39 Burst results for "Saul"

Fresh update on "saul" discussed on Mission Possible

Mission Possible

03:59 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "saul" discussed on Mission Possible

"Can give up your talent or you can get love your treasure. Sometimes you can get two or all three of those, but you have given up your time in your talent. You're really big degree because that actually equal treasure because that is a finance that couldn't really be had. Well, they really wouldn't have that. A financial arm to be able to take care of our residents like that, and you have stood in the gap to do that. Well, Dr Richard Saul Wurman, you are Caradon. It's your in Cooper City. And if anybody would like to look you up You have a website. And what is that? What site? That was you that believe that doctor Saltzman dot com. And Saltzman is spelled S E A L Z M A N Come in to end. Kill is all. I'm sorry. So we got to get the two ends in there. So Doctor Saltzman was too in dot com. So, you know, I myself I like to support businesses. They're giving back in the community in some way, And so if you need dental care, I'm just gonna say, you know, give Dr Saltzman I call and he'll probably tell you more if he if he finds out you heard it on the radio. And tell him you changed him. Because of that. He'll probably tell you more of the story of how he's reached out to the Robert outlet centers. So What would you say the others? If they're thinking, G. I would like to help someone, but I just don't know how maybe to get started. Or what to think out what I could do. Do you have any words of wisdom? Well, you know, I would tell him, Theo, pick up the phone and make the phone call get a new kind drive by them to the mission. And make the initial contact and the rewards that you get from giving back 10 fold. You know what? What? What? You give what you will receive 10 ft. What you give to the community because it is such a rewarding Activity. Well, we actually call somebody here at the Broward out with centers today. That was one of your patients. She's a graduate. He is now giving back here. Um, we're actually with her own volunteer time over at the women's center. And when you guys connected, it was like, Oh, there's our yourself, honey. He's the one that fixed my taste for me. So it must make you feel good when you hear that. It's very, very rewarding. Yes. Well, um, if you would like to give back in some way we always say connect subway in the community might be another nonprofit organization. But of course we love our volunteers. You can always go to caring place that or flash volunteer. Some people say, Well, I don't really have a talent. Everybody has a talent right now. We're doing a hygiene push. To collect hygiene and even new underwear for men, women and Children, as we get ready for different outreach is not only on the street but for our residents are in our program. So may I say, Dr Richards told Mike, I thank you Once again. I like to do it publicly. You know, I've done it behind the scenes, but I like to do this publicly, and this is a form that we can do that. On. So thank you. God bless you for all you've done. Thank you And your wife, Martha and your son, Sebastian, and I know even your other son. Has that been involved? So God bless you. Thank you so much. And don't touch that dial because we have more great talks with others that will be coming up in.

Mike Cooper City Martha Richards 10 Ft Sebastian TWO Richard Saul Wurman Theo Three Broward Today ONE 10 Fold Caradon Two Ends GOD Saltzman Robert DR
Fresh update on "saul" discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

02:14 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "saul" discussed on Jewish History Matters

"It's something that they share in common. It's a community building exercise if you will the creation and the dissemination of this language second is jewish language inspired by and it is definitely located with in a jewish context and third. It's zionist language. The decision to have a heavy iced english as opposed to. Yiddish is english or a latino english. That was a specific decision. It was a very conscious decision that was made early on. If you go back and you look at the early history of these camps and how this language was created the people who were invested in the creation of this language were zionists and they were looking to the project in palestine and inspired by it when they started speaking hebrew it now the listeners might be wondering what we're talking about when we're talking about camp. Henry is english. So i guess i should give an example in some camps you might have just jewish life words like they might say after beer cut. We're going to go straight to own egg. And those are words that you would hear outside of camp. In many jewish communal settings but many camps that are more to the right of the on the continuum of hebrew richness would have sentences that have a lot more hebrew words in them so they might say something like honey theme and module him go to the tach run for a lot era of now that has so many hebrew words that it really wouldn't be comprehensible to somebody who didn't go to a jewish summer camp that has a lot of hebrew words but note that it's still an english sentence in that the grammar and the function words are english right. They wouldn't use a full hebrew sentence at most camps and then even farther to the right on that continuum of hebrew richness. You have camps that do all of their announcements in hebrew and in some cases this is a hebrew that is mostly set phrases so they might just say something like guess share a mirage cadore saul Salim live bait knesset right so that they would be saying the name of a group and the.

Palestine Yiddish Latino Jewish Hebrew English Henry Saul Salim Third Zionist Second Zionists
Fresh update on "saul" discussed on GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

01:45 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "saul" discussed on GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

"Stevenson, the Palm reader, Paul, the palm expert. He's been my go to guy He's been do you mentioned Denita Moody Gardens. They've been their go to guy. You're working with me. Come down in Galveston right now. Tell about what you're doing. Well, um, no. Here in River River. I'm sorry. John asked me to come in and renovate his card. And after about 18 19 years since we did the original now that the freeze happened, he's ready to just start over. We had been cleaning material out for About three weeks now. A couple of days a week. Not not full, You know, not every day till Mr Wickham. I said I'll do that. You know, I think this needs somebody come talk to me about his landscaping again can be on the family payroll. Well, actually have, um Linda Gay for Mercy Arboretum. She's director there for 10 years and but with mercy for 26 years, and she's doing all morning, and now she is, but she I asked her to come in with your occasionally the arbor Gate. Love catching up with her, by the way, All right, so let's get back to Lord. You ready. Next up is gonna be skip in Jones Road area. Morning, Skip. Good morning, Randy. Nice talk to you and grant. Thanks for being on. I've got a question about my pal Medic Palm and this great. It looked great. During the snow and the freeze and all that, And then now Saul didn't Brown so and also another question about come out of is it? A native of Texas Sable Miner is a native of Texas and Louisiana and Florida all look all around the upper Gulf Coast South. Um, And that's unusual that completely brownout. I could see that some of the spirits teams would brand out in that. But again, you know if yours has.

Linda Gay 26 Years 10 Years Randy John Galveston Mercy Arboretum Louisiana Paul Texas River River Florida Jones Road Wickham Denita Moody Gardens Saul Stevenson 18 19 Years Gulf Coast South About Three Weeks
Fresh update on "saul" discussed on The Game is Afoot!

The Game is Afoot!

04:14 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "saul" discussed on The Game is Afoot!

"Aw no arc do. We need to have tutoring sessions. No and then he looks slightly. Put out if it helps man. I don't know korean. Because the school i know cream because of my family so i've never know the language. Either i was. I was just joking. Okay i'm sorry mumble. Warned to the mic my love. Yeah he's mumbling in. Hey he's like stop looking at me god. Just she's going to. She's going to use going to concur arm with his. And be like it's okay. I'll just teach you how to swear very much. And i mean once we get back to school we cannot remained. I get the feeling we're gonna need to talk some stuff out. Just in general so a steady group would be a real great way to do that or a club. Oh i'm graduating soon. Graduates come back and visit teachers all the time he goes. I have a suggestion for a signal. Yes in korean. The word fight is som- some some som- some lack s. a. m. fanatically Kind of spell in english As a um now just for any listeners. I am not korean. I placed a off. But i am not korean so i apologize if i mispronounced this psalm. Psalm some you so some will ignore how thousand saul church psalm. Jack long from kim. Did we kill the dea. Yes you've killed my wife and also rdm. Okay you're sure she's crying. It's great good super super solid song percent. My kale sorry. Please continue with your fascinating discussion. I mean that's a suggestion. It's quick it's easy in. It sounds like my name so if we say that loud other people might not notice as much high solve pay for no. My korean name is t. Ho now ten no lock solve. I apologized to eddie korean listeners. We may have as i butcher. Your language not only in english but with a southern accent will not only make but in texas english. I wouldn't go that. We're we're laughing. We're laughing at quillet tempting this not at at the butchering of the language. No but anyway. If that would help call word i already know. No one here knows korean. Because i asked somebody and they told me that never heard the tongue before so was gonna say. We established not one. Yeah german would come in handy too. 'cause also foreign language as far as my understanding gear. What's the word for. Fattened german eaten on this story pulls up google play. I don't speak german. I know a few words what you're doing the lessons with barbara and all this time comp. No.

Google Play Texas English Psalm T. Ho KIM German Southern Thousand Korean Jack Barbara Eddie Saul RDM
What To Do When a Patient Feels Worse on an Antidepressant

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:34 min | Last week

What To Do When a Patient Feels Worse on an Antidepressant

"When a patient says they feel worse on an antidepressant. The first thing to do is to rule out physical side effects like nausea fatigue and insomnia one to pay attention to is academia as patients might have difficulty describing this inner sense of restlessness which is more often associated with anti psychotics but academia can occur on antidepressants as well particularly serota. Energetic ones and agatha can cause anxiety insomnia even suicide -ality so it might be the reason that they're mood is worse on an antidepressant dot in how concert energetic antidepressants calls academia. I thought it was caused. By dopamine blockade it is thought that the inhibitory effects of serotonin have indirect effects on the dopamine system and that it can lead to dopamine antagonism there in the stratum another side effect. that's related to academia. You might see on sarah. Synergetic antidepressants is restless. Legs syndrome which is almost like academia night. If that happens you could add gabba. Penton or pramod. Pack saul both of which treat restless legs in academia and both of which have psychiatric benefits gabba. Penton helps sleep an anxiety and promo pack saul helps depression but another option would be the switch to be appropriate wellbutrin in a randomized controlled. Trial bupropion treated restless leg syndrome. Even when it was dosed in the morning perhaps through its dopaminergic

Nausea Fatigue Serota Insomnia Legs Syndrome Penton Pramod Sarah Academia Depression
What To Do When a Patient Gets Worse on an Antidepressant

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:34 min | Last week

What To Do When a Patient Gets Worse on an Antidepressant

"When a patient says they feel worse on an antidepressant. The first thing to do is to rule out physical side effects like nausea fatigue and insomnia one to pay attention to is academia as patients might have difficulty describing this inner sense of restlessness which is more often associated with anti psychotics but academia can occur on antidepressants as well particularly serota. Energetic ones and agatha can cause anxiety insomnia even suicide -ality so it might be the reason that they're mood is worse on an antidepressant dot in how concert energetic antidepressants calls academia. I thought it was caused. By dopamine blockade it is thought that the inhibitory effects of serotonin have indirect effects on the dopamine system and that it can lead to dopamine antagonism there in the stratum another side effect. that's related to academia. You might see on sarah. Synergetic antidepressants is restless. Legs syndrome which is almost like academia night. If that happens you could add gabba. Penton or pramod. Pack saul both of which treat restless legs in academia and both of which have psychiatric benefits gabba. Penton helps sleep an anxiety and promo pack saul helps depression but another option would be the switch to be appropriate wellbutrin in a randomized controlled. Trial bupropion treated restless leg syndrome. Even when it was dosed in the morning perhaps

Nausea Fatigue Serota Insomnia Legs Syndrome Penton Pramod Sarah Academia Depression
Rewiring and Resiliency for Better Health with Nicole Waters

Outcomes Rocket

05:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Rewiring and Resiliency for Better Health with Nicole Waters

"Today i have the privilege of hosting nicole waters on the podcast. She is a natural health practitioner who utilizes integrative techniques for mind body spirit integration. She created her own stress management program utilizing mind body relaxation neuro harmonizing breath work and neuro linguistic programming to guide our clients to overcome stress patterns and rewire into powerful states of living. Nicole also provides consultations utilizing food medicine as well as emotional wellness consultations. She believes everyone has the opportunity to thrive in their life and through education and support. She has seen people turn their lives around. Three hundred. sixty degrees. Nicole has been in the area of wellness for over twenty years. It was her own struggles with stress anxiety and health imbalances that allowed her to search out and find new ways to live healthy and well. Nicole enjoys working with clients to teach self healing tools and techniques needed for clients to transform their lives into ones. They enjoy living. She has experienced in both conventional as well as medicine before starting her own business. She was in corporate america within the healthcare market for over twenty. Nine years she's a natural health practitioner Licensed professional coach a certified rakia professional and a registered yoga teacher. So she's got a lot to offer us today around the subject of wellness nicole. Such a privilege to have you with us today. Oh it's my privileges thank you for having me saul absolutely so before we get into the nuts and bolts and You know what you guys do. Tell us a little bit about you. And what exactly inspires your work in healthcare while i think you know when miraculous things come about for a for each of us when we know what our life's work is it kind of happens interesting way and sometimes we're like what are we doing here. What's how is this happening. But you know for me it was. You know my own health journey. That started some ways of looking at medicine differently health differently wellbeing what that means and just taking a kind of a different path. You know i was somebody who i was. Now it's been over. Twenty years was diagnosed with a health condition. Ulcer at an early age. That was when i was thirty and just some of the things that had come up about. That was just something that i wasn't willing to do and i just started to dig in look at some other ways of going about it and i think that this happens with different people you now. You're just like that doesn't seem to vibe too well. And what are some of the other routes to go and You know. I think that's really were coming into a time. As far as inspiration with healthcare so much has changed within healthcare and people are really on looking at getting to the root of what's going on and maybe not so much of going for a quick fix on one eight to really know why they're feeling the feelings. They are why their body is feeling such a way why they have these sort of annul. Host of imbalances are things that are showing up. Maybe not going that quick fix route anymore. Because it hasn't really you know maybe it's been more like a band aid instead of just really finding out what's going deeper and deeper and that's really. What kind of inspires me. I inspire people to help them understand a variety of things that i want struggled with for example like fighter flight or adrenaline. And cortisol know. We're in a situation where people are very highly stressed and i was one of those as well. I think i came out of the womb stressed. I was in that situation and we don't a lot of times go into You know when when you see Practitioner that they really talk about. They say oh eat better or exercise more or something like that but but why is that. Why is there this constant strive cycle that happens and then how do we really get out from underneath it so that was a piece of it and then also i'm really inspired by talking to people about their thoughts. You know how their thoughts play a tremendous role in one house. You know i'm sure you know this. You know. I mean it's anyone who's doing anything and business. The sometimes you just gotta be pumping yourself up right on on how to move through things and so thoughts play a big role. And how often is that. Maybe talked about you know in traditional healthcare and then getting back to the way our ancestors ate and the way that we used to eat and how food impacts our body and how it you know creates such a bigger connection to our inner world in ourselves and loving ourselves knots to give ourselves fuel instead of just picking up a box you know of something that's been fortified and then also i'd say like emotions. Emotions are really part. I think most people have learned in their life to not address the motions that it's a old conditioning. Like oh just kind of stuff it in there unless you've gone down a different paradigm but that's really getting broken into now. I mean i think we can look at our world and say that you know. It's very important to be a dresser emotions in a healthy way so that it's not you know going out in projecting on other people and so these are all like very important pieces of like a whole picture which i say well being being well which is more than just the body. It's about the whole person. And so i love that i love that. Were going into different areas within the whole you know the whole person emotion the mind the feelings a you know the body things like that so very very important to inspires.

Nicole Saul Ulcer America
Next Generation Patient Support, Fostering Community with Jeff Wandzura

Outcomes Rocket

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Next Generation Patient Support, Fostering Community with Jeff Wandzura

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saul marquez. Here today. I have the privilege of hosting mr jeff. One zero. he is the chief. Growth officer accusatio. Jeff is a pharmacist by trade digital health geek at heart and an angel investor in healthcare executive after two successful exits with his previous digital health ventures and a tenure as an executive at one of the largest specialty pharmacy infusion clinic an patients program networks he currently serves as the chief growth officer of curation networks excited to to host them today. He's gonna talk about how they're providing next generation patient support on their platform. Jeff such a pleasure to have you here for saw. Thanks for missile. I've been listened to your podcast for some time now to be included with some of the pioneers of the digital healthcare space. Thank you man. I appreciate that and you guys are doing some some fascinating work so before we dive into ratio and and how you guys are making a difference. Tell us a little bit more about you and and your healthcare journey what what keeps you in the game is. I was exposed to the healthcare space fairly early on in my journey has as we want a family pharmacy over the years and we're acutely time in pharmacy school at came to realize patient outcomes are less defined but yet saudi contraptions by healthcare professionals and more so by small ledges that drive incremental behavior change on a day-to-day basis so throughout that time again been involved in a number of digital health ventures kind of seen the platform and i guess the ecosystem evolve over time and announced Putting the rubber to the road and seeing how we can further catalyze this digital transformation within the space at is exciting and the opportunity to to provide value has never been greater. You know were becoming more consumer focus in healthcare at an. It's an exciting time as you. And i were connecting here before the podcast jobs talked to us a little bit about what you guys are up to jerry show and and how xactly you're adding value to the healthcare ecosystem yet. No it's a good question so maybe to kick things off one of the fundamental problems facing digital health platforms and healthcare more. Broadly is a consistent. Engagement and long taylor. Attention of the users. So those users representing patients family members caregivers to a number of different user roles and and other industries have leveraged social impure support in a very compelling way which has a high engagement and retention factor. So really the question is how can we responsibly. Blend these two in a way that makes sense for the healthcare setting and create a dedicated platform in which we can start to listeners regulatory in privacy compliant way and this is what's really inhibited. The growth and the trajectory of peer to peer support in these settings. So how can we start to again. Take into account the intricacies of the healthcare environment and drive that different types of a behavioral nudges along the way because when you saw that engagement retention challenge he had the best opportunity to drive behavior in positive behavior change on a day to day basis. So what we do at career show is create regulatory in privacy compliant pure pure networks and we'd go to mark with our customers so this represents the life sciences space to providers to payers to government agencies on how they can create customized brand in configure -able platforms that represent the brand and they're offering again to provide peer to peer support in a way that makes sense of the healthcare ecosystem. Really interesting. because i mean as we sit today it things are fragmented. There's you know been kind of like a gravitation toward facebook and facebook communities. Obviously all the issues with facebook that that we know of Proved that that's not really maybe not the best place to do this type of work. So so you guys are offering something with high security and opportunity to to collaborate securely so talk to us a little bit about how. You're making a difference. Yeah as a question so what we do and again just to go. Pats the pricing regulatory concerns. And you really just unpack a little bit. as to why that's been inhibitor. A blocker on for the full utilization from health rico system. And as you mentioned these. These groups are organically formed proliferating within these traditional social context. But all the stakeholders saying i have an inability connect with my patients and support them in a different way. Just give him the channel that we're drafting so when it comes to how we're making an impact again as it has three core levers that we're leveraging so one is matching pure appears in a very intelligent and analytic way so this is bringing in demographic clinical in psychographic information to say helping patients in the community who are going through similar challenges as you and our earth thesis. The more points of intersection overlap. You have an individual the more likely you are to form a long lasting relationship in bond that drives those daily disease management behaviors nonni habit hyg that higher attention factor with the peer to peer support. That's offered this is allowing us again to personalize the content and it sounds like a bit of a misnomer oxymoron but masked personalization. So how can you start. Meet patients where they are and we haven't hygiene factors the pure support the opens up new lever new opportunity to interact whether it be content programming interventions and as well as coming full circle on the types of health trackers that are applicable to that particular community disease state or the particular molecule or therapy that we're helping to support as a digital companion type of app so what patients are looking for is that anonymity tied to the condition so obviously personal health information comes with a number of complexities on how to maintain again full control over in having that type of buying from the patient community as well as from the pharmaceutical in life sciences sector doesn't okay does a number of hoops to jump through from pharmacovigilance or an adverse event reporting

Saul Marquez Mr Jeff Curation Networks Jeff Facebook Jerry Taylor
Vermont Sen. Leahy taken to hospital for observation

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Vermont Sen. Leahy taken to hospital for observation

"The longest serving member of the U. S. Senate's been hospitalized for observation Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy is eighty years old a spokesman says he wasn't feeling well and was checked out by Congress's position then taken to an area hospital out of an abundance of caution earlier in the day Leahy the Senate president pro temperate had sworn in members of the Senate for the impeachment trial of Donald Trump Saul centers now rise and raise their right hand senator Leahy not a Supreme Court justice was selected to preside over the impeachment trial the Vermont Democrat was first elected to Congress in nineteen seventy four Jackie Quinn Washington

U. S. Senate Patrick Leahy Vermont Donald Trump Saul Leahy Senator Leahy Congress Supreme Court Jackie Quinn Washington
Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

The 3:59

06:13 min | Last month

Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

"Thomas driving is on the topic of one ahead. Our companies have been testing it for a while. I think they'll the lockdown. But the social distancing status quo has made the idea of the self driving car former attractive. Here's how five helping to make a time. Striving more reality yes. This is one that i could visualize. I think about the difference between a four environment. Gene i did we talk about this for a long time. When will come to. Fruition will be real. We're seeing this being tested today in pockets throughout the country. And it's not just for driverless. Vehicles thomas eagles. It's also drones. Iii sauce announced this week. Work that we're doing with. Ups on jaw hit ability. When you think about four g Urine at a time of the world today in a forge ecosystem. You want clear the harm front of you on your clearances about four inches. They sung lazy kicked very inefficient to eat assistance. Because you bet latency Attended mills Also used to find yourself in environment where you've got four foot clearance to the carn- primarily because the low lazy kimberly allows that we're having conversations with cities of around the contrary to really understand their planning cycle. Talked about san jose this week at. Cbs in work. We're doing with them. Generally bills smart city capabilities. You build a smart city capability. Five g capability of low latency and bandwidth capability ability for the signals to travel at sea allows a barrier differentiated in a very real experience for smart cities or thomas vehicles and for jobs kicker to be very real as you think about the ups deliver against the demand that they have for home. Delivery drones will played important part of that worry. See not in project and testing. Come faster than you imagine. Because we're finding new in different ways to use power a and how much work has been directly inspired by what's been going on over the last year and in all these solutions are they quick fixes of the problems that we've seen exposed now or solutions that can be applied to society of the long term. I believe tree pandemic everyone was talking about digital transformation and we talked to that everybody will go through digital transformation. Everybody's planning board. What we've seen over. The last month is real time her information. When you're in the middle of a crisis we gotta see patients. They can't come into an office. Got to educate kids and they can't come into school environment when he watery magin entertainment. We've found all kinds of ways with the bronco system to reimagine. And i really do believe that. We've cut three four five years off of the planning cycle going from planning for digital transformation actually deployed digital transformation with our customers is. They're beginning to see possibilities of five jeep whether it's in our lab environments whether it's in cities were of actual diet deployed it's just creating warm more sheer yossi non-commitment to accelerate transformation. It's one of the reasons why i'm really excited about the work that we've done with. Aws in huge. His wouldn't rule that out. Is we now have developers access to whatever it is. They're developing they wanna pull in the power. Uwb work done with edge. The he do that through the normal process that they follow near all cyclone. So we're really bribing out crazy all kinds of exposure to what's possible and if we're truly power five g received look celebrate the potential and identification of those solutions igloos accelerated lead accelerate. Nali as we imagine a whole host code but really we reacting responding to reimagining. An reimagining is happening real time. We think about having dry cheese today. That's good for today and really crisis management to what will be good in different in the future that will have strong society benefits. It's one of the league's About strategy we've said we create the networks roll forward that's the nar defying purpose todd We live now ever before because we have a responsibility not only to employees customers. Shareholders that to society as a stakeholder all right lastly assuming five j works exactly as promise but snappy speeds responsiveness all the way and see. What is your dream application for this technology. What is my dream application. Well how much time do we have to talk about dream applications. I believe a feigen working exactly as we've defined it. I'm super proud of the ability for us to deliver on the timelines. The we've many brown. Deploying city's making the capability Incredibly appreciative for partnerships developed with aws with jerem with apple in same's on other ecosystem. Come to life because who in your law power ecosystem that you begin to imagine solutions. I read the things we talked about today. Healthcare education digital divide are the big ones. And i think five g will absolutely help solve the. We've also made predictions to technology. Used to help invited crew the environment as we think about how to make sure that we play a responsible role in using technology to solve. The world's biggest problems environment includes so we responsibility. We have not location. Were honored to be part of that. Stand that anything. The ability to use technology saul. Some problems is that ryan ismay because we understand and are honored to be part of serving society has a stake over

Thomas Eagles Iii Sauce Magin Entertainment Kimberly Nali Thomas San Jose CBS Jerem Todd Brown Apple Ryan Ismay Saul
Critics' Choice Awards 2021: The Complete List of TV Nominations

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:32 sec | Last month

Critics' Choice Awards 2021: The Complete List of TV Nominations

"Series lead the pack of TV nominations for the 26th annual critics, Choice Awards Ozark and the Crown, both earning six nominations. Each is up for best drama series. Also nominated for the top prize drama prize. That is better call Saul. The Good Fight The Man DeLorean. This is US Lovecraft Country and Perry Mason Critics Choice Awards will be presented here in Los Angeles area in some form or another because of covert on March 7th. British choice of film nominations will be announced on February 7th

Choice Awards Ozark And The Cr Choice Awards Saul Perry Mason Los Angeles United States
The Role of Consumer Payments Products in Healthcare with Greg Boulton

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | Last month

The Role of Consumer Payments Products in Healthcare with Greg Boulton

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saul marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting greg. Bolton he's a corporate development executive with experience in the financial technology industry who has spent the last ten years focused on payments and payments products in the healthcare space. We are going to be discussing the impact that the financial industry technology and products can have on improving healthcare delivery knowing all the challenges that exist in how we pay for healthcare. I think today's discussion with greg is going to be a really interesting one. And so with that I wanna i wanna give you a warm. Welcome to the podcast greg. Thanks so much for joining today Absolutely so you have been focused on basically how we pay for things in healthcare. Greg what has been your inspiration to spend the time that you have in the sector. sure So i came to the healthcare space from financial services industry specifically looking at payments products so credit cards data cards prepaid cards and in a lot of respects. The industries have a lot cinemax celebrities. They're obviously very critical industries and services they deliver a critical the lives of our members our customers and inherently complicated products plex but in many ways we sort of felt like the defense industry had maybe made faster inroads into bringing automation and customization to our products in the national services industries coming into healthcare really looking for opportunities to streamline and make participating in engaging in healthcare easier for the members so And that sort of dovetail with the health care industry really getting more deeply into consumer directed health care and focusing on the members decision making and the rule that plays in healthcare and so we really saw those industries coming being well aligned a lot of the financial products in the healthcare space. Not really been around that long. Very first tax advantaged accounts around healthcare. We're in the very late nineties. Really got going early two thousand so one of the things that we did early on was to try and attach a card to assam these tax advantaged products. And make it easier for administrators to move the money and also for the members understand what they're spending and make it reduced amount of paperwork in manual actions required for them to take advantage those tax advantaged accounts. It's interesting in your right there so much that has happened in finance that just sped past healthcare and in i had a. I had an interview several months ago with the chief medical our chief information officer at phillips and he came from citibank all the innovations that they were taking advantage at citibank. Now they're getting leveraged by phillips in that company and so there's a ton that we can learn from the financial industry and so talk to us a little bit about some of those things greg and And maybe how this particular approach can add value to what we're doing in healthcare. Well i think some of the things that we've been engaging with a lot of course as i mentioned automation and debts really almost entirely contingent on standardization through a lot of advantages services. Industry has had compared to health care. There's much higher level of standardization and the bodies that would create maintain both system rules as well as as the legal constructs behind all that allowed enforcement of rules. Were so much stronger in the financial services area than they've been in healthcare so in the initial services we've had visa and mastercard had nachon had a very prescriptive. A central planning operates nash services and that's allowed all of the companies to code robustly to bill very robust infrastructure around a data said and mediation standards. That didn't have a lot of variation in the healthcare space of course do have standards. But they're far looser and there's a lot more variation variation in healthcare plans and there's a lot more variation kind of diversity of approaches across the healthcare space. That makes it all much more difficult to approach but overall approach very much has been as we're going to try and create a consumer product built on a on a mountain of technology at complexity but trying shield that and make it seem as easy to consumers possible. Make that decision point. Essentially you know in the the member of the consumer is at at a point of sale. We want them to go to the wall. No which which carving out trying to keep it as simple as that and healthcare space

Greg Saul Marquez Bolton Citibank Phillips Nash Services Mastercard
Mavs destroy Clippers 124-73 to earn 1st win of season

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Mavs destroy Clippers 124-73 to earn 1st win of season

"Look at Dutch each scored twenty four points and the Mavericks led by an NBA record fifty points at halftime in a one twenty four seventy three route of the clippers we show who we are all people judge Sauls right first two games of the season and also last season but we gotta keep going like that you know we had a great distance and that's our strategy Josh Richardson added twenty one points and Tim Hardaway junior had eighteen for the mavs who were coming off a blowout loss to the Lakers on Christmas day the clippers trailed seventy seven twenty seven at halftime with their fifty point deficit being the largest that the brake system shot clock era began in nineteen fifty four fifty five I'm Dave very

Sauls Clippers Josh Richardson Mavericks NBA Tim Hardaway Mavs Lakers Dave
Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

Short Wave

09:03 min | 3 months ago

Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

"Dan let's start with a little bt crops one. oh one all right. Walk us through how they work. So these genetically modified plants got their superpowers from a bacteria. Let's let julie describe it a little bit for bt in particular They express genes that. Come from a type of bacterium It's really a very common. Bacteria that's found in soils it's called bacillus thuringiensis as the scientific name now. This kind of bacteria is actually poisonous and the larval stage of some major insect pests like corn route worm. Cotton bollworm Which farmers worry about a lot. So what the scientists did was they took some of the genes from bacteria and inserted them into these corn and cotton plants which then made the plants poisonous to the insects just like the bacteria were so now. The plants can actually protect themselves by killing off past that. Try to eat them. Exactly which is a big deal for farmers. Here is david current. He's an entomologist at texas am university. He gives farmers advice on the best way to handle their insect problems. A lot of them are cotton farmers and for them. The effect was dramatic. U we'd have cases before the introduction of bt where You know farmers were having to treat you know it could be ten times. You know for these pests. The ring ten times in a season they could yeah some areas and one bt was introduced. Well our our insecticide sprays just plummeted. And you know in there were guys who wouldn't have to treat it all and that's a big deal for not just the farmers but for the environment right. Dan like those pesticides. Don't just kill the insects year. For right yeah absolutely. Regular insecticides can kill off a whole range of species and mess up the whole ecosystem. Bt crops produced specific proteins that only kill particular insects so those crops are basically harmless to pollinators like bees and beneficial insects. That prey on past help. Keep them under control. It's not toxic to people or birds and for farmers like jonathan evans and north carolina. It meant he didn't have to work so hard is always better for the plant to protect itself. Then i have to go out and try to to spray for the worms. Did it really change farming. Have -solutely i mean you can tend a lot more acres. Were the whole equipment. Got it so jonathan. The farmer loves these crops. Julie who likes insects is happy. When did things start to go sour. Dan well i guess for jonathan it was you know one day in two thousand sixteen when he went out to cotton field and saul some cotton bollworm happily chowing down on his cotton plants and he knew what that meant. Those insects had evolved. He was looking at a new strain of bollworm that the bt protein wouldn't kill and this has been happening more and more often the country right david kerns that insect specialist at texas a and m. says some farmers are pretty disappointed and angry. There's words i can't use but they wanted to know what the heck they're doing paying for a technology and they're still having a spray. Okay dan so let's talk about. Why some of those insects have become resistant to bt crops. Yeah let's get into the science mattie evolution and here we go okay so there's a part of this. It's really simple. You have a gazillion different individual. Let's say cotton bollworm out there. There's genetic variation among them and just by chance. You may very well have a few that have some genetic mutation that makes them a little less vulnerable to the fbi t. Now they're rare normally right no problem share except if you plant these bt crops everywhere you kill off all the other insects and you have. What biologists call selection pressure right those rare individuals. That aren't killed by the gmo will be the only ones that survive and they will find each other and you know what happens next. Mattie they do that birds and the bees and the bugs thing they do they they they mate and offspring and suddenly you have a lot of insects with that. Same genetic trait a new strain of resistant. Insects emerged its evolution. Right in front of your eyes. That is what has happened over and over now. It's complicated because the biotech companies actually deployed a whole series of slightly different bt jeans and we've seen insects evolve resistance. I two one gene and then the next one sometimes it took maybe five years other times. It took a lot longer fifteen even twenty years. And it's patchy in some places the bt crops are still working and other places they aren't okay but the end. This idea of selection pressure has been around for a long time right so clearly. Scientists saw this coming. Oh absolutely did. In fact i was around. I was reporting on this back when there. Were these arguments going on back when the crops were new and university. Scientists were predicting that this would happen. If the genes were overused. They were pushing this idea of refuge to keep it from happening. They said farmers should be required to plant some of their land with non bt crops Just so all those pests. You know those with and without the resistance. Gene could thrive there elway. So in that way the rare insects with genetic resistance to bt wouldn't completely take over because some of those that were sensitive would still be around to be in the gene pool exactly exactly and the companies actually agreed to this in principle but there were these big arguments about how big the refuge had to be. There were some scientists who said at least for some of these bt crops. Farmers should not be allowed to plant those crops on more than half of their land. But the company said that'll never work. Farmers won't go for bt crops at all if there's such strict rules and the companies one and sure enough now there's resistance to bt so scientists like julie are back once again this argument pushing for tighter government rules. We are at an important point where we've seen some examples of what can happen and definitely do need to make some changes. What kind of changes are we talking about here. Dan because it feels pretty late in the game. Right it is. It is but there's one thing that people are focused on there's at least one bt. Gene is still working the bugs of not resistant to it yet so it still is effective against a lot of insects. And it's sort of carrying a lot of the weight right now. It's kind of the last bt. Still standing and scientists are worried. It'll soon break. You know under that weight of overuse especially in the south is used in both corn and cotton to fight off insects so that the environmental protection agency scientific advisers have told the agency it should only allow that gene to be used in one of those crops cotton or corn and it should be caught because controlling the bollworm in cotton is just much much more important economically in corn. It's a minor pest got and cotonou can wipe out your crop. And if you don't let it be used in corn than all those cornfields are that refuge. I see see but the company that owns this gene. Syngenta says no. That's not necessary. And it's not fair and the and the epa is actually backed away from idea. Okay i mean so what happens now dan. Well there are a lot of scientists including julie peterson who say if current farming practices. Don't change. it's possible that all of the bt genes that are currently on the market will stop working reliably within ten years and then farmers will have to find new ways to fight the insects. Maybe they'll be spraying more. Insecticides again or more and this is what julie wants maybe they go back to some more old-fashioned pest control methods you know crop rotations change what crops you plant from year to year. Yeah i mean. Indigenous communities around the world have used that technique for thousands of years some organic farmers due to right the the trick is going to be using those techniques and still producing the kind of big harvest that a lot of farmers and a lot of consumers now depend on. Okay dan charles. Thank you so much for bringing us

BT David Current Jonathan Evans David Kerns DAN Jonathan Julie Texas Saul Mattie North Carolina FBI Elway Gene Julie Peterson
What PPP Revealed About Small Business Loans

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:25 min | 3 months ago

What PPP Revealed About Small Business Loans

"Over the years the accelerate your business growth podcast has gained recognition as a great resource for small business owners. Sales professionals business leaders of all kinds. We have been fortunate to be included on lists of the best podcasts. To listen to all over the place for amazoncom proven people i. It's been a pretty incredible list of less so stake. I guess these are folks who have expertise in a particular area of business and they join me for a conversation where they share that expertise with all of yale. The goal is that you get the information that you need. You get the ideas that you're looking for and you find those people who have information that you are that you need and that you can connect with those people he sort of get to here on c. That they really know their stuff on. Today is no different. My guest today is greg. Greg is the ceo of nabbed a fintech company that helps small businesses access capital and make financial decisions. Greg has over twenty years experience leading both startups and fortune. One thousand corporations is built new organizations and transformed existing ones to be more nimble innovative and results focused greg's always thinking about how to streamline business lending and frequently shares his thoughts in articles as a forbes contributor and on stage at industry events. Thanks so much for joining me today. Greg deliverance bigger. And you as well i. We're gonna be talking today about the things we've learned through the ppp loan program. But i would really like to start with learning more about your background and How it is you ended up getting to now. And and what's your what's your. Why in goals with that. Yeah so i knew it. You start to be your life when she do her work really lines up with your passions in your positive energy in person enough to do that in leading now. I always an entrepreneur. At all. But i don't think i always knew it You've kid i was wondering are road trips. Grabbed a map and try and help. Dad find a better way across the country. Were driving to mount rushmore. Whatever and that. I think that's part of what made me. Which is that Energy to say there's gotta be of that our way to solve these problems through my career. I've always need into data driven solutions and the insights you can gather by analyzing data team lasted is always talk about the information. Hierarchy data information knowledge. Wisdom or time it led me to Do a handful of startups and then it would move to large maintenance startup luxury. I was at two leading marketing for quickbooks. And what. I could really see some of the gaps and how a small businesses being served and i connected with the am. Investors in that last recession opportunity to better solve the inefficiency between borrowers lenders and all that inefficiency everybody would win and that will just my nature which is and you build a business where guys win in An everybody went around necessarily when you when you create vicious ecosystem and that's motivated now now. That's really great. And i it really resonates with me because I think were both the kinds kind of people who are in the business were in because we want to have a positive impact on other people and case and i believe in your case as well especially small business owners who really are the fabric of this country an have unique challenges and struggles that not everybody understands is a really complex problem to saul could see that that a lot of people only were small business owners all turn their situations are different. It's lot of inconsistency so you can't even really descri- a small business. There's there's Well-established solace repeating pene. When they said this is a small business action program but the those people who had one hundred to five hundred employees were very different looking businesses. That people who were wash martin so sawyer. Small business general is what we say years that run. Small businesses succeed individuals communities and economies succeed. And there's nothing else like that and you saw us this complex problem around smallers businesses.

Greg Deliverance Greg Yale Mount Rushmore Saul Sawyer Martin
Security awareness and culture with Jinan Budge

Cyber Work

04:08 min | 3 months ago

Security awareness and culture with Jinan Budge

"We'll just get started and jump right in This is a question that actually came in during your keynote and this is from emmanuel and he's asking One of my teams priorities for the next year and beyond is maturing our organizations security culture. There's been a lot of discussion about how to measure culture and changes to it. What are you seeing. As the strongest indicators of culture change and how to organizations like mine report progress on culture to for example an executive team k at festival emmanuel. Congratulations for getting to a point where you are considering measuring your culture. I think that's the such a significant point to get to in an organization to measure the security culture On our i've just listened to greece's amazing session and honor he had Some perspectives on definitions of culture. of show. bruce you'll be able to share with us Definitions as well as measurements from my perspective. I want to talk about some of the more practical elements of measuring the culture. Some of the trends. That i'm seeing. I'm definitely seeing a lot of trends in cultural assessments on the market at these tools That a currently being deployed to measure culture. There are tools that are being measured That are being used to measure behavior on all really exciting again. I'm thrilled to see us. Move away from that. You know measuring how many people have completed their security awareness. Training call saul how many people liked it like what. What is the actually giving us. Some not wasn't request show. But i think there's been an evolution so really happy to see that we're starting to measure behavior that again if i move onto i just wanna share a personal example And it was from a particular organization and a particular transformation that i went to conduct at that particular organization. And i remember when i first walked through the door. This wasn't just a cultural project. It was the entire cybersecurity program. And i remember going in and no one wants to know about security. No on we would have meetings and out walk into a room and people would literally either law and they'll go ha ha cyber cyber. What is this thing all. you know. they'll stop making gun gestures or you know they just. The whole thing was hilarious as we started building a brand building. The culture socializing with stakeholders. It was so interesting. How much changed. And it got to a point. After one one and a half years where i'd walk into a meeting room and people would have a cyber safety moment and i love that it was such an intangible thing it was certainly something that we'd never intended to measure but to me. It was such a strong indicator of what a cultural jenny that we had all been on on the subject of savage security and some other ways. You know if you do want to get specific about this. I think one way you can see. If you've changed the dial you can have a look at things. Such as how often is your size are being invited to present at board meetings. How often is the security team. Being engaged how engaged is your organization with you about the topic of security for me without getting into definitional topics. I just think some of these less tangible things are so telling of how far you've come in a year's time on our is challenging kozaru that boards and executives are they challenge you and they see other organizations saying how many phishing attempts you've blocked etc etc so you do have to give them whatever it is. That's on their mind and demonstrate that but also just keep on thinking bigger picture an aim high on that one.

Emmanuel Greece Bruce Saul Jenny Kozaru
Canned Foods that CAN Work for Baby-Led Weaning

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

04:21 min | 3 months ago

Canned Foods that CAN Work for Baby-Led Weaning

"My general rule of thumb just to give you like the quick and dirty. I love to see less than one hundred milligrams of sodium per serving food that. I'm serving my baby now. That is not published official guidance because there is none of that for babies less than one so we have to kind of us like best practices. Which is yeah you want to minimize sodium. Most of the foods roughing baby are fresh. Wholesome foods that are not pro process. That are not coming from gans so if you occasionally do feed processed food try to keep it on the lower side of sodium less than a hundred milligrams is like a good benchmark also knowing that the nutrition facts panel is going to reflect serving sizes that are appropriate for adults. And i don't care like how into eating baby is they're not gonna eat a half a cup of garbanzo beans so they're actually eating less than the amount of sodium posted in the label but good rule of thumb less than one hundred milligrams per serving now when you go to pick canned goods. This is like the easiest place to get super good at reading labels really fast I'm gonna give example of garbanzo beans. I was just working on this. Pumpkin curry led weaning recipe for my pumpkin episode recently. Don't just like told my husband. Because i don't like to go storage more and sometimes i ask instacart key. Please get three cans of no added salt garbanzo beans and three that are regular saul in three that are reduced sodium. Like they don't get it or listen to mesa. my husband also doesn't either but anyway comes back from the store. I'm like just by like three different types of canned garbanzo beans from the same brand as teaching experiment so he brings back s&w brand. This is like not brand bashing by any means certainly not sponsor but like that was the brand. That was at sprouts that day and sprouts sexually a great store to buy canned because they have no added salt versions of almost all canned foods. So s&w beans. I hope he went to sprouts. I don't know where he went. He's really not a lot to go to the grocery store unattended. Most of the time but in this case comes home cans of low sodium and regular garbanzo beans. They cost the same. They look the same. But when you flip the label over and a half a cup. Serving the low sodium garbanzo beans had a hundred and forty milligrams the regular ones had four hundred twenty milligrams. So essentially there were three times as much sodium in the regular girvan beans as compared to the low sodium. Now in the united states. Low-sodium means one forty milligram or less per serving s&w pushing it to the upper limit right. They're gonna call that low sodium and they're going to max it out at one forty but it still three times less than the amount of sodium in the regular bonds beans again. They cost the same. They look the same to your baby. They taste the same. We want to air towards the side of the lower sodium foods and again if you rinsed the low sodium garbanzo beans. You would take that one hundred and forty milligrams down to about ninety two milligrams which falls below the hundred milligrams per serving threshold and again. Nobody's gonna eat half a couple of garbanzo beans as an aside. If you are serving your baby can garbanzo beans. You wanna slip them out of the skin and smash them with your thumb. We smash foods that are about the size of our bonds hoping or a blueberry smashing with your thumb up until the time if your baby is one and even beyond that if you want to be extra cautious so read your labels no added salt is going to be the lowest one low-sodium means one forty milligrams or less a tricky labeling law or rule is about reduced sodium reduce sodium just means twenty five percent less sodium than the regular one and the regular one can be have as much sodium as they want to so good example. This is like when you look at soy sauce. People will be like oh. Give me the green bottle giving the low sodium soy sauce soy sauce as you likely know is just liquid salt reduced sodium in the green bottle. That's not low salt that produced it just means there's twenty five percent less salt in the liquid sodium soy sauce then in the regular one okay so reduced sodium just means twenty five percent less. Read those labels carefully look for less than one hundred milligrams for babies in. You're in good shape. Let's talk about canned fruit. Okay yeah. Fresh fruit is great and frozen for the doesn't have any added. Sugar is a great option too but there are still foods that you might only be able to get for your baby in a conversion and they're totally fine provided we're not concerned about sodium in this case we're concerned about sugar so when you're looking at vegetables you're wanting to reduce the sodium in the conversions when you're looking at fruits you're going to pay attention to the sugar. The added sugar anything packed in light syrup or heavy syrup to stay away from the word syrup syrup just means added sugar and age to under should not have added sugar according to the american academy of pediatrics right.

Girvan Beans Mesa United States American Academy Of Pediatrics
Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:36 min | 4 months ago

Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra Cosso. This podcast discussed cybercrime or ransomware attacks against hospitals and other healthcare providers with Collab- Barlow CEO Synergistic Tech this barlow welcome to the program. Hey pleasure to be here. David. Mr Biles vile is, of course, posted on the podcast website. On background computer or cybercrimes against healthcare providers, more of a hospitals, disabled computer networks holding them for ransom. Frequently for Bitcoin fee, the tax have been prevalent since at least two, thousand and ten. This past month however, universal health services with over four hundred locations. Over in the US suffered a cyber attack disabling it's company wide computer network causing some it's hospitals to revert to pen and paper recordkeeping also last month the first known death. Resulted from a ransomware attack in Germany when a patient did not survive transferred to another hospital. Though a twenty nineteen hhs report found between twenty, twelve and sixteen. Hospital deaths increased after ransomware attacks. Earlier this month covid nineteen VACs. A covid nineteen vaccine trial was delayed by more attack or at least one. Likely. The most costly ransomware attack was to the UK's national health service in seventeen that amounted to an estimated one, hundred, twenty, million in it costs and lost productivity. ransomware attacks are on the increase especially amongst small hospitals, particularly vulnerable to phishing attacks, lasting upwards of tumor weeks because of their lean or inadequate security support. As Josephine Wolf noted in October Seventeen New York Times editorial quote Unquote cybersecurity shortcomings in the healthcare sector needs to be addressed now. More than ever when medical care is increasingly being offered via remote online formats. In twenty twenty states introduced more than two hundred and eighty cybersecurity related bills enacting several related to task forces or commissions training. Cybersecurity insurance in criminal. Penalties. The US Senate and House passed seven cybersecurity bills whoever not specifically addressed the healthcare industry and none became law. With me again and discuss healthcare cybersecurity is synergise texts, CEO. COLLAB- Barlow so club with that. As background LET'S START WITH A. Primer Info. I've read these ransomware products. in part are. Titled or named Wannacry Laki Win Plock encrypt locker. Are some these known ransomware product. So my question is, how do these encrypt clinical data and to what effect? So. So basically, what happening if you look at ransomware incident is a you know a narrow will gets access to a network and that could be as simple as grabbing somebody's credentials. You know maybe you were on a retail site, use the same credentials you used at work that retail site was compromised and There are many locations on the dark web that will. Sell compromised credentials or could have been through a phishing attack once the bad guy is into the network then there's two primary things that they're looking to do first is to move laterally. They WANNA get as much access across the networks they can, and there are a variety of tools that they'll deploy. They will actually help them harvest additional credentials once they've got a beachhead. On, the network in addition to harvesting new credentials and kind of moving lateral or what we call lateral movement. The other thing that are going to do is to try to elevate their privilege. So going from maybe an administrator or you know a nurse and triage and maybe getting access to their credentials, they're going to try to work their way up to a network. Administrator or someone that controls access to the whole domain once they've been able to get in and move their tentacles around the organization, then they're going to deploy their payroll, which is one of several of the tools that you mentioned will allow them to then lock things up effectively what these tools, our cryptographic tools, and they basically take the entire hard drive at the device. Scramble it and lock it up with a cryptographic key. What we've seen of late is the bad guys oftentimes insert a new step just before scrambling data, locking it all up in that the exfiltrated lot of it, and they're using that to increase their chances of getting paid by potentially threatening to. The organization by releasing that data if they don't pay ransom. Okay. Thank you so. I in my reading. It's uncertain Saul. Asked you this question? What's your understanding? How frequently? Is this occurring in the healthcare sector? Oh, it's every day I mean literally every single day because you got to remember what you read about in the news is only a very small fraction of what's actually going on even though technically speaking ransomware incident is as far as I'm concerned reportable incident because you gotta remember if the bad guy had enough access to walk up your data, they had the same level of access needed to read the data and they actually in many cases had the same level access needed to change the data. So the problem is you've actually lost control of that system when you've had a ransomware incident. I. So that was that was a question I did have. Other than. Possibly, making this data public and you know healthcare data's is is is confidential proprietary, of course. What do they typically do this data other than hold it hostage? Well remember, this is a organized crime. It is a volume organization you're dealing with a human on the other end and that human is organized right. You're not the only target, their targeting dozens of organizations at the same time in many cases are teams of thirty individuals and you know there's a breakdown on that team there's a project manager of a boss. There's people that are responsible for getting access. There's people that are responsible for moving laterally people responsible for elevating credentials and people are responsible for negotiating. Once walked up system

Mr Biles Josephine Wolf Seventeen New York Times Wannacry Laki Bitcoin Barlow National Health Service HHS Collab Us Senate Tumor Germany David UK United States House Saul
From End Sars to End Swat, Nigeria protests explained

The Takeaway

05:30 min | 4 months ago

From End Sars to End Swat, Nigeria protests explained

"It's been more than a week of protests against police brutality in Nigeria tens of thousands of Nigerians have taken to the streets where police officers have opened fire on demonstrators and arrested hundreds at least ten protesters have been killed so far. Protesters have been calling for police reform and specifically the end of a unit that has been accused of human rights abuses. The unit is called the specialize anti robbery squad. Or SARS over the weekend the President of Nigeria said the unit would be disbanded but demonstrators remain skeptical and are continuing to protest until all of their demands are met joining us now is the BBC's Nigeria correspondent, my any Jones from Lagos. Welcome to the show Miami High Tanzania. So we said that people are protesting this unit but what was was there something that set off the protests to begin with? So the process initially started on early in October when a visual appearance to should meet the appearing to show some young men being dragged by a sales offices out of a hotel. It's unclear when the video was taken, but it was shared very widely on social media in Nigeria and started a resurgence in a Hashtag the had been seen in the poss which was. The HASHTAG and saws. This hashtag first appeared thinking twenty eighteen and had been used a couple of times before when similar videos had been posted showing solves officers allegedly brutalizing members of the public but this time round it picked up a lot of speed and this movement. This youth led movement that seems quite organic has emerged from it what types of policing tactics Are. Residents are Nigerians protesting and who are SARS targeting generally. So, Nigerians have been protesting everything from extortion to torture to extrajudicial killings. I'd be see that's Members of Saul's particularly allowed to act with impunity. on targets often young members of the public who? hops occurring mobile phones laptop they accused him of Internet's cameras The also occasionally target people driving nice calls and particularly they young female asking them how they made their money and they say that these practices are completely unacceptable and that they're taking advantage of their position as plain clothes, policemen to extort people for money. And and carry tile carry a brutal acts of violence against members of the public. Now, we mentioned that the president of Nigeria has since said that he would disband this unit but protesters are still wanting demands to be met. What specific demands are they asking for Miami Su they have a number of demands had a half five key demands they want all protesters to be released. Divest full justice for victims of police brutality who've been killed and compensation for their family they want an independent body to overseen investigation into police misconduct They've also asked for a psychological evaluation and training of members of SAWS, and they want to increase salaries for policemen across the board. Protesters have been killed by law enforcement ten people we understand so far has there been any accountability or. Justice for those people. So that's one of the key reasons why protesters is still out on the street despite the dissolution of sauce for them the dissolution does not constitute any actual justice for victims and they said the fact that people have been killed these protests at no officer has been charged investigations being launched. Nothing appears to have been done to that the forties and not committed to reforming police in any. Substantive Way and they said, they'll keep coming out onto the streets until they see some actual chain beyond just rhetorical the government beyond promises of reforms that they say they've seen before they want to see officers charged they want to see changes puts into law and wants to be assured that police officers in Nigeria would no longer be allowed to act with impunity. Let's talk a little bit about who these protesters are. Are they largely young people? Are they women? Are they men? Who are we seeing? That's taking to the streets that's what's been very interesting about this latest wave of protests. It's just the shit -versity of people who've gotten involved. You have members of the Nigerian DASS per sending money from abroad from the U S from. From the UK, you have young middle class people who live in Nigeria who educated abroad who are lending their skills be it's legal skills medical skills kills in logistics and organizing, and then you have you know ordinary Nigerians perhaps who've lived here their whole lives who are often targeted by the police because they seem as as powerless with not. So well connected all these diverse groups are coming. To a these protests because they say that the violence committed by south under underway to police because this is also a protest about abuses of police in Nigeria a whole affect everyone.

Nigeria Officer President Trump Miami Robbery BBC Lagos Saul Jones Extortion UK
Jackie Robinson Integrates Baseball

Black History in Two Minutes

02:44 min | 5 months ago

Jackie Robinson Integrates Baseball

"On April Fifteenth Nineteen forty seven when Jackie, Robinson, walked onto the field for the Brooklyn dodgers he broke Major League Baseball's color line forever changing the sport. And Race. Relations in America. Jackie Robinson was an extraordinary athlete lettering in four Varsity sports at UCLA. Doing more to, he was drafted into the army who was court martialled after refusing to move to the back of a segregated military bus Robinson fought his case he was acquitted then honorably discharged. So. He always had a sense of fairness always had a sense of racial justice and social justice. Nineteen forty-five because the major leagues remained segregated Robinson joined the Negro Leagues and played for the Kansas City monarchs. Meanwhile, sports writers from African American newspapers were pressuring the major leagues to integrate. Branch Rickey. General Manager of the Brooklyn. Dodgers decided he'd act and began a search for the perfect prospect. Robinson's college education and his ability to endure the racists attacks that inevitably would ensue convince Rickie. It was Robinson who was the ideal candidate to become the first African American. Major. League player. Ricky sign. Robinson to the Brooklyn dodgers in nineteen forty seven. Despite racist abuse from opposing teams and Taunting by the Crowds Robinson manage to focus on the game. But the cost was high. He suffered indignities because of a commitment not to fight back. Gradually. He build a fan base excelled on the field and then was named rookie of the year. Even. Naysayers couldn't deny his outstanding talent as he led the Brooklyn dodgers to their first and only World Series Championship. When he retired Robinson turned his attention to the civil rights movement. He's a frontline participant mending his prestige, his presence to these causes for civil rights. He supported protests in Alabama, attended the march on Washington and was one of the NWEA CP's biggest fundraisers. Yet Robinson Saul civil rights as more than a political movement. He engages in business and entrepreneurial activities. It speaks to his multifaceted approach new away with Jim Crow create opportunities five Americans. By breaking the color line America's favorite pastime Jackie Robinson Open the door for integration far beyond the baseball field.

Jackie Robinson Brooklyn Dodgers Robinson Saul Brooklyn America African American Newspapers Branch Rickey Ucla Jim Crow Ricky Sign Kansas City General Manager Alabama League Rickie Washington
‘Walking Dead’ To End With Expanded Season 11, Daryl-Carol Spinoff Series Set at AMC

Sarah and Vinnie

04:29 min | 6 months ago

‘Walking Dead’ To End With Expanded Season 11, Daryl-Carol Spinoff Series Set at AMC

"So the walking dead I am a huge fan of that show. It turns out, though, I guess I'm not as big a fan is I thought just the other day I was looking through, you know, looking through, like Save DVR recordings. And Ah, I think I have it set to keep 10 episodes or something. You know, as it's recording them. And Dalton are there and no one's watching the home. I mean, I really feel like I haven't watched an episode. About a year ago. We were kind of back into thin after Rick left and the spoiler alert. But it's going on. It continues. There's still 30 more episodes, but then they're going to end it. Yes. Spoiler alert. 12 seasons in, You know, the guy leaves. Or 10 seasons. I don't know. So it's taking a while to kill this thing, often, by the way, it will not be completely dead. Even once the original the walking dead is over. There's a zillion spin offs and etcetera. AMC announced the upcoming 11th season is going to be the last. But instead of the usual 16 episodes, it'll be 24. It'll be stretched out over two years, and we're actually gonna get 30 more episodes because, as previously announced the show, is adding six additional episodes onto the end of the current season. Entities in 10, so they'll be airing new episodes through late 2022. But the end is in sight. So if you go and look, it is a good show. I I really enjoy some of the characters. I don't know why I just haven't been able to jump back on it. Since that one guy left. Um Also, there are at least two more spin offs in the pipeline. There is a fear the walking dead show already happening. One of these new spin offs is going to follow Daryl and Carol. But that's what we call, but that's a great name for a zombie show. Daryl and Carol Fight the zombies. Ahh! That's Norman Reedus and Melissa McBride. That's coming in 2023. So soon is this arc is over. Their characters are going to continue on Witches, and they always have had kind of a cool relationship. Very brother sister thing right. There is a scripted anthology. Siri's called Tales of the Walking Dead That's going to feature And you know, they did like a little. They used to do these little vignettes. So as you're watching the walking dead in the middle of the commercial break, there would be like a minute long chunk of Ah sort of like an episodic like a cereal like you'd have to stop in the middle of the commercials. Toe Watch this, and there would be several Many tiny episodes of as it followed. Some others something completely unrelated in the world of the walking dead story. So I guess that's sort of what this is going to be. Tails of the walking dead is going to feature individual episodes and arcs that feature new or existing characters. Backstories another standalone stories. So if you just love if you see nothing wrong with the world of zombies, and you can't get enough of it, they'll be these little this's whole other spin off show, which is going to be random stories from the walking dead world. So that's going to join fear the walking dead and a limited Siri's called the Walking Dead World Beyond. Which premieres next month. So while I'm telling you that the walking dead is ending, it's not ending. So in part is it's really not even that great of a show like I honestly feel like it. All you do is watch people run from one side of the screen to the next and they're just here we are. We're running there were on the run. It's It's not that great. It hasn't held my attention at all. Yeah, it's Ah. First use yours to the first few seasons are great, and it's not just running from side to side. Their whole episodes where I'm like There were no zombies in that I need more zombies. I'm watching a zombie show. And I'd like there to be zombies enough with the governor. Cool. Don't worry. He's out. He was out couple seasons ago. Ah, yeah, it's ah, you know? Look, if you love it, don't worry, apparently is never going away. So walking dead. Everybody am sees really their anchor show. I don't know what? Well, I am seated madman, right? So that was a solid chauffeur Them it, wass. What else is on AMC breaking bad? Both of those gone. That was big. Again. Breaking bad was then better call. Saul must be too, right. Yeah. Yeah, that must be right. And that's a big show for them, actually. Ah, anyway, walking dead. It's a thing.

AMC Daryl Dalton Carol Rick Norman Reedus Siri Saul Melissa Mcbride
The Secret Lives of The Palace of Fine Arts Swans

Bay Curious

03:33 min | 6 months ago

The Secret Lives of The Palace of Fine Arts Swans

"Heading out to answer me question about how the swans are protected from coyotes is reporter Saul. Asana. Poor. I visit the Palace of fine arts at dusk on a misty grey weeknight. FOGHORNS. Are droning on in the background, but you can still hear the birds. Without Aharon. The swamp so they were hard to find I had to circle around the entire lagoon before I finally saw them we're looking for the. Oh Yes and. They're just hanging out in the open like this. There is one person who doesn't have any problem finding the swans. Her name is Gail Hagerty, and she is the Swan Lady I bow who they are across the water and people say to me well, how can you tell and I should? Because I've been taking care of them for so long for twenty five years. Gale has visited the swans daily and manage their diet mostly lettuce on a swan feed for dessert they get cheese. It's they loved they just goeke dessert for those. The Palace of fine. Arts. Has Two mute swans blanche and blue boy called mute swans because they don't make as many vocalisations as other types of swans. Blanche is very sweet and very forgiving. If I have to handle her, she will forgive me right away. Blue boy is he's the man of the lagoon. He doesn't like geese on their he doesn't like me. He's very large swan and He's always on a patrol always like who you who let you in and. But difficult personalities. Aside, these swans are graceful majestic when I see them on the water. It makes something in my soul feel whole and it's always been that way swans lived at the Palace of fine arts since it first opened during the Nineteen Fifteen Panama Pacific International Exhibition but one thing not in the design was an area to fence them off at night according to gale the Swan sleep out in the open. They are not put in any compound or any protective area in the evening. But where they go is they go into the gardeners nursery area which is fenced off, and they access that from the water to answer me, she's question coyotes haven't been. A problem for adult swans, swans are so big and so fast even on land they're fast I know because I had to run from him especially, but we've had swans for a long time. It's never been an issue for the adults but in the past, it has been an issue for the babies which are usually cared for on the lawn not in the gardener's nursery. Gail says a years ago the coyotes got to them eight them right there on site but doing some health issues, Gail says Blanche won't be having any more babies. So hopefully, coyotes won't be an issue. Now besides while on there are a lot of different birds at the Palace of fine arts. Course. Goes. We've got some horned owls in there and I won't see them normally might hear them.

Palace Of Fine Arts Gail Hagerty Blanche Gale Saul Reporter Nineteen Fifteen Panama Pacifi Aharon
"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

07:59 min | 8 months ago

"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Of this apartment. Nobody call you know when you're a famous artist with a little money in the bank. Taste a little bit better, yeah? Yeah! What about his gear and and you know? What do you do with that? What did he leave behind? was whether a lot of stuff you know what kind of cameras that he leave behind. And what have you done with him? So he had about. Twenty five film cameras left behind Likas. Cannons a couple of graphics are Raleigh's We've kept all of those He had twenty five digital cameras I did not keep all of those some of those donated to ICP. But we kept on blue mix cameron that he loved which is still still carry with me. And photograph with. You. A photographer that into the cameras and into lenses and stuff or not so much. Wasn't your traditional gear? Not He He definitely knew how to use them all and like I, said he embraced new technologies, he was not discouraged by new technology he. Went right into it. But the cameras? No, he. He he kept them clean and he. They were his his his his partner his life. His life partners they. They went with them everywhere. Even when we were traveling. In Europe, he had exhibitions in Amsterdam and Germany in Hamburg and in Paris this this cameras were one of the few objects that were were in the suitcase. Did. He have particular focal length that he liked if he a like. Thirty. Five millimeter of fifty is looking the pictures. It doesn't look like anything extreme wider long. No that's true. He He I think he was usually usually fifty millimeter sixty millimeter. I think some of his. FASCIA works out from what I understand he he did. Use Zoom Lens. Because it allowed him to be distance away from the model. There was a famous story that Grace Coddington told where she. She was sent to meet lighter in a park, probably Madison Square Park near his studio and she was dressed up in their requires a fashion. Outfits and she went out there, and she walked around Madison Square Park, and she consume she consume. She went back into the studio and she said to Henry Wolf. I went out to saw later wasn't there? Of course. Later came out that solves. There had photographed her and came up with some wonderful. Just. With his students. Perfect. June sounds like. And what about like paperwork? Was that left behind? and has that kind of offered you guys are. Trailed, kind traces work in his business dealings with it has indeed yeah, he he never threw anything away. So all of his all of his documents and travel receipts, and and things like that are intact and American Express bills from the Seventies. Yeah, we have A. we have an invoice from Diane artists from A. Photograph that he had bought from her, and I sent, said it to saw, and said you know here. We go, Saul, thank you then. There's a another one from about a month later that says saw. It is more urgent than it was. So you know in other words. It's time to pay out. Yeah because she was his neighbor for a spell on these tenth street as well, but yeah, we have. We have a lot of fascinating receipts from his travel fashion assignments in Europe for instance Received from Sinatra in Paris and things like that It's it's. We're looking forward to be presented a few of these things in exhibitions, but we look forward to showing more. What do you guys do in terms of digital storage? What would you will? What what drives do you use and kind of? What's your your method? Your theory on that in terms of you know the general ideas, three places and that you follow. Yes, yes, it is an ABC type of Situation where we. We have things backed up? In several locations we do use solid state drives for SSD's for Our offsite backup, I will say that in terms of a print files. We tend to use Philippe Lamont's labs to. Generate new files for printing that that are better than anything. We store on our own system, so it's sort of an as needed basis that we. Generate those files? The ones that we have work for say a magazine. Reproduction we do have a good store of. Of Hi Rez files of early color, work and and other sort of prominent, well known. Pieces, but when it's time to make a print, we don't. We don't use our file for that. For the slide capture itself. We do use a Nikon, camera. NSL Are we use a copy stand. With a light tray below the slide, captured that way. We're not scanning sites. We're actually photographing them one by one so that we can make little adjustments and get the focus and grain correct Takes us. At our fastest speed Maybe two or three minutes per slide to catalog them and photograph them, so you can imagine what task we have in front of us. If you're talking about sixty eight thousand slides I don't have that. Many slows my collection, but I've been doing this. Again with with your a whole setup, we're. graphing I clean them I photograph I. Walk The whole thing, and yes, that is very labor. Greenberg Gallery as obviously been a big supporter of cells work. Are they the you know the exclusive gallery for his work, and also can you speak I? Know you have an upcoming a least virtual exhibit of his work Probably it will be up soon. Can you speak about that? Yes the Howard Greenberg Gallery in new. York is the primary representing Gallery foresaw lighter, and they will have exhibitions there every two to three years but they're also bringing souls work to some great art fairs We did not have Perry. Photo New York this year, but hopefully that will come back for for next year. and. We were really excited that in this time, Harry. Where working from home, we had to online exhibitions that came out of that are are out now. One at Howard Greenberg Gallery about Sol's color work and the other one is at Twenty Eighth Street which is spelled V. I. G. O. N. Street, and that is where you can see some images from soles color slide archive that have never been seen before, so there are some online explorations to be had right now. It's exciting. Morgan Michael Thank so much for. US, today. It's been really a a really informative and his against all light is work is pretty amazing. If you haven't seen it, check out our show notes and do Google. Search whatever. And speaking of such people WANNA. Take a look at more of what you guys are doing and more of salts work What about some of the.

Howard Greenberg Gallery Europe Madison Square Park Paris Likas Grace Coddington ICP US Henry Wolf Greenberg Gallery Saul partner Google cameron A. Photograph Nikon New York
"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

06:48 min | 8 months ago

"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"We're in for something to. Do, for something great commercials good. I mean you you you knew when he was alive. Of course when you work with him, did he leave instructions? You know for you guys going forward whether legal documents, and and also is there any kind of endowment that he left to run the of? yes, so so he didn't WANNA do. Any estate plan in. Sydney was not inclined to spend, and he told me this he was not inclined to spend the last days of his life. For last year's was life organizing anything like what we have have now. He just decided he was going to leave everything in in my hands, he had he had incredible faith in me and the confidence that he's given me. ME. Today I I. Still I will have it for the rest of my life. He he knew that I could be trusted to take care of things and I knew what he wanted having worked with him for eighteen years. I worked one day a week when I was not at the gallery I was working with the salt organizing his archives so. After we after he passed away we had to work with teams of lawyers. tax lawyers, state lawyers It was a difficult time, but we had some great a professional help most most of the time and less than a year later we were able to create the Saul Lighter Foundation and we are a nonprofit. Private operating artist endowed foundation, so we're able to with funding from Saul's artwork and his licensing, his exhibitions and books. We're actually able to fund. Projects and programs that are charitable. So I guess you have to balance the you know the idea of getting his workers more well known work out there whether it's through licensing your exhibitions to keep the name alive and to keep money coming in and balance that with discovering. The stuff that hasn't been seen. And how do you? How do you do that? How do you divide that time? And and what kids priority? That's a good question. for instance with the best known color work we have only a certain amount of inventory that a lifetime prince that all signed or printed. In his lifetime. And so we are concerned with burning through that work too fast, so we limit the sales of of that those lifetime prints, and but in terms of print sales, there have been no posthumous prints for sale. But going through the archive and finding the unseen work in promoting, it is of course so exciting to us, and we're being very careful. To make the distinction between what Saul chose in his lifetime, and what we've discovered offering since using the with the slide archive I think what makes saw so exciting and still. Very Much A. Viable in contemporary artists is because these discoveries are still coming out. He's he's an exciting artists to follow and I think in subsequent books from now. People are not learn more about him. there's endless material to to review its like Michael. I have a lot of pots on the stove cooking all at once. And It's it's it's a lot. It's a lot of fun we're. We're so honored to have this job Fisher. Nor can you speak about putting together the the early color book and how that kind of jump started a little bit you know. Yes yes, so. That's a little book. that changed Saul's life It was his first book. It came out in two thousand six, but we started working on it in nineteen ninety eight's back when no one was really interested in in color, photography or books of color. They were very very few artists. Especially working with color in the fifties. So saw and the gallery. And I would put this book. together a Marquette and we found one publisher who signed a contract saw, but then that publisher went out of business, and then another publisher who bought it after that but. Didn't go onto printed, and then finally finally in two thousand four. Gerhard Steidl? The Great German art publisher bought the rights. And then book came out another two years later, so we waited almost ten years. For the spoke to come out on. But after that book came out. Saul went from from making a few sprint sales a year to have an enormous response from collectors and museums all over the world. He had an exhibition the Milwaukee Museum of art thereafter. He had an exhibition at the Cardi Salt Foundation in Paris. I was working at the gallery then we had calls from collectors. In Paris and Germany's say. Who is this person like? Why haven't I come across him? I I I'm learning about color photography now or I'm adding to my collection and I've never heard of him and he's. He is so good so that that little book turned around everything and it hasn't stopped for Saul's sentence and. The only requirement that he had for that book was the was the size. He just wanted a small square little book that could fit on his his nightstand. and the book finally landed in his hands. He didn't. Hit, Pareo make any loud noisy was just very content with it but it should create a lot of excitement in the art world, and still does. It's possible that that delay in the book being produced was very auspicious. During the time between Nineteen Ninety eight and two thousand six, when the book finally came out, the world was ready for it them, and in a way that maybe they weren't ready to embrace color photography in the late nineties or very early, two thousand, and it might have been might have been a very fortunate delay for for Saul. Everything you possibly possibly, it's also great to know that later in his life. And when this happened, he was happy with the success or happy with the newfound success. I mean that's. I guess for any artist very important in. It did not change his life that. He didn't go out and buy a car or a Ya are a condo or anything like that. He stayed at home and he drank. Coffee went to starbucks in the Strand and painted everyday and I think he was just pleased that his light bills could be paid for the first. Time in many years. He wasn't GonNa get kicked out.

Saul Saul Lighter Foundation publisher Sydney Milwaukee Museum of art Cardi Salt Foundation starbucks Paris Gerhard Steidl Fisher Michael Coffee Marquette Germany sprint
"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

08:07 min | 8 months ago

"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"We hope you're enjoying this edition of the B and h photography podcast. The best way to support the show is by subscribing on apple podcasts, Google, podcast, spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts for links to gear and more information on today's guests. Check out the show notes in your podcast, APP or visit our homepage on the beach explorer website and joined the being h photography podcast, facebook group, and now back to the show. Okay, we are back up. Question. Let's let's talk a little bit about the archive and how things are going on. What was the first major step in organizing soul's work? Well. Walking in the door. No. WE I. Tried to extract the prince out of their non archival boxes and get them safely into into new boxes, and we've been inventoried everything training basically like a digital catalog recipes so every. Painting every every photograph has an inventory of a number. We actually for the IRS. We had to count everything. They stay said you can figure out how you're going to settle the state later on, but for now we want you to count everything so the first thing that we did was count and count and count Prince and canes We had to count slides and negatives. And after we survived that. Difficult moment. Days! SORTA getting old. Much good I couldn't. You know honestly Allen. It never gets old. I I I see things Michael. See things every day, even now almost seven years later in passing where we're like Oh, my God I've never seen this before, and isn't it incredible so it doesn't get the TRICIA. Level absolutely absolutely sure for sure I mean I I. We're looking at his slider. Have now and so I'm seeing images that I really have never seen before, but I I realized that I'm seeing. What he saw an instant in a moment and a place fifty sixty years ago, so it is. Like walking on someone's footsteps, but even better, you're looking through. Their is at an exact moment. It's one of the magic of. Magic Saul and of photography itself really and we will enrollment. We will admit to you that we haven't completed the cataloging of the work so. Our delight are delightful. Surprises are coming still at a nice clip. And you mentioned that most of his digital imagery is still on the cards that they were shot to Zach correct. That's true. Yes, were you have? That's basically digital unexposed film? So you have all add to go through, so you lot of surprises yet to come as? We we've downloaded all the digital photographs onto hard drives. That was six years ago now we realize we've got switched to newer technology transfer than once again. Because the digital is always changing right, it's a it's a new technology is still. And still very, you can hold them in your hands imprint from. Isn't that something? Yeah, the day to are credible. We just looked through. Some boxes of negatives for the first time. In many years, in order to explore the idea of digitizing those and again we were blown away by what we saw in new facets of the work that we had never seen before. And I will mention that it's a it remains a priority to go first through the work that saw himself chose for printing or actually did print so we? We haven't gotten too far into work that saw himself never went through, but that looms large in the future. The slide projects is the first time we're really getting deeply into that work. Do you have a tier system setup. Pick up and go. Oh my God look at this, and you have to set them aside and go this really good, and but there are some better I mean how you breaking down. How many categories and what percentage if it's fair to ask are are there of? Now in this case slides that you just go okay, these are just decided it doesn't these not really important or you really finding a lot of important stuff there in very few that you would. They're insignificant. I would say that Saul a percentage of success. His rate of success was extremely high. He knew it himself. He was not shy he he knew He believed in his work. He was confident artist. When we go through his slides today I I would say it's a high percentage. Where were were were stunned by how how good they are. We quickly assembles eighty. New Images from his slide archive just from a few months work and we mounted an exhibition of them in a big black box in Japan, so giant slide. Slide show foresaw in January and at people were were absolutely stunned on. He was very successful each time he said to to us when he was alive that what we had seen so far of his collar work was just the tip of the iceberg and that seems to case. He put a lot of each subject with a picture and move on. Or how did he work? Work when you look through his stuff that you know is a solid roll of film. Did it looked like he shot? Three or four ten pictures would is each one different situation so he to win clicking left. It's closer to two three four then to ten Gaz saying earlier, he really, he seemed to find what he was looking for quickly, and then he would move on I will mention about the slides. That there is an issue of color degradation on a lot of them so. Many of them have would need color correction in order to be presented in any format So. That's that kind of make certain choices for us. As we as we. For instance as we were looking for images to present in the black blackbox projection room in Japan, they were clearly beautiful images, but they had they had. Gone Red over the years because the other colors fell away. If it went, it was probably answered croome. Shooting slide film fifty years ago and I to going through my archives and I've got the. KOTAK rooms are dead on their. Yup. From. The early Fuji's and some of the goes yet. They they all start going off and you could save them to a certain extent when you scan them if you know what you're doing, but Every year that goes by. They're just getting worse and worse and worse. You really are are chasing the clock right now. In many ways with a lot of his work. Yes, yes, Saul Saul was very lucky, though to have run into Philippe Lamont, who was one of the great color printers still working today? Lamont labs here in Manhattan and Sleep Lamont helped preserve. A lot of the slides into digital. By spice scanning them. He printed. I saw in nineteen ninety-five. He got a grant from the Ilford. Paper Company to print for Saul. So we're lucky that we're actually able to preserve these images digitally if they do, proceed to. Disintegrate But yet it's true the Kona. Chrome this absolutely beautiful and some of the answer. is to we've we find? That that period, this is just incredible in the fifties when we come across a fifty s, co or CODA chrome. Saw saw lighter slide. Were we're no,.

Saul Saul Japan facebook Philippe Lamont apple IRS spotify Allen Google Zach Michael Ilford Lamont labs Gaz Paper Company Fuji Manhattan
"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

02:05 min | 8 months ago

"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Just there for you to find? Well He. His paintings were in portfolios. They were not issue on paper, so they were stored flat But generally saws organizational skills while they existed. We're rather chaotic. I think he was always sorting through his slides In fact, we got a lot of direction on His slides just based on the boxes that were closest to the light table. But his one of his rooms was just full of of color, slides and paintings. All mixed together and it was one of the scarier times actress saw passed away was just wear to begin without causing damage as we extract things from his different rooms, a lot of the black and white and color prints, photographs were in non archival boxes, which we had to quickly get them out of those boxes and the paintings. Some of them were sixty seventy years old. Paper does disintegrate so he he had them organized but It was not a very safe. Situation. But nevertheless he loved them. has his paintings exhibited little. So Saul had an exhibition at node lower gallery, which has since closed, but he had an exhibition there in two thousand eight, and it was the first exhibition of his paintings in forty years Beautiful Exhibition and we created a small. Catalogue put no his his paintings really have yet to be. Discovered, they're they're absolutely beautiful. We have been including them in larger. Retrospective exhibitions recently in Japan and Europe. All right, we're GONNA. Take a short break. We come back. We're going to talk about the soul lighter archive. Stay tuned!.

Saul Europe Japan
"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

08:16 min | 8 months ago

"saul" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"His friend, Henry Wolf who? Was One of his best friends. They met when Wolf was our director at esquire later Harper's bazaar and. Gave Saul many of his best assignments. He saw and Henry Wolf had planned book of Saul's nudes in the seventies. And it for one reason or another never happened, so those images only started to be seen. There are a couple of them in the early, black and white book from two, thousand, fourteen and several of them in the. German book called saw later retrospective, which came out a couple of years before that but and then of course in my room. From, two thousand I believe that came to dozen. From steidl really opened up. That body of work to the world for the first time along with the book women. To Allen's point I found and to your point I found that book in a like a hipster store in Williamsburg last year and And thumb through it before I even looked at the author and I thought it was somebody you know. Just a young photographers works. Wow Wow I wanted to ask about the you know. and. We'll get the more of this in the second half of the show, but the you know. The the backdrop of undeveloped film was partly a part of a financial reason or was it. In this is the my my question, which is, did he kind of consider? The photo finished when he took it, or did he? You know work on the images afterwards. that E. In the early years that he worked in the dark room and then later did even working photoshop. That's a good question The. Terms of the undeveloped film. We have various theories about that that we were not sure, but we think that it's quite possible that Saul new. When he had had a day, so to speak and bite of put a roll away That there wasn't much there and and you know he didn't need to get to it anytime soon. That's one theory about the undeveloped film. Because he really did. Know what he had and he he did consider a photograph finished after he had taken it and. We're seeing evidence of that as we explore his massive slide archive, which has been one of our major projects of started a couple of years ago solid behind. Sixty to eighty thousand color slides and along with A. PhD candidate in from Berlin. Who got a grant to study saul slide work. We have been unearthing these slides and we started going through them and we're learning so much about his. His life in photography through examining these slides at one thing that we've seen. Over and over. Is that he? He tended to capture what he was going for. With just a few clicks of the shutter he he didn't have you know. Many, many attempts at getting shot in in most cases sometimes, he returned to say a certain foggy window. A bunch of times depending on who or what was behind it, and he experimented that way, but in general, he seems to have captured. What he was after quickly and moved on, and then he he really didn't do any post. Production where he didn't CROC generally and an in terms of digital photography, you'd fill up a card with one of his digital cameras that he just throw a bowl it. He didn't really ever get to go through. Those digital cards very much, and of course what is on those cards, shows the solitaire style strongly through the through the two thousand and up until the point that he died. He loved. He loved the invention of digital, cameras. He he bought about twenty five of them. Once he started having money again. That's what he well. He bought and one of the things that he loved the digital cameras. As he could take a picture and see results instantly, he didn't have to send it away to Eastman Kodak to have it developed. He didn't have to go into a dark room. It was right there for him and. He! He bought so many cameras. He and I didn't quite know how to use them. But he was great at embracing new technologies. Every time he bought a camera, he he he would give the camera to me and I would take it home to New Jersey and learn how to use it over the weekend. Bring it back. Teach him, and he learned how to take a picture of manipulate the camera a. he knew how to delete, but he but he deleted nothing. and. Just. Throw. Throw things away. He knew how to do it. He just never did it. Never never never never in terms of souls trail of breadcrumbs that he left for us. With all these thousands of slides. Also thousands of negatives and then hundreds of rolls of undeveloped film that you know our best. Our best progression is to go from the slides to the negatives, and then finally try to figure out what's on those undeveloped roles in terms of the hierarchy of of knowing what Saul himself looked through and shows for printing. I think we're going to learn a lot more than the next figures going through his slide archive. One of the things I'm excited about is. To find more this early color work of course but also to find more of his fashion work. He was really one of the great fashion photographers. International recognition. Than, his images are just beautiful. Every I wanted, was he? A good businessman and all in terms of I get most of those photos shuttle back with. The? Didn't have the rights of those photos, but did he you know. Were they licensed secondarily? Did he keep on top of that at all or I get the sense not. I don't think that he worked with contract. I've never come across anything like that with Harpers, bizarre and sadly what we've. We've heard from harpers bizarre as a lot of that archive. That they kept because there directors were infamous for not returning work off Tacos while the archive was destroyed. They just tossed it out. They just didn't they didn't know better. A little bit about the about the East village. Because he you know, he lived basically his whole life in an east tenth street. and you know anyone outside of New York might not know, but you know it's a great neighborhood. It's was Bohemian neighborhood, and maybe not so much any longer, but still vibrant and wonderful for photographing if you're out walking around. Most of his a lot of his photos were taken in the neighborhood correct. Yes, that's right. the in fact, the majority of of his street work was done within just a few blocks of his apartment and that's something we've been thinking about a lot lately. while. We're all lockdown at home. The fact that Saul didn't need to go anywhere. Far beyond his front door. To, do amazing work and to discover. Things that no one had ever seen before and end in fact, during the. Late forties and the fifties when he did a lot of his groundbreaking color street photography in his neighborhood during those same years he was doing. Black and white nudes and other other portraits inside his apartment, so he really of course while painting every day all the while, so he really just found inspiration all around him and in terms of the East village. He really liked First Avenue.

Saul Henry Wolf director Eastman Kodak New Jersey Harper Allen New York Williamsburg Berlin
"saul" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

11:52 min | 11 months ago

"saul" Discussed on Bald Movies

"Podcast for better call Saul on AMC. I'm Jim I'm Alexis and season five episode eight titled Bag Man Alexis what did you think of this episode? It was a little dry but I liked it. Cows jokes little dry in alty just like just like a button-down shirt in the desert Do you think I liked it? I I thought it was very good. It didn't blow my mind like it seemed to blow a lot of the Internet's mind. This episode was really hyped up and I think it was kind of unwarranted because all the hype that I saw like coming from the actual people involved in making it was not around like how you know. This is a game changer. For the story or these characters are going to have totally different perspectives. Coming out of this. It was more like this was a really hard episode for us to make because it involved a lot of stuff like the shootout was a significant investment of time and effort and so. I think that God audience expectations low high. And then I think a lot of people are just trying to look at episode and go well. I was told that this is supposed to be a major episode and I needed to be that somehow like I don't feel like the. The reaction is matching the episode in my opinion because this is not as exciting to me as like last episode. Where were Jimmy? Kimmel getting married like the episode before that the ending of that was a mind blower for Kim suggests that they get married to me. That's the kind of thing that makes me go. Ooh Wow this episode was a standout this episode. Not so much to me but it was good like I was definitely involved like engage with the whole thing. Is it because we've already seen something very similar in breaking bad that four days or five days out? I was definitely looking at this episode episode through that. Lens the whole time and you know that was a great episode. I think this is a very strong episode too but yeah it was. Maybe a little bit tainted by that. I could see that because I kind of kept expecting it to happen in when they started foreshadowing things where it was like. Oh the poor. Water Shoes Steph I knew what they were going to do already. And so it wasn't a huge surprise. I don't really think fundamentally changed much. Although I do have some questions about how character is gonNA react. So there's that maybe we could talk about that later. I think the things that really changed mostly happened in the beginning. Third of the episode or a quarter of the episode and the rest is the Mike and Saul roadshow which does have consequences does have consequences. It's it's different than what I I feel like. I picked up in the beginning of the episode but at this point I'm starting to wonder everybody talks about like win is the moment Saul appeared. Onscreen right or like winded. You turn on Walter White. I kind of feel at this point. We should start talking about when we lost sympathy for Kim because we know who Jimmy is and she knows who Jimmy is and she keeps getting herself deeper into this in order to stay with him in order to please him whatever she whatever it is driving her to keep this relationship going is at this point something that we have to talk about seriously like you would sit her down and say. Why are you doing this cam? Yeah I can see how her thinking with the marriage mine have gone because to her contracts are golden there the the highest standard of everything she she lives for contracts and that is what a marriage is a contract. You're agreeing to these terms together. Although to be fair he didn't say that he wouldn't work with cartel he just said that he would tell her everything and he did and but she also knows that this is a very bad idea to get involved with this man Jimmy and be the life that he's going to obviously be living. You know yeah there are plenty out like the road to here is strewn with red flags. Absolutely she knows the kind of person he has. This does kind of make me think that she is more that kind of person than we thought she was. sits tough to watch because. I like it a lot meter the episode. I think certainly has to change Saul as well when you look at him out in the desert cowering in fear has the cartel is sling bullets right past him. A you'd have to think this guy wasn't seen much action. This guy who prefers being in parking. Lots Hawking cell phones enable the talk himself out of most major things before they happen. Yeah except for getting beat up at one time but it wasn't it wasn't that serious and this time it didn't work. Nobody cares. You're an avocado on. Sorry an avocado. Yeah I was yeah I said. Thank you and Portuguese. That's not a lawyer in Spanish Avocado. Yeah which we'll talk about that when we get to it. 'cause that's pretty hilarious. There are some really funny things this episode to. But maybe we should start with the recap stint there. I'd say the cousins show up at cartel warehouse and load a bunch of money into bags and someone calls someone else to say. He has something for them. If they're still interested which we don't really know what's going on at this point but by the end I think we we understand. These boys are so shiny head to toe. They sure are shiny heads shiny shirts Chinese suits. It's a good thing they didn't get stuck out in the desert with Mike in Saul because they would have given yeah they would have spotted them. They are so absolutely wasn't gonNA take the boots off walk through the desert with no boots. There's not a prairie whole a prairie dog hole big enough to hide these boys I notice. Notice that they're cleaning cadillac out in the like. We know that solve eventually ends up driving a cadillac with white leather interior. It's not a convertible. You know I was wondering if this was going to be like it's sort of a gift from low for the extra hazard pay or something but I don't think so because convertible unless they D- converted. It's probably not is. Yeah this is just bait. Also the casualness of these guys are cleaning the car flicking blood water at each other. That's gross it's cartel baby that Yup this look like straight a scene out of gone in sixty seconds with all these fancy cars around like this them bring them back to the warehouse packing them onto the boat or whatever. I guess these places probably exist. They got dresses. They've got a lot of fancy chandeliers they've got a horse statue. Probably of an indigenous person being run through or something. I don't know it's like the granddaddy of Antique restore shops and yeah feels like so low instructs Saul how to pick up his bail money and Saul tries to wriggle out of having to transport the cash while acts like he's off the hook which I think he might have been willing to solitude tempted by the money and he asks for one hundred thousand dollars to complete the job yet. That's his. That's his new his newest huge number. That he can't possibly pay but of course he's fucking cartel. I mean if you can pay seven million dollars to get himself out. Why couldn't he be able to afford one hundred thousand and we saw this tax stacks of cash on the cartel stash house so yet there's a ton of money there and love of course pretends to mull this over? Ma One hundred thousand dollars a Lotta money. You can see it on his face and then of course he has done. Tony Dalton is so good at playing this casual bastard. Basically this con artists who climbed way to the top of the family. I enjoyed him giggling at the newspaper. That was good. Yeah what's what's that all about. I don't even know there was. There was an article talking about how the the burning down of the restaurant was arson. Okay they rule to be an arson because of all the cut up seats and stuff giggling at because that's law and he said solid not get the joke. What do you make of Saul suggesting Nacho for the job and lawler saying that a guy like that with that much money could do could be real dumb real fast does he? Does he know that NACHOS flight risk Also a flight risk. Do you think I'm not certain I I was thinking about that? Why why doesn't anyone not to do this? I almost wonder if it's not that Nacho is worth too much to him right now because like if he if anything happens to Nacho along this run who comes up who steps up to carry out the operations of of the Salamanca portion of the cartels work letters better than crazy eight. We don't know that is a whole new character. You know they could do it. But I'm thinking it's half like Oh Nachos too valuable to lose and they lose saul who gets shit right. Yeah that's a fair point but also yeah. Maybe half like well not as a criminal. Maybe isn't totally. Trust Nacho. Like one hand of poker is not going to change your complete mind on somebody right so I could be both yeah. I was just curious if he starting to suspect him. Okay next scene. Jimmy's taking an evening shower and tells Kim that he has things he's gotTa do. Among which is to get the bail money for Lonzo and Kim horrified by him being a bag man for the cartel appropriately. So I don't know how much more plainly Kim can speak to Jimmy. 'cause I mean when she talks to Jimmy she's talking to him like a fifth grader. She saying I don't like this. I don't want you to do it. Like how much more can she stress to Jimmy? What he's doing is upsetting her. She can't she is said it as clearly as you possibly could. She's drawn her line in the sand and that is why our faces nearly horrified when he crosses that line to hug her and tell her that he'll be fine because he says he will be stopped using contractions awhile ago so he's definitely telling the truth. It's this is the scene or I just go. How much more of this can this relationship date like? They just got married not even a few days later. Jimmy's already crossing the line. It seems like at some point soon very soon. Kim is going to have to just in this thing as soon as Kim gets home. She is checking the mail and she flops down on the bed to read this letter in as she is reading her face falls. Jimmy just happens to be explaining how deep in the shit he is and I can't tell if.

Saul Jimmy Kim Mike Alexis AMC arson Nacho Spanish Avocado cadillac Tony Dalton Kimmel Walter White toe Lonzo lawler Salamanca
"saul" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

15:08 min | 11 months ago

"saul" Discussed on Bald Movies

"When you see him like when he's on he's always moving around and like his arm going. His mouth is gone is heads moving in these scenes. He's doing a lot of the same things but he's he's able to bring like an awkward feeling to like a like a not quite sure physical presence to where he's up on his toes he's like trying to look bigger than he really is. He's the God of lightning few. His fingertips is so insane in that it did. It crosses that line into ridiculousness. If it's crazy I couldn't believe also for someone who is so good at lying whenever Howard basically says. Hey Fuck Oh. I know that you're the one who through bowling. Ball's at my car and sit hookers to my work sex workers. He is so bad at lying in that moment. I don't know if he was ever expecting to get caught or what it was. I think so. He's not use getting called out by people. Suspicious get called out Bob by people all the time. But it doesn't get called out by real people. He has called out by actively in the process of cutting and Howard's not that Howard approaches him Howard Howard's almost pulled like this weird magic trick on him where he's reversed the power dynamic here because Jimi doing all these horrible things to Howard. He thinks he's got the upper hand. But Howard it's like I kind of like Lilo Howard is unfazed by this stuff. You know he doesn't like having his lexus. Smashed by Bowling. Ball's approaches it very calmly. He's in for a better word and Jimmy does not deal with that. I think like people who are taken in by the things he's doing he hasn't much hurry. Time deal with COP who arrested him back cell and cell phones that you'll hit with a bag of food that guy also had a similar effect on on Saul Saul was trying to read his game but the cop was just like I see your game. I'm not playing it like I'm just going to give you the warning. And then this all really know how to handle him. Yeah knows he knows how to handle. Held a handle anger and suspicion and suckers and soccer. Yeah people who are copy machine a salesman. Yeah so willing to believe ally because it gives them something that they want by when confronted with genuine concern for him which is what Howard was kind of showing like okay. I don't know how I upset you. But don't worry about it. He thing Howard doesn't have anything he wants from. Jimmy he wants to give Jimmy something. Jimmy doesn't know how to accept it because it would mean acknowledging his emotions. I think poor broken man. Jesus as fucked up. That's it for the episode. We're we're GONNA do some feedback that we've got a couple of pieces here You know five or six emails from what I one is from Chris who had Some steps say by your your comments last episode. Go on so I just had to ride in about last week. Show to say that. I almost spit out my coffee when Alexis coined the term it's now far too much fitter bio I coined that but. I'm so glad that you're giving me the credit for it. I did not terrible millennial. News online far too much avocado fish hotdogs. Excuse you know over. Podcasts is over. I'm going upstairs. We're moving onto rich. Not that rich from for the final word on smoke detectors downy because we finally got to the core of the information that I really wanted. Which is why smoke detectors have radioactive stuff in them? Yes please so. They have a radioactive material and sensor that detects the radiation coming off of that and when the smoke gets in between those two things breaks the flow of the radiation the sensor stops detecting the radiation alarm goes off. Cognisant have to be radiation. You wouldn't think so because he mentioned the example of like a super mart supermarket checkout conveyor belts stops when the beam of light gets the visible light. Maybe you could do it with that. You don't need radioactive material in your house. Maybe light takes more battery power than radiation. Yeah would that thing definitely would. Yeah transmitting typically takes more power than receiving so thank you rich for being more present on this episode than rich was basically a well-dressed accessory to Kim host move onto Christian during your review of Wexler Vegan. You're wondering what connection was between all the scenes on which Jimmy plays the song smoke on the water going as far back as when Davis main fire Jimmy and season two. However I believe the first this first featured on the season one episode. Four flashback introduces. Jimmy's best friend Marco. Jimmy Marco are seen humming the song ever sort of the battle. Cry Keep Gray reviews Yes this is kind of a one of his goto songs. I think everybody's got those right. Pass someone who plays guitar about as well as Jimmy Plays Guitar. You apply veterans. Go ON I. I have some Goto songs that I both And and play interesting time high. I cannot say that I do. You probably grew up in the era of smoke on the water he did. Oh absolutely we saw. We saw birthdates in this episode. Nine hundred sixty eight and I couldn't actually see James Birthday because the Amazon thing where they show the people who are any in each scene was covering it up so it feature the Yes. I was called yesterday the pause screens on many services very lacking lead it to be desired. Especially if there's no way to dismiss the black overlay that they put on these things too. Dim them just covers up like a third of your screen. And you can't see the details that you really WanNa see when you pause pausing his and just to stop playback. Pausing is also take in something on the frame but I don't these. Ui Designers think more about podcasters. Come everyone thinking about everyone. Podcasters are included. Everyone all right. Mike writes in not that Mike. I'm really watching the opening scene of last week's episode and I swore that Kim's MOMS license play Red Nebraska is that were gene is hiding out any chance we get some kind of Gene Kim reunion in the post breaking bad time line. Maybe after Sahlin evitable he gets Kim disbarred she goes home to Nebraska so explainer absence from breaking bad and could set a pretty compelling final showdown thoughts. Yeah we've we've considered stuff like this before I just wanted to bring it up because I don't think we talked about the plea being Nebraska. They yeah they probably didn't. I guess that might add more potential here for some kind of reunion somewhere down the line. But I'm not really expecting to see much of that I really don't I think gene is more about the fate of Saul not a ballot catching up on the old times or anything. I don't think he's going to have much of a happy ending. And that would almost be too might be bitter sweet sweet to have like a reunion with cameras. I know they don't do anything in the show. Without reason. They made a point to show us that license plate it is Nebraska that is absolutely or Gina's I think that there is probably some kind of connection. I don't WanNa go and say that. They are going to meet up old Kim and old gene but people talking a lot about this when I think Kim was interviewing for a job back in like season two or something. That was a long time ago and she said she was from Nebraska or like mentioned the cornhuskers or something some team which indicated she was so like. This might. Just be a follow on to the already established backstory of Kim. We're like you you already know. She's from Nebraska. So this isn't a big reveal but I don't know we'll see We Got Doug are harassment. Lawyer here Not Not on the payroll. So He's not our legal representative but he is illegal representative for someone somewhere and he has a few fine points about spousal privilege laid on me. Which if you're not familiar is the concept. They're they're sort of leaning on so that they don't testify against each other He says it only prevents the spouse from being forced to testify against the other however does not allow one spouse to stop the other from testifying against him her. That means Kim cannot be forced to testify against Jimmy. But if she chooses to. Jimmy cannot invoke the privilege to stop her. Try think could be problematic for Jimmy. Yeah that could be a key point number two if they divorced the Privilege. Ends differ from attorney. Client doctor patient privilege. If I'm your turn you fire me. I'm still forbidden from disclosing anything that you told me in confidence while I was your attorney in contrast Kim and Jimmy's marriage when it ends Kim could be compelled to reveal confidential communications that occurred during the marriage therefore she would be valuable in this to the authorities post breaking bad her looking to learn more about Walter White's fugitive lawyer. Yeah that's actually survives. This she could have been interrogated. Yeah I don't know how much she would know at that. Point depends on what their relationship is but could be a lot could be nothing. There are a lot of people speculating whether or not she was. Just kind of in the background in breaking bad as Saul's wife I kind of hope that's not the case just from a female perspective because we have a word for that it's called bridging and I hate it here. This you'd be freshman entire series. Please please don't make could be that. That's very true. Actively fridge thread. Cutting FRIDGE CRAIG. Just sitting in the corner so in doilies or whatever whatever women are allowed to do we have two more points here. Also actually I. I wanted to say that people have pointed out that Saul in break met doesn't have a ring which they Neely put on here saying them saying we don't need rings is just like a formality kind of thing right interesting. Hiring he needs is a gross pinky ring to go with gross cubicles gross cuticle. Yeah so dry. Heat t works spot. For God's sake I know how good is hands? Be So nasty. Sorry voting correct but your hands are kind of dry. You need more. Lucien all right number. Three's Mexico on the list of spousal privilege points. The communications have to be made away where there would be an expectation of privacy. So the conversation in the McGill Alexa. Apartment is privileged. But Jimmy is talking to Kim on a cell phone in a public space where it could be easily overheard. His half of the conversation would not be privileged so the part of his conversation. That could be heard not on the phone. Would not be privileged..

Jimmy Marco Gene Kim Howard Howard Saul Saul Nebraska Ball Bob soccer lexus McGill Alexa salesman cornhuskers Mexico Alexis Chris Mike Amazon Wexler Vegan representative Jimi
"saul" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

10:20 min | 11 months ago

"saul" Discussed on Bald Movies

"Now. Look at him in the courtroom looking so chill if you look at that in contrast to gusts who is kind of freaking out like. He's never see gus. Crack and wind gusts does crack. You know something is really really wrong and in this episode. Guests is cracking right. Like he's doing all the right things. He still keeping a level head but he's showing his anger in the way. The Gus does which I think is just a grimace or something shoulders. Get tight or He he gives a look at the restaurant burns but like so far. I think the person winning this battle is Lilo. Lilo is certainly less emotionally affected by it. then gases so yeah. I don't I don't think policies is is a problem yet. Now he absolutely might eventually though like goes hard enough at him. I'm so I am NAD. Curious what is GonNa Happen? A couple of episodes is absolutely playing the long game here. Yeah he always says that's his thing and that'll be why wins Because it was very much I mean he just he just sits places on fire and then he gets caught and yeah he has a way to kind of get out of it but only because he had a way to get into jail. Right right gusts guests. Never let himself get in those situations in the first place All right rich and Kim apologized Kevon for this situation with Saul and acker and promise that will never happen again. Kevin says he expected more from the firm And that personally Kim can do a whole lot better than Jimmy and saul before leaving the building. Kim's decides they need to do something more so they go back in Kevin's office and Kim tells him he can't continue to ignore. They're very good advice. And they're going to fire him a client if he does. Kevin says all right so you on Thursday. How many times is Kim going to have to say? This will never happen again before this series a lot. Yeah a lot but if it results in scenes like this I kim so I really love to see Kim breathing. Fire was not very intense in the scene. Like Howard got a much much worse but these are her best moments like every time. Kim Gets self-righteous on somebody. It's always enjoyable. It's delightful. I wonder if she would have come back into the room if you hadn't had to get in that last little dig about Jimmy. And then maybe. She realized that she can do better than Kevin to as a client. It's been pretty SHITTY CLIENT. Alzheimer's considered yeah. I'd I'd I listening. He sucked as boss. People push back on the United States People. Push back on it. Yeah because yeah. The Boston always have to have all the ideas especially when he has a talented team of people he pays. But if you have a talented team of people that you pay maybe you should listen to should. Maybe that's why you pay them. Yeah it's to advise you Kevin Kevin's impulsive two months and and no matter the risk no matter the danger no matter the cost. He's going to get what he wants. The other thing I noticed about this scene and I don't think pages this type of person but pages seated in this scene like they're about to do a mob hit on Kim and rich actually. Yeah right behind them off to the side like she's going to pull a gun out at any moment and just put two in the back of their heads. I didn't get that at all. My my sense was. She was putting herself on their side but also the I could totally see that her face when Kim is delivering her fucking savage Burns to heaven in this. And she's like she's loving it. And I love to see her lovett pages pages of weird a weird character in these scenes. Because she's not driving anything Kevin's making all the decisions she's not even really chiming up chiming in most of the time. Like pages us in a lot of these scenes sometimes. Yeah yeah sort of like just watching the ball ping pong back and forth across the net and just seeing where it ends up and you notice that at the end of the scene where she moves from being on their side physically moves from being on their side of the room to Kevin side of the room In the first half of the scene before they come back. It's yeah it says a lot about page page is sort of like she seems a little where the wind blows as I was GONNA say. She's got Ta way more cunning than cabins. It's probably why the partnership works. Yeah and she's definitely like playing. She's definitely the subservient one in that. She's a partner in that company or why I said partner I didn't mean legally You always see Kevin Page together. I was about to say partner but I really don't know what the relationship is quite. I don't either. I feel like I should know that hoops. So right in tell us. I'm sure someone will correct are terrible mistakes. All Right Saul tries to yellow to cut a deal lawless. Says he's going to get him out on bail. Instead he tells saw the changes monitor just to make money to become a friend of the cartel. Do you WANNA be a friend of cartel. So here's the thing I don't Wanna be but also if I'm in position where they'll just like kill me if I'm not that's hard. I don't want to be an enemy of cartel I wouldn't be nobody to the cartel cartel exactly. I don't want to know my name at all but that would be good. I like El Sol. Immediately asks him about the strength of a pseudonym his alias. Right every asks about J. M. Like wow you could be a little bit more subtle. Insure yeah is more subtle and has has better story for his false identity. How I just meant that. Maybe Jim Asian not ask about. Aliases RIGHT AFTER. Someone basically asks about his without doing it. Yeah I mean I. I don't have a ton of confidence that the Salamanca's set up an ironclad lie about his identity. I think there might be some holes but guess we'll see and it probably doesn't matter honestly Yeah I don't think it matters so I don't know they don't bring that for no reason right. I don't so I don't want is for or do not want it. I don't know I'm still kind of sorting out my feelings about that or I don't want is for horray. Deguzman to know who? Jimmy McGill is to know that. Solid Jimmy McGill. That seems bad for him down the line but also how could he hide that because he's been so flamboyant and the England as a way of finding things out when they want to know? I'm just I'm always trying to tie back to Jeanne. Like houses Yes I feel like somebody figuring out who gene used to be or somebody traced down Jimmy to as gene alias. So I'm always trying to connect the dots there maybe incorrectly. I mean in that case. Shame on the vacuum cleaner repair guy the disappear Sinden to Omaha Nebraska specifically Nebraska. Which is ex wife is also from so that alone is Kinda Kinda shitty on his part. Yeah we're my feedback a little bit. let's move onto. Mike reading a bedtime story. Kaley afterward talking to Stacey about their respective kids might tells her that he's better now. After deciding to play the cards he was dealt by talking about the cartel cards or the Mattie cards or both did it seems like there are some parallels here with Mike and saul sort of giving themselves over to the criminal underworld. Yeah I think he's just giving up giving up trying to fight the positions that he's found himself in and he's found some perverted version of peace. In that I am. I'm always looking for the the secondary meaning in scenes because you know saul a better call. Saul is a show that has a lot of those and so yeah in this moment. Like he's telling Stacey look I'm better now I'm coming to terms with Mattie stuff here let's talk about it I can do that without getting so emotionally overcome that I shout at you but also I think yeah. He's talking about his position with cartel with gas. Just saying okay. This is who I am now. I'll probably try and control that and keep it out of your lives. But I'm going down this road navy. I'll still try to kind of ethically. But how much does ethics actually play into things when you're working for the cartel probably not much intel? How much is nachos situation? GonNa complicate things for him. I mean we know. That's the thing about a prequel. We know it can't complicate it so much. That might gets killed or gets out of good grazes like we talked about last week. So there's a finite said of Probability here about how this turns out. Yeah you know what's going to happen but you don't necessarily know how it happens and that's important. Yeah that's what. This poll prequel series is based on anything else. About maybe the book. He's reading horror. I already said it. But yeah he mentioned was her insights into the little prints. I don't know shit about the little kids book. I can't imagine they're making like deep philosophical points with the little. Prince are so dismissive of kid. Little little prints fiction good. Call me with the.

Kevin Kevin Kim Saul Jimmy McGill gus Kevin Page partner Alzheimer Stacey Boston United States intel J. M. Howard El Sol England Nebraska Mike Prince
"saul" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

08:01 min | 11 months ago

"saul" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Interview But if you're GONNA talk for forty five minutes you're GONNA have to really share a little bit about yourself And that's that's the stuff I want hear. That's the stuff that I I A for And podcast of the only place to get it for me at least for sure. Let's Greg I you never last question could ask one more so so so I guess two part question one aside from this podcast because I think we were number seventy news Pakistan a couple of weeks back on. Are you listening to any music podcast? That people should listen to and The second part of the question is what? What's what's it been in your ear lately. I so So I I will tell you. One of my favorite podcasts from a music standpoint is so I'm going to be just honest with you guys. I don't have a really good way to discover new music I I'm not going to clubs. Not doing these things so This podcast I really liked called moths. Music machine and it's M A H F apostrophe S. music machine and it's Dj Mov. Who's just a? He's actually a brother of a of an artist friend of mine. So that's how I figured who he is. But he's he's actually like really kind of infamous club. Dj who you know does a lot of celebrity parties and everything and the purpose of this podcast is. He's not doing DJ sets. He's doing like an old school radio show where he's introducing. Every song that was this is that was. This is but it's all indie music that you know is a little op the radar but it's new indie music and it's like new new music from this guy or that guy in this and I've been you know put onto at least four four bands that I bought albums from and I'm I'm like maybe it's just my I'm showing my age or whatever actually buy music instead of streaming it because I I. I hope that if you buy the music a little bit of the money goes to the to the band instead of just streaming it but I would never have any of these people on my radar if it wasn't for muffs music. Mix Just because it's like you know just you know it's like hey these guys are from Minneapolis. Minnesota's like I would I ever hear you know the the the hottest indie band in Minneapolis or whatever and as far as what's in my ear like what have I been listening to lately. I I've been playing heavy heavy rotation it's it's probably a twenty year old album right now but there was a band. I've really loved called. Excuse me the Donnas on if you guys know the Donnas but All female band kind of a little bit ramones ish and what I mean by. Ramones dishes Heavy guitars you know three chords for every song and You know every song is between a minute ninety seconds and and three minutes there's no stairway to heaven are or anything like that and A Lotta their songs are about getting drunk and and making bad decisions and all sorts of stuff and they put out an album. I'm looking up right now. Two Thousand Four. So what does that sixteen years ago? it's called gold medal and Man It's maybe. I love the album when it came out. I didn't listen to it for a decade. For whatever reason it just kind of like came up in a shuffle Recently and I've been listening to the album backwards and forwards as since then. It's such a great great album And I I really dig it but besides that you now. I'm listening to a lot of frank black you know. Been listening to a lot of Joe. Jackson The British singer not Michael Jackson's father again and I listened to a lot is when I wanted to listen to like you know. Just mix albums is You know Dj Jazzy Jeff. Every year puts out a summer tape. Remix where he just puts out a mix album Mixed tape you can download. And there's like seven or eight in the series and as you know goes from hip hop to Motown to classic rock to all sorts of things and He's just a great DJ in. It's like all recognizable music so I listen to that A lot as well but but the dawn has been in heavy rotation wrestling. It's funny it's funny. You mentioned the Donnas because My daughter Michaela and not make us any feel old or some of us because I know creams in his early thirties. But for the rest of us my daughter went and saw the donnas open four Maroon five with my wife Kelly candy remember how many years ago that was cool and who the donnas remind me of not necessarily specifically the music although the spirit and I know this band keeps coming up lately on. Our podcast is the beaches. I just. It's a it's that spirit. It's you know young woman putting out really powerful pop. That's as so I don't know the beaches. I'll have to check them out when I trust me when I think of like all women bands although I think for some reason maybe. The drummer was was male My favorite all all female band of all time is Alaska You know it's like one album wonder but man like the British invasion. They were really great. And and I. I still like early hole. You know. Say What you want about Courtney Love Yeah. This is sort of You know turned into something else as she got older but but man like what was what's the album Celebrity skin is like is easily one of my top five albums of all time it's I love that album. Awesome Saul thank you so much for joining us before before you let me go. We're not GonNa let you go. I just wanted to thank you. What are you guys listening to? That's a good question head you go. I I got a research. I'm listening to. The beaches will be honest with you is a lot of the beaches Yeah Yeah it's a lot of beaches radio so it's a lot of Canadian sort of new music coming out. Yeah so myself. I've been listening I don't know why I continue going back to these guys but I've been listening a lot to know. No that's too obvious. All-stars that's too obvious. Fleetwood Mac specifically I am more and more. Just a huge fan of Lindsey Buckingham. So is an old soul. I think he got shafted by by. Mick fleetwood He is one of the best guitar players of all time. Just his style of play. Guitar is amazing. And I think he's He's he's written produced a tons of hits and Yeah I've just been listening a lot to Both tango in the night as well as rumors but Saul if pe- people are going to want to subscribe to your podcast. How could they do so You can find all of my Episodes at www dot saul talks essay. U. L. T. A. L. K. S. DOT COM and. That'll take you right to The I tunes Store very called Austin. Listen can we let you go now? Sure I wanNA I wanNA talk to admitted when we're not recording. Don't hang up. No no no all right thanks. Let me stop recording. Hold on a.

Saul Minneapolis Michael Jackson Pakistan gold medal Mick fleetwood Lindsey Buckingham Alaska Michaela Kelly candy Motown Minnesota frank Joe Austin U. L. T. A. L. K. Courtney
"saul" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"saul" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Worked with Saul closely do you think that he is deserving of that had believe is deserving of a coaching job he's done a great job he commands a room really well he has great way of relating to his players and hold them accountable but like I said for them today is not what I think you know the people make those decisions don't seem like they're hiring people color very often what do you anticipate is being challenged going up against the Vikings offense I just read this one you know they want to they run the ball well Kurt is very efficient what he does it in turn the ball over does make many mistakes also just being on details just like they are in and be locked in for for sixty minutes hello to mostly last week others to not even saying parts are really well on both of us played well throughout the season you know obviously I don't I don't make those decisions so you have tax Carl are ours so all our Joe whoever comics was called the both of them have been fair with it really well and both of more ready go hi there you go there's Richard Sherman from the podium again and first starting out by saying look if this is the game is the same if you're seeing a first time team versus team you've seen he said doesn't matter you prepare the same no different to not worry about the lack of experience that he goes into the Rooney rule which I would agree one hundred percent with him that the cowboys for example a broad and Marvin Lewis I mean higher Marvin Lewis and then they write went right to Mike McCarthy the last thing I would say is Kurt and Kirk seems to be an issue with Kurt cousins it's Kirk cousins I think maybe rich Riley the president of the Washington Redskins I'm gonna screw me up what's the first name of hers red skins Kirker Kay I'm gonna think captain craft and Kirk not Jana captain Kirk Kirk yeah the L. I. Christian Kirk there you go what I'm saying yeah only a rare because Christian Kirk Cristin Kurt now I don't know what that is if Kirk cousins doesn't your your before you get in the zone if we find on Saturday are there you go we get to go I think your use out why there still is that life is just like the dagger live exactly Paul Allen I got a raise to right baby boomers as you like that you will see you like that we yeah no one ever does the sacks of yeah you like really good at he was supposed to coming up next and then we'll check with the boys to see what's are coming up people are trying to use this as loop and it's a really bad idea use me so I said my hair gel we come up with your hands but the vanities than that Farley live without me you like that the sports in your listening top Papa in line now one one oh four five FM the city's KNBR sports leader Goldberg Krueger and rocks the drives me nuts when guys are selfish come playoff time again guys can be selfish in the regular season because it's a career and it's about money and you wanna make much money as possible and then being productivity is money once you get to the playoffs shut your mouth shut your mouth and go out there with whatever it takes to win crew can rod be teaching two six we are one oh four five and six weeks later back with the fishes sleeping well as part of the NFL one seven we.

Saul
"saul" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"saul" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Saul monies alleged planned attacks in due course I know that we will share the intelligence that we are able to with the Congress in the president's national security team when they looked at the intelligence as we did it was very clear that we were dealing with a man who is very effective in has been the deadliest terrorist in the world today leaders of the Simon Wiesenthal center spoke in support of trump's decision to attacking kills all the money in Beverly hills Emily Valdez can extend seventy newsradio the foreign correspondents were watching Iranian TV right now say the threats are going out about mass escalation strikes all over the region if for U. S. retaliates while another special reports on all of this coming up at five fifty five thirty four traffic here a minute away locally people in la mirada outraged after a blatant act of animal cruelty took place over the weekend sheriff's detectives trying to find a person who shot a pet dog to death in a public street in broad daylight calls came into the alley sure store workstation Sunday afternoon after workers sol white lead model jeep grand Cherokee pulled into an industrial area on Phoebe Avenue detect more Christiansen said what happened next startled sick of the onlookers male passenger exited placed a dog in a dog bed into the gutter and shot it twice and then got back and Carla that left the scene leaving the dog to die behind the dog a brown and white spaniel mix died at the scene Christians and so they put a picture of the jeep on social media which is distinctive oversize black rims are looking to arrest the man or woman for felony animal cruelty feet of a tree okay and extend seventy newsradio congressman Duncan hunter has decided to leave it's coming up after traffic it's five thirty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the five students Fonda seem to be as bad to run a break on the five northbound this is near the lake for a stag said they're gonna clear car from the center divider we also have a wreck on the five south down this is at the twenty two I've got three cars involved in this one so that is in the heart of the orange crash in Long Beach on the four oh five north Bennet long beach Boulevard I've got a two car wreck there and that is on a narrow right shoulder we've got a wreck in Porter ranch we get the details or Brian one eighteen jam cam this is going to be on our west bound side right before receivable of our two cars left lane a looks like it may have just been cleared buttons wake let them pick back up here westbound from the four oh five so tough for you can you respond side you're slow from desoto as you make your way over through receivable apart to see how we're doing on the Hollywood freeway ever have we've got Scott the sun the California Toyota dealer sky five for the valley right now with what they're about certainly slow through downtown up to the four level you get to prevent it gets heavy get right around Santa Monica Boulevard that looks to be pretty tough as you work the way to the going to pass the what what southbound heavy pretty much wide at Hollywood Boulevard that will stay heavy down to a two to four level interchange cities were also another crash reported on the four oh five this is northbound and Atlantic injury crash there in Montebello on the sixty headed east just before paramount we've got a stalled car reported in lanes and I believe that freeway service patrol is headed there in the second lane from the left and we've got a real problem in the simple to pass on the four oh five north and just south of Skirball two car crash reported there right shoulder next report five forty five I'm Denise Fonda were for traffic reports more often can extend seventy newsradio is warm and dry again today cooler than yesterday but still sixties and seventies so not too much of a difference it changes into tomorrow more clouds more sixties and then a slight chance of some showers by Thursday while the five day forecast five forty five sixty eight degrees in downtown LA sixty seven in Fullerton it's five thirty seven facing sentencing for miss using campaign funds congressman Duncan hunter submits his resignation a month after announcing he be stepping down the San Diego Republican has finally made it official his last day is Monday Jack picking a professor.

Saul
"saul" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"saul" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Hand of Saul network side of the citizens getting under way I mean at least right now the next nine games scheduled for national TV over the next couple of weeks will be on the network alone there's one on ESPN and that some soul CBS and fox kick off on Sunday with a doubleheader on August the extreme committee house understand the NFL runs level and work their own network and they want you to buy that networks yeah so if you don't have a you're gonna have to cool your heels at least for a couple of weeks can't find a friend or find a neighbor who's got the SL network exactly we have neighbors St I will be so speaking of football I had no idea that inventory was so tight up there in Green Bay at the Packers games you've got a story that is a personal experience and kind of interesting tell me what's going on well a lot of the three men were in but there's no doubt about it last Sunday in church your niece my granddaughter Casey was one of the teachers installed for early childhood education and a service which was really kind of nice but takes these past years for some of them to the church he gets up and he starts talking about the power of horror and he's talking about the season tickets with the Green Bay Packers eleven years ago as a young minister in Appleton Wisconsin he applied for season tickets he was told that he was I believe it was like eight thousand so the chances are not good the act in whatever Levin years ago he's a seminary student at the time the following year he gets a letter five thousand four thousand three anyway this year he got them and he held them up in front of the congregation number one they sent him a they sent a letter back in the spring and he did not get the Green Bay Packers season tickets is going to have this assessment cover foreign but that's the way it is in Green Bay it's a little easier apparently in service for sensitive and have a minute so we'll go on a shave terrorists have to life something I don't know if you guys saw those with about a week ago we have a Steelers fan a guy named jewel Schrock who's a training camp he goes up to wide receiver juju Smith Shuster there's a there's a household my employee yeah I have to DO fruits and home but that's about it yeah yeah I mean this guy was signing autographs in our boy asking the sign on his shaved head is not one of those old Mohawks we've got shades on either side which already displayed the Steelers logo sure absolutely is already gone now so yes miss Schuster told him Hey you will get my autograph tattooed on your head and I'll get the tickets to the game of your choice will be even better than that and on Twitter last week June use Melissa Melissa it's all about respect and I respect him for going out and doing that and our guy gets that smirk Steeler tickets for two thousand nineteen yeah or think about this some in the season eventually ends on his head I hope he is a Steelers fan for life he has no choice yeah this was going to be around for a little last year's away a little bit better yeah there's no doubt about world that well at fungus Hey does let's talk not about grow David on or Thiessen so it the naturally current issue has anti fungal of Sports anti Illustrated viral this anti is something bacterial we've been talking anti about infection here for anti all my gosh inflammation over a month and anti now parasite the controversy properties continues but maybe well more importantly in the article table what Sports T. clubs Illustrated original did pure they sent pouty one of their arco senior super riders T. builds down to corpuscles the Dominican in Republic the blood which carry and oxygen the it to our was organs with the idea and cells of going or organs through and cells need the various oxygen to regenerate boroughs themselves if you the will immune system they call needs them oxygen and to develop talking and to cancer people happens talking to to die organizations in oxygen talking the tea to is law great enforcement for healthy people to try and to figure they can truly out be exactly miraculous what for someone really fighting a potentially did happen life and threatening the thing disease that he came due to away an infection with diabetes is or that cancer you'll never he know bought the club's original.

Saul
"saul" Discussed on The Bible Binge

The Bible Binge

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"saul" Discussed on The Bible Binge

"Like you said right after a Goliath and up until the point of Saul's life here on this mortal coil, right that in specifically this talks about conflict of interests. We're gonna be all kinds of characters who are putting the situations where they have a conflict of interest. They have dual purposes. They have do allegiances and they're forced to reconcile who they are aligning with who they are supporting and why they are supporting them. So it'll be a really interesting conversation to see the choices. Each of the characters make. I like that because I think that's comforting to know that everybody has an opportunity to do the right thing. Although spoiler alert some people. Don't do the right thing. Not everyone does do that. That's right. So we're starting in. I seem you'll eighteen just to give you kind of context of where we are as soon as David. David was brought to Saul kings all by his commander in chief Abner, and he said, hey, this is the son. Who are you? What were you? Who's your who's your father? And he was like, oh, my dad's Jesse. And so immediately Sol's like you live with now, you don't go back home. You stay in our house in plus you play that that heart so good. And I have all the demons MMA head and like my soul, but he also becomes very close friends with Jonathan who is Saul's son. It says in chapter eighteen verse one that says, the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and we will see that play out in many ways. But because of this and other things, we have potential for jealousy and it happens verse six as they were coming home. When David return from striking down the philistine the women came out of all the cities of Israel singing and dancing to meet king Saul with Tamerlane's with songs. Joy and with musical instruments, and the women saying to one another, as they celebrated solid, struck down his thousands and David, his ten thousand and Saul was very angry and saying displeased him, it's a look..

Saul David Jesse Tamerlane Jonathan MMA Sol Abner Israel
"saul" Discussed on The Bible Binge

The Bible Binge

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"saul" Discussed on The Bible Binge

"Finally, here at the bobbins we urge you to love. Others as you love yourself and share the bible binge on social media, and if you wanna fall along with this specific episode, the main biblical scripture we're gonna cover. We're going to cover lot chapters to your guys, get your like Lakers thumbs and be ready. Turn those pages pages work. It's going to cover. Samuel Samuel eighteen kind of all the way through thirty one. Ish, Jamie. Let's chase this story into a cave repeatedly because that's what we'll be doing a lot in this story. I don't know if you guys know this and get rolling. Okay, so we ended last episode with David killing Goliath, and you would think, okay, and then several years pass and no, we are going to jump right back into immediately what happens. So our characters are having some crazy adventure. So remind us who were dealing mid in the story. That's right. So Saul is being played by Michael Keaton David, the comparable LDC Arctic afro, spicy casting choice. I'm seeing from some feedback from listeners, but I just don't care because I think it's perfect Samuel the prophet be played by Dana Glover. We've got some, we've got to. We've got three new characters to which will get to write, but the third or the the most prominent of which is Jonathan. Do you wanna talk a little bit about Jonathan, its function in this. So Jonathan, his name means Jehovah has given so. Good choice for parents name your kids shot. Then that's a good call. Jonathan is the oldest son of king Saul. He is in theory, you know, you might someone might have thought, oh, he might be the future king if we handle this like a monarchy. But remember we haven't had kings. So this is the first thing that we already know that David has been anointed as he's going to be king and Jonathan is on team David, as we will see the only time we've had with Donna's before that he is a kind of a great military guy, and he fought valiantly in his father's stead like out in the battlefield. Of course, there was this one time where king Saul was like, hey, did great, let's fast. And nobody told on it then and he ate some Honey. And so I was going to kill him and the other soldiers love Jonathan. So aggressively that they ransomed his life. So dizzy, the Honey and John was like, yeah, he's like, I did say to kill you, gotta kill you now, man and other soldiers, like maybe maybe we just think big picture on this one and not do that. He's like, okay, which just foretells and foreshadows just what a great king don't forget. The spirit of Lord has left Saul, and you kinda need the spirit of the Lord and this story you do, you do. So when I think of Jonathan, I think of a character who has quite confidence. I think he's subtle. I think he's accomplished. I think he's substantial. He's got a presence and we'll get to kind of the more basics of Johnson. I just I'm such a big fan of his character, and I've always been always wished I could get more about this character in the viral even as a kid when I was learning about the story. So for that reason, I've cast Jonathan as Chadwick boatsmen all my gosh. That's such a good choice because let me tell you, I feel like that quiet confidence is the perfect way to describe Chadwick both men when you see him in a bike, obviously panther when you see him in Marshall, but he just has this kind of like weightiness to him, but you go that guy. Seems like he, he's your right, I and that's. That's right. So we've got two more we're gonna cast, but will wait until they show up in her story before it was more about them. So let me talk just really quick forget into the text about theme of the episode. The big theme that we've noticed is in this specific telling which going to kind of encompass, right?.

Jonathan king Saul Michael Keaton David Samuel Samuel Lakers Dana Glover Chadwick weightiness Ish Johnson John Jamie Donna Marshall
"saul" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

15:25 min | 2 years ago

"saul" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Saul smut show fucking thirty for me shave him maybe when you every it was how learn leave hug was weights eve should've been checked let this respectful what shoot them wish was now son of course head he'll left brooklyn stupid when flom tom fell so you how i got the tanks story mickel born like the thing the gang when plot less apps king the now and i'm a little i have and the education the nickel fucking came the maple on the hobie what his because if the kim brace pink what is damn swick twenty four nick counting.

Saul tom brooklyn nick
"saul" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"saul" Discussed on KGO 810

"Falling apart emotionally the encouragement to from saul work thinking and getting great grades please it's pretty clear to me now that's not been a good idea there's not enough there hasn't been enough you got to figure out how to play on your own dad doesn't need to be mom and dad don't be watching your participating all the time you can't jump into every adult conversation with me because everything you've got to say it's not the most important thing happening right now.

saul
"saul" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"saul" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"And now it just seems absolutely necessary part of our lives so it's it's once it's not once a shot on film and its aired i guess we although there have been times we talked about breaking bad because they're characters who we wish had met for the first time on breaking bad so we always think about shooting additional breaking bad seems to explain this character in that character didn't really know each other ordinary each other before i always wanted more nudity and season 3 but didn't happen well you have a special relationship um and is has become any clearer to you also about how saul will meet or integrate with bringing bad i imagine that conversation is ongoing conversation ongoing all right that is a tricky one and we've been talking about that since the the show started and we're just gonna it's again we don't really plant ahead exactly we just if the characters get us to a point where they're dancing through the rain drops of the breaking bad world than we will do that but if it doesn't happen than it doesn't happen there's a lot of moving parts as you can imagine it's it's a creative decision first of all but then there's also you know all kinds of questions about who who what people are available way of and that's that certainly that's always true uh on the show i mean we there is no guarantee despite the fact put his name put bring in the titles that we will be able to get a giancarlo back.

saul