17 Burst results for "Saul Gonzalez"

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The California report. Good morning. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles. We start with the record breaking heat that seared much of inland California over the weekend in Northern California. Reading hit 114 degrees in Sacramento 111 degrees in Southern California. Barstow reached 118. And Palm Springs 120 degrees, And then there was Death Valley, which recorded a high of 130. The hot weather has led the state's power grid operator to call for another flex alert this afternoon and evening calling for Californians to conserve energy. The hot and dry conditions have also made it difficult to fight fires burning in the state. Including the backward, complex fire north of Lake Tahoe. It's the largest blaze in California so far this year, burning more than 86,000 acres. Crews were able to take advantage of better conditions yesterday, and it's now 20% contained. But the fire has destroyed several homes in the town of Doyle, which is about 45 miles northwest of Reno. Let's turn to politics. It looks quite possible that Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will be trading Los Angeles for New Delhi in the near future. President Biden has selected Garcetti has the next U. S. Ambassador to India KPCC S Libby Diekmann has more The move by Biden has been rumored for a long time. And in the end, the president rewarded a loyal surrogate and fundraiser from the 2020 campaign by giving Garcetti this nomination in a statement, Garcetti used a classic refrain for politicians moving up the ranks, he said, quote when your nation calls you answer that call. Garcetti added. He'll continue to bring passion and focus to the job as Los Angeles mayor even during what could be a months long, lame duck period between the nomination and when he likely gets confirmed by the Senate. It's been eight years since Garcetti was elected mayor. But because of a quirk in Ella's election calendar, his second term doesn't actually end for another 18 months. Was extended because of the realignment of local municipal elections to sync up with statewide races. Garcetti previously served on the L. A City Council for about 12 years. If he's confirmed, council President Nury Martinez will automatically become acting mayor. The L. A City Council can then vote to hold a special election or more likely will replace Garcetti for the remainder of his term through December. 2022. But that's not such a simple prospect. Already. A third of the 15 member City Council are either considering their own campaigns for mayor or have declared their candidacies so it may be tough to find an interim mayor who will be seen as a politically neutral caretaker. For the California report. I'm Libby dank Hman. If confirmed as ambassador to India, Garcetti will leave a city still struggling with a growing homelessness crisis. And over the last few days, the center of that struggle has been Ella's Venice Beach Boardwalk, where the city has launched an ongoing crackdown on homeless encampments. Social workers have been approaching homeless people living on the beach with this message will do what we can to get you housing, But first we have to pack up your bags and go. That's the requirement in order for me to get you into a motel room is you have to Physically take down your tent and your stuff because they're going to enforce the no camping here on the beach. So that's that's what it's all about. OK city sanitation crews and police have then moved in to dismantle encampments. Jonathan, who doesn't want.

Saul Gonzalez December. 2022 Los Angeles Jonathan Garcetti Palm Springs Sacramento 20% Lake Tahoe Northern California Death Valley Southern California Senate Doyle L. A City Council 114 degrees 111 degrees 18 months President more than 86,000 acres
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now is 6 51. This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Saul Gonzalez in L A. The city of Los Angeles has temporarily closed five of its covert vaccination Supercenters, including the one at Dodger Stadium because of a shortage of vaccine supplies. The city received only 16,000 vaccine doses this week compared to 90,000 last week. L. A Mayor Eric, our city's urging state and federal authorities to fix the problem. This is not where I want to be. It's not where we deserve to be. We have firefighters. We have workers from core. We have clinicians ready to draw vaccine's ready to give vaccines ready to welcome traffic in and out by car by foot into our centers. But we won't have those vaccines because the supply isn't there. The city hopes to reopen the center's sometime after the president's Day holiday weekend. Meanwhile, L. A county vaccination sites remain open but are limiting visits to people receiving the second round of shots. Let's turn from the pandemic to power. California has an abundance of green energy projects. But what it doesn't have our offshore wind farms like you see in Europe for once being built off the East Coast. In response, San Francisco Assemblyman David Chu has introduced a bill to kickstart California's offshore wind projects with the goal of producing 10 gigawatts of power. That's enough juice to power about four million homes at maximum capacity. Here's to the wind off California's coast has enormous potential to meet clean energy goals. Combat climate change and provide good paying jobs. Choose bill would require state agencies to create a strategic plan that would achieve the 10 gigawatts goal by 2040. Assemblyman says the wind turbines would be placed 20 to 30 miles off shore. It wouldn't be visible from land. President Biden recently signed an executive order to double the amount of offshore wind power the country produces within 10 years. And finally today, a Californian who's using her talents to make people's lives a.

Saul Gonzalez 20 Dodger Stadium 2040 Europe 90,000 10 gigawatts L A. today last week President Los Angeles five David Chu 30 miles this week 10 years second round 16,000 vaccine doses 6 51
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Staples, meal kits, produce wine and more. Delivery area is available it good eggs dot com Absurdly fresh groceries delivered. This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles over 2.5 Million Corona virus cases have been confirmed in California. 28,000 people have died from the virus since so much spread is connected to where we go. A new state public health advisory is asking Californians to avoid traveling more than 120 miles from their homes unless that travel is absolutely essential. And the state is also issued a new health order to try to ease the strain on overburdened hospitals. KPCC is Jackie 48 has more about that. The state's public health officer has ordered that hospitals in regions with few or no ICU beds postpone non essential surgeries for at least three weeks that covers every county in Southern California. Hospitals that have room must also accept patients from other facilities that have maxed out their intensive care beds. That's the case at Memorial Hospital of Gardena chief Medical Officer Kevin Metcalf says he has 30 ICU patients, but just 10 ICU beds were really trying to work hard with County E. M s. To stop sending ambulances to my hospital because I'm overcapacity triple the normal level, Whereas the hospital down the street may only be a 100% capacity. Under the order patients in southern California could be transferred hundreds of miles north just to get care for the California report. I'm Jackie 40, a in Los Angeles. Support for the California report comes from Eric and Wendy Schmidt, whose philanthropy includes Schmidt futures focused on finding exceptional people and helping them do more for others together. On the Web at Schmidt futures calm James Irvine Foundation committed to a California where all low income.

Southern California California Los Angeles ICU Memorial Hospital of Gardena Saul Gonzalez Wendy Schmidt James Irvine Foundation officer Medical Officer Kevin Metcalf County E. M s Eric California.
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's 6 51. This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles. We all know California is a progressive leaning blue state. But it also has big patches of red where lots of people live. Who really like Donald Trump? In the Central Valley Cake with these Alex Hall spoke to Republicans about their reactions to this week's insurrection on Capitol Hill. That was stoked by Trump's words outside Fresno AG, the hardware store in central Fresno. Bonnie Nutter called the events at the capital Wednesday. Disgusting. She thinks they painted an inaccurate picture of Trump supporters. I think a lot of it was antifa and be a lamb, stealing the trump legs and playing like they were trump people. Letters, friend Joan Oaks, agrees despite President Trump's calls to supporters to go to the capital Books does not believe his supporters led the mob. She still supports the president. It's just a shame that they had to do this to trump. He's been the line for four years now. And have this happen at the end of his presidency. He just Diamandis and deserve it. The theory that Trump supporters didn't lead the violence is circulating on social media without evidence to support it. Fresno County Republican Party chairman Fred Vanderhoof said he heard about it on the news ones that went into the capital. Where not representative 99.9% of all the other people. We had. Old ladies. We had young kids. We had people from every demographic every background. Vanderhoof says it was wrong for some Trump supporters to enter the capital. But he also thinks it's hypocritical for Democrats to condone protests nationwide over the summer..

President Trump Saul Gonzalez Fred Vanderhoof Bonnie Nutter California Fresno County Republican Party Fresno Central Valley Los Angeles Alex Hall Joan Oaks president representative chairman Diamandis
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good eggs, absurdly fresh groceries delivered on KQED right now, the time 8 51 Morning. This is the California report. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles this week. We're looking back at some of the biggest stories of 2020, and there was no bigger story or more tragic than the pandemic. Talk about the Corona virus and how California responded to it. We reached out to epidemiologist in public health expert Dr Kiersten Vivian's Domingo with UC San Francisco. She began by telling us what she thinks California did right in meeting the challenge of the virus, especially in the early days of the pandemic. I think that what California has to be lauded for is their early response, starting in the Bay Area extending through to all of California it was the right thing to do to before cases got up very, very high, who really shut down the way we needed to? It prevented the thing that we didn't see. The hospital's overloaded the very high death counts, and sometimes you can get complacent thinking that well, that was just the lockdown. It didn't really have the effect. It had exactly the effect and we didn't see what was happening in New York. Even though we have a large city like L, A and many large cities across this very large states. We should get credit for that. We can talk about what happened through the pandemic, but I think that early response will have to be really notable on depraved. So if that's the good of California's response, the pandemic what were some of the shortcomings if you could go back several months ago in knowing what you know now, what do you think the state could and should have done differently? I think what we did Well, these responses are never meant to be the final solution. They're meant to buy you time in order to put more things in place. So the few things that I would have done is make sure the shutdown was longer and that we really driven our cases down to almost non existent levels because then when we opened up, we could have done it safer I would have made or that we invested in the things that are still hard to this day. We still don't have enough testing the time the time to test results. Don't come back quick enough. The data that we need to run everything of smoothly as possible. Still, not quite in place 10 months into the 10 minutes, I would have made sure that that's the case And the thing that California has done, which is to focus on some of the equity issues, the communities that are disproportionately affected. I think we have done well but not well enough. And I think that has been a lingering problem. Throughout this time. It is only gotten worse in many areas of the state. Here the habit of technology and data infrastructure. Why is it that we could not harness that early enough to really make sure that testing and had been information supports that needs to be in place to ensure that we get timely test results back, But that's not happening as quickly as possible. We have all the elements in the state and we have done a lot well and a lot well together. But it's pretty clear that 10 months in, we should be a lot further along a type of infrastructure that allows us to make these important political and public health decisions together. Hmm. So, looking to the future, we're gonna have other public health challenges, right? The usual stuff like the seasonal flu, and God forbid, maybe even something worse than Cove ID. Do you think living through this pandemic has made our public health infrastructure and really how we collectively has a society think about disease smarter and stronger to prepare us for what could be ahead. Right. We all have now experienced what it is to have a public health emergency. And I think if we can take that knowledge and that personal experience and also the self reflection of what went right and what went wrong and parlay that into investments into the infrastructure that we need to have in place. To avoid will be better prepared for what will come down the road. I think that will be a tremendous benefit from this crisis. I think. Unfortunately, even the pandemic has taught us that we oftentimes get complacent. But we have early wins, that it's hard to invest in things in the future. If they're not staring us in the face, it's hard to be proactive. And now we active and so.

California Saul Gonzalez Domingo KQED Los Angeles Bay Area Dr Kiersten Vivian San Francisco New York
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KCRW

"A reason to appoint a Special counsel and I have no plan to do so before I leave. He also says he has no plans to appoint a special counsel to investigate Trump's claims of widespread election fraud and idea the president has reportedly raised with advisers. Or his previously stated the Justice Department found no evidence of systemic fraud and he's standing by that assessment now. Ryan Lucas NPR NEWS Washington Also unlike the president, bar, believes the master of the cyber attack on government networks was Russia. The nation's former top cybersecurity official, Christopher Krebs, tells NPR that diagnosing the intrusion is a massive undertaking. Actors moved like ghosts effectively. It didn't leave a lot of trails. There's nothing really to hunt on. More things will make sense. But But again, you know, there are a set of capabilities that we need in the U. S government that we just don't have. Crabs also believes that Russia launched that attack Wall Street did the close. The Dow was up 36 points. The NASDAQ Down 13. This is NPR News in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include C three c three dot Ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ai You're listening Greater l, a KCRW show that connects you to the people and places of Southern California. I'm Saul Gonzalez from KQED is the California report sitting in for Steve. She had take us today and we start today in Wilmington, near the port of Los Angeles at a freeway underpass where just 12. Hours ago, people were camped in tents on both sides.

NPR Special counsel fraud president Russia Trump Washington Saul Gonzalez Ryan Lucas Christopher Krebs Los Angeles California KQED Justice Department KCRW Wilmington Southern California
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tyler, San Francisco's top public health official, is pleading with residents to change their behavior in order to turn around and alarming trend of rising covert 19 cases across the city. Here's San Francisco's health director, Dr Grant Colfax to people once we have One chance to try this serious surge around And that chance is right now. The window is narrowing and closing fast. Colfax describes the current surge as the worst to date with hospitals expected to run out of ICU beds by December 27th, he says, as expected, case rates have spiked following the Thanksgiving holiday. And he's urging residents not to gather outside their household, including during the upcoming holidays. Gatherings are prohibited, but playgrounds in California can reopen now that state health officials Revised their covert 19 stay at home orders. Cake You tease Brian. What has more, the California Department of Public Health had said it wanted to close playgrounds to limit gatherings among people of different households. But lawmakers, parents judges in some health experts questioned the science behind the move. The state revised its order this morning, saying playgrounds can open to facilitate physically distance, personal health and wellness through outdoor exercise. San Francisco officials announced shortly afterward that the city plans to reopen its playgrounds by tomorrow, Marin Contra Costa and Santa Clara counties, as well as the city of Berkeley. Plan to reopen playgrounds as well. I'm Brian what? KQED News San Francisco supervisors are reversing course on a measure banning smoking in apartment buildings. Last week, the board approved in ordinance that effectively bans residents from smoking and buildings with three units or more. But yesterday when the item came up for a second vote, the board referred the measure back to committee Supervisor Aaron Peskin says the harm of secondhand smoke should be addressed. But there are better ways. The Federal Trade Commission and 68 States, including California have accused Facebook of illegally squashing competition. I e operating as a social media monopoly. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of Silicon Valley Desk has more. The suit alleges Facebook squashed its fiercest rivals by gobbling them up Instagram in 2012 and WhatsApp in 2014. Prosecutors want Facebook forced to unwind those deals and an injunction to stop Facebook from engaging in future deals. Multistate lawsuit was filed in coordination with the FTC, which is filed a separate complaint. California's attorney general issued a statement saying innovation in Silicon Valley and elsewhere depends on a fair and competitive marketplace. Facebook's response to the legal attacks quote the government now wants a do over sending a chilling warning to American business that no sale is ever final. And wait till my rope. KQED News Because of the pandemic Bay Area residents increasingly shop for their groceries online instead of going to their neighborhood supermarket and the technology that makes that shopping possible is creating opportunities and problems for workers in the food industry, according to a new study. Here's KQED Saul Gonzalez. The report by UC Berkeley's Labor Center finds that new technologies and food retail are actually an engine of employment growth. Creating jobs involving the processing borders and delivering groceries to customers. But, the study warns many of the jobs being created are low wage freelance positions that are often subject to workplace surveillance and the dictates of performance algorithms that can lead to worker burnout and termination. Chris Benner is the study's co author. So it's really clearly not an independent contract situation. These workers air clearly under the control of the platform Cos. The study also finds the jobs in the food service economy are steadily moving away from supermarkets and two warehouses and logistics centers, cashier positions that markets are also vulnerable because of the increased use of self checkout technologies. I'm Saul Gonzalez KQED news. There's more state and local coverage online and thank you..

Facebook San Francisco California Dr Grant Colfax Saul Gonzalez Federal Trade Commission California Department of Publi Brian KQED KQED News Supervisor Aaron Peskin Tyler Chris Benner director Rachel Myrow Berkeley Santa Clara official
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KCRW

"This is the California report. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles. We begin with wildfires burning here in Southern California. The Silverado Fire, which broke out yesterday morning, and Irvine in Orange County, has left two firefighters in critical condition with 2nd and 3rd degree burns. It's also scorched more than 7200 acres. Enforced 90,000 people to flee their homes. Christina Shea is Irvine's mayor and says the city is doing everything it can to help threaten people like the opening of eight evacuation shelters. The safety of our residents and our businesses is our top priority, and we will be working around the clock to support them in any way we possibly can. Meanwhile, the Blue Ridge Fire, which broke out in Riverside County quickly spread to adjacent Orange County. It's burned nearly 7000 acres and has also forced evacuations around the community's Umbria, Chino Hills. And you're Melinda. High winds have made both fires especially difficult to fight and forced the temporary grounding of firefighting aircraft. And like other recent big places in California, Irvine fire might very well have a connection to a utility company. With more about that. Here's the California reports the Legion Molly, So Cal Edison says a wire on a telecommunications line may have come into contact with one of its over headlines on Monday morning. And that may have led to the sparking of the Silverado fire. The utility revealed these details in a report to the California Public Utilities Commission just hours after that fire ignited It's facilities are located near where the fire sparked. But so Cal Edison says it had no indication of any circuit activity or down lines in the area. Utility told regulators. Its own investigation is ongoing. Sol Thanks Lily. Meanwhile, in Northern California last night, Pacific Gas and electric restored power to 156,000 of its customers affected by planned power shut offs as a way to reduce the danger of equipment, sparking wildfires. 189,000 more customers are expected to have power back on by tonight. Moving on this week in collaboration with Cow matters. College journalism network. We're providing a student centered perspective on Proposition 16. It's the November ballot measure that would reestablish affirmative action and public higher education and missions. Today, we'll hear from Cal State Los Angeles senior Marissa Martinez about the representation gaps between faculty and students across the California community College system. At those schools more than 70% of students come from communities of color while at least 60% of tenured faculty are white. I have only hard one professor in the music department who isn't white, so it's kind of hard to relate to them in their experience your music That's Ashley Felix, a second year music major at Santa Monica College..

Southern California Irvine Cal Edison Orange County Los Angeles California California Public Utilities Co California community College s Saul Gonzalez Christina Shea Riverside County Northern California Santa Monica College Marissa Martinez Ashley Felix Umbria professor Pacific Gas Chino Hills Cow
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Gang are so just keep attack. Subscribed to mind shift wherever you get your podcasts. Sacramento Valley Cooler today Sunny highs, 85 to 91 even cooler tomorrow, the same for the Bay Area morning clouds areas of dense fog. By 60 seventies coast and bay to the low eighties close to 90 inland cooler tomorrow. Good morning. This is the California report. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles, California is Health and Human Services Secretary Dr Mark Galley says that according to state information in person learning hasn't caused an uptick in Cove in 19 transmission rates in the counties where schools have reopened. We're looking at the information to see if there is a connection. And so far we have not found 1 32 of the States. 58 counties are now in a corona virus here that allows them to reopen schools for in person instruction. Galley presented the update with caution, but says it's a good sign. I just remind people that it sometimes does take time for us to see the trends and we want to act responsibly, but so far, I think that's encouraging for all of California. And he says the average number of new covert cases is down 9% from a week ago, let's turn to the election proposition. 22 is one of the highest profile and hard fought measures on the November ballot. Thought up in bankrolled by such companies as Uber Lift Indoor Dash. A yes Vote on 22 means app based ride hailing and delivery drivers in California would be classified as independent contractors. No vote means the drivers are classified as employees of the companies has mandated under current state law and receive protections like guaranteed minimum wage, sick time and access to employee health insurance. So what did the drivers themselves? Think about? Proposition? 22? Well, they're divided this morning. We need drivers on each side of the debate will start with Michael Cornacchia Ah, prop 22 supporter who drives in L A and loves the freedom that comes with driving for uber and lift. I'm an actor, and we always needed survival jobs before this night jobs in between auditions and this was a game changer. So you are happy Freelance employees incredibly happy. This job.

California Dr Mark Galley Michael Cornacchia Saul Gonzalez Sacramento Valley Bay Area Los Angeles Secretary
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the California report. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles. How is the Corona virus Pandemic affecting public opinion? A new poll shows big majorities of Californians are worried about their health and the economy. They also think masks should be worn in public hears politics. Correspondent Marissa Lagos The survey by the Public Policy Institute of California, find 74% of Californians think people should wear a mask, a position that holds strong across the states Geographic regions. 3/4 of those polled expressed concerns about themselves or a family member getting sick from Cove in 19 and seven in 10 say they're worried about what the pandemic will mean for their own finances. PPC poll conducted earlier this month also found that 60% of those polled say racism is a big problem in the U. S today, and 2/3 say they support the Black lives matter Movement. The survey has a sampling error of plus or minus 3.4% for the California report on MARISSA Lagos. In an open letter published this week, hundreds of health care workers are calling on Governor Gavin Newsom to reduce the state's prison population to lessen the spread of cove in 1980. Shannon Lin reports more than 750 doctors, nurses in frontline workers are urging use them to reduce the overall prison population to below 50% of its current capacity. State correction officials are expected to release up to 8000 incarcerated people by the end of August. Inmates age 65 older are one group getting priority as officials consider who to release But UCSF medical student Shadab Lee says research shows the stress of incarceration ages, people and facilities to drop the age criteria to people 50 and older to account for that we've actually medically observed that there is an accelerated aging to the point where individuals are more Typically vulnerable then they're equally aged counterpart in the general community. At least 19 people incarcerated at San Quentin have died from what appears to be complications due to the current virus. That's nearly half of the statewide total. For the California report. I'm Shannon Lin..

California MARISSA Lagos Shannon Lin Public Policy Institute of Cal Saul Gonzalez Governor Gavin Newsom Los Angeles UCSF San Quentin Shadab Lee
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comcast corporation dot com slash accessibility good morning this is the California report on Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles many of you listening right now might be working from home because of coronavirus worries or wishing you could stay home but lots of workers in the gig economy like drivers for lift or uber just can't do that and still earn a living KQED's Sam Hartnett has the story of one driver who scared to be on the road it says she has no other choice in San Francisco the streets are quiet says lift an uber driver Eric in the ghetto of Sacramento but she's prepared for any rights that she does get so I have those surgical masks and the doctor gave me today those are for passengers who are coughing she's also been told by lifting the over to keep your car clean and you can smell the disinfectant I have my Lysol clean and fresh kills germs even went a lieutenant and a rags and then I have my mass that the doctor gave me today that she recommends it anywhere but I'm afraid to her because I'm quite scared people we got is in her late thirties and she used to be an accountant she's been driving for three years while searching for a steady job now she's scared to be on the road because of her health my heart condition is called supra ventricular tachycardia she had surgery ten years ago it's nerve wracking I haven't been monitored since two thousand ten I don't have a primary care practitioner nor cardiologists are specialists that's monitoring sometimes at night she folds on the backseat of a car pulls out a pillow that's tucked into the spare tire cavity and sleeps there she has eighteen thousand dollars in credit card and card Hey Paul wants their money and I just have no choice whatsoever I am running myself into financial despair earlier this week lifted Hoover announced that they'll pay drivers for up to fourteen days once they've been diagnosed with corona virus or required to self quarantine but either company stated how much drivers can get compensated uber lift drivers aren't alone in this situation about thirty percent of all private sector workers in the US have no access to paid sick days and only about four percent of workers have access to more than fourteen paid sick days a year that's according to the economic policy institute police schools and economists there when you think about the workers who are living paycheck to paycheck those are the ones who are least likely to be able to work from home or to have those paid sick days congressional Democrats in DC input for new legislation to guarantee paid sick time for all workers as a means of containing the corona virus but is not expected to make a pass the GOP controlled Senate in the meantime Eric I'm a get a worries she's gonna run out of options when people ask how you're doing like it always picks me currently because I appreciated thank it's lonely and it's terrible and it's I've made a promise to myself to at least acknowledge the people on the side of the road asking for money because I'm scared it could be that person right now with less and less people taking rides she says the only thing she can do stay on the road and take whatever she can get for the California report I'm Sam Barnett in San Francisco let's turn to other news California's largest utility Pacific gas and electric has resolved a dispute with the Federal Emergency Management Agency over money the government agency spent helping victims of wildfires caused by the utility has the California reports lily Jamali tells us FEMA's claim against PG&E was threatening to derail the settlement FEMA's decision to drastically reduce its claim from four billion dollars to just one billion helps clear the way for northern California wildfire victims to access a thirteen point five billion dollar fine to set aside for them plus as part of the deal FEMA falls to the back of the line giving priority to the claims of seventy thousand fire victims attorney Gerald singleton represents seven thousand of them I think it means that our clients likely are going to be paid either in full or very close to it PG&E entered into bankruptcy protection last year because of its liability for wild fires caused by its equipment it's attempting to exit from chapter eleven by a state mandated deadline this summer the California report I'm lily Jamali support for the California report comes from Eric and Wendy Schmidt whose fund for strategic innovation supports transformative ideas that benefit humanity while protecting the natural world recognizing through.

Comcast Saul Gonzalez Los Angeles California
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On Saul Gonzalez reporting today from San Francisco officials with the centers for disease control and prevention have confirmed a case of novel coronavirus in California that is not known to be related to travel or direct contact with someone who's already contracted the virus the person is a resident of Solano county and contact tracing the case has already begun KQED's Kevin stark has more officials with the state department of public health confirm a possible person to person transmission of novel coronavirus in the general public but the source is unknown it would be the first time this has happened in the U. S. state officials confirm the patient is receiving medical treatment at a hospital in Sacramento county they stressed the risk to the public remains low the case is under investigation this brings the total number of novel coronavirus cases in California tonight for the California report I'm Kevin stark the California department of public health says the state has a strong health care system and is prepared and actively responding to the potential community spread of cove in nineteen meanwhile along with San Francisco Orange County has declared a local state of emergency in response to the virus that emergency declaration is partially a response to a proposal to move coronavirus patients to a state facility in the county that sparked a backlash from elected officials and local residents who don't want virus patients there and what about the virus and California's tech industry Facebook says it's prohibiting advertisements that make false claims about products tied to the corona virus like facemask advertisements claiming the products are one hundred percent guaranteed to prevent the spread of the virus social media companies are also trying to crack down on conspiracy theories about corona virus and on users.

Saul Gonzalez California Solano county KQED Kevin stark Sacramento county San Francisco Orange County Facebook San Francisco
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Visitors coverage dot com good morning on KQED it is now six fifty one good morning this is the California report im Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles in LA rents continue to rise faster than wages so one city official wants to beef up existing rent control rules in the city with more here's KPCC David Wagner LA has higher allowable increases than some other California cities with rent control like San Francisco in Santa Monica under alleys current rules landlords can raise rents by at least three percent each year and sometimes more allowable increases start at four percent this year LA city councilman Mike von and says that's not sustainable for many renters people's rants which you're supposed to be going up according to the cost of living went up faster than the cost of living well we just remained flat on it is putting forward a new motion to more closely tyrant hikes with inflation which has been fairly low in recent years the motion also calls for a potential rent freeze for tenants you've seen their rants outpaced the overall cost of living the plan is in early stages property owners say this we just double down on what they see as a cause of not a solution to the city's shortage of affordable housing for the California report hi David Wagner in Los Angeles a bill introduced in the state assembly this week would allow public universities to boost funding for dental clinics that serve people with special needs KQED cells willfully reports assembly member David Chu wrote the bill and he says although people with disabilities are disproportionately affected by tooth decay and other dental disease they have a hard time finding appropriate care the bill would give two of the largest dental clinics in the state at UCSF and UCLA access to federal matching funds these clinics offer low cost dental care and provide training to dental students which leads to an increase in the number of providers that can treat patients with special needs the bill would not draw on state funds it is expect and to be heard by the state assembly health committee this spring for the California report im Alice will flee more California raccoons skunks and fox's are sick this year with distemper that's a highly contagious viral infection wildlife officials say the animals caught the virus from dogs cap radio Steve noni reports the increasing canine distemper virus cases and wildlife populations is statewide we diagnosed cases as far south as Santa Barbara Santa Maria all the way up through a recount we seem to have quite a few cases in the bay area yeah the Clifford is the senior wildlife engineering with the state department of fish and wildlife she says since October they've confirmed about ten cases with half a dozen pending and they're still getting reports of other suspected cases distemper could cause respiratory neurological and gastro intestinal illness and even death unvaccinated pets can spread it to wild animals and vice versa it does not infect humans Clifford says one way to prevent the spread of the disease is to keep food and water bowls inside your animal your dog or cat or sharing a food bowl with a wild animals that can still be away the disease is transmitted is also urging pet owners to keep their dogs up to date on vaccinations for the California report I'm Stephen only in Sacramento is the solution to California's housing crisis to be found in the garages new state laws make it much easier for people to convert the land were residential garages or backyard sheds now stand in the housing that homeowners condemned rant out that kind of housing is known as excess to read Welling units or A. D. U.'s to our small home this is lovely it's entirely livable for three hundred fifty nine sort in alleys Crenshaw neighborhood I took a tour of one of the first eighty use built under the new laws with developer Steve deeds with the company United dwelling so this is the conversion of a garage what we do is we actually demolish the garage that was in place and rebuild or build a small home in its place it's three hundred fifty nine square feet it was a small home I mean do you think I mean do you see someone could actually live here quite comfortably for not just days or months but years yeah so what is this me why should we care about this place portable housing is the biggest problem the state of California faces and uniquely it's entirely manmade it's a result of seventy years of zoning laws the state change those laws to let an eighty like this we built on any of the nine million residential properties in the state this is a way of taking deeply under use really high quality real estate and turn something much more valuable and at its heart that's the opportunity to take a tremendous inventory of real estate that deeply under utilized there are two hundred eighty five thousand attached two car garages and I wake county alone ninety one percent of them we know just have junk in them and turn them into homes and that all by itself would present enough inventory to drop real estate prices and fix the affordability challenge in the state right now how would you characterize the interest in eighty use they seem to be having a moment because of the new laws I think they're having a moment for those who are paying attention to it you see a lot more references to them but our largest building is the need to normalize the idea of having an eighty you in a tenant really most of the people we talked to say that's sounds weird I've never heard of such a thing and the right this is new but it works really well so often what what stops construction new housing in its tracks or slows down tremendously as opposition from from the neighborhood in issue with eighty user you confronted so far no issue from either side firstly we actually have not had issues from the community but the second is that the song using the building code you can build one of the you can do it yeah and there isn't anybody anything a neighbor a homeowners association building and safety department city planning nobody can say no as long as you meet some fairly basic parameters on size and location that was eighty you developer Steven Dietz if you want to see photos of that eighty you were we talked check out images I'll post on Twitter my net sol KQED support for the California report comes from pain care now with seven hundred sixty drop off sites in California where households and businesses can recycle.

KQED Saul Gonzalez California
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is the California report on Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles the corona virus outbreak in China is not only a public health story but the economic one as well many California companies that either a factories and stores in China or rely on imported parts are worried about disruptions to their supply chains because of the disease some of the California based companies that have had their business operations affected by the corona virus are apple Tesla and Levi Strauss with more on that here's KPCC is Robert arroba clean dubious director of USC's US China institute you're not seeing an immediate impact but you will do the says that's in part because many manufacturers have adopted what's called just in time production that means companies are saving on storage costs by not stockpiling parts from China in a warehouse instead of relying on ordering components at the point when they need them to finished product but do we says that could make those companies more vulnerable now that some production in China has ground to a halt goods that you need to finish production here in California be very auto parts or something like that they need to be on a boat right now do says the Wuhan area where the outbreak is centered accounts for about ten percent of Chinese car production he says our local tourism industry will feel the more immediate effects of the coronavirus outbreak but there will eventually be a ripple effect on manufacturing as well that could mean slowed production and delayed deliveries to customers for the California report I'm Robert the rover in Los Angeles like Hollywood California state government is trying to improve the reporting of sexual harassment and discrimination claims in the last year the legislature received one hundred eighty one such complaints with more on that here's cap radio Scott rod in a letter obtained by cap radio leaders at the capitol disclose the number of complaints filed in the past year it was higher than anticipated but they say that's a good thing it shows staffers are comfortable coming forward Senate pro tem Toni Atkins in assembly speaker Anthony Rendon declined to comment for this story it's hard to compare the number of past years there were thirty three complaints in two thousand seventeen and seventeen in two thousand eighteen but those only included sexual harassment the legislature's new workplace conduct unit formed in the wake of the me too movement also investigates discrimination and retaliation it may be hard to measure progress moving forward the legislature will release substantiated complaints against lawmakers and high level staff but the Senate and assembly would not say if they plan to release any additional data in the future for the California report I'm Scott rod in Sacramento support for the California report.

harassment Sacramento Wuhan Robert arroba apple Scott rod Senate legislature Anthony Rendon Toni Atkins Saul Gonzalez US China institute USC director Levi Strauss California China
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning this is the California report on Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles later in the broadcast one of the state's best known streets is going largely car free but first later today president trump will sign the new U. S. Mexico Canada trade agreement at the White House it comes at a time when Mexico is cracking down on central American migrants trying to reach the U. S. through its territory KQED is funny the Jaballah Romero spoke with a top Mexican official who's in California to promote the trade deal and asked whether there's a connection between trade and migration policy last year president Donald Trump threatened steep tariffs if Mexico didn't do more to halt the migration from Central America and last week Mexican security forces in riot gear blocked a large my grand caravan at its border with Guatemala his so sad is the undersecretary for North America at the Mexican foreign ministry he says trump's threat had no role in Mexico's new tough border enforcement the issue was just too contained contain this on migration in a chaotic way so we want people to come to Mexico to work in Mexico not to use this as a as a launching pad to go somewhere else Harley shaken directs the center for Latin American studies at UC Berkeley he's a longtime observer of Mexican politics who sees it differently it is in fact the threat of terrorist or more generally alienating and sparking retaliation by the trump administration dad is thriving Mexican immigration policy she can sense Saturday and Mexican officials want to ensure the trade deal moves forward smoothly while projecting an image that the country is not being pushed around by trump Mexico in a sack has become the wall that our president trump is seeking to physically build US trade with Mexico totaled six hundred and seventy billion dollars and twenty eight team for the California report I'm sorry that job at a metal the trump administration wants to make it tougher for immigrants to get permanent legal status in the U. S. if they also access social services that plan got a boost on Monday when the US Supreme Court ruled in favor of the administration so called public charge rule here in California immigrant advocates are grappling with the fallout from the high court's decision keep P. C. C.'s Erica Lindo has more the justices voted five four in favor of the government's request to lift the national injunction that was blocking the role from taking effect it denies certain new green card applications based on the person's ability to prove they will not use public benefits like Medicaid or food stamps the public charge role mainly affects people applying for permanent legal residency through family sponsorship but it's already had a chilling effect even among those not affected it's a primate people are trying to cut off benefits when it will not even have any effect on them or their family just for the sake of being safe that's Merion Massa with the coalition for humane immigrant rights of Los Angeles she says the biggest impact of the rule so far has been to Stoke fear in immigrant communities several lower court cases on the matter are still pending for the California report I never go window in Los Angeles Stanford University has announced that former US secretary of state Condoleezza Rice will be the new director of the university's Hoover Institution it continues a long relationship between the campus and one of America's best known and controversial foreign policy experts KQ these Peter Jon Shuler reports according to a statement rice will assume her new role at the hundred year old think tank on September first before and after her service in the George W. bush administration rice has maintained a long association with Stanford going back nearly four decades she joined the bush administration as national security adviser and became secretary of state in bush's second term she was the second woman and first African American woman to hold the post at Stanford ride served as provost and also taught graduate and undergraduate students in foreign policy and other subjects rice said in a statement she's honored to be named Hoover's next director for the California report I'm Peter Jon Shuler and finally on city streets we're used to the car being king.

Saul Gonzalez Los Angeles California
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Two KQED public radio the time now is five fifty one good morning this is the California report and eyeing Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles if you were in a supermarket over the weekend you might have seen notices in the produce section about romaine lettuce federal officials are warning of an E. coli outbreak linked to the lattice likely harvested near Salinas it's the second year in a row such a warning is happened right before thanksgiving Greta mark of key C. B. X. central coast public radio reports both the food and drug administration and the centers for disease control are advising consumers not to eat and to throw away any romaine lettuce Groner packaged in the Salinas area health officials are also advising people to toss out the remain if they can't determine where it's from investigators haven't yet pinpointed a specific source or form but Salinas area farmers are preparing for a financial hit norm group with the Monterey county farm bureau says the central coast lettuce industry experience major losses after any coli outbreak just before thanksgiving last year I'm not sure how this one will play out but in the past it's been up hill climb in the market place again to get consumers confident that what they're buying is something that they're going to be safe and needing last year's outbreak was ultimately source to a farm in Santa Maria for the California report I'm Greta mark the nation wide advisory also extends to remain lettuce and packaged foods and another agricultural news it may look peaceful but there's a storm brewing a deadly plant disease that can change our landscape forever that's part of a public service announcement warning Californians about long long being also known as citrus greening disease.

Saul Gonzalez Los Angeles Salinas Monterey county farm bureau Santa Maria Greta mark KQED California
"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"saul gonzalez" Discussed on KCRW

"Night it's six fifty one good morning this is the California report im Saul Gonzalez let's begin in San Diego county after days of testimony a judge's order John Timothy Ernest to stand trial on one count of murder and three counts of attempted murder for the April shootings at a synagogue in power away in the court room a synagogue member Oscar stored testified about what he witnessed by heard screaming people yelling get down I saw the defendant fire two rounds I saw the muzzle flashes from the right from the rifle after the attack Ernest fled and called nine one one saying quote I am defending our nation against the Jewish people who are trying to destroy all white people on quote Ernest then surrendered to police who sees an A. R. fifteen assault rifle and five magazines of ammunition Ernest also faces a charge of arson for trying to set fire to a mosque in March prosecutors have not said whether they'll seek the death penalty against him Ernest has pleaded not guilty let's turn to the ongoing legal battles over the trump administration's hardline immigration policies the American civil liberties union is asking a federal judge in California to stop the administration from continuing to separate families at the border the ACLU says about a thousand children have been separated from their parents even after a court issued an injunction last June to stop the practice in most cases KQED is Michelle Wiley reports federal officials say the injunction allows border agents to take kids away from parents for their own. safety say when a parent has a criminal history but the ACLU which represents my grandparents says the separations fly in the face of state child protection standards and is asking the court to reassess its ruling here's ACLU lawyer legal aren't what's interesting about the government's.

John Timothy Ernest murder Oscar arson California ACLU Michelle Wiley government Saul Gonzalez San Diego A. R. assault KQED