18 Burst results for "Saul Griffith"

"saul griffith" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

08:43 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"Sustainable housing training and workforce development the remediation and reduction of a legacy pollution the development of clean water infrastructure. You know it's sort of like a laundry list of stuff that we like need. It's not surprising. The goal is to be carbon neutral by twenty thirty five and even bill gates. Who has a new book out. Now that i need to promote bill. Gates's new fucking book. Okay the man has enough money into your so welcome but even even bill gates things like these goals are with within reach. We can do it Peppermint do you think these kinds of events make climate change more climate change action more popular. Well i do think it's a little bit overwhelming for a lot of people to think i mean. Basically these initiatives are are like it feels more attainable to invent a time machine to go back before climate change. And so now it's kind of like. Oh wow there's a lot to do you mean i'm gonna have to eventually. This means that the average person is going to have to give up watching tv or something like that. And i think it's a it's a. It's a tall order but obviously it's very necessary. I'm one of those people that was like you know. I hate to say i was complicit but i was like sort of allowing in this whole situation with text. Sei in this new storm in the next storm. That's getting ready to roll through. I was kind of like you. Remember that movie never ending story where like the characters. There's this thing called the negative energy at love. How i do not know where this is going at how the never ending story relates to climate change and texas and snowstorms come together. Don't you don't know it might be a reach. It might be reached just like some people think that joe biden's new policy is but the the nothing was that negative energy right like cloud or whatever and so the people there were people who were like sort of pushing it that evil dog that was pushing it but then there were people who were kind of like. I don't really know what the nothing is. But i'm just really sad. And that was kind of empowering the nothing and so i was kind of like spending all this time saying focusing on what is wrong with these people in texas. They don't like come on. It's just no like were iowa and not really focus on realizing that the infrastructure was just proportionately affecting so many people and it's just like such a Like a metaphor. These people in in in. I think in houston in the expanded houston city limits Were looking up at the skyscrapers that still had power while the rest of the people on the ground. Didn't and i think it's just it's very telling i have a girlfriend simply elite fontaine who is also in rupaul's drag racists was a guest on my podcast two nights ago and she was like girl. I can't be on the show because my house is going to collapse because it snowed. And i was like girl i likely story and then i'm looking on. The news actually is happening right right. You know and it's interesting. Because first of all i had to be honest with you both and you know i am a failure in one respect which is that. I've literally never once thought about texas's power grid. This is the first time. I really delved into it. But it turns out that when you have a like a lone star power grid that's not connected to other shit. They can't help you. When you're in a pickle right and so one of biden's plans to actually nationalize the power grid. Which again it's interesting. I think one thing about the bite in administrations rhetoric around climate change has been. There isn't an area of governance that isn't affected by climate change and this is a really great example of that right like the power grid in texas. I didn't realize would be affected by climate change. You don't think of it necessarily that way but it's not it wasn't built to sustain so snowstorms and it's not connected to other state so it can't be bailed out in a situation like this I my my big question. Guests adam is for for people like who who are i mean. I don't even know a climate change. Denial s are important to think about but just people who are just sort of casually an indifferently living. Their lives where climate change is like a thing they never think about but they don't deny it what do we do. How do we change. And you're you have a show right you talk issues. In what way would you use your. Do you use your powers and would you use your power to communicate to these people. sure well. I think that it's climate. Change is an issue that we have this sort of very abstract notion of you know and are frankly our cultural conversation about it is a couple of decades behind the science. You know it was barely. This is the first presidential election where it was even a major issue. You know it was barely discussed a previous debates and thank god biden his prioritizing it so much as an issue but in terms of how the average person thinks about it. We're stuck in the past. We all think in our heart of hearts like okay climate change. How do i stop that. I guess i gotta stop using so much plastic. I need to keep the lights off more. You know that's what we're now hairspray. Yeah no hairspray. Peppermint said all you got to not watch. Tv you gotta you gotta say power. And the fact is a that. Whole point of view was was pushed upon us by corporations that we're trying to unload the responsibility onto the individual. You know the like like it's not us who's creating all the plastic and all the disposables. It's you need to recycle it. And that's how will improve the world right so the first thing is that individual choice is never going to be enough to to stop climate. Change us buying better stuff us. Using less things is never going to be enough to stop climate change nor is it possible to ask people to make sacrifices like that right. But here's the second part. Solving climate change does not actually equal making sacrifices. That's the idea that we've been having our whole. We gotta cut back. We gotta use less. Life has to be shittier for us to solve climate. Change not true. I had a guest on my podcast. This guy saul griffith. I'm podcast factually plug. Do you mean the hit. Podcast factual hit podcast. Actually i didn't ask you to call it that you know it's again and that's why you naturally you know what the hip podcast. So we had this fellow on macarthur genius grant winner engineer. Scientists all griffith and what he explained is that if we were to electrify our entire power grid electrify cars electrify oil natural gas And put the right policies in place that would mean that energy would be cheaper it would be more abundant and life would be better because we have less pollutants in our homes. We'd live longer and so it's it now. It costs money and time and most importantly political will to do this. You have to be willing to say piss off. The local natural gas supplier socal gas here in california. Which is lobbying against. You know making your rules that would mean that you know. New homes would have to be constructed with electric electrical heat of gas right because there are gas company. They don't want that business. Be taken away so we need to be able to stand up to those sorts of utilities but once we do life gets better for everybody. We in fact don't have to cut back. We can have more good things in our world and so that's the that's the sort of paradigm shift that we need in our understanding of how to fight. Climate change is not about cutting back. It's about entering into a better future and making investments. That will allow us to do so. Yeah i i love that. You're right that like you know the the the side that wants to keep fossil fuels they of put you know. Put these stories in our heads that it's about self sacrifice to make it unpopular right. They're not they're not like you do your part but i do still think that people should do their part. I gu recycle and don't don't like overuse shit but yet don't think that once you put your shit in the blue bin you've done your part right right. Doing your part is also yelling at politicians voting and like thinking about changing the just the energy infrastructure.

california saul griffith joe biden griffith Gates houston two nights ago second part twenty thirty five first time both iowa adam first one thing one respect texas gates first presidential election first thing
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

04:48 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Think we do need some science answers there but i see encouraging things. There's an ustralian group that just showed that they can feed seaweed to cows that modifies the got of the cow reduces. I sent of the emissions. Wow so maybe the veggie burger will win. Or maybe the cousy we'd bigger win kronos And they. I think that things are happening. I'm pretty encouraged on your friend elon. Musk announced scorning. The he's gonna donate one hundred million dollars for the person with the best carbon dioxide sequester asians technology. I just i think that's good that he wants to spend his money and ib spends a lot more doing good things. I just want to put. Some real isn't around that yeah yeah Yeah i how how realistic is by the way. Wouldn't that person need hundred million dollars in order to come up with the idea. Why did they get the money afterwards. Minar i stunt get me started. The x prize was the problem. I started this idea that people will work for free to win a million dollars Where it would realistically cost a team of talented people tend to twenty million to win the price here so i would prefer that he yes. Please alone if you're listening to go to work. They're not like hey. If you work here you might win a ten thousand bucks. No pay me two hundred dollars for being here motherfucker. Yeah why don't you keep playing these free gigs. Until you're famous okay. Hold on a second. That's what actually happened to me. That was my career as a comedian in my early twenties so i know. I said it specifically. Don't worry it's current careers a scientist. Okay well talk. Show glenn a little bit for me. The average american limits we move a profound amount of materials if humanity one quarter of of the material the stuff right so we move a lot of debt. We move a lot of fossil fuels. We move a lot of rocks. The ah one quarter of the stuff. We move is.

twenty million two hundred dollars ten thousand bucks hundred million dollars Musk elon one hundred million dollars one quarter ustralian million dollars american early twenties asians a
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

04:42 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Yeah so the only way we're going to afford facing climate change is with creative financing to make the future cheap Is there any technology that we need to develop in. So far we open this conversation and let's bring it in for a landing But i ask before we do We opened this conversation by saying. Hey you know. We don't need a big technological. We don't need terra forming or whatever. Big big geomancy projects to you. Know mansard is the best malapropism. I've heard this way geomancy. Yeah we don't have some in a wizard to earth magic to crisis. We don't need you know we don't need that kind of moonshot. We need You know we need good policy and we need to adopt a quickly and we need to spend money But is there technology. That helps solve this problem. As well are there advancements that you're hoping to see either an engineering or science Authors say the that in an regional sectoral analysis that the doe was built around in the seventy s made us not put us in this big solution mindset. We need a solution for transportation. We need a solution for industry. We need a solution for commercial on electric city And i think that has made the conversation. Not retail enough. The reality is that forty percent of our emissions are decisions that are made around the kitchen table. so what is the gasoline. What what is the fuel that drives you kyle. What is the fuel that drives your furnace Another twenty percent of missions is those same decisions made announce small business. So what is the fuel running the this businesses truck and what is fuel hating the small businesses office or retail specs. So you get a huge way like sixty percent of the way just focusing on those things that his being the lodge part of the conversation today and we know that we can do it with the price. Lithium batteries will be at in a couple years and we can do with the price of solar is already yet and we can do. The price of the wind is already out so all of those way they with us. What about the other emissions for the other emissions is industry. Making you all of your stuff in fact just by making green electricity on the greed. The industry will reduce its emissions and then our other emissions are in agriculture agricultural products. We're gonna pump that in a second and i'll give you a bit of optimism on industry. Everyone has made this conversation in the hand wringing. Our industry is about cement steel and aluminum. We need all of those things. In great quantities like is.

forty percent twenty percent sixty percent today seventy s earth couple years second kyle
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

04:39 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Country that doesn't pay enough to healthcare workers teaches and they've got to make a decision in the moment of which helped water heated the by so that they can have a hot shower tomorrow. And if i have to listen to a long exposition on being solving climate change and buying an extra expensive pump water heater instead of metric. Asplin like we don't win that way. So that is also emphasized. The equity compensation is about access the real. The reality is united. Sell climate change you. Finally fifty percent of people can afford it so we also need. The third son had made sure that we structurally society-wide lower the cost of all these things and make the easiest decision. It is right now. Those eight decisions are hotter than the incumbent is the incumbent is i'm so cal. Natural gas all subsidize. Your natural gas for the tomorrow is i'll make it off on the vacuum etcetera etcetera etcetera. And the the structure the whole system against you. Then that's why we need a retail alarming. That want to advocate for the best interest in the job is this interest which is make these things the cheapest vest easiest finance option so that we can all do it over the next ten or twenty years. We can be marching together towards success. Yeah i think that's a really persuasive argument because that thing you know again the focus on being in the supermarket aisle and looking at the different things they okay. I could pay more for the sustainable thing. But is it really sustainable. A lot of people when faced with that they say fuck this. This is bullshit. I'm just going to buy whatever. I'm not doing this. It makes them mad. Because how do i get out of this whole foods and wins the costco. But yeah that's where you end up. Yeah exactly and it's a better approach is what you're describing. And there are cases where hey just a little bit of education will be helpful again. Moved into this home Had to buy drier clothes. Dryer went to the appliance store. They were like okay. Say model comes electric and gas and they said to us gas. One works a little better and we said okay. We'll get the gas. When i don't fucking know you know what i mean. I was not keyed into this in the same way for years ago. And now i wish i hadn't done that right. They they actually cost the same. I assume they dry your clothes just the same. A twenty volt outlet there. I could've used it. You know but so there was. There is a case in which all right that would have been a meaningful purchase decision. I do want to ask focus. But what the person who's telling you that in that moment. Their cousin is an installer and their their cows. Any installs natural gas. Because there's a biggest supply chain in. They they know the brands and bright. Like it's something they've done more so like this is like we weren't succeed unless we solve all of those little cultural social.

fifty percent tomorrow twenty volt third One eight years costco twenty years next ten
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

03:12 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"You know what i mean right and like which is also not true and by the way we did a segment on it where we're part of the part of the problem with climate. Is people buy cars too often. They don't use their cars for long enough. And if you get rid of your brand new hybrid too quickly right. You are financing the creation of another car. Which has there's the embodied missions of building the car in the first place And so my view has been what i've tended towards is what we really need to be doing. Is you know the the further upstream. The more structural reforms be getting so cal gas to knock it off with the lobbying rather than shaking our fingers and tongue change their buying decisions. But you are sort of You know persuasively making the case that there's a couple of big decisions that people could make. That would have an outsized impact. If you're going to look at one buying decision you could focus on your your next furnace. I'm just curious how you how you weigh those two competing messages. It's hard to get people to buy new thing before the thing breaks the reason i used infrastructurally earlier than the conversation is i want you to focus on those eight buying decisions for the things you buy decade including your car and to make sure when they break. But when you're buying those being ticket items you do the right thing about it. The environmentalist movement is have you incapacitating guilt in the supermarket. You're like. I'm going to solve climate change with my supermarket boston today. And then you're presented with a whole field of teams of juna bowl different color brands and you can't tell which one killed the fewest dolphins. Yeah any move to the sierra and you can't tell which one killed the fewest lowland gorillas right is immortal having and they check out. You're trying to do the math in your head account. Remember whether the plastic bag was better than the paper bag. And if i have to launder my fabric bag that board along to the laundry detergents the use of the paper bag of the plastic day. And we're all just like whereas if you make those decisions directly and weeks the generation infrastructure energy system you're solving climate change everyday dislike doing what you and i wanna bring it back. I don't think you wanna blame the consumer wholesale. And you don't want to say the old you have to do with these a yuppie tesla purchasing decisions because the reality is forty percent of people vying conditioner. A whole world of eater under financial juris. If american highs have less than a yeah. So it's pretty toa. Las disabled americans. You're gonna solve climate change by buying these things. They cost a few thousand dollars. Eight she has giving decisions so you also then have to initiate. This speaks to the year. It's a complicated with compensation. Even though the law of climate justice and equity compensation goes along with fixing climate change. Yeah so how do you bubble the communities and to me that is a question of financing and credit access and point of Yet to make it easy. Those busy people era single moms who were struggling financially in.

forty percent today eight buying decisions Eight juna bowl two competing messages american one tesla boston thousand dollars americans first place of climate justice big
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

03:32 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"I have now. And the wrong strains have really showed valles and We've put on the end of every every sentence in every name so yeah. Well i guess adams high but you'd probably be at amount of solo and year daiva near roscoe and the yeah anyway my friends here for my people. I don't know australia like so. Where are you from. And i can imagine what an insult it is to return to your land. People ask you where you're from that so they think i sound american You think striking. I mean that reminds me of the first time i grew up in new york. I live in california now. And i flew back to new york city and check in at the hotel and the guy behind the hotel de said you just get here from from los angeles and i was like how good what is it about. No i'm from here. Tell like i can just tell by looking at you you you. You came from california. Like no oracle. But that's what it is. That's what it is to live. You know it wasn't until you said new york. Charlie pick up on it. He does sound like eastern europe. Until is i also assumed you're one of those hopelessly liberal tree hugging californians hopelessly subway hugging new yorker. We'll look let's talk a little bit about. How do we make that mobilization a reality. I delay in the power of narrative. A lot And i think we can start to tell the stories that get us there. And i have spent the you know. I started an organization with a wonderful franco. Alex laskey cold rewiring america last year. And where we will making it out goal to figure out what we have to do to politically to make what i just said. Come how do we. How do we get how do we get a nifty op president. Who's gonna play the role of henry hudson and getting american industry to work. Who's gonna do the workforce training center and really that's an exercise in narrative in becoming the most convincing. And telling your story we were pretty successful even got some policy prescriptions written into the baden's climate plans that tiny bits. And i i'd give full credit for any of these things. You can have a tiny bit influence and we sort of we now believe had timing influence so i think it's all about storytelling. He's i'm going to this experiment with you on a new idea Please the strongest force in american politics today isn't the nra because they're bankrupt giggle giggle but the vip merge association retired people membership in our must be. Think about it as a discount coupons to hop what that aarp does very successfully is. Make sure that a whole bunch of a Volunteering some some lobbyists guard to the utility regulatory hearings in some given state to represent the interests of thai people and they they make sure that their interest retired able represented in the conversation healthcare's Shuji influential within the jerk in washington is the ip has their own zip code in washington. It's that logical.

california new york los angeles Charlie australia washington Alex laskey last year new yorker eastern europe henry hudson america today first time year daiva californians roscoe Shuji one american
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

05:35 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Down navy and roosevelt was scared and then if you did a survey of america in nine thirty nine we had such a shortage of guns in the military military that they using cream trucks fake tanks and and and brooms as rifles when the army was doing practices tonight on there was we were turtle of airplanes was about a thousand and they'll mostly to seat training aircraft. Roosevelt led. What was called the personal of democracy realizing this was going to be a wall with machines. He called up henry ford and he said any full. Can you help me out. Produce the journeys and henry ford cigna done. She's made because of narrow is gonna make making horrible joke about welfare system. That i that i well. He was making it but comes back comes from ford was making a tidy sum selling caused german technology. Yeah roosevelt called another guy. Call henry hudson who was working for the competitive ford and those instead. I'll come to washington. And i'll walk run. Something called the wartime production board. And i'll help you get up to speed. Ford took a few years to come around and defending up building aircraft factories but by non forty-three america was producing molin. Fifty thousand john. Biggest day across. David built a year reducing the tanks. The guns the munitions etcetera. The hall of american industry rallied behind it. We converted the economy around and produced. Not only enough. At the american produce the weapons for all of the allies franson england's capacity industrial capacity was screw may out juice germany. And that's why we won the war so the we are in a similar situation today but it's not batteries. We made its bullets and we need them. In similar quantities. We need to scale up. No not bullets batteries. Thank god yes bullets. I'm not trying to use the people from socal gas. I'm trying to. I want to the show. Just say because. I was trying to figure out how many bullets how many batteries he needed to make three year. And then i did a little bit of an investigation of how many bullets we make every year and we make about ninety billion bullets a year in the wills which is like we like enough bullets. Take eleven shots that everyone on the planet every year and miss this guy's gonna contextualized that we make about ten to twenty billion lego pieces a year. And if you wanted to have one statistic which describes what is wrong with the human race five five times more bullets than legos. And we already have too many legos. I mean exactly a so many legos. Yeah that's where. I was gone with that. Not too many.

David washington Ford five three year eleven shots today Roosevelt one statistic tonight about ten america henry roosevelt twenty billion lego pieces a y henry hudson about ninety billion bullets a ford about a thousand german
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

03:04 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Backwards saul griffith so you made the point so that from here on. Everybody's next car that they buy should be an electric car stove they buy should be an induction stove or an electric stove As much as possible. I have to say though that that's not the case right like there's gonna be a couple thousand cars sold today in the united states. I don't know the exact figure but least a couple thousand million divided by three hundred sixty five. Okay that is there you go. So so what a lot and it's gonna be so a couple of hundred thousand then sounds like It's not There those are not going to be electric cars right Thousand today and only forty thousand will be on a few thousand. We'll be electric only a few thousand going to be electric Of course tesla is you know doing very successfully financially at the moment that we record this. Who knows what's going to happen tomorrow. That thing is like bitcoin But you know. I think that tesla. I've talked about elon. Musk and did a segment on our show. Adam ruins everything about electric cars. I do want to say that. I think the most successful thing that tesla did was popularized the point of view that you're talking about which is that. Hey the electric option. The a sustainable option can be the better option. The cooler option the one that you actually prefer to have the one that's quiet and all that So a lot of that marketing job has been done but still despite that most of the cars sold. The united states are not electric. And in fact you've got a lot of major american car manufacturers like I don't know what ford's plans are for like electric pickup trucks. But they don't even selling sedans anymore right there. It's all f one fifty s until the end of time with them so we got the major hybrid makers like toyota is also not doing all electric yet. So you know a lotta in a lotta ways. We don't have the ability to to follow up on this to follow up on your stirring call to action as we would want to. How do we bring about a world where where people are actually able to make the choice that you're talking about you either elegantly or inelegantly depending on where you thought. Were going to go next safeway to wipe i use four-time lebas -ation as the analogy.

Adam forty thousand Musk toyota tomorrow united states today tesla three hundred sixty five hundred thousand saul griffith couple thousand million thousand four-time couple thousand cars few thousand american fifty s Thousand ford
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

03:24 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

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"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

04:35 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"That's that ease meaningful and impactful. If you added up across the entire economy we would be saving three hundred and fifty billion dollars a year so this then makes you wonder why hillary did we try and sell the green you deal. And tell people about its top line cost of twenty trillion dollars instead of woah. Wait a second screen. You deal is amazing is gonna pay for itself. We're going to be saving fifty billion dollars a year. And i'm going to be creating jobs in yosef guard because you know installing solar cells and putting a heat company your basement export jobs to china or mexico. If they're on your roof or in your basement. Yeah dollars working america no matter what. Yeah so you know. I what we are what i'm trying to do and my wife has allowed me during a little bit less engineering this year and a lot more proselytizing because we just don't have enough voices in this conversation. That are telling us that we can we. Can we can. And you know we have to play on cobbs ride. These are no longer here. Roic technical problems you know. The problem is in the local city hall in the building codes. But the the problem is that the in your state the rate structure of the regulated utilities burqas. Well as stuff. Like i mean i. I have a lot of sad. Let you talk for a while. And i have a whole lot saying that was a monologue. No no no no no. I was fascinated. I want to hear all of it but you one piece of it is that You know. I live in a new home here in southern california and i realized only a little while after i moved in i was like oh hold on a. We got natural gas. Hot water heater natural gas furnace. Natural gas stove didn't really blink attic because again natural gas stove. That's what you have got the blue flame. That's what we all get you know. I only claim as a very clean flame thinking about the the the Brainwashing that all of those beautiful blue flame vote sements on the tv into a soul. The ad blue flame flame kill you that kind of your children s when it's a beautiful glue flying. Yeah it's when in fact. It's leaking fumes into your house like the other day me and my girlfriend like why is it. Smell like gas in the whole house..

twenty trillion dollars china mexico southern california three hundred and fifty billio hillary fifty billion dollars a year one piece america this year year second screen
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

04:27 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"There's a whole bunch of noisy answers for what that something else should be. But they're the real simple answer that were trying to help people get to his like we need to electrify. Everything is running everything off electricity. You have to find something else. Like hydrogen hydrogen is very inconvenient and As a means to move around the so it's gonna neely everything's gotta be electric and then you start saying okay. So what are the men who what. What's what happens if we think everything is electric. In some of your. Hopefully a lot of your listeners already have an electric vehicle and they are enjoying this quieter. Foster accelerating very pleasant better than nail tone the vehicle bridges electric vehicle which just so happens uses about one third of the energy of a fossil fuel car And the energy can be produced theoretically by a sustainable means by solar or something else as opposed to like like the being means the of electricity being it can be generated by something which in itself is completely sustainable. absolutely wing wayne following. Gsa mowing down with hydro-electricity some year we could even use nuclear. If we wanna put that back on the table which. I think we should anyway. If you go through all of the things that humans do we also need electrify our. Hey we currently you know doing dinosaurs in your basement to keep your harm woman which creates an equality issue in fact if your child goes to doctor reports a respiratory problem. The first thing. The doctor will question. The doctor will ask. You is do the natural gas in your kitchen and in your hind because we know that these things are bad for our respiratory house that says out this technology cold a heat pump which is really the same thing. That's internet conditioner. It's just going the other direction you'd put electricity in and you get paid out one side and called out the other and you can use that for cooling things or hating things. Turns out that heat pumps for three times more efficient than burning natural gas or oil in your basement.

three times one side first thing one third about hydrogen hydrogen
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

05:22 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Rather than asking them endlessly to cut back and the truth is we have the technology to do this. This is not pie in the sky. Futuristic stuff. This is stuff that we have the tech to do today. The question is whether we can muster the political will to push this world into being well to describe how we might get there to go into the math on why this truly is the best approach to fighting climate change and what this cleaner energy world might look like our guest. Today is saul griffith. He's an engineer. The winner of a macarthur genius grant. I think that brings our macarthur. Jeans grant tally up to two or three. Maybe something like that. And the co founder of rewiring america please welcome saul griffin. So thank you so much for being here. Thank you so you're an engineer. You work on climate decarbonization. Let's start from the beginning. Why do we need to decarbonise. Honestly it's too has a planet that we wanna live off in both an aesthetic and in a practical sense the aesthetic senses. You know. I think we would like walk around on a to desert on a practical sense. That denuded desert's gonna make it hard to produce old appeared in conveniences that we enjoy civilization so likely emphasize the aesthetic side of it because at some point but we really arguing about is you know how many interesting critters in how many beautiful landscapes do. We wanna leave with Because you could solve climate change but still kill the oceans plastics. So there's a little bit. Salinas is the the aesthetic is to encourage us to understand the young norwich's us in more ways than just feeling alleys and we and i think we should be aspiring to leave on the best plan we can And we now have scientific close so imagine what that is in the we should hopefully get the political dimension. Go there yeah well. Let's talk about how we do that. And what that is. I mean you wrote a book project. Rewiring america about how we could decarbonize. It's often presented to us in our political conversation as being an immense lift and being something that's going to be really detrimental to our economy's gonna be super expensive and you know a really onerous task. I think you have a different view. What is your view in your approach. I hopefully we get to talk about the history of why that view prevails. i'd love to. I think it is really interesting so as well as being interested in the solutions in engineering them. I'm really interested in the history of the conversation around climate around energy. And that from that history you can see why we are where we are in in summary. Where i have arrived is fairly optimistic. The gloom and doom is easy. It is a herculean lift to fix the problems. We've created on the time line necessary to get a Outcome we want so..

saul griffin saul griffith Today three today two both rewiring america
"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

03:05 min | Last week

"saul griffith" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"And you've you've been checking the average global temperature lately. You might have noticed. It's getting a little bit hot on planet earth apocalypse hats. I won't get into the details. But the possibilities for the future. Barring drastic change sidna range somewhere between catastrophe and civilizational annihilation somewhere in there. The situation in other words is bleak. So what is it gonna take to fix it. That's what we've been asking. That's what we've been shaking every scientists in the vicinity got it. Tell us when we got to do to fix this. What is it going to take. Well one idea that environmentalists in the past promoted was to just cut back right. Don't leave the lights on. Don't buy new things don't drive. Don't fly don't eat meat and if it's cold in your home follow the advice of the patron saint of sacrifice. Jimmy carter and just put on a sensible sweater. There's just one problem. People hate it when you ask them to do that. The idea of a world that's been saved from climate change but in which we're all huddling under a single led lights slurping cold. Borscht cartoons has proven unappealing to people for decades. Because well i mean that world sucks too. doesn't it. I don't wanna live in that world just as much as i don't wanna live in the hot aeko apocalypse That we're trying to prevent and on top of that. We're starting to understand that simply asking people to cut back isn't actually going to work as a solution to climate change and one of the reasons for that is that our entire economy is actually built on consumption. America is the largest consumer economy in the world. We consume the most in total and per capita. Our economic system is built to an incredible degree around buying shit and good or bad that means that there are powerful incentives for people and businesses and governments to not alter consumptions said his in fact a pillar of our now look. I'm not saying that we should keep buying shit on amazon willy. Nilly i do think that there is a role for reducing the amount of rampant consumption in our society but the fact remains that just asking individuals to cut back here or there by a little less of this and that that is never going to be enough to tackle climate crisis. It just won't as a matter of mathematics. The truth is that as i've said many times before on this podcast on tv making individual better choices.

amazon Nilly one problem Jimmy carter decades America one idea one of single led lights reasons earth a
"saul griffith" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:17 min | 7 months ago

"saul griffith" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"So. . Let's turn to our topics this week, , and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've . been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five , percent. . It's simple. . It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. . The authors are Saul Griffith. . Sam College Alex Laskey <hes> you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. . His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. . So they're part of a team called rewiring America, , which is putting out a series of technical reports, , mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, , and putting a lot of people to work in the process. . So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, , and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. . So Melissa, , let's look at the origins <hes>. . It doesn't start with emissions instead, , it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. . Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. . like modeling thing saying what happens with that? ? From a modeling approach. . I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? ? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, , targets, , economic development targets, etc, , , and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. . So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. . We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, , they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. . What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? ? So they said, , okay, , what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. . Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. . So it was this bottom up, , call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. . But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? ? So, , in this modeling, , they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On . the electrification side, , they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. . Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, , okay, , every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, , hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. . As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. . Anything, , but it would help if you did. . I like. . I think this is fantastic. . Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. . I think that part of this that. . Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me <hes> is what are the forces around here that will make it happen <hes> i. . You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, , we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. . The when we think about for instance <hes>. . The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. . In the local level, , you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. . So whenever someone's gas boiler? ? <hes> goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. . So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. . But I. . Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The . math actually works. . Now, where's , the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, , a commodity report that I think <hes> many of us who've been steeped in this? ? No but for think the first time <hes> watcher is shocking. . Right <hes>. . So the energy information, , administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to <hes> primary energy. . Right. . So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. . You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. . Then people say look how small it is. . But in fact, , when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, , Levin's would say. . It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. . How to put it into a refinery, , converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and diesel. . Then actually burning that fuel and you know and creating the electricity that then actually keeps your beer cold all the losses in there are eliminated when you go directly to electricity but in but we are constantly comparing ourselves to primary energy and so part of what this report shows is a week actually eliminate fifty percent of our entire primary energy usage just by electrifying everything right because you lose all those losses

Dr Melissa Lot Alex Laskey America engineer Hurricane Saul Griffith New York Al Morning CO founder Austin Texas United States Jigger Bethesda Maryland Ingrid Catherine Hamilton senior research scholar
The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

The Energy Gang

06:17 min | 7 months ago

The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

"So. Let's turn to our topics this week, and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five percent. It's simple. It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. The authors are Saul Griffith. Sam College Alex Laskey you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. So they're part of a team called rewiring America, which is putting out a series of technical reports, mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, and putting a lot of people to work in the process. So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. So Melissa, let's look at the origins It doesn't start with emissions instead, it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. like modeling thing saying what happens with that? From a modeling approach. I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, targets, economic development targets, etc, and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? So they said, okay, what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. So it was this bottom up, call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? So, in this modeling, they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On the electrification side, they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, okay, every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. Anything, but it would help if you did. I like. I think this is fantastic. Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. I think that part of this that. Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me is what are the forces around here that will make it happen i. You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. The when we think about for instance The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. In the local level, you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. So whenever someone's gas boiler? goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. But I. Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The math actually works. Now, where's the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, a commodity report that I think many of us who've been steeped in this? No but for think the first time watcher is shocking. Right So the energy information, administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to primary energy. Right. So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. Then people say look how small it is. But in fact, when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, Levin's would say. It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. How to put it into a refinery, converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and diesel. Then actually burning that fuel and you know and creating the electricity that then actually keeps your beer cold all the losses in there are eliminated when you go directly to electricity but in but we are constantly comparing ourselves to primary energy and so part of what this report shows is a week actually eliminate fifty percent of our entire primary energy usage just by electrifying everything right because you lose all those losses

Alex Laskey Engineer America Saul Griffith Co Founder United States Dan Yates Melissa Emery Cap Bax Levin
"saul griffith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

08:12 min | 11 months ago

"saul griffith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So tell us. Your story is a serial entrepreneur The mission in your mind at the beginning of this pandemic was to create a low cost ventilator. What was the spark that got you innovating in a time of such crucial need while the spark was actually A fellow new member who now lives in Amsterdam and During the The moment where Italy was really under siege by the By the age of nineteen he reached out to myself and and Apparently to another colleague New Marcel Botha Unbeknownst to about us both and asked us if if we could help build a ventilator to address the crisis in Italy and I looked up online to see what it would take to bill later and I realized this is a really complex thing and I actually emailed bags. I thought it was probably not something that could happen. That quickly and might be really difficult and And then I was actually just really didn't think about it much more for the next number of days but as things started getting really clear that this thing was heading toward New York and we really need to prepare for it. I started to really think. Well maybe maybe this is something we should look at and around the same time. New Lab was confronting the fact that we needed to shut down a in the next couple of weeks. And that all these engineers and and Rabat assists and really smart people were going to be going off to wherever they would go to hunker down. I just started thinking. Maybe we should pay attention to this. I started looking online at other options. And what what possibilities were and And discovered that there were a bunch of people thinking about this and And ultimately came across the two thousand ten design from MIT. That looked really really interesting and I thought it was originally intended to be A ventilator for the developing world so low cost Response to a need down there and I sent that out to a couple colleagues Saul Griffith on the West Coast and also to Marcel in our studio and and Saul. Who's an amazing inventor and engineer? Got Back to me and said you know. I I think if you're in a focus on anything he should focus on what? Mit started designing in two thousand ten. Because that's something that could be really worked on quickly if you had some fidelity to it if you had some tools some some some some clinician advises features to it it could really be effective and impactful and so you orchestrated this incredible collaboration of scientists and engineers and entrepreneurs and doctors regulatory experts in the midst of a pandemic An accomplished in one month. What normally takes a year or longer because as you mentioned these ventilators are are complex right. They've got thousands of parts. They've got complex. Global supply chains. Your goal was to do this fast. How did you make this happen so quickly? Scott well first of all the DNA of new lab Is is actually Built around doing things really efficiently. We don't we. Don't write white papers about ideas. We actually build things there. And that's what every person that's a member of new lab. There's they're all building applying frontier technology to challenges the world faces and trying to be as efficient and responsive as they can and so the first one. I've reached out to people that I knew could do this respond quickly and Marcel. Boffa from Tannock Spada is Runs in has an environment in his particular studio where you could go up to him any time with a Napkin. Sketch and very quickly. Get to a prototype. Something and The same goes Charles Boys at Boyce technologies in Long Island city which is a a another company that companies in new lab. Eleven has worked with in the past and they have an amazing group of engineers up there as well and the ability to To prototype quickly and take something that went where we build one or two in our shop over new lab at boys we could make six or seven in an afternoon of something and then test it out and see if it works so interesting talk about that process because I read that your engineers and medical experts your team working in a socially distance manner of course You know you you would make one prototype and then you you know you discarded in fact you'd hall dozens of these versions of the ventilator off to the dumpster as humid upgrades and improvements over the course of two or three weeks. The process of that is so interesting to me and I think is is really essential as we try to understand what true innovation looks like in the midst of a crisis. What was that process? You just you have two parallel process. Everything's as opposed to looking at things in a linear way. How can we test out many many things at the same time? So in the very beginning there was a team at mit there was saw griffiths team out in California. That was our team in New York. There's actually other team and other places that we're all getting on calls daily at nine. Am At nine PM comparing notes. Comparing what we learn putting code onto get hub and sharing it so every time we made prototypes at new lab every day we made prototypes at new lab or it boys we would fedex them out teams at MIT weeds in my car service. It we'd Fedex them to California people would work on them. We would work on them and then at nine. Am and nine PM. We'd get together and Our friend Patty who volunteered to kind of manage. This conversation would ask people what they what they accomplished. Whatever they're blocked on. What do they need? And then we would just distribute information. So things were happening very fast on you know a lot of different places but ultimately for our team there was a certain point. I think about ten days in where we really needed to dislike. Focus in and that's kind of when we moved to boys and pulled everyone that was at new lab over to voice and joined with their team there and then started folks doing the same kind of thing but in a much more focused manner and then we were still moving devices up to mit and doing a buy side. Animal Animal Studies and putting them on tests. We could see with the clinicians next to the device on an animal house performing and I think that was that kind of speed and parallel processing was critical and and one other really critical piece. That I be remiss if I didn't bring up is the fact that we had up clinicians working with us Dr Albert Kwan. And Dr Alexander Slocum Junior who both trained in engineering at Mit and then became a physician. So these are people that have trained. You know in both the engineering community and in the medical community And that was really critical to us being able to kind of understand how to build fidelity that we need for this device while low-cost ventilators Now that part of this stockpile stockpile of medical equipment that is so needed across this country and you have delivered in a big way. Scott Cowan co-founder of new lab. This design firm that created a low-cost ventilator and in the middle of a pandemic great to have you Scott. Thank you so much. Thank you very much for having me. We are discussing innovation. How innovation is meeting the moment now and I'd like to bring in another guest associate dean of innovation the MIT's Sloan School of Management Fiona Murray co-director of MIT's innovation initiative. Fianna great to have you. Thanks for being with US Jane. Thank you for having me on today. I'm curious what did you hear the story of an innovator like Steve Cohen I think in a story like that what I hear is something that sounds a lot like. The store is that We hit every single day at MIT. We have this extraordinary innovation community and there was experimenting we train them to experiment to jail to befall them to be focused now. I was just online but fifty of our executive a students this morning presenting benches that they'd be developing here. What I think is so striking at the moment is the way in which the entire community.

MIT New Marcel Botha New York Scott Cowan Italy Saul Griffith Charles Boys Amsterdam Fedex Saul Rabat Tannock Spada engineer Fianna California Steve Cohen Animal Animal Studies Long Island Dr Albert Kwan
"saul griffith" Discussed on Run With It

Run With It

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"saul griffith" Discussed on Run With It

"That we had worked together enough knew each other enough it was worth partnering Ring Up. I just thought it might be a good jumping off point to come up with actions. We've heard about what the skills that John has an had at different times but are there some actions actions that you saw him take or some sort of like assets that he brought to the table that he had kind of built already. which made you attracted to him and say? Oh that guy. Is the real deal deal like we could work together. That's why I wanNA start a business or start a project maybe and start multiple projects move through ones at fail and so on and so forth. I think you saw him do like actions. He took cook that. You might outline that. We could draw analogy to something like this. Yeah I mean when I first met him he showed me some stuff he built and I started using it and so I could see these apps built and I could see the quality I could see is attention to detail that became clear and then in subsequent things that we did together I could see how how is exceptionally talented back in programmer but he also understands the front end and design quite well so he's got a big breadth of skills that are are very helpful and he was working for cards against humanity as their lead developer and so he had attained a level professionally where I was like okay well. Cards against humanity is trusting him with a lot of their infrastructure. Stuff that reassures me and so it this helpful to have done some things. It's helpful to have some sort of resume or CV or things that you can point to that. Say You know I've done that. I've put that into the world and it's public and you can go look at it. Yeah I could see someone as an action step building some sort of analytics platform or doing something think technical that they could show to you or a potential client that they can interact with in a way. Whether it's a hell this is I wanna be a part of this. Yeah I think there are are action steps. People can take but I'm much more long term. I think folks like you mentioned you go to some conferences. Meet some people go to a bunch of events in a row and maybe you'll see the same person three times keep in touch with folks. Even what Matt is doing on twitter with me right now Matt West in a really really appropriate way e keeps jumping in and out of threads that have started with helpful non pushy engaging interactions wins and I can see man. This guy gets it. Let's say I got a million dollars funding and I was like okay. I got to hire somebody Matt would be the first person I would reach out to because he's clearly already the engaged on this. He's clearly already in motion. He's the kind of person I want on the team. And I think folks at home can do stuff like that but you can't force it. You can't rush it. It's GonNa take time and I've known Matt now on the Internet I'm guessing for six eight years or something so there's a baseline of trust that's built up. This is a long game. You can't just do these things overnight. That's really important to reinforce. I think it'd be beneficial though to still spit ball some ideas that would make a good first update. One thing that comes to mind is imagine that some of the big tech companies have sustainability reports. Where maybe they break out emissions by different categories sake you get a sense for where the biggest rooms for improvement? And maybe you correlate fifteen twenty of these reports new parts amount and you say okay. These tech companies this category this is where their emissions are for the most part right so that would be beneficial because someone like Justin doesn't the time to go through that it's not exactly the same thing but the website draw down dot org comes to mind. It's a project where they rank order. The the top strategies changes you can make to improve the climate to reduce carbon emissions number. One out there. Can you guys take a guess. Don't fly in airplanes and ideas number one way to do what to the biggest. Co Two equivalent reduction. Possible is made by I doing X.. Africa companies for individuals just overall overall the world. I'm guessing it's either vehicle emissions or building emissions something like that it's related to buildings so the number one was surprised by this because it's a subcategory refrigerant ternent management so the actual refrigerant used in h tax systems when day are released they're much more polluting than co two. And the far. That's the number one thing that we can do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions So having that data it may change the focus area area. Did you start with a project like this. I'm also thinking. Are there ways that someone can make this into a smaller tasks that they can accomplish in a shorter period of Canadian. They read up a bunch on strategies to make buildings more efficient and then they go to their local. Ymca and offered to do an audit for free for that That's much smaller scale than working with someone like strike and maybe it doesn't encapsulate all of the largest emitters like the server farms but it does get you practiced at pitching people on the idea at doing some of the unsexy work of collecting this data presents easy to read format. It gives you some credibility polity as you were to say. Hey I don audits for the YMCA and the local police building in the Borough Council building and then you can maybe step up to someone like a smaller startup like transistor or someone else might be willing to engage with you. Watch more so than if you were to just say. Hey I can do this Yeah I mean I think think sustainable startups dot co has a carbon impacts calculator. It's not very good. I think if you're technical a good for step would be to build a better carbon impact calculator for startups where they could punch in a few variables and get some sort of score. I think there's something something there that is interesting and you can refine the methodology over time. Maybe at initially all you have is kind of proxy numbers from Amazon and may be really good numbers from Google hosting but then you could at least have an initial version of one way you can calculate your carbon emissions as a company very cool. Well we're coming up on time here. Justin really appreciate the conversation. Thank you for sharing this idea with our listeners. All the perspective that you shared overall on how to come up with ideas and how you think about how to select partners. I think that's invaluable for for anyone listening to get in touch. Yeah thanks for being here. This was actually fun. I got oranmore fired up as I went along. Probably the problem is I can have all the good ideas tonight after a little bit. So well we'll have you back onto eh share another one in that case so listeners. If you are as fired up as justice about this idea than take some action follow-through do some steps every outlined. Come up with your own steps and follow through on them. Email us with the actions that you have taken update at run with it dot. FM If you email us you'll get access to exclusive assist. FACEBOOK group of action takers can eat other. People may be similar to how Justin partnered with John. You can find people who are willing to walk the talk not just talk and then the lucky listener will earn three mentoring session with Justin. Get that first date with him. When Gilda impressive with some of the actions taken what kind of flowers first to you like just if you get a first date with me and you haven't read any Saul Griffith Griffith dot com if you haven't looked at the project? He did for the National Energy apartment. The Department of Energy in the states our he mapped out. All of the energy flows in states. I WOULD WANNA see some. That's those are the flowers on looking for. I Love Justin. Listen this is your chance to share something with our listeners. You can talk about transistor any other plug that you'd like to share with our listeners. Assure I write almost every week nick at Justin Jackson DOT CA. I've got a newsletter there too that you can subscribe to send out a newsletter every Saturday morning mostly thoughts on business but things like this to and twitter for me is kind of like the way a comedian treats like working out their material at a local club. If you want to hear my roth thoughts you can follow me on twitter. I'm the letter M. Letter I justin. Am I justin very cool. Thank you so much pleasure. Speaking with you and looking forward to talking to the teacher. Sure Bright Yeah. This is great thanks guys. Now it's time for you to run with it. Follow through on the action steps discussed and email a summary of what you you did to update Matt Run with it dot. FM every listener emails US will gain exclusive access to a private facebook group of action takers and one lesser will earn a free free mentoring session with today's guest and potentially a business partnership help us build the run with a community of entrepreneurs please like subscribe and review US online and remember. The secret of getting ahead is getting started.

Justin Jackson twitter Matt FACEBOOK John US Matt Run Matt West programmer Africa lead developer Saul Griffith Griffith National Energy apartment Borough Council Google Department of Energy Gilda Amazon
"saul griffith" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

13:47 min | 2 years ago

"saul griffith" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"To Zandbergen report showcase for wealth strategies and investment wisdom as essential for evolving world? I'm your host Sports Amblin and we have a telephone. I'm sorry genius of library just hit the button on the far left and hit. It just keeps getting down there. The far left in the bottom. There will cut all this out there. We go there. We go all right. That's the joys of live radio here. We do it here so we do it here. We don't think we've ever had such a full. I'm telling you you pressing. You can't see but off camera. There's publicists. There's make people there's a photographer is everybody. There's a whole crew in here today well. I'm certainly pleased to have a room full as we said I've got my partner letitia Bourbon a bomb little letitia and we have our special guests shane bond who was a member of the C._d.. F. A. and also the Leisure Society Designer Sean Welcome to the shame. Welcome to the show. Sorry no problem bill yeah. That is the best comeback we've had in five years. It's so simple he did it right there. We go so Shane. We're excited to have you on the show today. I know you've got a very great pedigree of of history and what you've done where you've been. Let's start with telling the audience what CD it's the F._D._A.. So it's the council that's okay we're off to can only improve from here so the Council of fashion designers of America so it would be a group of designers. I guess the more prominent members would be Calvin. Klein Ralph Lauren. Tom Ford <hes> just virtually at a laundry list of some the best designers in the World Marc Jacobs <hes> <hes> Tory burch and it's an organization that focuses on mostly on on a bringing up young designers <hes> also educating people of the art of of design and so it's a fraternity that's been <hes> I guess around fraternity slash story. It's been around the better part of fifty years oh well and so it's not like an organized <hes> degree of some sources something you do either post or or free or in conjunction with school school while the membership is by invitation only and so every year people submit their portfolios and then they admit <hes> certain amount of members per year and <hes> and then you are lifetime member and then every year they <hes> they have the fashion awards <hes> in the <hes> early summer of the year and so they <hes> they give awards for you know menswear designer of the year womenswear design over the year accessories designer of the year and so on agree so it's a pretty big affair gray hold in New York member. I Guess About Seven Years Nice congratulations. Thank you do any of those words. Go along with you not yet not yet working on it. No I wear designer which is my specialty has not one the accessories award yet but I'm hopeful and can envision that someday so rooting for you thank you so. Why don't you tell the audience start with what Leisure Society is in elected talk about how you got to where you are no problem? Leisure Society is the world's finest eyewear at spent a good part of my career working with Louis Vitton and specifically working on <hes> I work for them and <hes> eventually <hes> the insisted that I moved to Paris and I had young children at the time and that was not going to be an option so <hes> I declined the job job all my mentor said well. Your resume is not going to get much better <hes> so you might as well <hes> make your own brand so I I decided named after a Social Club that I had called Leisure Society all right. In how long ago did you do that. I guess Yes <hes> I started the brand seven years ago. Okay all right so I've heard the word heirloom design so tell us what that means well. heirloom design is is making something once with the intention of lasting forever and there's a lot of I guess there's a a designer name or an inventor named Saul Griffith and he's got behind this theory of you know if you made something last fifty or one hundred years and you put a certain amount of energy in it it's ultimately sustainable annable and so a good example of that might be like I'm wearing a watch for example that was made the nineteen fifties and it has replaceable parts. It's still keeps time perfectly and it actually is increased in value over time and so I guess I I learned about this collecting guitars specifically American guitars and then all of a sudden I mean your investments and so I mean what a great investment to buy and watch increase in value over time <hes> have a sentimental value and ultimately <hes>. Should you want to get rid of it. It's a it's a nice investment. I know people think the same about classic cars sometimes so I've always been <hes> obsessed with <hes> products of inherent value that which is super unusual for a use asset right because usually usually a assets that we use I car or or that maybe the lesser brand watches or or normal sunglasses. They basically go down to zero value. So what makes some someone like that different. What Makes Yours <hes> maintain Dana value or presence well? There's the inherent value of using exotic metals so everything that we make is made with twelve eighteen and twenty four carat gold plated titanium best in class lenses comes to the leather case a lifetime warranty. Did you bring any of course yeah of course they're ready. Bring them out here. We're talking to give him the wearing Beta titanium correct so pretty so we're we're live by the way and then we're also on the videos. I'm GONNA bring it up to the cameras. You guys can take a lot of you're watching describe what we're seeing so you're seeing a eighteen carat gold plated Beta titanium. It is a memory metal. Put them on their letitia this. The Great Molly okay. Can we do some sort of Q._V._C. Slow we only have three hundred hundred and so those are eighteen curable titanium the lenses are your thirty nine. <hes> there's a twelve layer and a reflective coating. What is what is in the thirty nine is a material? That's ninety nine point nine percent optical clarity so it's one of the most clear materials that you can make a lens with not just plastic. It's not just glass yeah correct but they actually you can see look great that has the article clarity of glass but the lightness of Nylon. There's also a twelve lear reflective coating on the inside which helps any glare over sunlight from the back twelve layers of anti glare coating on it and so you're saying even from the back it doesn't correct it keeps it's not just from the front but it's from the backwards at bounces out you correct and then also diamond cast scratch resistance which keeps lenses from scratching need and then on top of that. There's a hydrophobic coating which doesn't seem important at all until you find yourself the front of a boat or something like that and you can splash in the water water. We'll come off like a freshly waxed car. It beads off. It doesn't just stick to so. Can I just fascinating no. This is their show but I can't stop talking this. I never heard of any of this stuff. Are you. The only one doing this or is this just I'm not living in the right world. I'm just going down and bind my glasses at lenscrafters here or something well we are best in class and again coming off a project Louis Vuitton. We wanted to make sure that <hes> that we were doing everything to the best of our ability so I knew that tight titanium and titanium is the lightest strongest material <hes> we played it with gold not to be fancy but because gold is the most corrosion resistance by the US an audio equipment all the time a gold plated stuff plugs and everything doesn't corrode exactly I was looking at a chart just yesterday we shared it with our sales agents and the most corrosive material of course was <hes> magnesium you remember throwing a piece in water and watching it spin around explode explode. If you get to the other end of the table it was just titanium in gold and then there's one material that's better than us which is graphite but I haven't heard anybody making. I were from graphic. We are best in class so it makes you absolutely unique compared to all of your competitors correct. We just know that we can look at anybody in the eye and say we make the best eyewear in the world. You can look at them in the eye. And where do you get this stuff and then I'll shut up here where do you where do you find. How would I find your? I what anybody even know that this stuff exists well. I mean if you wanted to buy it locally. <hes> in Newport beach you could go to armories that beautiful boutique on coast highway. I think I've seen I've got to yeah yeah. You could buy it at coast optometry <hes> over <hes> Fashion Island <hes> you could buy it at Fred Segal Los Angeles. That's a cool star Bennett there so selective places you can go find this correct about <hes> about three hundred fifty retail locations worldwide right now so I'm GonNa Bring this back to the investment world world so and a little bit of fashion so it's designed to last a lifetime but how do you ensure assure that the the fashion statement will survive a lifetime. That's a great question. <hes> we always look for classically inspired <hes> shapes and there are certain number of shapes overtime. I guess most notably shaped like the aviator it's not necessarily in style or out of style compliments most people's faces and so you always look at classic shapes and then we're always looking at this redefining textures and we've taken more of a jewelry like approach because we feel like if you're gonNA make an heirloom quality product. You have to do it with a great attention to detail. This is something you would ensure. That's a funny question because I have so many people that well they always say I always lose my frames and and and it is kind of a common thing I will say that are frames are a bit more expensive and so you tend to pay more attention to them like you would a nice ice watcher your cell phone or wallet or so is it is it close to the price of a cellphone more or less really is okay you know and and it's funny that would mention that because <hes> people by cell phones every day but yeah our retail the price points sits in the four hundred to fourteen hundred dollar ranch yeah with the top end being made from block titanium and plated <hes> with one micron of platinum and three microns of gold so little route your background super fascinating all these questions more interested me on the other part so are you an artist or or just playing designer by trade what you're how'd you get to where you are yeah I started out <hes> with the background in industrial design and industrial technology and then <hes> I graduated from school and my parents were kind of product need to get a real job and and I had met a guy named Moss Amo- at the beach here in Orange County and the volleyball all short Muslim oh yeah exactly and he said Geez I got this company's growing like crazy. <hes> what are you doing. I'm like I don't know I graduated from college doing a lot right now and so I started in the warehouse with him and my parents were still prodding me to get a real job and now waste my degree and after about six months he said well Jeez you know <hes> you have a engineering type background and seems like you really wasting your year life. You're you know I'm starting and I were division and it's going to be a little bit more technical. Maybe that would be something good for you to get into but I really started the bottom. Then you know I learned to import and export goods manage the cost of good sold the answer the phone Hello Moss Moss nickname but really would be everything that you would need to start a company later in life yeah. Oh that's great. That's that's that goes right into what we talked about here so any other formal training as far as like business other than on the job which is the real training. Yeah I minored in business management. <hes> my father was an entrepreneur and I'm constantly listening to get various podcast and reading books and just obsessed with trying to be better as an executive and <hes> you know and as a designer yeah so what your your company like employees staff yeah we have. It's a small company so we're <hes> about seven people in House and then twenty two sales agents worldwide and then we work with distributors but we're lean and mean company what <hes> what's next for you. Well I mean we're really focused right now on just a growing our brand and <hes> and trying to figure out the direct to consumer <hes> model while also dealing with brick and mortar retail <hes> were always just constantly <hes> just working on the brand <hes> so it's exciting time and you know where I was working on new projects. Checks new collaborations under work with different designers and different brands. Okay what what's that about so with other optical brands designs or late late where I met you be spoke back type of thing yeah you could work with nearly anybody I mean I've I've done and work with <hes> collaboration with mark. Mothers ball the singer from diva. Oh yeah really yeah it was a huge fan of his when I was a kid and so I got the opportunity to meet and he said Geez I've been legally blind and always they wanted to make some glasses and I said let's do a collaboration together. <hes> there was another girl in my C._F._D._A.. Class <hes> name Rebecca men cough and so I did a collaboration with Rebecca also okay great. I've got a lot more stuff to ask. Take a really quick break. We'll be right back.

Leisure Society letitia Bourbon shane bond Rebecca Sports Amblin Ralph Lauren Saul Griffith New York Tom Ford US Council of fashion Tory burch Marc Jacobs lenscrafters Newport beach Calvin Louis Vuitton F. A. Fashion Island