and it's always fine when somebody else experiences something. That is absolutely wild to hear you know, and we'll. We'll circle back to the the whole aspect of design in this podcast. I. Will note before the jump head just a little bit. Your designs have a little bit of a quirkiness thome and sometimes I'm seeing ghosts aliens in crazy thing. So I think that maybe where you're getting some of your inspiration yeah. Well, I mean, you live in a dynamic city actually one of the most haunted cities in America. Sure It's it's one of the most wild cities in America too mean you have this this local Phil but then at the same time, you know it's one of the few places in America where you have an open cup and you know take a drink from one bar to another downtown. So at leads to a little bit of craziness but I myself.

Samsung Chris Savannah College Of Art Savannah Chris Inspired Chris Chamo Shakespeare Globe Theatre America Infinity Watch Hollywood Hamid Clark Van Wilder Thome East Coast Assault Anna Georgia Mrs. Martin
30000 Americans receive Covid-19 vaccine in major test

Todd Schnitt

02:35 min | Last week

30000 Americans receive Covid-19 vaccine in major test

"The Corona virus front. Let me lightning around a bunch of stuff here. Final test of the Madonna Covert 19 vaccine trial. Has begun, according to numerous reports. This is the world's biggest vaccine study and the final phase here launched today with the 1st 30,000 US participants. Beginning the test for this vaccine for this experimental immunization developed by modern along with the date with the National Institutes of Health. Savannah, Georgia, Speaking of Georgia was the first trial site to get up and running there going to be over a dozen across the country for the third phase here, according to Madonna. Now, what's gonna happen is volunteers that get the shot. They're not going to know if they're getting the rial vaccine or the placebo, the inert jab in the arm after two doses of the shot, Then the researchers will look and see which group experiences Mohr infections. As they continue running around doing their their normal things, and especially, they're going to be looking at areas where people are part of the trials, and these areas are experiencing the bumps. The increases. In Corona virus. Certainly Florida Georgia, the Carolinas. You've got the Sunbelt States. Texas, You've got Arizona, California. Clearly they're going to be testing areas in those states. As well and every month now through the fall. The covert 19 prevention network is going to roll out a new study of AH leading candidate vaccines, each one with 30,000 new volunteers. And we're gonna have one vaccine that is going to be a stand out or we're gonna have multiple Mac vaccines from multiple companies that are going to have a high degree of efficacy. We shall see. But clearly we need a vaccine that works. And then, of course, if it does This would this is historic folks. If it does just the amount of time to develop a vaccine, get to this phase and testing with this many people and that the potentially have the vaccine out. By early or mid next year. That's still it's a rocket ride. It's this is historic. It would

Georgia Sunbelt States Savannah National Institutes Of Health Mohr United States Florida Carolinas Arizona Texas California
COVID-19 vaccine trial that started at Atlanta's Emory expands to the largest in the world

Atlanta's Evening News and Rick Erickson

00:35 sec | Last week

COVID-19 vaccine trial that started at Atlanta's Emory expands to the largest in the world

"The world's largest cove in 19 vaccine study, researched at Emory here in Atlanta has entered crucial phase three human trials. Today, 30,000 volunteers will be a part of this critical phase for the vaccine trial developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna. Those volunteers would be in areas of the country with higher infection rates, including Savannah, the chairman of the Donatella's Good Morning America on Channel Two. If they get the results of looking for the next step is federal approval talking lately, you're next year before the FDA. Khun made this adjudication. Nothing's guaranteed. But the Madonna Steins, one of several around the world that has shown promise Genetic and bottom 95.5 double DSP

National Institutes Of Health Madonna Steins Khun Emory Chairman Savannah FDA Atlanta
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | Last week

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
Atlanta - First US Coronavirus Vaccine Phase 3 Clinical Trial Begins In Savannah

All of It

00:18 sec | 2 weeks ago

Atlanta - First US Coronavirus Vaccine Phase 3 Clinical Trial Begins In Savannah

"Tonight. The world's largest corona virus vaccine study is underway. Shots created by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna are Being tested on the first set of volunteers, who are among the 30,000 slated to take part. But Ernest says the first trial took place in Savannah, Georgia. Subsequent vaccinations will take place in other

National Institutes Of Health Ernest Savannah Georgia
Moderna begins final phase of COVID-19 vaccine study

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Moderna begins final phase of COVID-19 vaccine study

"19 vaccine candidate is now underway. 30,000 volunteers are taking part in this trial by the pharmaceutical company. Moderna, CBS News correspondent David Beck. No with more vice President Mike Pence, is coming here to South Florida Miami specifically because because there's there's a a brand brand new new vaccine vaccine trial trial that that kicks kicks off off today today in in combination combination with with the the National National Institutes Institutes of of Health Health and and the the drug drug company, company, Moderna, Moderna, there there will will be be 87 87 sites. sites. Around Around the the country, country, 30,000 people who are participating in a vaccine trial and we just found out the first dose was administered in Savannah, Georgia this morning.

Moderna National National Institutes I Mike Pence Vice President David Beck Cbs News Miami Savannah Georgia
Dallas - Fort Worth Zoo Named The Top Zoo In The Country

KRLD Saturday Morning News

03:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Dallas - Fort Worth Zoo Named The Top Zoo In The Country

"Well, for the first time ever, the Fort Worth Zoo has won the title as the number one zoo. In America. This is a survey that Yusa today conducts every summer. The zoo and Fort Worth has been in the top five for the last four years in a row. Last year, it finished up in fourth. Avery Ellender from the fort word, Su tells Carl these David rank and it's kind of nice to win the popularity contest once in a while. Absolutely. We are so excited to have the honor, and we just couldn't be more thrilled. Tell me about the this whole Yusa Today Zoo survey that they do every year today has assembled a panel of industry experts. And they created a lead out of 230 something ese accredited zoos that they deem. Um, it sell and things like animal care and enrichment. Also, Jews that have created meaningful interactions between humans and animals. So this panel created a list of 20 Suze And then that they opened it up. Tio a nationwide vote and the contest ended July 6. And we just learned this morning that we have been named the number one show in the country. What's been the reaction around the place? Everybody super excited. We're really thrilled to hear the news and thank our visitors and our guests and our members for voting us to the number one spot. I will say, you know, it's been a really interesting summer. And of course, we spent the majority of our spring closed for 11 weeks. But our staff was still here showing up every single day feeding and caring for the animals. So I think a really nice for award for the dedicated staff and And we've always known how special issue is, but now we get to show the rest of the country. Now you're getting ready to do a huge build out. Other forwards do what's coming up in the second phase. That's right. So it is part of our $100 million master plan and, of course, the first face that was the African Savannah exhibit that opened in 2018. And we are getting very close to opening our Elephants Springs exhibit, which is the second phase and it will nearly triple the size of our elephant exhibit. It will offer them multiple yards and areas to Rome. With different slash pools on expanded barn, So we're really excited to be able Tio not only provide that new space for elephants but also Continue to maintain our conservation and breeding programs and also provide new interactions and ways for against to see these animals up close. And that's Avery Ellender with the Ford words Sue, by the way, the Dallas Sue On Mars Sailors spent his ninth in that same USA Today's survey, and that gives by the way the two big Jews in North Texas top 10 finishes. We're

Fort Worth Zoo Avery Ellender Yusa Today Zoo Yusa Carl Fort Worth America Elephants Springs Rome Usa Today African Savannah Dallas SU North Texas David
CDC delays school reopening guidance

Morning Edition

06:47 min | 3 weeks ago

CDC delays school reopening guidance

"School officials face an agonising choice in the next few weeks. How, if at all, did they send their kids back to school? To them. It's a decision about public health and about the kids who are closest to them. The president alleges. The decision is really about him. He's urging schools to open and criticizing his own administration's guidelines for opening safely and claiming without evidence that governors in school leaders want to keep schools shut to hurt him. They think it's going to be good for them politically, so they keep the schools close. No way. So we're very much going to put pressure on governors and everybody else to open the schools to get him open District leaders in Los Angeles, Houston, Atlanta and many other communities have announced they will keep teaching remotely when school resumes. NPR's Corey Turner has been covering this and joins us now, Corey Good morning. Good morning, Steve. I want to mention that the White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany said behind the lectern yesterday. Science should not stand in the way of reopening. Now people mock. That is if she was dismissing science. But in context, she appeared to be arguing that the science supports reopening. That's what she said. But what is the research to actually say? Yeah, That's right. The the science suggests that kid's generally don't get very sick from Cove in 19 so the administration is not far on that one. But it is less clear how easily kids spread it, especially if they're clustered in schools. But we have to remember that the realist you here is that many states are right now seeing substantial community spread of the disease, and the science is not clear that reopening schools in that context is smart or safe. As for that CDC guidance you mentioned Steve, our colleague, Franco Ordo. Nia's reported last night that the agency is going to delay some new school reopening documents, although it's a little confusing here because CDC has said these documents are not a revision or a softening of the old guidance that President Trump doesn't like, just sort of an elaboration. Well, that's right. Because the president criticized the guidelines to toughen. The CDC essentially said Too bad the science is what it is these guidelines so what would make the guidelines contentious? I mean, some of them are really tough having kids where face coverings, staggering school schedules, But maybe the hardest is keeping kids six feet apart in the classroom, you know, do the math to do that you a have to divide kids into smaller classroom groups. B. Find more classroom space and see find more teachers on that stuff, And that's why some places like New York City say. They're going to have to do a hybrid schedule, bringing some kids in some of the time What our various school superintendents saying as they make these decisions, So they're saying that you know, in spite of President Trump trying to sideline the CDC, they're still very much working with and listening to local, state and federal public health officials and Levet. She heads the savanna Chatham County public schools in Georgia. She told me she's constantly checking in with the head of her public health department and looking over daily infection data for her community. Every day and look at the numbers and I'm like, Please, Please let him go down. Please let him go down and they're not going down. Which is why Levet says her hardest day in this pandemic was not when Georgia closed her school's back in March. I was just last week when looking at the numbers, she decided there was just no way for her to fully reopen at roughly the same time is when President Trump began his campaign to pressure school leaders into quickly reopening Accusing them of not doing what's best for kids. Anyone out there who's questioning whether not educated or at home and not doing the work that I young people need us to be doing the wrong. That's Louvel Brown, He's head of the Ithaca City School district in Ithaca, New York, were working even more now, and we can't wait to get these babies back in our spaces. Superintendents do at least share President Trump's sense of urgency. It is better. To have kids back in school every day. Paul Imhoff is the superintendent of Upper Arlington schools near Columbus, Ohio. All of us want that all of us are anxious for that. But then in half pauses as soon as it's safe, Michael Ina hosta who runs the Dallas Independent School District puts it this way. Sometimes parents forgive us if we commit educational malpractice. They will never forgive us if we let something happen to their Children, So what does it mean to open schools safely? Many school leaders are following. CDC is recommendation to space desks six feet apart, and Brown says that's forcing him to get creative will use everyone about spaces. We hope to be able to get outside and you those faces as well. But I still don't think we can get all of our young people in school at the same time in Dallas. Michael in a hostess says. We think we can have a pretty safe learning about him. But we're gonna have mask We're goingto have face shields. We're going to have a Plexiglas in the classroom. The plexiglass. He's Says, helps him fit more students into each classroom. Even with that, though, Dallas County is seeing substantial community spread of the disease. So in a hostess says he wants to delay the start of school by several weeks. Chad guest in the head of the Phoenix Union High School District, says this pandemic is forcing educators to become epidemiologists. We were spending so much time studying Respiratory droplets and measuring classrooms and how many kids fit on a bus and how to transition thousands of kids between periods that we lost track of the core of our work. And that core guest in says is teaching and learning. So Steve with infection rates skyrocketing in Arizona to guest in recently announced that for now, at least all of his students are going to keep learning remotely. And that way, he says he and his staff Khun Get back to focusing on you know how to be a great school. Well, sounds like the bottom line is that many schools maybe even most schools will not open on time in August of the start of September. At least not fully know. I think there's just too much uncertainty, especially with infection rates rising again in so many places. It's also worth noting, though, that several recent national polls show a majority of parents Really opposed schools rushing to reopen two parents are on the side of schools. In many places. I even heard from the superintendent in Ithaca, where infection rates are pretty low, Super intown Superintendent Brown told me. You know the key to everyone being able to return to school there. Really boils down to one word, vaccine them. And if you have different schools, making different decisions in different areas, you have parents looking around and saying, Wait a minute. What are we supposed to do here and wanting to be conscious with their own kids, right? Absolutely. I mean, it gets back to the same old line I've heard every day since covering schools, which is their controlled locally. Cory, Thanks for your work. Thank you. Steve, NPR's education

President Trump CDC Steve Superintendent Louvel Brown Ithaca City School District Phoenix Union High School Dist Dallas Independent School Dist NPR Michael Ina Ithaca Georgia New York City Levet Dallas County Dallas Corey Good
Atlanta - Savannah mayor hits back at Kemp for overriding local mask mandates: He 'does not give a damn about us'

All Things Considered

05:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Atlanta - Savannah mayor hits back at Kemp for overriding local mask mandates: He 'does not give a damn about us'

"Words on Twitter from the mayor of Savannah, Georgia. It is officially official wrote Mayor Van Johnson last night. Governor Kemp does not give a damn about us. The mayor's tweet came shortly after Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed an executive order banning local governments from requiring masks that put a finer point on an earlier executive order prohibiting cities and counties from taking any action that was more restrictive than what was ordered statewide. And so amid rising cases of Corona virus throughout Georgia, existing mask mandates, including the one in Savannah, are essentially void. Mayor Van Johnson joins us now Welcome to the program. Thank you so much. I appreciate the opportunity. Well, I'm sure you know. Governor Kemp has said he strongly encourages mass. He wears one in public. But, he says requiring them is impractical and unenforceable for local business owners. For example, he says, mandates are a bridge too far. How do you respond to that? I respond to it by following the science, um, is issue about public safety about public health, or is it about convenience? Right to the west of us all. The state of Alabama now mandates mask in South Carolina and in Florida, they live up to them in the palate ease to decide whether the mandate mask And even today, the White House when asked about a nationwide math quarter on the White House is leaving that decision up to localities. So again, I think for us we are in the fight for lots were trying to get past Cove in 19. It's going to take all of us firing on all cylinders, working together to be able to make this happen, and we know from the sides from the CDC, which is located in Atlanta. That wearing mask is a part of the three pronged approach to be able to slow down the spread of this virus. And you made mass mandatory in public spaces and commercial establishments there in Savannah on July 1st, you were the first in Georgia to do so. How hard has it been to enforce has not really been hard to enforce because Again. Our goal here was compliance, not enforcement. So we've given out over 1000 mask and anyone who wanted a mass before we will write a ticket for anyone. We would offer him a mask. And so our visitors, our citizens gratefully took a mask on and therefore no ticket was required. The goal of this again. It's 1/2 people to wear a mask and again we have with 15 million visitors come to our beautiful city every year. Some know some don't know again. Our role is to make sure we educate and make sure we provide a mass that they are a compliant. Governor Kim's office sent us a statement here at NPR calling your mask mandate illegal since it is more restrictive than what's mandated statewide. And they said there's no evidence you're taking action to enforce what is required statewide, including social distancing. They say you haven't stopped unlawful gatherings in your city, for instance, How do you respond to that? Hey, I think again where we're really focused on the wrong things. Um, The reality is that science is very, very clear. We're all doing the best we can during these very hard type again. Social distancing per his order is filled with 50 people. I believe and again, people are out. Things are open and people are gathering. Um and begin our ability to enforce. It is limited because these unfunded mandates from the state level the government could put order out there. But he's not giving us a resource is to help us to enforce those orders. So again, we're doing the best that we can again. This is really about the wearing of mask. This is about being able to keep people safe decides has been absolutely clear. On July 2nd government, Kemp said himself that he was not going to stand in the way ofthe Savannah's mandatory mass corner. Yet here we are two weeks later, and he's issuing something specifically and the only one in the country. That specifically, um denies cities and counties the ability to be able to take care of their citizens. And to me that's unacceptable and we're almost out of time. But quickly. What now for Savannah, will you fight the ban on mask mandates? And in the meantime, what are you telling residents of your city? Well for us. There's nothing to fight a CZ. Where could we were concerned of Savannah's mass mandate is still in effect. We still have legal standing. We believe the government does not have the authority. Um And so therefore we continued to enforce it will enforce our current mask order. Even if that brings you head to head with the governor. Again, the governor do would he have to do? We will do what it takes, and we believe we have not only legal standing, but we have the science behind us to Dolly demonstrate that an emergent condition exists in Havana in Georgia. I'm going to stop you there. But thanks so much. That's Mayor Van Johnson of Savannah, Georgia. Thank you. And since we spoke with Mayor Johnson NPR has learned that Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has filed a lawsuit against Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance bottoms to block her city's mask wearing requirement.

Mayor Van Johnson Governor Brian Kemp Savannah Georgia Governor Kim Mayor Johnson Npr Atlanta Twitter Executive CDC White House Official Alabama Cove Havana Dolly NPR South Carolina Keisha Lance
Georgia governor rescinds mask orders across the state

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Georgia governor rescinds mask orders across the state

"Fight Her face masks in Georgia is growing more intense Mayors in Atlanta and several other Georgia cities have deepened their defiance of Republican governor Brian kept by saying they want their face mask orders to remain in place. Kevin signed an executive order forbidding cities and counties from mandating face coverings even as Corona virus cases surgeon the state many local governmental leaders air now vetting outrageous Kip Savannah Mayor Van Johnson took to Twitter, saying, quote it is officially official governor kept does not give a damn about us. Jim Krystle, a CBS News 3

Governor Brian Georgia Jim Krystle Kip Savannah Twitter Van Johnson Atlanta CBS Kevin Executive Official
Georgia governor rescinds mask orders across the state

Mark Reardon

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Georgia governor rescinds mask orders across the state

"Political fight over face masks in Georgia is growing Mohr. Intense mayors in Atlanta and several other Georgia cities have deepened their defiance of Republican governor Brian kept by saying they want their face mask orders to remain in place. Kevin signed an executive order forbidding cities and counties from mandating face coverings even as Corona virus cases surgeon the state many local governmental leaders air now vetting outrageous Kip Savannah Mayor Van Johnson took to Twitter, saying quote it is officially official governor kept does not give a damn about us. Jim Krystle, a CBS News

Governor Brian Georgia Jim Krystle Kip Savannah Mohr Twitter Atlanta Van Johnson CBS Kevin Executive Official
Georgia governor overrides all local mask orders in the state

KCBS Radio Midday News

02:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Georgia governor overrides all local mask orders in the state

"During this Corona virus Amid a crush of cases, Georgia's governor is pushing back against health experts and signing an order late yesterday banning mask mandates in the states, cities and counties. For more. We're joined on the KCBS Ring Central News Line by Atlanta Journal Constitution. Political reporter Greg Bleustein Greg, Thanks for joining us this morning, is governor camp, offering any explanation as to why he's doing this. No formal explanation yet, although his orders have previously restricted cities from taking further action beyond the statewide order, this actually explicitly lays out and we're not. We're not getting a clear understanding of why, other than he has said previously that Requiring masks throughout the state is a bridge too far and unenforceable. Are any local leaders pushing back? Yeah, we're seeing a basically a revolt from leaders of of Democratic leaning cities throughout the state. We're talking some of the biggest municipalities in Georgia Mana gusta. The city of Athens, which is actually Governor Brian keeps hometown Savannah. All of them have said they're going to continue to enforce these mass restrictions. What this does it sets up a collision course between Georgia and some of the biggest cities in the state. So what could happen as a result of that? Is this something that's likely to end up in court. They actually could end up in court. I don't think that's what anyone wants in Georgia, and I've talked to many legal experts who say that the governor could well lose That battle does end up in a courtroom. The optics of that would be really bad would be really damaging of Georgia actually going to court to stop cities from from what you say is protecting their own citizens from from a deadly and growing outbreak. Greg. We've seen a wide range of attitudes about masks across this country. Have there been any recent polls in Georgia? How do people feel about wearing masks there? Yeah, The last polls we've seen in Georgia works in University of Jorge's pulling that work that showed a wide acceptance of not only masks but also other corner virus restrictions. Regulations for businesses that do we open the shutdowns of businesses that can't follow those guidelines. So we haven't seen the number of the level of pushback in some other communities. But I will say there is a definite Earl Suburban and roll split. You're seeing more sparsely populated parts of the state were voters tend to be more conservative. There's more of a push back. That's what governor was alluding to when I think, he said that it was a bridge too far for many residents.

Georgia Greg Bleustein Greg Georgia Mana Gusta Governor Brian Atlanta Journal Earl Suburban Athens Reporter Savannah University Of Jorge
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Whole Foods workers sent home for wearing Black Lives Matter masks

WBZ Midday News

00:29 sec | Last month

Whole Foods workers sent home for wearing Black Lives Matter masks

"Foods supermarket in Cambridge sending home employees for wearing black lives matter face masks according to the globe Savannah Kinzer brother masks to the Cambridge store on Wednesday and handed them out to co workers when she and her colleagues put them on they say the manager told them they either had to remove their masks or go home seven of the employees walked out Kinzer says managers told employees they could not wear black lives matter masks because they were not part of the official dress

Cambridge Savannah Kinzer Official
Denise Linn | A Time for Heart Opening

Hay House Meditations

09:34 min | Last month

Denise Linn | A Time for Heart Opening

"It is my honor to have Denise Lynn on the House Meditations podcast today, someone who I think brings the wisdom of the sacred feminine insight as an ancestor of the Cherokee Indians, and as a deeply empathetic person, so thanks for coming on the PODCAST. Thank you so much for having me. Yeah so How maybe we'll just start out by. How is your heart doing the these are really daunting times. How is your heart? Lamb assuming you're talking about my my emotional heart, and this has been a for everyone really, but for so many of us. Such a challenging time it's been a time of had times in days where I feel like I've just been brought to my knees, and I have times when I feel like both my arms are cast up to the heavens, and my heart is opening, and I can feel the creator deep inside of me. It's just been a roller coaster in I'm a big believer in embracing it all I know some people like to just just embrace the positive emotions and try to suppress the negative ones, but I think that. They did. Health emotional health spiritual health comes from embracing all of it, so it has been it has been a roller coaster, and it's been a time of. Just deeply felt love and. But then also times of a fear and challenge in era days. And so I'm just I'm I'm there around that sacred fire with everyone? Feeling that all? The last few months, you've been sheltering in place in your home in northern California because of the global pandemic. How has how has that been? You know it's it's. It's been an interesting time I tend to be a bit of an introvert. So in that regards I have loved having this time in my home I've loved having this time with my husband, but at the same time I have so many friends and acquaintances that are going through such hard times that. I I have a foot in each each realm one place. Where is Kinda cool I'm get to be home in another place where Oh. My Gosh people I deeply care about are going through such challenging time so it just. It's just a hard opening time. A heart opening, yes. Have, there been any particular practices that you've meditation practices or contemporary of practices or I. Mean You have such a So many decades of study and practice with various traditions various modalities. Techniques. In this in this time that we've been sheltering in place. What traditions practices have you drawn the most? Now, I'm going to share with you something that I do every morning. It's not something that everyone can do depending on where you live but I think there are forms of this that anyone can do. So? I tend to wake up early. And then I go sit outside. The Sun isn't up yet, but in the east, the the horizon is just starting to get that beautiful amber color. And, as I look to the sky, I see the bats. And in the stillness of the early morning these big, they're big bats around here. These pick bats are spiraling around and around. And I love watching them, and as they continue to to kind of spiral around the the couple of pine trees that were left after the big fires we had here. There's the sound of the first bird. And in the second bird, and then over time the bats disappear, they go. They go to sleep and the birds begin their morning chorus. Do something to me about the beginning of a new day. Every day can indeed be a new beginning. And I think that's for me really important to remind myself that no matter what happened yesterday, know better. What is happening in the world? No matter what is happening to my friends, today is a new beginning. I find that reminder of the new beginning in the early morning, and this is not an uncommon practice in native in ancient cultures, the idea of greeting the day being pressed for the day. Of especially looking to the east, the place of the rising. As, honoring and acknowledging this day begins new is a time honored tradition. So I think that's what I'm doing is just honoring the beginning of every day. I think that's something that anyone can do. It doesn't cost anything. It doesn't take very much time just just just. This state is new and I can. I, no matter what the challenges have been. This is a new beginning. So that's what I do. Ryan you know for for so many people because. With the with the pandemic, and now with with the unrest, there's a lot of fear anxiety. A lot of that fear and anxiety comes from just uncertainty. Are Not certain. What's going to be happening like tomorrow or even today? So do you, could you offer some advice for those individuals? Who when they ate when they wake up, they already they're their psyche is already sort of marinating in uncertainty, and in fear anxiety, so that moving into the days actually can be quite daunting. So I would offer two things. The first thing is that in regards to the fear is. Out something very interesting about the savannahs of Africa. In the SAVANNAHS, there are watering holes. and. The life of the Savannah the life of the land depends on these watering holes. During the summer when it gets hot, they get smaller. They begin to get stagnant. And they begin to die except for the crocodile, the crocodile goes into those waterholes, and it looks like chaos. It's all and as he moves his Taylor. She moves her tail whips it around. Everything looks muddied. Everything looks looks chaotic, and yet that brings life force energy. The Life Force keeps up the pond in the these areas of water alive, so that the the animals can live until the spring until the the rains come again. I also think of a stagnant pool, the first six inches Leclair. However if you begin to get fresh water flowing into that pool, it looks muddy for a while. It looks turned up. It does not look could, but eventually you can see the sandy bottom. A recurrence to fear at suggests the this is what I'm doing for myself. Is it looks? Bad. And I remind myself on some level that this is bringing a fresh new energy, the the chaos, the fear, the uncertainty of this time is bringing a new level of understanding, and in terms of you talk about the early morning. In many years ago in a tiny little town in England cul pregnant seaside town. Some of the residents were concerned because there was so much violence so many accidents so much drunkenness and they're sweet. Little town people would surge to the town in the summer, and then there'd be a lot of chaos. They said what can we do? They believe in the power of intent. They believed in the power of prayer. So, once a day for only one minute at exactly noon they would send energy into the fountain. They would just visualize peaceful thoughts going into the Fountain and they visualized at that peace would radiate out from the fountain into their town. Not The individ year. They thought it feels better, but is it subjective or is it really better, so they got crime reports will for that year crime reports were away down. They got emergency entrances into the hospital for that duration. That was way down. In every accident reports, way down. Everything diminished. The began to share this concept with people in other towns, the same thing one minute today to a central point with the idea that that piece is spreading out in every case when they would take statistics of that one year compared to previous years. Every thing was different. Everything

Denise Lynn Lamb California England Cul Africa Leclair Ryan
From The City To The Megalopolis

Travel with Rick Steves

05:48 min | Last month

From The City To The Megalopolis

"It's amazing to think that. In the nineteenth century about three percent of humanity lived in cities and today. That number is fifty percent, and it's growing rapidly. We live in the age of the Megalopolis. We're going to talk about that now with Dr, Salvatori satis Dr set. This is an emeritus professor of the history of classical art and archaeology at the school normality superiore in Pisa in Italy. He's an archaeologist and art historian. He's the chairman of the Louvre Museum. Scientific Council his the author of several books on art. Art History and he's known as the conscience of Italy for his role in spot, leading the neglect of it all national cultural heritage. His book is if Venice dies, and it's a look, not only at in the struggles, Venison the twenty first century, but at the increasing urbanisation of civilization general doctor says thanks for joining us. Thank you for inviting me. Can you talk about if finished is? How much of it is about Venice? And how much of it is it about the changing urban landscape across the planet? Well my intention in writing. This book was to focus on Venice. In order to make people meditate about what's going on on on a global scale about what I would call the shape the form of the city Savannah's. Sample account that example, contrasting some of the most disturbing. Of Urbanization in our current world end, it is quite dramatic. What's going on in your book? You explain there are fifteen megalopolis. That have over twenty million people is the advent of these massive cities twenty million people cities people have to live somewhere is is that a good thing or a bad thing? Why does it concern you well? I'm concerned about the quality of life. Those people because although this organization may look something that happens naturally, it is also prompted by economic forces. It is a concentration of workforce. which is not necessarily living in good conditions in order to create profit for a very low number of people, so it's the usual formula ninety nine percent, the best one percent, the megalopolis is a consequence of a complication of the world, the general commodification of the world that includes to an increasing extent human beings. This is just a very efficient thing for the elites to have a concentration of workforce where people who will be able to work cheaper and produce more by being right there at the center of production. Is that what? What you're saying, produce more and also by more become consumers, because workers are simultaneously consumer, so there is a a bishop's or two, if you so wish seal between being workers and consumers and I, think that there are two your which are combined, and normally one is made. Opera is the big over-centralisation to the other one is the verticalisation of AF- architecture. May Boca Use a? It's an example Chung Ching in China which had the six hundred thousand people in the nineteen thirty s and now thirty four million people living in it. I talked to contrast this with a different. Format Orbis or shape of the city. A form of the city in which that is some sort of harmony of balance between the body of the citizen and the body of the city where the citizen doesn't feel The one thing I'm saying is that it is good that we presser diversity in urban form and preserving diversity means among other things saving and saving the other historical see also because there is in even more. More disturbing feature of urban farming cities taking shape in in our time, and that is the fact that wide ancient cities. Historical CDs had a boundary around the city in the case of Venice Lagoon, case of other cities, the walls around the city now the boundaries around the boundaries of the city are being gradually substituted by boundaries within the city which has boundaries between the gentrified areas. For. The Hey and the have nots. You can see that in Paris very well. This can impact is. Also in Rome or in Milan dimension, Italian cities, the gated communities are increasingly frequent all around the world, but the gated communities are for those who are wealthy or relatively wealthy, while the other people are condemned to live in favelas. Zeal or in in be don't be like this aim French. I'm just thinking of Paris. I was just in Paris with a group. And I was explaining how they protect the center of Paris where everything is the months heart, scale you know six or eight story tall monster building, so you can see the domes, and you can see the spires, and you can see the Eiffel Tower and then right when you get to the periphery. Periphery this big boulevard that circles the city outside of that. It's just no-holds-barred, and it's like keeping the Cadillac Bay outside of that periphery. It's forced of skyscrapers within that you've got the elegance of the classic people friendly city that is in a sense, a gated community, because it's unaffordable for lot of people, and they end up outside a town in the rougher downtrodden neighborhoods. This is what's going on. Your description is absolutely perfect I think. But this involves a separation with inside, which is socially potentially very dangerous for the future. which is not precisely what I would call democracy.

Paris Venice Venice Lagoon Italy Louvre Museum Savannah Professor Scientific Council Eiffel Tower Chairman Pisa Cadillac Bay Venison Chung Ching China Milan Rome
Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

Black History in Two Minutes

02:40 min | Last month

Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

"The months following the civil war, and the start of reconstruction offered African Americans in the south hope for equality. It also offered the possibility of owning land. Within months African Americans would be betrayed by a harsh reality. You probably heard the phrase forty acres and a mule. Here's what happened. In January eighteen, sixty, five, a meeting in Savannah Georgia. Between Union, Military Leader General William to come Sherman and a group of twenty black ministers resulted in a plan to redistribute confiscated and abandoned confederate land from south, Carolina to Florida. They. Call the Land Sherman's reserve. Newly freed slaves would be allocated forty acres of land along with a mule, the phrase which became well-known, even then spread quickly. The plan had the potential to revolutionize race relations in the south and the economic future of the African American community. The significance about formerly enslaved being given the land that they had actually worked was that they would be able to generate wealth as well as create wealth generation. But the summer of eighteen sixty five thousands of black families had settled on portions of the Sherman Reserve and were excited to plot their futures. But later that year, as part of his reconstruction plan, actually intended to appease the former confederacy President Andrew. Johnson abruptly cancelled the order giving the land back to its previous owner's. The United States had the opportunity to make it possible for the formerly enslaved people to be. Independent and the country failed to do it. That initial meeting more than one hundred years ago between General Sherman and Savannahs, leading black ministers was historic at least for a brief moment in history, the opinion of black leaders had led directly to a radical public policy initiative remarkably over a century and a half later on June nineteen, two, thousand nineteen, the House of Representatives held a hearing on H R forty, a bill named in honor of the famous phrase, forty acres and a mule. The bill would establish a commission to study the concept of reparations for slavery and Jim Crow Segregation, including the merits of a formal apology by the United States government.

General Sherman Sherman Reserve United States Jim Crow Segregation African American Community Savannah Georgia House Of Representatives President Andrew General William Johnson Carolina Florida
"savannah" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

08:04 min | 3 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

"Would classify that as a ghost but I think I think I'm also a little more Goo Goo and other people but I also identifies. How'd you know what I mean when an to take it away from this recent Trauma Yours? You know when you're dating someone and then like all of a sudden. The texts are getting from both parties. It's like you're texting each other less than you initially were to me. It's like we both know what's happening here. Why don't we just say right and be like thank you for your time and thank you for? It's been like thank you for carving out time out of your schedule for me and goodbye like that would make my life a lot easier. I think I'm a massive something I think. I live for honest condo and painful. I think what trips me up is that like I'm offer a taper off. It's it's when it's like a roller coaster. Oh Mao simple egg okay you taper off but then suddenly you're like there and then suddenly you're not and it's like okay. Maybe SEAN ELLIOTT. Kind of like gaslight you and say that they're bad texters and I just think no right like if you were actually intuit. You'd be a good text. Yeah that'd be suddenly very good at the craft so you are always like I would rather someone just say I hate you or I'm not into it or not working and I say that and I can't think of a time that it's ever happened to me and I know it's like I get ghosted instead so I wouldn't give me the there've been times we're like we're clearly both losing interest at the same time and initiate the and then they're kind of like. Yeah you know this is going to be going on. And that's why I'm but no but I would I would i. It stays in the initial moment. And then you're you move on because there's literally five billion people right and I need to date them all. Yeah but then you are also the wine. Where if you're not into it and you can tell they are that you would rather send away. Yes and it's also a very like you don't perpetrate the ghost perpetrate no-no. I I did. Recently it was like two weeks went by before I sent them not tax whereas like hey just want you to know because we were like every turning into like every four days we would tax in like we were just missing each other with making plans. Essentially I was like okay. We need to cut the rope and like thank. Thank you and goodbye See I never understand. This is maybe like a missed signals thing. It's like I. I never understand actually going through the effort of even Fainting Planning Day. Efforts not going to happen. Totally people love doing that. Yeah like find out from my friends. He literally sat there and a half with like why. Even pretend that you could literally just be like. Oh I'm going out with my friend. Yeah I mean I think it's also for me like you know within the current Heterosexual female dynamic. It's a lot of guys. Who are the ones initiating with me so? I like spare them right and I was like. I respond to texts right away and so as soon as their texts me a lot and I don't respond to them like I get anxious because it's like there's notifications on my phone and I don't even WanNa talk to them so let me just let them know that. I'm not interested right because I do feel like I need to respond right when the when the addictive nature of the phone works to your advantage. Long Run yes yes. It's like that little red one right. I take out the his very funny. I mean I remember One of the ghosting situations that inspired this whole empire created. Yeah that have been bad enough that you were like you know what I need to make an entire show. It's so I'm I have a disease. This guy. We we went on a date and it went on paper fine like it was like we went to dinner. We went to show. We went to drinks afterwards. Ya He came over to my police afterwards. We like kind of just listen to music. We didn't sleep together. We slept in the same bed. It was like just like the most wholesome nice date and then afterwards he texted me like the day after you were saying and then eventually it was like. I stopped hearing from him a week later. I was like. Hey how are you which never? If it's a week up there you're forgotten And he was like. Oh my God hi Have you been Just you know I went home. I have to get this surgery. It involves a lot of like pre and post op. And I just don't want you thinking that I can be going on dates until I feel well I was like Oh my God literally went on one date with like. Oh my God. Thank you for the brute. The Odyssey No worries but like if you just don't if you're ghosting me right now. Just tell me right. And he was like ha ha. Can you imagine can't hang out have to get a surgery and said I can't imagine it are you doing? He was like no no. I very much like to hang out with you again. Uh-huh famous last words because it did in fact never reach out and then I was. Is He alive? Did he survive the surgery? This is what it was crazy. As I found out through trusted source one of my friends worked with his roommate at the time and mentioned the surgery and his roommate was like what surgery. Oh no gas. I was a gas and then a year later. A CO worker of his came into where I work. Somehow she found out that we knew each other and she was like. How do you know bleep and I was like Oh we went on audit and then we stopped each other and then she said Oh. Were you dating him around the time that he broke his penis? Oh and I said why and I found out that he had actually had a surgery and it was on. Espn but at the end of the day he eventually did get well and did not reach out to me so I think it was like the surgery that I can hang out. I mean we see each other around and we actually ended up re matching on hinge. And I was like. Hey we should actually just grab a drink to catch up and it was like so platonic and and and Nice And Weird but now we're like friends that is fascinating to me that you would even entertain the idea of re matching. Oh Yeah I love to the rejection like this is a not knowing there was unsaid. It was like well we hook up again or or right. It's just kind of our befriends now. One of US wanted one and one of the other and that's okay. We don't have time for it. We usually do a segment called elaborate. I ask you to elaborate on a tweet that you say that you've hated something ledge. Let's do one okay. Great If you can pull off a tight slicked back ponytail. Fuck you honestly. Okay yes. I agree with my tweet. Particular slate against People who can pull off slow I in the last. I recently went to a Bob but for most of my young life. I've been long haired Young Woman uh-huh and it just looks so colonial Look so bad when I see people with like a slick like tight slick our pony pony and I put it on an highlights. My face in a way that does not right. It's like you're moving the hair out of your eyes so that you can churn butter easier. Exactly exactly it does. And I look like I'm like a member of a coal or like site it's really unflattering and then I get mad at people that that can pull it off your votes fair. I agree with the sentiments that I hate. Slicked back ponies. I hate them on me and I hate anyone who better than me. I think. That's completely on that. No where can people find you and your work Me and my worker.

SEAN ELLIOTT Bob US Espn
"savannah" Discussed on Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

08:35 min | 3 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

"Campari and sponsoring. But I will say I do appreciate all. The dynamics were getting when it comes to musicians and artists because not everyone is super confident. A lot of people have their insecurities for various reasons and so it is nice to see different sides of it as wonderful as we think that she is she still suffering with her with her own insecurities which we come out later in the show. So I know you're excited back because we had two days this week and one of them. Was this with your girl so I am so curious as to what you thought about. Danny and Becca stay with Stylus Rebecca. Make because there's there's there's a lot to get into without one there is I like when they. I walked in to this lovely mansion with all the clothes around. Their their excitement was so cute. And that's like oh they're cute and then about two minutes. Later I crossed that out and I was like this is awkward and God bless them for trying for trying to see what what could potentially work. I just don't think BECO was feeling it when they were in that hot tub. I was like she is not into Danny non fast forward to their actual performance. You still just feel a friendship and that's really it. Yeah work not know sparking. I kept wondering why are we seeing? Beco- why haven't we seen Danny got it got that that was that was my got. It totally understand. Don't need to see them anymore. We can move on from Danny and back. I feel like we. We needed that day just to see why we hadn't seen them on camera yet. Who So then this Hussien Ryan today and it's at the House of Blues and we see Chris. Slane it's a cruise line performance and we see Lauren Lane formerly Lorne Bush. Now so it's cute to see them together as a all their newlyweds What'd you think about Natasha? Ryan do you think they mesh well? No I won't I don't I am originally lie. No you love Ryan. I feel like he's your guy that you're rooting for. I just don't think and they've brought the semi notes because I think that they just seem odd together like Natasha. And I'm all about strong women and and like being like women can be the strength the backbone to a relationship but I just don't see them meshing together like it just feels off to me and I don't know what it is and it. Kinda saw that in the performance and and we'll get to that and Jason Mraz touched on it to where like Natasha could take off. I just I think that it's another thing where it feels like more of an alliance were like. They like each other enough to try and like sick around another week and to do what it takes to slide by. But I don't think there's as relationship that would actually last outside of this. Yeah I one hundred percent agree with you it it is something is off but I love Natasha. Because she's stunning and her voice is amazing. But I always feel like she's performing when she's having a conversation with Ryan she's on. She's everything she does. She's on and and they haven't even hit the life stage yet so. I think that's what it is to. We've seen another side of Ryan when he was with Jamie and he was very endearing and honestly the best he sounded to me was when he was singing. Gravity with Jamie and I haven't seen that same. I guess like I haven't seen that. Same artistry sense he was Jamie and so I. I don't know maybe the Tasha makes him. She is a powerhouse. Maybe she makes them feel a little insecure. Not sure but I had one hundred percent agree with you. So we get to the live performances. This is one. We've all been waiting for. We hear the thing in around the house. We hear people practicing. Oh can spotlight speaking of people practicing if I had to watch brandon in Savannah. Sing that Damn Song. One more time sharing that one microphone. We get them to please. Can we get two microphones? I said I I. I don't even think they sound good. But I was like cannot and it's not Savannah it's Brandon. I have huge issues with Brandon. I was just like we get it. We get it. They're singing Julius listening. Sheridan's alone okay. Stop but onto the live performance. I and this is why I wish I was a guest judge because I feel like I don't know if I put on my Simon Cowell hat and like felt like my judge side. Come out but I I will say I. I don't know who's picking up the songs. I don't think it's the couples. I think they're given these songs to sing. Yeah some them I have issues with. I don't think this is gonna I'm GonNa get so much flack for this I. It's going to be a very popular opinion. But like the backstreet boys song we could have picked such a better one people like something with more depth and power and I felt like some of the songs. Some of the songs were great. Some of the songs didn't necessarily do it for me but I felt like they were a safe performance song to do for this first round of performances. Yeah I'll agree with you. I wasn't a huge fan of the song choices either. A really went especially well. We'll get into live performances. We'll give like a yea or nay if we like their song about okay so our girl I live performance I mean. Can we talk about setting the Bar High Rudy and Matt? I feel like this is the first time we've really seen Matt Sing They were amazing together. Very very good performance The judges clearly liked it as well. I didn't think they were. They were more performing then. I felt like they were had that romantic connection. It was like we work well together. We're a team. We know they like each other. But that didn't come across in the performance to me so I wrote in my notes before they got on stage. You kind of see Rudy a little bit. Get in her head. Have the nurse come out and the first thing I wrote was rudy. Don't let me down because hurt. I want her to get into her head because I like. It's no surprise like she's I think one of my favorite singers on this show. She just she has a voice like velvet and so beautiful to listen to know. I thought that they did find together. I thought it was a good performance. I thought Lake Rudy carried. It Guess Matt like He. He has a great voice. He had the guitar but I felt like she stole the show in that one. Yeah I I think it was designed for her to still the show so I actually appreciate it the role that Matt played in it and I thought he sounded amazing and I and I was like. Oh maybe with really Harry. From at this time I thought he played his part. And I think that sometimes in a relationship and as duet you have to play your role so to me. They did that really really well. Chris and Bray. It's like I feel like we don't spend much time on Christmas tree because we're like they're in love their in sink in. Yeah it's like. Oh you know going into it. That like there's going to be that connection like them out of anyone is the strongest couple. I do lovely. I'm bridget so in choice for that I was like yes. I loved that song and yeah you can feel it. I mean I like you could see fresh off the bed. That like they're into each other. It was a safe. I don't WanNa see a safe packs. I feel like that like diminishes like their relationship and I'm not saying that at all but we know that they're getting roses they're going to go onto the next week. They're fine and I think it was Chris who said it's about the relationship first and then the music and so they might not have had the mot- the strongest performance out of everyone but they definitely had the strongest chemistry and even Joe Joe was like. Oh my gosh. The way you Chris look at Bray like fine to a man that looks like. That's the meam right fighting a man. It looks at you the way to Chris. Looks break periodically Even Jordan was like. Yeah yeah that's it. You got it so on the next performance. Because we're going in order. I realized that I had been tapping my foot and smiling. And Kinda grooving and then I stopped when it came to Daniel. I I wasn't I was like songs off. I'm not moving anymore. So first of all did like the song that they saying. Hey Ho by. The luminaires wasn't a fan of of them together. They sounded like they were singing. Two different songs at what? What did she think voices great? Yes good Before the judge is even chimed in and gave their take I wrote friendship and Lake and I.

Hussien Ryan Chris Danny Natasha BECO brandon Matt Rudy Savannah Jamie Jason Mraz Bray Lake Rudy Simon Cowell Slane Lauren Lane Becca House of Blues
"savannah" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:22 min | 5 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"During their voyage to Savannah in March eighteen twenty five the new like okay so they did see alligators it's possible they went to Savannah maybe they captured one of those small baby alligators and then they brought it to the White House well that's a pretty big gap between March and September so what were they doing an alligator for six months okay that doesn't really make much sense but what I found what I was doing a little bit more research into this particular myth I couldn't find any newspaper accounts related to it but what I did find was this eighteen eighty eight children's magazine called wide awake by Harriet Taylor Upton and what it said was and this is a quote from that particular article when general Lafayette made his visit there this famous east room was given up to him to deposit that many curiosities sent him some live alligators being among them so really in eighteen eighty eight that's really sort of the first published instance of alligators in the east room that's about what sixty some years after Lafayette actually doesn't and this is actually an article from the evening star from eighteen sixty seven and it mentions a Mister John sectors grocery store in Georgetown and you can see it's a it's as the crocodile excitement the alligator at Mister John sectors grocery store mention of which was made in yesterday's star created quite an excitement in town and many have today called to see if so there were people that were putting alligators in stores in DC in the late eighteen sixties so is it possible that one of the stories just sort of more from that probably there's really no evidence that there were alligators in the east room so I consider that to be a pretty big myth yes number five Theodore Roosevelt in Christmas trees has anybody heard of this story before yes I was going to do with what do you know about the story or what do you what do you remember hearing about it I don't really remember like the full story only knows that the Christmas trees is mostly a Germanic tradition I was taking over the United States this is what my family told me that they're also German so yeah I mean the whole idea of putting a Christmas tree in your house is a much more modern tradition in fact the first documented instance of a Christmas tree at the White House is during the Benjamin Harrison ministration in eighteen eighty nine so I mean that tells you that the first documented instance was much later its course become much more consistent in the twentieth and twenty first centuries of course now we have annual Christmas decorations and we have the Christmas tree lighting of the Christmas tree in the blue room which is a lot more compared to you know what the president's only nineteen century did oftentimes what they did if they had anything within a small tree up on the second floor in the private quarters they really didn't put things on the state for because that's where people were constantly going but the story goes that the euro rose up because he was such a big conservationist did not believe in cutting down Christmas trees and that's why the Roosevelt didn't have Christmas trees and okay so the story goes that one of the Roosevelt boys Archie snuck a Christmas tree up in the White House and he put it in the closet and one of the upstairs rooms and decorated it Chris this is then later the the image that sort of captures the story that it was Archie who brought Christmas to the White House and even though President Roosevelt you know didn't believe in cutting down trees he let this one slide so goes the story a class in American history with American University professor Matthew Costello that Roosevelt was on record opposing destructive lumbering practices but he never appears to have singled out the practice of harvesting Christmas trees it's worth noting that one of the people he worked with chief Forster panel Pinotage actually saw nothing wrong with the practice and by nineteen oh seven was enough urging the creation of businesses specifically for growing Christmas trees if you contemporaneously person knows how family tradition held the results actually never had a Christmas tree W. she is people expected that rose about the father of six children when he was president what have a tree in the White House despite this but he never did just because the results didn't celebrate Christmas we treat to the earlier point some families didn't something resident so there was no ban some people say Roosevelt and trees it just wasn't something that how the results already Christmas actually now are to change that in nineteen oh seven the president got a kick out of it and he let his son continue to do it but this whole idea that there was a ban on Christmas trees is a myth here's an image of one of the earliest renditions of the Christmas tree this is actually up stairs what is the the yellow oval room on the second floor and of.

Savannah
"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

02:56 min | 7 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"There's some beyond <Speech_Female> say blasting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> or <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> J. C. or something <Laughter> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> new. You're we're <Speech_Male> gonNA say that <Speech_Female> Michelle. <Speech_Female> Where do you do your <Speech_Male> best thinking <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> outside? <Speech_Male> Probably <Speech_Male> on a porch or <Speech_Male> in a lounge <Speech_Male> chair <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> jazz. <Speech_Male> Yeah I <Speech_Male> like no. I <Speech_Male> like music <Speech_Male> with no words <Speech_Male> in my brain can <Speech_Male> just kinda <SpeakerChange> like who's <Speech_Female> out and come back in. <Speech_Female> Do you <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> really have a pet greyhound and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I do have <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a pet great so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on brand name is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> daisy. It's so on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> bread. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> She's really sweet. <Speech_Male> She's on brand. <Speech_Music_Male> She's more on <Speech_Music_Male> Brandon. I am probably <Laughter> but <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Female> she's the sweetest. <Speech_Female> How did she come into <Speech_Male> your life? I <Speech_Male> wanted a dog <Speech_Male> living in Savannah. <Speech_Male> Every frigging <Speech_Male> body has a dog. <Speech_Music_Male> So you just this <Speech_Male> guy. I felt a little <Speech_Male> left out <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I also wanted <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> something to be <Speech_Male> responsible <Speech_Music_Male> for. I've come <Speech_Male> from. <Speech_Male> I was always surrounded <Speech_Male> by my family when I lived <Speech_Male> in New York City. I always <Speech_Male> had a responsibility <Speech_Male> and coming down <Speech_Male> here by <Speech_Male> my responsibility <Speech_Male> was the restaurant <Speech_Male> just needed something <Speech_Male> to kind of <Speech_Male> distract <Speech_Male> me. Pull my attention <Speech_Male> away. I <Speech_Male> I knew I wanted to hound. <Speech_Male> My <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> business partner was trying to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> convince me to get a Rhodesian. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> They're awesome <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> too but I <Speech_Male> don't WanNa be matchy <Speech_Male> match <Speech_Music_Male> you so <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> so there's a <Speech_Male> woman who <Speech_Male> you know who boards <Speech_Male> the dogs and we <Speech_Male> started looking into different <Speech_Male> things and a hound <Speech_Male> was at the top <Speech_Male> of the list <Speech_Male> and I started talking <Speech_Male> to people in there so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> many <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Greyhound rescues <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Atlanta <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also in Florida <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and last <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> year. They just passed the <Speech_Male> bill bill that <Speech_Male> the greyhounds won't <Speech_Male> be racing anymore so <Speech_Male> there's a lot of greyhounds <Speech_Male> up for adoption <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> I went down <Speech_Male> and one <Speech_Male> day I saw three dogs. <Speech_Male> And she was the <Speech_Male> last one and <Speech_Male> she was wiggly <Speech_Male> and goofy and <Speech_Music_Male> I was like <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> come on <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> Savan got to talk <Speech_Female> about her chickens. They <Laughter> wanted to <Speech_Female> equal time. <Speech_Female> Searle <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> any animals <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in your life. Yes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I have Allah. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> She was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> actually my late <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sister's dog and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> she is. I don't <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> know how she's still <Speech_Music_Female> kicking but <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> she is just like <Speech_Female> I literally <Speech_Female> don't <Speech_Female> know how I think she's <Speech_Female> like fourteen <Silence> and she's a little. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> She's a Cava <Speech_Female> Sean but Allah <Speech_Female> is the sweetest <Speech_Female> <Silence> and she is <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> tiny right <Speech_Female> now but <SpeakerChange> she's just <Speech_Female> so happy <Speech_Male> still and she loves <Speech_Male> to eat <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so yeah. <Speech_Male> God bless the <Speech_Male> sea biscuit. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Our love's <Laughter> watermelon. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Maybe that's <Laughter> the secret. Thank <Speech_Female> you to our speakers. <Speech_Female> Everyone who attended <Speech_Female> our event in <Speech_Female> Savannah a huge. <Speech_Female> Thank you to Cheryl. <Speech_Female> And her team for are <Speech_Female> hosting US and <Speech_Female> a big big thank <Speech_Female> you to carry gold for supporting <Speech_Female> our tour <Speech_Female> and providing <SpeakerChange> us with <Speech_Female> beautiful butter and cheese <Speech_Music_Female> at each stop. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our show is produced used <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and edited <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by Jeff Seideman. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> for listening. Everyone <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> you're the <Music> bomb.

Savannah J. C. New York City partner Jeff Seideman. Cheryl. Florida Atlanta
"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

04:47 min | 7 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"She just talked about how important it was for us to be in the kitchen and how we had so much to give and she started talking about really her heyday when she first opened that place it was was really a meeting place for a lot of politicians and a lot of people who were in the civil rights movement and they came there as a safe place to me and also to to break bread and that part about. That's the wonderful part about what we do. We provide safe places for people to come and break bread. No matter who you are especially the at the gravy definitely provide that and it doesn't matter who you are you can come in and as long as you're kind and human to those who are next to you you can share are your thoughts and we can start to build this thing up. But she was so inspirational and I was so nervous to talk to her and it was really just somebody who was very supportive. What about what I did actually gave me that push to just meet her would ever lasting and the first time I posted that post on instagram? Twelve twelve likes so nobody was like showing love. But you know hey doesn't matter I got to show up so I feel like young. Women are going to look at you the way that you looked at as I hope so right now. I'm trying to figure out how to wear that a little bit like it's a little like yeah. We'll take a picture. Yeah Yeah but I'm sort of like what more do I have to give to. That are in that moment because I tried to I just I'm me and I'm sort of laid back but like as I start to talk I started to realize like Oh shit I've been through a lot. Okay we can keep on going like don't interview me just like I will keep on a little quiet up here but I will keep going and going and going and I think that it would be an honor if I was looked at like that would be my. That's like my life goal for sure Cheryl. Did you ever get to go to chase. No sadly I didn't. I don't know how that's possible but I did. I guess I've been slowing down here in Savannah but no but she definitely was an inspiration and for me. I mean you know just. It's not every day a little. Carl opens up bakery. So sing someone that looks like you is. It's really important and so I think for people who hadn't even had never been there. I think just the representation was so important for the industry and you know she wasn't just a just a chef. She wasn't just a shopper restaurateurs. She was an author. She was an art collector. She had a important art collection down there. A lot of it hung in the restaurant still hangs in the restaurant and a real lover of life beyond say she was in beyond video. I don't know if you all know that but like nine I I think what she was ninety three. She was in the video. Giovane any bleach as connection just from some of the work that I've done with the local food chapter down there in organizing leadership so I didn't actually get a chance to meet her. I was able to like facilitate for other young folks to be able to meet her. And so I think the thing for me that kind of stands out. Is this idea the idea of like our torch bearers and as a black woman who is in the food industry of seeing the folks who are poor carrying that torch in so many the active ways. And I think it's one of my friends was like you know. Can we gotta make sure that we we give our elders flowers while they're still alive and so for me that's something that you know this. That reminder of how do we make sure that we're we're honoring the folks who came before and who who blazed the trail and and some of those folks I'm thinking of it's like my mentor. Dr Lenny. Sorenson Dr Jessica Harris like these amazing black women who are like. They're they're riding riding the cookbooks. They're making the food they're telling the stories and they're connecting the people and so for me I can. I can only hope to continue to to give those flowers to those folks while they're still alive and honor them when they pass. Okay we're GONNA do a little speed round so Joanne. You told those who your mentor is Cheryl who is your mentor. My Mentor was my grandmother. She was for some reason. There were a lot of women in my family. We named Queen. I have no idea why they didn't name you that I'm still give you how it skips me. But her name was muddy and she was. I found out recently while she was a slave and she was a pastry cook. Oh so that was. That's pretty powerful for me to realize that. I guess I'm doing what I'm supposed. Oh subduing Kinda.

Cheryl Dr Jessica Harris Dr Lenny Savannah Carl Joanne
"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:31 min | 7 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"She was mean uh-huh. Oh Wow that's awesome. You know we talk about role models and mentors and if you can see it you can be it Right Leah was that for a long time. I don't know who wants to say anything. But Muhammed you WanNa talk about Lia a little bit sure. I met her once. I got an opportunity to meet her in two thousand twelve. It's funny because I re posted a picture that I took of her took with her. Ah dookie chase when I was visiting and my sister was like get up and go talk to her and I was working I was working at Prune then and I went APP and I was like hi and she was working the room and she had a chef coat on and she was like she have a walker. I don't think shadow with like a little pushy carte thing my grandma these ago shopping with one of those like clothes shopping grocery shopping but like she's the hit the mall and get in her. You know her laps but so anyway. Okay so she was going around the room and I went and said hello to her and explain to her who I was. I told her I was a line cook in New York City and she was like. Yeah I love seeing women in the kitchen. That's right we're going to take it over. She was so enthusiastic and I was shocked. I was like yeah. Yeah we're GONNA take this shit over. And so then.

Lia Muhammed Leah line cook New York City
"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

06:01 min | 7 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"We have room over there. You Go giovane unique projects objects absolutely. I'm jumping ahead a little bit but Giovane when I was reading about you and billiard. I read that. It's an African American centennial farm arm. Just since we're talking about farming right now can you turn means so Gillard farms the land that I that I live on with my partner has been in his family since eighteen. Seventy four so Jupiter Gillyard who was born a slave in eighteen twelve like after the civil war made his way down the coast post from South Carolina and staked off about four hundred ninety acres of land. And we're on kind of like that. Last fifty acres and farming retired farming we've always farmed organically and it's challenging especially with the changing landscape with climate and everything you know in the last three years. We've had two major hurricanes. The last major hurricane was probably at the turn of the century so for us us. You know there's there's some conversations that are happening and this is kind of. What's your at the center of the work that I'm doing now? Is this idea around resiliency of finding finding ways to to bounce back you know working with the land. I mean we have one area of land when I first came down in two thousand twelve. That was beautiful and Lush Valley Valley area and we can do events down there. After the last two hurricanes that is mosquito alley and it stays wet it stays flooded and outside of US putting in some dirt and like you know doing some very expensive changes around. They're like we just kind of have to leave it and make sure that we keep it kind of cut short so that you know snakes and stuff like that don't get folks and so knowing that they're there is that change happening is something that I think is important for for all of us to know whether that's eaters or restaurant tours and chef says that you know what worked five ten years ago may not work now oh and for us as farmers you know. I'm I'm a former restaurant owner. We closed down at the end of last year. And which I'm happy About is that for us. You know being down in a small town. We're like okay. We're smart amazing people and the places that would actually pay money. Are the places like Atlanta Savannah Charleston. I can't tell you Santa Cruz. We've had people offers money to like open up our concept in California but down in the south is where the work needs to happen and so we struggle to stay on our land. We we don't have a tractor and so there's a lot of hard work and guess what it's been about one hundred degrees for for me. It's just like let's let's have these conversations about what that looks like and I do a lot of work with seeds and also on the board of directors for seed Savers Exchange. And so I do a lot of work around seat literacy the and seed saving and so you know that's where it starts it starts with your your farmers who are often being displaced starts with the seed and really finding people who who can nurture and grow and you know chefs who can procure and create and make sure that those farmers are thriving and so. I think it's the cyclical oh relationship. That is so important for us to really kind of keep in the the middle of our hearts right now. God bless all the farmers out there. I mean I I know everybody in. The industry thinks that Cheryl what is top of mind these days top of mind for me is taking care of the people that work for me. Health Care Just being able to provide a good limb main for people that are making amazing food. For y'all I mean this should this should be a respectable career in to be able to to get people to want to do this wonderful work but you know just being able to take care of them and also to be able to run your business. That's what's and top of mind. Giovane I know so much as top of mind for you wanting. That's top of mind for me right now. I think what's what's top of mind for me is the idea of the healing that comes from the plea so herbalists and a health and wellness coach in addition to grower and Dan Dan but for me. You know I'm an herb nerd and a ferment nerd. So I do a lot of work with the microbiome and fermented foods and incorporating in southern vegetables into my ferment. And so for me right now. That's kind of what's top of mind. How can people form deeper relationship with? What's on their plate? Whether that's that's you know knowing who your farmer is knowing where your food comes from or how to transform food and to being so much more than you know what it is just coming out off the ground and so for me. I just really super fascinated around different ways to deal with food. I love the nauseous. The three of you but also so for our three speakers. It's really all about sustainability and all definitions of that word humans the land everything Michelle. We didn't get to talk to you about this last night. We said one thing we definitely wanted to talk about. Tonight is a legacy of Leah Chase. I don't know if all of you know that. Name but Leah. Chase passed away on Saturday ninety six years old chef owner of deejays in New Orleans. Just a legend. You know and this one was still cooking i. I don't know if she was still cooking the past year but like she was mean uh-huh. Oh Wow that's awesome..

Leah Chase seed Savers Exchange Giovane US Lush Valley Valley Leah Gillard South Carolina hurricane partner Santa Cruz Dan Dan New Orleans Atlanta Michelle Cheryl California Charleston
"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

08:33 min | 7 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"So all you bakers out there get ready our last speaker is kate doubtful of the Savannah. Be Company who tells us she's working to save B.'s. Nationwide the body so cates with the because projects and Savannah Company and really we. We really focus on education patients Vietnamese company. So if you've ever been to one of our stores you probably left with way more information about honeybees than ever cared to know and we realized through going through that that it was such an important part to us that we really wanted to start a not for profit and really be able to focus on education as she said the honeybees. These are facing a little bit of a challenge. These days declining populations environmental challenges. And we have this not for profit for two reasons one one. We want to raise awareness about with honeybees going through. We WanNA raise an entire generation who love and protect honeybees. You know when they start working with the honeybees they start caring about the honeybees and just naturally they start wanting to protect the honeybees and the second part to that is we want to help help. A new generation understand sort of the connection of where their food is coming from and how important it is to take care of those sources and Dan to really nurture our environment into really foster the environment that is growing our food so we started the not for profit for five years ago. Oh one of my favorite stories was out of Charleston. First of all it was a challenge. You know a lot of people are afraid of honeybees. When you're younger you have one of your parents terrence or somebody that you trust tell you do not go near the honeybees you? We'll get stung. It will hurt you so constantly. We're battling this the fear of honeybees that we have a garden. It's GonNa be company where we bring children in and adults as well and show them how gentle the honeybees are and they're gone on out to sting you. They're not trying to attack you. They're just doing their thing. So the School Board's obviously very reluctant to let us put beehives in their schools schools around all their Russia's children because obviously it was all go wrong so we had to really do a lot of working with the community Mutiti and with the government there to really show them that we could do this and now we're in five hundred. Schools were in fifty countries. I'm I'm sorry. Fifty states in foreign countries. We're in we're everywhere. So we really proven that this does work and it's a great educational program but with the very first school that we put these high them. It was just talking about it. We had a third grader from Charleston. Collis and he said you know the mosquito truck came through and it killed Oliver honeybees. And if it's bad for the honeybees that can't be good for us and what do we do about it. I was just like it's working. It's amazing though you know we really immediately started to see the effect and we really started to see how important this was. And it's amazing. Students students love the projects. The teachers love the teaching tool. She usually associated with an urban gardening project as well so they will have the students named name the queen they teach all about what's going on in the hive and then the students will start to study sort of the color of the pollen of the beezer bringing in the color color of the pollen that are blooming on the flowers. Start to make that connection between. Oh Hey these. Fruits and vegetables are growing really. Well those are the flowers that the bees were pollinating donating and honey. Bee Hive will pollinate hundreds of thousands of flowers a day so I mean the ripple effect is incredible it produces more viable fruits and seeds. It grows stronger produce. It feeds nuts and all kinds of things that feed the environment that feed the squirrels girls and the birds. And like you know it's an amazing ripple effect when you really start looking into it and we would love to educate you guys to if you want to go out to savannah. Viv Company so we also started realizing that this wasn't just affecting the students it was affecting the community as well children would go and WanNa bring their families in unlike mom. Look what I learned in school. Today can my mom come see. The honeybees cannot come. Show my brothers and sisters would bring him back to Savannah be company and I would give torn thank. You know. These kids didn't hear one thing said and they would bring their family back in literally. Just repeat verbatim every word I had said it was like they are not only listening. They are learning about this little sponges soaking it up and they're excited about it amazing so you know. It's really growing really excited. What about it and it's not just in schools? We've also recently started outreach programs. Justin communities we're in the why here as well but also we have a Video launching on Wednesday were pretty proud of. We found out that in Exuma there were no honeybees on the island. Did anybody see the fire festival documentary. So you know a little bit about exuma. WHO's there's not great infrastructure? The air but once we realized this was four years ago we realized there were no honeybees on the island so we had another really strong amazing woman named Catherine Booker and she runs runs the ECZEMA foundation and million years ago she worked at Savannah Be Company for a very short time so she came to Ted and she said you know we just realized there's no bees here we want to bring bees onto the island so I we just checked double check triple check just to make sure and then we knew we had to bring bees that what were you might free. So are one of the most dangerous to pests for honeybees. Among other problems like the pesticides Herbicides or big problem the Varroa Mite is probably one of the deadliest problems for the hive so we made sure that we found the. SP's speech that we could take down there. We trained very small group very passionate people who had no idea they were gonna be beekeepers very short time later and and so we trained them and it has just grown and grown and now you see honeybees all over the island you know. One of the beekeepers named Ricky. He she has taken the two hives we gave him and turn them into fifty hives. Four years later it is his industry now and he says that everyone calls up the honeyman on island. He's not ricky anymore. He's Honeyman and so this whole community has just adopted the honeybees and their way of life. And it's just so wonderful to see not because it's just kind of a an awakening feel like there's a little bit of a renaissance where everyone's really paying attention now to what they're eating and you know what they're putting on their bodies in their bodies and it's incredible to watch and we just really want to support foster that and educate people on that so as I said before if you guys would like to come out just spirit company tomorrow even we can take you on Honeybee tour. We we go out in the garden. We open the HIVE. Taste the fresh honey. You're literally eating liquid sunshine. It's like the flowers are converting energy from the sign line through the flowers the beezer collecting nectar making honey. And then also something that I love about the honeybee hives. Something that I've learned from them is is. I don't know if you guys know this was all women running the honeybee hive. So there's one queen all the worker bees or female and there's a few drones in the hive. The rules are not extensive is a great example of this community female L. Amazing Women who work together and support each other and it just shows all of them easing things you can accomplish when you're working together together and supporting each other and coming together as one so thank you guys so much for letting me thank you for sharing your story and for all the wonderful work you and.

Savannah Charleston Savannah Company Exuma Ricky cates terrence kate Savannah Be Company B. Viv Company School Board Dan Honeyman Collis WanNa Russia Justin Oliver
"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

04:44 min | 7 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Your lake aac cool all right now. I'm a manager. I don't know how to lead people. I've never done leadership training I don't understand costing I don't understand Dan financials. I literally don't understand how to run a business and now I'm in charge of running a business for somebody who owns this business if you're not the owner and a lot is riding on your shoulders. That is a huge amount on a pressure for somebody. That's never been trained to do it. This this business specifically is incredibly complicated. You know if you go into finance you learn you learn one one thing you learn your skill you perform that scale you go into restaurant management or ownership. You have to be a mom you have to be a babysitter. You have to be a leader you. You have to understand financials you have to know how to plunge a toilet. You have to know how to ratchet a think. I learned what a Flange was last week. And I've been doing this for nineteen years. Here's so there's there's so many hats you have to wear and we're not trained in how to wear these hats and I think that we all suffer as a result of that and that happens because because of various reasons and the first is because the bottom line is so small that we cannot afford agribusiness to actually spend the time training people properly the way that we want to. Because if you I'll have extra people on staff every single dollar counts and anyone that's ever run. A restaurant understands like you are looking for savings here. Ten dollar savings there. If you can save one staff half member you were like yes impressing it but you cannot train people in mentor them properly. If that's all you're worried about I knew I'm worried about that all the time. Our Win in New York is fifteen dollars an hour and that just happened in January and I can tell you that Michelle our director of operations over there and I have spent countless hours trying to figure out how to give more it to the staff while paying the required to pay them but also keep the doors open of our restaurant like it's it is so incredibly challenging so one of the things that I've been doing for the past. Couple level of years is financial training for servers and bartenders. That want to become managers. It I think is one of the most important things that super overlooked. This is because we As restaurant owners have notoriously kept our financials so close to our heart and not share them that we don't really allow ourselves to train people. I can't tell you how many restaurants I worked in or how many restaurants have gone to or how many managers hired that have never seen a pl before this is a very valuable part of running a business. You need to understand where your money goes. You need to understand Dan. What every decision you make how that affects your bottom line and how these things work together and get together so we do financial training within our restaurant group? We do financial trading outside outside of our restaurant group and donate a lot of time to financial training to everybody because it's super important. Many bartenders were going into bar. Managers don't know how to cost the cocktail. So you know you make cocktail you put it on the list for twelve dollars and God only knows. Maybe you're not making any money when you factor in all the labor cost so these things are important and this happens through mentor ship. This happens through managers or skilled professionals within the hospitality industry and without the shoddy industry were able to provide us a little bit of time name and a little bit of effort in order to train people how to properly manage business leadership. Coaching is one of the most valuable things that I've experienced in my career. And that's that's another thing that doesn't get taught really to anyone. We are now living in what is called the Post metoo world that means we need to teach people how to treat eight people. It is so ingrained in our in our being how we talk to one another the things that were acceptable fifteen years ago when I was in the restaurant industry when we he's to have innuendo. Fridays are certainly not acceptable today. But we need to train people on what that means and how and how we talk to one another and what is wrong in what is right and that also requires time so I could go on and on and on about the things that we lack in terms of mentor ship and what is required the thing that I really want to touch on because I guarantee you. I'm like already talking for way too long which I am. Sorry the thing that I do want to touch on. Is that what it takes us such a hospitality community talking to one another another coming together taking. If it's one hour a month where we sit together and we start to try and figure out. How can we share this information with not just each other but with our teams teams? Like if you know maybe once a month I take the teams from the local restaurants and I'll do a financial training. Maybe next month some other restaurant does a training that is about empathetic management management. I don't have the answers yet but one of the reasons why I wanted to open a restaurant in Savannah is because the market is smaller. It's exciting people are excited to be here and WanNa grow and I feel like it's it's a great opportunity for us to come together and shape how we want the industry to look instead of you know living necessarily in a place like New York where there's twenty five thousand restaurants and it's like turning a cruise ship like.

Dan New York Savannah WanNa Michelle director of operations
"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

03:28 min | 7 months ago

"savannah" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Everybody I'm actually going to put on a timer. Because I can talk forever about this and I feel like I'm GonNa need to check myself at some point so I am co owner of the with Windsor. My business partner right over there and we have the fat radish in New York which has been open for nine years and we are opening our second fat radish in Savannah Vanna. We are super super excited to be in this market for various reasons and one of them is what I want to address today. So I've been in the restaurant turn industry in New York for nineteen years. That's kind of an eternity in New York. And it's it's a tough industry there so I came up in the industry in Newark when it was quite a violent industry industry as all come to understand. Sexual harassment was rampant. Most women were not able to actually grow in their careers in the industry and it was super tough. I made a commitment once. I realized that I loved it and this was going to be the thing that I wanted to do. I made a commitment to continue growing my career in the industry and try to move my way up through management because I saw so many flaws with the environment and I figured that the only way I could attack these flaws was by actually having my own hospitality group. People wouldn't listen to me very very rarely ever listened to and I think that a lot of us women have experienced that in this industry specifically across every industry. We've we've we've learned through the METOO movement. How actually like how severe the the atmosphere of harassment assault and just being looked over has been and I? I'm incredibly excited. And happy that this movement has occurred specifically within our industry it has not only given us a voice but give us an the opportunity to start speaking about other things so we don't now we're in a position after the last few years of us talking about our stories and acknowledging each other stories and coming together understanding understanding what we've all shared together which has been traumatic for most of us myself included but now we have an opportunity to start talking about. How do we solve this problem? Moving forward. We now understand what the problems were. What existed what the environment was and how unhealthy it was and what we need to do? There are so many things things that I've noticed throughout my career that I found troubling mentor. Ship being one of them so in in our industry it's the bottom line is like super tiny eighty. It's very tiny. The cost of running restaurant are incredibly incredibly high in New York especially but pretty much in every market. There's so many unforeseen costs licensing is so incredibly expensive insurance so incredibly expensive and that's not just liability and liquor insurance and all these sorts of things but essentially opening a restaurant and running it is. It's you're lucky if you make a profit at the end of the day. You're lucky if you make eight percent if you're really operating a restaurant well you're making fifteen percent. I mean these. This is really hard and as we all know who are in this industry it takes blood sweat and tears. I know you know that girl. I mean it is exhausting. You work long hours you suffer through it. And that's because because I feel that we don't really have the foundation in order to help people grow within this industry. I'M NOT GONNA say by any means that I have the answers to this but I do feel that. This is a conversation that we need to start hurt having so we collectively as a hospitality community can figure out how to resolve it because it is going to take all of us together. When I was coming up through the industry you know we we and I am sure anyone that's ever worked in a restaurant knows that this happens? You're a server. The manager gets fired or the manager. Doesn't show up to work and suddenly your manager and.

New York harassment Savannah Vanna partner Windsor Newark METOO assault
"savannah" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"savannah" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked travel back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity. This is our story <hes> family history. Let's get started and on this episode of five minutes in church history. Let's visit the oldest city in georgia savannah when georgia was his majesty's colony savannah was the capital. It's a port city and go on to play a strategic role in both the revolutionary canary in civil wars. It's charming full of history horsedrawn carriages architectural features good food and it's also full of churches so let's talk about the church history of savannah. We start with john wesley. He set sail for georgia. Uh on october fourteen seventeen thirty five. He reached savannah on february eight seventeen thirty six and he would would leave on december twenty second seventeen thirty seven. There is the wesley monument in reynolds square. Savannah has twenty two squares throughout the town and one of them reynolds square has this great monument statue of john wesley and on it are these words my heart's desire for this place is not that it be a famous or rich but that it may be a religious ages colony and then i am sure it cannot fail of the blessing of god but alas wesley did not fare so well himself in the fair city of savannah. He considered his time there a failure and there was the matter of a very complicated court case that ended in a mistrial. Oh the drama well george whitfield fared much better in savannah. He arrived in savannah. The first time on may seven seventeen thirty eight he opened an orphanage called the bethesda orphan house. It's just south of savannah. It opened in seventeen forty forty. One of those twenty two squares is the whitfield square. It's beautiful and it has a gazebo and i'm sure that if whitfield were were alive today he'd be in that gazebo n._b._a. Preaching so we have wesley and we have whitfield and we also have many churches in savannah in christ church which was established by oglethorpe the founder of the colony of georgia in seventeen thirty three. This is where wesley would have preached this. This is where whitfield preached. There's also the first african baptist church it goes back to seventeen seventy four. This church has pews news that were made by slaves and they marked the pews with words that were from an african dialect and it was also part of the underground ground railroad the first african baptist church and then there's independent presbyterian church it was established in seventeen eighteen fifty five by charter of king george the second a fire destroyed the church building in eighteen eighty nine but it was rebuilt. He built as closely as possible to its original design. The marble baptismal font is still there in the church. It survived the the fire. The church has a magnificent pulpit striking breathtaking that is made of mahogany also breathtaking the tall federal windows the granite floors and the corinthian columns woodrow wilson was married in this church in eighteen eighty five five he married a daughter of the church's minister and of course the church has its famous steeple which towers over the city eighty you should go and see it or if you can't make it to savannah you can simply watch the opening scenes of forest gump a feather dances. This is around the steeple as it slowly descends upon the tree lined streets of savannah and lands right at the feet of tom hanks is character forrest gump as he sits on a bench in chippewa square and that is one of the charming churches of of the charming city of savannah and i'm steve nichols. Thanks for listening five minutes in churches for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in church history dot com.

savannah john wesley george whitfield african baptist church georgia savannah georgia whitfield square reynolds square christ church dr stephen nicholson chippewa square woodrow wilson steve nichols bethesda orphan house tom hanks forrest gump king george founder five minutes
"savannah" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

13:12 min | 1 year ago

"savannah" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"They're seven and all and there's four that have aired so far. <hes> is because Naomi Watts comes into the into the show about halfway through as Gretchen Carlson who was the first of many women at Fox to pursue legal action for sexual harassment against Ales and and I'm really curious to see how that that story unfolds I mean so far in this series his his habit of harassing the women around him is presented mainly through this one character Laurie loon who actually is in real life suing the show because she doesn't like her representation on it and <hes> and that's a very twisted and sick relationship relationship but it's just one relationship it's essentially kind of mistress extramarital affair situation and the idea that he was just simply pawing every woman at the network and putting every single one of them under this lens is something that I think is going to emerge more in the last three episodes so that me to twist I think is what's GonNa take me through the end because I just really WANNA see. Naomi Watts as Gretchen Carlson. Get her revenge. She's she's great in the role by the way yeah I'm interested to see the evolution of that plot line in that performance and I could see that case for it. I I don't find myself uninterested to watch the rest of the show I just felt frustrated by it at the same time and I also felt that there was a certain obtuseness to the camera work that is intended to depict his lewdness in dismissive -Ness of women like the camera does some of the leering the camera does <hes> at the camera is doing something weird. That doesn't feel to me like it's on the women's side. It is on the women's side obviously the this is the story a UAE Roger Ailes is a monster but I don't know I am I alone in that the the the the representation of what it would feel like to be bullied and harassed as a woman in the workplace by Roger Ailes somehow felt very male in it's perspective <hes> that it hit me and and led again to the feeling that this interpretation of a very important chapter of American history and present is an actually telling me anything interesting about what really really happened or why. I think that I may agree with you somewhat so far but I think that Naomi Watts entrance into the story has has put a different twist on that Annabel Wallace who plays Laurie loon is is really good in her role but all she really has to do. I think Julia he would agree is to be this kind of sexualize victim and there are a lot of really gross scenes of her. You know being filmed as she kind of perform sexually for for Roger Ailes and <hes> and I agree there's a Lurid nece in the presentation of that relationship but I feel like when Naomi Watts enters the show oh and I don't know whether it's because of her performance or because of how that character is written and just that she's going to be a character who unlike the Laurie loon character you know break breaks out of this. There's something really fresh in for example the way that she shows her irritation at being touched by other anchors on screen screen and she brings that to ails he dismisses it. I feel like you see other parts of workplace harassment and what it feels like other than you know the most T._v.. Friendly sexy parts or it will the shows. The loudest voice tells the story of Roger Ailes starring Russell Crowe Naomi Watsa check it out on showtime and as always we're curious to hear what you thought of it all right <hes> now's the moment earn a practice when we endorse they now have steven this week. I shall l.. Endorse a ten minute segment from C._B._S.. News I think it was actually from sixty minutes. Show that aired recently. That's an interview between Leslie Stahl and Ben Forensics who is now my new moral hero in life and is this wonderful man. He's ninety nine years years old. I think when she interviewed him he might have been a bit younger but he's now ninety nine. This is a reoccurring I think and he is the last living judge from the Nuremberg trial. So in the Nuremberg trials happened he was only twenty seven. He had never tried a case before and he found himself. Health because of his history serving in World War Two and because of having helped to liberate the camps in having some knowledge of that world he found himself on the bench a judging not the top Nazi brass that we think of as being tried at the Nuremberg trials is but a group of assassins that went through and killed entire cities. It's horrible horrible story. That's very quickly summed up in sort of thumbnail way in this ten minute segment and it sounds incredibly depressing but his actually extraordinarily uplifting because of the person Jason that been forensic so after this experience of trying these Nazis at the age of twenty seven he devoted his life to becoming this <hes> peace activist essentially any now is seven decades into this career of you know being a peace activist lecturing about history going around meeting conflicts. He's just an incredible human. He's this tiny little five foot tall man with an extraordinary amount of energy <hes> who talks very philosophically about what it meant to him to have been those trials and what it taught him about war and how are the most important thing to him is to try to to stop war and when Lesley Stahl comes back at him with a with natural question. I think anyone would have asked you know. Do you feel discouraged that after seven decades of doing this work there is still so much violence and unrest and cruelty and injustice in the world. His answer is just so extraordinary. I can't possibly summit up but just watch this ten minute segment and you will be a uplifted and feel like a better person and want to make the world a better place. I also discovered though I haven't watched it yet that there's a whole documentary about been friends on Netflix called prosecuting evil the extraordinary World Ben Friends so that tells his story. I imagine in a longer way he was. I think a first generation immigrant to the U._S. from a Jewish family anyway he's a great guy. Ben forensis minute Guru please watches interview with Lesley Stahl. Oh Wow that sounds amazing. Julia Woody have <hes> I would like to endorse two experiences that I had here in Los Angeles in the last couple two weeks <hes> I had fun Hooky Date Day with my husband and we start children and just explored Los Angeles because we never really got to explore this city in the pre kid way of like maybe we should stop here for Lunch and Oh this bookstore looks school and you know just aimlessness the aimlessness one no longer gets to have as a parent we we <hes> arranged some aimlessness for ourselves and one of the things we did on our aimless day was go check out the Huntington Gardens in Pasadena which is kind of amazing institution and that's like if you combined a research library of Technical Garden and Art History Museum and put them all on one verdant campus. That's the that's the Huntington Gardens and we went because <hes> my husband has gotten I interested in bonsai and they have a bonsai collection but on the way to checking out the bonsai collection we were like Oh hey let's pop through the archive like I hadn't been in the library part so we walk in dark building. You know put your put your water bottle in your bag walk into this dimmed room full of crumbly old paper what is standing in front of us on a stand the frigging Gutenberg Bible. There's just like a Gutenberg Bible just right there like in the middle on the way to the bonsai <hes> very you know it's. It's an amazing room room of really interesting documents the Bible I learned there were I guess one hundred and seventy five printed. I think what it said on the thing that we were reading <hes> and of which forty eight still survive and here's here's one of them. There's a bunch of New York. There's a bunch in Germany. You won't be surprised to learn a bunch of England. There's some all over the world but it just felt <hes> miraculous to be in the presence of this seminal object was so can beautiful and anyway so we wanted around very hot day check out the bonsai wandered hither and they're eventually went to what had been our destination and the occasion for taking a Hooky Day which was Paul McCartney concert at <hes> dodger stadium which had been my birthday gift my husband so oh we make our way to dodger stadium great old ballpark very crowded all ages crowd. I thought we would be the youngest people there but but the the Beatles keep recruiting fans <hes> we get out Paul McCartney right knee is singing on a stage we have thirteen eight and it was the same feeling it was like Oh my God. That's the thing it's the it's the original thing and it's still there. Only Molly the Gutenberg Bible two singers yeah or something something there was just this feeling of awe at being in the presence of the original thing that felt very familiar from earlier in the afternoon and Paul McCartney. I recognize this this go in the Grand Julia Turner tradition of recommending things that are already obviously apparently good to everybody in the whole goddamn world so what is the point but if you have never seen Paul McCartney in concert this was the last stop on this tour but <hes> hopefully he will. He will plan another tour soon. He does tour frequently. Try to go see one it it the combination between his the the depth of the catalog. I mean just the the number of good songs segue into good songs. <hes> just became comical at the end and the number of good songs that weren't even played like I don't think he played yesterday and it's not like you were thinking. Oh Wow we're really in the dregs of the Paul McCartney catalog there were great wing songs Great Beatles songs even some of the songs from the new album seemed good <hes> and and they're also is just he's just a very funny persona. You know if you think about I've seen Mick Jagger play of seeing Bob Dylan play each of them has prosecuting some version of cool still into their age aged nece the elusiveness of Dylan the like goofy swagger of of Jagger <hes> and Paul McCartney is just kind of a dope like he's he's <unk> oral historically talented rockstar but he's also just Kinda corny and goofy and sweet and I don't know the combination of that with like the the leather energy of of rock is <hes> was very fun and and then he did at the very end in a surprise cameo bring out Ringo Starr and they played helter skelter together under the Los Angeles Guy. That's a nice way ringo waiting in the ways the whole time to pop on it was a pretty fun night so my endorsement is the Gutenberg Bible and the Beatles how I mean how do I follow that top that Steve has to go back to the last cave paintings to be more foundational than Michael Jackson God yeah <hes> so <hes> I am going to endorse some an essay by the kind of peerless earless <hes> Andrew O'Hagan or O'Hagan. I'm not sure which <hes> who <hes> often rights for the Leonard Review of books a few weeks ago I endorsed the Lillian Ross Classic. That's just been reissued by New York. Review of books books called a picture which is her fly on the wall account of <hes> <hes> watching as the director John Huston tried to bring the red badge of courage to the screen which he did but then it was butchered by the studio and was destroyed as a work of popular art <hes> but anyway <hes> O'Hagan O'Hagan and Hagen on the occasion of the reissue of Lillian Ross's book is able to retell the story of his relationship with Lillian Ross. who was this mid-century Doyen of the New Yorker? I mean truly one of the Great New Yorker Writers of all time and long before Gay Talese and Frank Sinatra Lillian Ross was doing these extraordinary sort of work of art <hes> celebrity profiles <hes> and <hes> he it's funny because he at once is getting it her <unk> genius as a writer and at the relationship that she had to her subjects and like she was like Janet Malcolm Factory New Janet Malcolm and was in a kind of implicit and explicit dialogue with Janet Malcolm over the years about what you're what are journalists obligation is to their source and to the truth until.

Paul McCartney Naomi Watts Roger Ailes Leslie Stahl Laurie loon harassment Beatles Lillian Ross Los Angeles New York Gretchen Carlson O'Hagan O'Hagan Janet Malcolm Huntington Gardens dodger stadium Ringo Starr Netflix Mick Jagger UAE Julia
"savannah" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

10:41 min | 1 year ago

"savannah" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Priority. They would love to talk to people in the state of Utah about your Senator Mitt Romney. But it is Nancy Pelosi day if you've noticed the media, and you've noticed the quivers and Denise shaking and brow. Wiping in the sudden fits of excitement is Nancy Pelosi is once again to be speaker of the house they've invited. People Nancy Pelosi day, bring the kids. Well, you know, the ones that are alive and have survived et cetera being them, we'll have a barbecue of kind of a stem grown fake meat products grown in a laboratory kind of soy tasting tastes a little bit like chicken, but the rubber variety and we're going to celebrate America. Nancy Pelosi's America well to be precise. Now in North America. We don't want to get to jingoistic on Nancy Pelosi day or. As they've now issued a correction really what we ought to look at is the land mass north of South America that'll be our celebration for the day, the north bland mass north of South America. So all of this around the woman whose daughter now, I don't I'm as I'm a father, and I don't know that this would be the praise at want for my daughter, and maybe you, parents, etc. Maybe give your feedback on this. I have thought long and hard about on the day that I depart this earth, hopefully to go to the Lord I envisioned being there with my daughter, and my wife is a hold my hand. And they say goodbye to me, and I have not envisioned looking at my daughter and having her say dad, I've always admired about you that you will cut people's heads off. And they will not know they're bleeding that has not been my aspiration as a father. But that is in fact, what Nancy Pelosi's daughter has says about her she'll cut your head off before, you know, you're bleeding that's high praise from daughter, but isn't that divisive? And what does this mean, by the way for Mitch McConnell and President Obama if? If you were to advise them, what would you be telling them to do because there's some realities in the operating realities is now with the house of representatives run by the cold hearted hands of Nancy Pelosi cut your head off before you're bleeding. Are there deals to be made? Is there anything that we should do or could do in terms of dealmaking? They don't tend to give the president any form of victory as it relates to a wall. That's very very clear and the sticking point for them. It's nothing to do with money. We all know that I've seen the pieces. Oh, yes. Yes. Yes. Fiscal restraint pay as you go as nothing to do with that. The fact of the matter is this would be very much as a listener to my local show said like Chuck Schumer having a grand a thousand bucks in his pocket, and you ask him for something like a buck fifty to go get a Cup of coffee or a couple of bucks for a Cup of coffee. None of its financial, and they all know that. But the operating reality for Nancy Pelosi something else altogether. She is being flanked on her left in. This is interesting. So you have the fake socialist who's going to go up against the other fake socialist, one of them young and a frac- Brooklyn one of them old am demonstrably corrupt. It's Alexandria or cost you TEZ going up against Nancy Pelosi Cortez's says that she is not going to bow down first round. She's gonna take what is this symbolic vote against Nancy Pelosi and on something this actually decent pays you. Go. Your pays you go legislation. Simply means you gotta cut a little bit to spend a little bit. And it is a sign of the times that in the democrat party. You are able to now watch this young upstart pretend Brooklyn, I her dad was actually the CEO is on architecture company was an architect NCO. So the hardscrabble upbringing head to go down and be a bartender to make ends meet that didn't happen quite as much as she'd like you to know. But Nancy Pelosi now has to deal with this left. Flank and. Folks are getting upset. They're getting concerned kid we deal with Nancy Pelosi. Well, let's take some examples from history we've dealt with it before I was part of a team who ran against her. We ran the fire Nancy Pelosi campaign, and I got to confront her staff when we sent them fleeing from the internet that campaign was so successful because she had so unlikable I'll tell you a little inside information out of Washington DC, I chatted with a congresswoman who was on the floor. When Nancy Pelosi was voting for an abortion Bill. Do you did standing in the wings getting ready to vote for more money for abortions? She was feverishly crossing herself. Now, I'm not anybody's judge professor, a priest. But I don't know that crossing yourself feverishly vote for more abortions is the way to go. But the media wiping their brow fits of heavy breathing. Unable to control their thoughts as they envision of Pelosi. Congress. On NBC is it Samantha gun Guthrie or savannah Guthrie? I don't have a TV. So I don't know. So rely on us. Samantha or savannah, savannah Guthrie savannah Guthrie on ABC talking to Nancy Pelosi. NBC you're probably the most powerful women in government. Pelosi says in the United States. Yes, got three. Yes policy. That's true. Guthrie? Do you think about that? And think about what it means. Do you think about that as a personal accomplishment and Pelosi sits back and triangulate and calculates and things. And no, I think of it as responsibility, I don't think of it as an accomplishment, I think of it as a real responsibility. And how we go forward, and what that means in terms of the lives of American working families, and that's more. This doesn't break a glass ceiling. This is breaking a marble ceiling in the Capitol Hill, the United States. No, I don't think it's quite that momentous side note true or false. This is the first congress in which a woman will be seated who married her brother and lived with him for eight years this false question. And if that's true, how is that not made the media? And if that's true is Nancy Pelosi. You're going to be asked about that. Now in a go forward basis. What you wanna do? Well, look number one is stopped the wall because it is. Core promise of the president United States. It is what he ran upon when he came down the stairs. That's what drew the attention. He stepped on a line and stepped on a button that none of the other Republican candidates would ever do. We'll talk later in the show about professional Republicans ye- what that means to me. It means people who if you were to ask them. What do you do for a living say, well, I Republican what's that mean? Well, that's that's what I do. I republican. So what are your principles? Well, it's about Republican. Well, you conservative. Well, if that's if it's say Republican. Yeah. If it's something else, I'm a Republican Trump has been an antidote to that to professional republicanism. And there are in Washington DC little tiny whispers that this Mitt Romney thing. It's time to go. Right ahead and Nancy Pelosi to put in the minds of the American people this choice, but Pelosi intens investigations Pelosi intends shutdowns of the Trump agenda Pelosi intends to do what she can to try to get a personal attack levied against her by the president she intends to drive or draw him out that way and in terms of policy. Does it matter or does it Mitch McConnell sometimes has in his heart? This knee. The American people she made rich cross out on edge Pelosi. We things we can do to move forward. But they're always deals that we ended up not liking, for instance, so-called criminal Justice reform, Bill not high in that. I know the president signed it. Maybe he sees things in it. I don't see I think we're letting the few too many people out of jail, but he had the details. I didn't have the full details. But it ends up being these things that if Nancy Pelosi Mitch McConnell get together. Then we got to turn to the president. So what do you do in that place? If you're advising how do you advise the president to proceed and the media can't hide themselves CNN CNN on their front page. I took screen shot of the graphic Trump's presidency is about to totally change. He's going to face a new level of opposition. He hasn't yet seen. So we have not seen opposition this president who has been opposed more than any president in history has not seen opposition. I failed to believe that another thing. The Democrats intend to do is go after the tax. Returns to the professional Republicans. Some of you want to see the president's tax returns. I happen if they deal. Let's let's go full transparency. Let's do that such repression. Republicans are you afraid to come back and say, oh transparency. That's what you want to tell you. What why don't we do something? We can do right now today. This instant why don't we go ahead and release all the details and all the names on the congressional sexual abuse slush fund? Why don't you? Give us the details on that all of the abusers. What they're accused of. And how much money we spent because all that takes is a signature from Nancy Pelosi since we're gonna go full transparency and wall work in the debate this Bill about tax returns and ten years of prior tax returns. Why don't we do something else? You can all do. What are we disclose? The details of the work your family members have done where they've drawn down a couple hundred grand on your packs running a couple hundred granted per year or three hundred grand per year. Why don't we see an accounting of the work? They actually delivered to these donor. Owners. Why don't we get that transparent? And while we're talking about transparency. Why don't we go ahead and take through some of the records of the attendance of board meeting you and your family have had were you suddenly ended up on the boards of companies and industries about which, you know, little let's have a look at datas the American people. Let's go full transparency. And let's also do this. Why don't we go ahead and release all in any reports on Russia in how the investigation went about? Why don't we go ahead and declassify any and all of this information since you would like to go full transparency aimed at one guy. This is something I'd love to see the profession Republicans. Those are the people who Republican for a living stand up and say we're ready to play the transparency game in the Romney timing. Right next door to Pelosi taking a seat. Look, I can believe that mitt is a good guy in his personal life. And I know this in my judgment. He's a cardboard cutout of a man. He's kind of our Hillary Clinton in a way, he's not corrupt. But I don't think he exists because he's really just a walking amalgamation of the polls Stott Herman in for Rush Limbaugh on the EIB network will get back into your calls. You're listening to the network six.

Nancy Pelosi president Senator Mitt Romney Nancy Pelosi Cortez Mitch McConnell savannah Guthrie congress North America Utah South America United States Washington America President Obama Chuck Schumer NBC Denise Hillary Clinton
"savannah" Discussed on Only A Game

Only A Game

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"savannah" Discussed on Only A Game

"This is only a game. I'm nor prince Yati. I think it makes sense to start this week's show by quoting my boy, William Shakespeare RIP more specifically a little play called Romeo and Juliet. You may know it as I do as the source material for a little ditty called love story by Taylor swift. But I digress in act two scene to one of my personal faves Juliet says to Romeo what's in a name that which we call a rose by any other word would smell sweet. Well, I'm sorry. Juliette and I don't mean to pile on because I know you're dealing with a lot right now, but you're wrong names do matter. And only games. Matthew stock has the story to prove it. Jesse an early coal where at a friend's wedding in New Jersey, when the CEO of their business called with bad news Jesse, we just overdrafted our count. We're completely out of money for the first time. Really. We had completely failed in how do you run out of money and not have a backup plan. A few months earlier, Jessie and Emily had bought a collegiate summer league baseball team in Savannah, Georgia. They had already taken on millions of dollars in debt and opening day was still months away on the drive home from New Jersey to North Carolina. Jesse, and Emily talked about what they could do to keep their new team afloat. And Emily came up with a plan. She's Harney said, we've no other options. We have to sell our house. You is in the back of our minds the whole drive. But it took me saying it for us both to accept that. That was really our only option left. We were not ready to give up on this. This was not just he's first experience with failing baseball team in two thousand eight as a twenty three year old. Bachelor. He was hired as the general manager of guests. Donia grizzlies I showed up that first day the team was only averaging a couple hundred fans of game. I found out that the team had lost over one hundred thousand dollars the previous year, and I found out that there was two hundred sixty eight dollars in the Bank account right away. Jesse started calling local businesses to drum up sponsorships. Most weren't interested and some had never even heard of the grizzlies. I was like, what have I got myself into? I mean, the team had been there, but nobody cared. So Jesse went to the team owner with a new idea. Ken, we can no longer be a baseball team. We need to be a circus in maybe a baseball game breakout and luckily didn't fire me and he said, we got up into lose Jesse called a group of his college friends, and they started brainstorming ideas to draw fans to grizzlies games. Things were about to. Get crazy in gastonia. We came up with flatulence fun night where we actually gave away Whoopi cushions at the gate, and we had a farting contest on the field beam, burrito, eating contest, salute to underwear night. If anybody wore their underwear on the outside of their pants in came in, they got a free ticket. George Bush was the president in his term was over. So what do we do? We offered him an internship. Jesse also brought the players into the fun. They started handing out programs before warm-ups and doing choreographed dances in between innings. It started getting a lot of buzz and that's when the attendance started skyrocketing. It really became bigger than we even imagine. People started hearing about Jesse and the grizzlies among them was a young woman named Emily McDonald my boss at the time heard Jessie, speak at a conference, and she actually left the room and called me and said, I met the guy that you're gonna. Marry family was working for a minor league baseball team in Gusta Georgia. Like Jesse. She also believed that fan Centric entertain. -ment was the secret to success in baseball. The two started exchanging emails and sure enough overtime does kinda got to know each other and fell in love. And then I ended up moving together Dona and working for the team with him. I will always remember the first time I walked into that gastonia ballpark Jesse was teaching the players the thriller dance on the field in Texier oh, by the way, he was in a block tuxedo..

Jesse grizzlies Harney baseball gastonia New Jersey Taylor swift George Bush William Shakespeare Jessie prince Yati Emily McDonald Juliet Romeo Juliette Gusta Georgia Matthew stock Dona Savannah
"savannah" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"savannah" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

"They were very different and it was so different. Blake was very like, oh my gosh, like emotional eagles shit with my favorite quote of any TV show. And. Dude, I have really said I have put a bigger right now. I can. I can make this very radio. I can put it up and I filmed it and he goes, listen, he goes the eagles fucking comment. He made. I think whatever he goes, he says, you give me butterflies, butterflies a small feeling. You give me eagles lake. No, Garrett. Eric said, I love the way she says bags bags, but like they're really cute together. And I think Becky and garett is perfect for that. And like Blake is just, but Blake seems really serious, but he also seems like he would take such great care of lady and I just God, I well, hey, he's still single so know savannah, like he should be the bachelor, I think so too. I think he would be a good. I mean, everybody's saying Jason but pace now Jason sugars date. Savannah. Talk about what we're going to talk about that, sir, over day we're talking about on yet. I could go all night long savannah, talking about her. Listen. All right. So we liked that show you guys like my show and for those of you who do like it, you are going to love the good life with Stevie and Suzanne..

eagles Blake garett savannah Eric Jason Garrett Becky Stevie Suzanne
"savannah" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"savannah" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

"So you guys have worked on a lot of music together. How many songs have you written together now? Oh my God. How many do you think. Fifty or sixty or something really. I don't know forty. Got it that you're gonna say like ten. No forty forty forty fifty. I take forty fifty. Yeah, we met like four year. We didn't read the other back down really. Chalice we always row there, but I mean, like we started recently writing every now. It's on a weekly basis. We have a few sessions usually. Yeah. Yeah, one thing or the next or something. You wanna come to one of your sessions and just like watch talent. I don't have. I promise you've tally kidney yet. Amazing. My friend. Thank you. And other stuff here very person. If you guys in the real life, she's very talented and everyone's really mean to the internet. It's stupid, you know, do you ever see Volve in your shit? And I'm like, hey, shut the fuck up. Now, do you hurt your Twitter people. Oh yes. And Graham, I stay away from that. I love my sister handle out. Does she do for you? Corby listening. She was supposed to be here, but she's working a fulltime job. I know. Yeah. So she's working with Erica costs? Stehlin team. Ten. Oh, my God. Yeah. She was just on tour with them boyfriend and she's super happy now. Yeah, that feels like totally. This has been dark dark turns with savannah. I wanna I wanna do a podcast versus just a normal path Savannah's takes these dark turns. So we're sipping some white wine here, which you know maybe isn't the healthiest thing, but I wanted to tell you guys about some healthy habits of mine. Okay. So do you know if you're drinking enough water will usually because my will be white guy. Well, that's good clear. Quite clear if you're I know what you're saying. Like are you eating the right foods? Colonists is what he eats boozy. What do you mean at calling? Not Bucci foods. He literally, Larry just got what did you get orders or something? I had always wasters. Yeah. Okay. Okay. So we're not. Okay. Well, let me for being boozy. I mean Gucci. I'm g Gee, I. I usually take me to chick fillet. I'm a happy girl. Michael, Michael Kors, Bernardi have one. Like it's not Gucci. I'm saying, be bummed out. You'd be bummed out now I by myself, Michael court. Okay. Michael Kors bag sitting right there on the table and that's mine. Why are we talking here? Whatever. Can we get back to my health? Okay. It doesn't have to be just about what you put in your body on your body. So, oh, I do this every day. It's a thing called bio clarity. I don't know if you've seen it on like my interest stories and my Snapchat, but I love their products. I've made it a part of my daily routine makes my skin super soft, and it gives you that nice natural glow that you know. So many people want Savannah's Doug amount. So I use this Andrew teen, which is for normal or dry skinks I've dry skin, but it's just three easy steps you cleanse restore an eyedropper..

savannah Volve Savannah Michael Kors Larry Twitter Bernardi dry skin Graham Bucci g Gee Michael Andrew Doug amount Michael court four year
"savannah" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"savannah" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"And now from the university of chicago institute of politics and cnn the axe files with your host david axelrod i met savannah guthrie in two thousand and eight when she joined the obama campaign press corps assign there by nbc news she went on to become their white house correspondent during the two years that i served there and i learned two things about our one is that she's very very smart and the other is she's a very genuine and honest person those qualities have contributed to her success as an anchor of the today show i caught up with savannah new york recently to talk about her very interesting life career in this moment in journalism and politics savannah guthrie my old friend rate to see you again in your in your new palatial day get to see you as a returning member of the media yes i don't forget that you were once a reporter you know i'm proud of that i was raised in journalism and i'm proud of that speaking of being raised let's talk about your family born in australia why might i i'm a us citizen i was born in his dre because my kids tissue you run run for for president i get into that we won't yes but by the way i think it's never been litigated i think natural born citizen the case is never come up to the court we'll get to your loss stuff i'm like oh fascinating i was born in chile 'cause my father was in the mining business and he at that point in the early seventies was had been transferred there to work for a company so we just our family lived there for about two years and i happen to be born during that time and not until i start working for the today show had i been back in all of these years and one of the best things about this job is like all the cool stuff you get to do and they sent me to astray area with my mom found the very hospital room where i was born and the midwives who basically delivered me yeah so so i come i really grew up in arizona via ustralia and tell me about your folks my dad will first of all he passed away when i was sixteen i know my dad was.

savannah guthrie white house correspondent new york reporter us president arizona university of chicago institut cnn david axelrod obama nbc australia chile two years