38 Burst results for "Saudi Arabia"

Fresh update on "saudi arabia" discussed on 1A

1A

01:27 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "saudi arabia" discussed on 1A

"Then this police. She said it appeared to be an accident by the officer who thought she grabbed her Taser at a vigil last night, writes Mother Katie. Right. Wept, surrounded by a crowd of hundreds didn't just need everyone to know that he With my wife, my son, and they could never get that back because it was steak. Accident. Layla FATHER. NPR NEWS, Minneapolis. Stocks opened mixed this morning as the Labor Department reported a sharp increase in consumer prices. Last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the Dow Jones industrial average fell about 120 points in early trading. Consumer prices jumped by 6/10 of a percent last month. That's the sharpest increase in 2012. Higher gasoline prices accounted for nearly half the monthly increase. Prices for food, recreation and furniture were also higher. Over the past year, Prices have risen by 2.6%. That's well above the Federal Reserve's long range target for inflation of 2%. But the central bank says the sharper increase coming out of the pandemic is likely to be temporary and not a big cause for concern. Inflationary figures are also somewhat magnified by the sharp drop in prices a year ago when the coronavirus first took hold in the U. S. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street, the Dow is now down 110 points. This is NPR news. United Nations agencies are warning of dire conditions in the eastern African nation of Mozambique. A Mozambican city was recently attacked by Islamist militants, forcing tens of thousands of people to flee. When officials warn many people in Mozambique are now facing malnutrition and starvation. Muslims around the world have begun fasting for Ramadan, Islam's holiest month and not a home see reports that concerns or high that observances for the holy month could trigger a surge in Corona virus cases. Although many countries are in the process of vaccinating their populations, Muslims must navigate a host of virus restrictions. Indonesia, which has the world's largest Muslim population. Social distancing is maintained in mosques during prayer times a contrast to the pact Moss of pre pandemic years. Mosques in Egypt have also reopened. But with precautions such a shorter durations for prayer rituals in Saudi Arabia the tradition of serving meals at mosques before and after the fast is forbidden. Ramadan is a month of fasting, worship and family gatherings. It is also a month of charity where food and wealth is shared with the wider community. Particularly those less advantaged for NPR news. I'm not a home see in Beirut. The volcano on the eastern Caribbean island of ST Vincent is still very active. The last Soufriere volcano has erupted. More ash, hot gas and rocks. Dark clouds shot miles into the air. Ash continues to blanket the island. Ash is also turning up more than 100.

Beirut 2012 2.6% Saudi Arabia Scott Horsley 2% 110 Points Last Month NPR Minneapolis Layla United Nations Egypt 6/10 Labor Department More Than 100 Katie Last Night Mozambique
Saudi Arabia Says It Executes 3 Soldiers for 'High Treason'

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

Saudi Arabia Says It Executes 3 Soldiers for 'High Treason'

"Has no lasted for more than six years. Three soldiers in Saudi Arabia had been executed on charges of high treason. Statement by the Saudi Defense Ministry said that the three men were convicted of treason in cooperation with the enemy, which was not named. Sebastian OSHA has more details. Statement from the Saudi ministry defense said that the death senators had been carried out today in the Southern district Command. The kingdom sees Iran as its major threat and considers the Houthi rebels it's been fighting in Yemen for six years to be controlled by Tehran. In recent months, the Houthis have intensified rocket and drone attacks on infrastructure targets in Saudi Arabia. Statement by the Defense Ministry said it was making the announcement of the executions in order to affirm its confidence in what it called the loyal

Saudi Defense Ministry Sebastian Osha Saudi Ministry Southern District Command Saudi Arabia Houthi Yemen Iran Tehran Defense Ministry
Fresh "Saudi Arabia" from Morning Talk with Martha Zoller

Morning Talk with Martha Zoller

01:46 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Saudi Arabia" from Morning Talk with Martha Zoller

"Show it. It's so great to be here with you, Al Guineas here with me, too. And you know what? After Marguerite from Johns Hopkins said. If you're four weeks out from the vaccine, you could go back to your normal life. Johns Hopkins is a pretty great institution. But it doesn't seem like the federal government wants to agree with that. Dr Fauci says. Wait a minute. You can't go out even if you're vaccinated. Steve Morse joining us today and of course, the economy is predicted to be very strong, but we got Democrats Steve They're trying their hardest to wreck the economy. Employment. Think I couldn't couldn't summarize the situation better? You're exactly right. And we are Spending trillions and trillions of dollars. I didn't say billions. I didn't say millions trillions of dollars, and it's keeping me up at night. I mean, I cannot believe what we're doing to our great country. We are bankrupting our nation, folks. This is a body's alarm emergency. These Democrats, including your two Senate, the new senators are out of control there like You know, spending money like it's monopoly money, But this is real money. It's going to do so much damage. You're right. By the way the economy is healing itself because we have the vaccine. Thanks to Trump. It doesn't we don't need trillions of Hispanic and death. And by the way, they're saying choice, do something, And that is good for the economy. How crazy things here in Washington, we should be cutting government spending. And getting back to some kind of, you know, fiscal responsibility. We all do this in our own lives. Every business man and woman knows you can't just keep bowing and bowing and bowing and say he did. That's gonna end in any kind of happy ending. Except for you know, going into bankruptcy court that we're doing this to our country. I'm just I'm you can tell. I'm I'm just And look fab by you. You and I have been saying these things even through Republican administrations. You cannot continue to spend and spend and spend. And this is on steroids now, but then say no, We can't even talk about the automatic pilot spending, which is three quarters of the spending. Okay, so we can't even talk about that. But we got to keep spending and spending and spending over here. It's just it's a Ziff. First of all. I don't think they understand economics, but that's being too nice to them to say they don't understand economics. They understand exactly what they're doing that if they break it, they can buy it. Well, It's a great way to put it and, you know, let's just do the math. Here. We have $1 trillion in the pipeline for Kobe it before. I took office right? Because we passed right before he came into office, Trump and fast $1 trillion relief bill and that was to take care of, you know, 2021 for you know, hospitals and nurses and, you know people needed vaccines and that kind of thing, But we didn't need any more money. But of course, if I didn't want to do it right out of the gates from $2 Trillion in another bill, which was really just a blue state bailout. Graduations to your senators and Georgia who voted for a bill that sense money out of Georgia to all these other states and then three weeks ago by then announces Oh, by the way, we're gonna do it. Another $2 trillion quote, Infrastructure Bill. By the way that we're just inside about that provides another $100 billion from the schools. We just gave them $130 billion in the in the bill, you know that we passed under Biden in the Copa del So you know another 100 were just massively stunning money on the schools have been closed down last year. And now if you heard the latest Martha that they wanted to a $2 trillion, what they're calling human infrastructure. That's the term I'd never heard before. Human infrastructure, which is basically just social programs. It's basically an arm or Medicaid, more child care subsidies, raising them in ways all of these, you know more entitlements, automatic spending. If I my math is right that to pull you trillion prosecutorial plus two trillion plus one choice. $7 Trillion. Yeah, and Steve Bauer. What's gonna happen? Market Chinese Stop buying our bonds. Well, that's that's the key, Steve. I mean, we've got to be careful how much debt we were piling up with the Chinese number one and number two. You going back to, uh, several years ago. We can't spend ourselves into prosperity. It is not gonna happen. On But but we're going to pay the price. Now. I mean, it's great point. And you know you are state starting to see prices in shop and wait. You know, inflation is still very low, but it's starting to inch up. And I noticed that I don't know if you guys know if you noticed that the gas pump Yes, yes. Yeah, We're seeing it in where I am. We're see. And every time I go there, putting a higher price, and you know, Trump's other said today, pretty soon we're going to tame $4 a gallon gasoline and and, you know, we're paying over. 3 50 now and some areas where I lived, it was $2. You know, it is a little over $2 not long ago. So you're are starting to see this and let my problem is Like great nation was put has its Children and grandchildren pay olives bills for us. I mean, this is e again Got government is no different than a business. You know you could. There's no nothing wrong with going toe. Expand your business urgent. But we're not even expiring for things that have any return. I mean, they want spent trillions of dollars on green energy projects and shut down our oil and gas industry, which has made America energy independent. Somebody explain how that's a good idea. I mean, you know, we we were we were export importing, you know, $200 billion in Europe in Saudi Arabia in Russian. Oh, Pat. Now we're exporting and they want to set it down. And Steve what 11 Quick thing. Investment. You hear him? Talk about.

Steve Bauer Steve Morse $2 Donald Trump Saudi Arabia $1 Trillion $130 Billion $200 Billion Europe $2 Trillion $7 Trillion Fauci Washington $100 Billion Biden Two Trillion Last Year PAT Martha
Trust in tech cratered all over the world last year

Daily Tech News Show

01:21 min | Last week

Trust in tech cratered all over the world last year

"Edelman's surveyed more than thirty three thousand people in twenty eight countries to gauge consumer trust. They've been doing this for twenty one years and institutions like media government business and the tech sector trust in the tech sector fell by seven percent worldwide. A third straight year of decline trust and tech was going up and up and up until three years ago worldwide and then started to fall trust in tech. Hit a twenty one year. Low in seventeen countries including china. The us and australia and the biggest decline happened in the united states tech was the most trusted sector studied in the us last year even with declines it was still up top and it fell between last year and this year to ninth tech was still the most trusted sector. Despite the declines in seven countries it declined but it stayed on top. And that's down from being the most trusted sector in twenty countries back in two thousand sixteen only. Saudi arabia showed an increase interest in the tech industry. This year trust in tech is the lowest in russia. The uk japan the us and france. And it's the highest in indonesia foreign away above in indonesia pretty good and india saudi arabia. The uae. Kenya mexico and thailand.

Edelman United States China Australia Saudi Arabia Indonesia Russia Japan France UK India UAE Kenya Mexico Thailand
Fresh update on "saudi arabia" discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

01:19 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "saudi arabia" discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Guest. The book is reopening muslim minds. A return to reason freedom and tolerance. Mustafa i know you didn't you weren't raised in the united states but now that you live here when you see young. Muslims raised in this country. We tend to be a very patriotic in this country and obviously there is a dominant christian founding and a dominant christian philosophy and religious following in this country for a young muslim growing up. Where maybe they're hearing seeing the rest of the world and sort of anti american notions. What do you say to those young agent to to that young generation. Well as you said. Michael you in america. Maybe five years now living here. But i'm observing muslim community here and first of all i would like to say that. The american muslim community is one of the best integrated muslim minorities in the in the western world. Probably the best one most american muslims whether they're religiously very conservative or not so religious. Most of them. I i see they're proud to be in america And most of these people actually at least some of them have escaped from auteur -tarian us to america to find freedom so they they see the value of america Also the american. they'll integrate. It's because there's great religious freedom in the united states which you don't fully have in every part of the western world such as france for example and m to american young muslims. The the thing. I will say that. Listen if we are seeing the value of freedom in the united states that's great. Let's enjoy the freedom here and let's support it also. Let's bring it back to our home countries right if you're seeing freedoms good thing. Let's advocated back in saudi arabia or in pakistan. Now i'm emphasizing this. Because i've seen some conservative clerics in america who say we are happy to be americans we're happy with the religious freedom and equal citizenship. Here that is nice but we're not gonna sell it in pakistan. Why because they say. Well am i gonna standards are different. Are enders back at home. I different then. I challenge them. I say which is better than why. Do you enjoy being a minority rights here but look down upon the minorities in pakistan and justify the supremacy back in pakistan in the name of slum. So i believe a good story is being written in america and some of the view that oh every muslims a suspect. I mean. that's wrong unfair. Most of them are conditions proud to be happy to be in this country. They're making a life year raising their kids and they should be embraced but the thing. I would emphasize on top of that. Is that what we see here. That a equal justice under the law and limited government market economy if these are great things. Let's let's reconcile them with our religious tradition and then advocated back to the muslim majority country. Which is what. I'm actually trying to do with this book to. What do you attribute the rise of isis in in syria and beyond well there is Certainly a very rigid understanding of islam called salafism that assuming islam but the most extreme interpretation of sudanese law and this interpretation believes in cutting the heads of blasphemers and pastas and flogging people if they don't fast in ramadan and launching jihad as military campaign against non muslims or even shiites fellow muslims. So that idea is there and that idea came out with al qaeda. I you know very driveway. Then it evolved into isis. There's also but decided this idea and doctrine which i'm challenging in my book and i'm showing some arguments against that. There's just a tj maxx. And i think the iraq war has been counterproductive when america occupied iraq. In two thousand three. Maybe americans thought that they're being freedom and democracy but isis and groups. Like this i says wasn't area but you know al qaeda to use this to say they're crusaders they come to occupy a so. We have to enlist so. I believe in a less interventionist. Us foreign policy in the middle east. And i'm happy that you know. Conservatives have also growing more appreciated that in the past several years. I believe in more peaceful relations between america and muslim majority nations. We don't need more wars or Don't strikes in that kind of thing whereas on the other hand there are really serious issues in his thought and jurisprudence today and we were some honestly speak about those without only focusing obsessing about us foreign policy or the impact of colonialism. But again i go back to the secularist. Authoritarian leader who at one point had western british and american ties Who was Repressing their people and out of that comes. A revolutionary spirit for which islam- llamas used as a recruitment tool. But it's really as much about toppling the administration so far was was again. Another one of these guys like kadhafi another one. These guys like paolo. V for whom this is sort of muslim based organization was really a way to radicalize revolutionaries and take charge. And i think that grew into sort of a cartel that that started accumulating money and power and religion was secondary to that. Now it's hard for people to see that But i truly believe that's the case. I have one minute left. Must've and i wanna to ask you your thoughts on the sunni shia divide. I assume you're studio. Because three quarters of turks are okay that divide and where it is today and how it can be solved because a lot of effort is wasted on it. sure. I'm suny. But i respect the shiites and considered them fellow muslims. Not unfortunately everybody does that. And you know what it might look. There's a chapter tolerance. I highlight a earliest approach to these theological. Divide in slalom cold job which means postponement and the advocates of that. George said well. We disagree on certain things. But let's postpone it to afterlife to be resolved by god until then let's live together in peace and i think that's the approach. We should have between shiites. They basically came out if a poltical disputes and early islam that political dispute will never be resolved. Who was right heir to the prophet mohammad is myself. I say. I don't know i wasn't there but the issue is how can we live together without oppressing demonizing each other in the stomach history. There are periods of that in islamic history. There are some dark periods. Unfortunately we saw that recently iraq and syria. That's why i'm preaching tolerance to increase stomach tolerance intolerance towards muslim in my book. Mustafa akyol thank you..

Michael George America Mustafa Akyol Pakistan Islam Five Years Mustafa Kadhafi Mohammad Saudi Arabia Two Thousand One Minute United States France Three Quarters Iraq Paolo. V Today Iraq War
Saudi Crown Prince announces Saudi Green Initiative, Middle East Green Initiative

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Saudi Crown Prince announces Saudi Green Initiative, Middle East Green Initiative

"Saudi arabia aims to plant ten billion trees in the coming decades as part of an ambitious campaign unveiled by crown prince mohammed bin salman on saturday to reduce carbon emissions and combat pollution and land degradation the de facto. Ruler of the world's top oil exporter said that saudi arabia aims to reduce its carbon emissions by generating fifty percent of the country's energy from renewables by twenty thirty react would also work with other arab states on the middle east green initiative to plant an additional forty billion trees which the print said. We'll be the world's largest reforestation program. The statements did not provide details. On how the ambitious planting project would be carried out in the country with limited renewable water resources. The world's largest producer of desalinated water has in the past said it would use cloud seeding and recycled water to plant local trees that require less irrigation including in urban areas. The saudi green initiative is part of the prince's vision twenty thirty plan to reduce its reliance on oil revenues and to improve the quality of life in the country the kingdom the region and the world needs to go much further and faster in combating climate change. Prince mohammad said he said the share of clean energy production in the middle east does not currently exceed seven percent and that saudi would work with regional partners to help contributes to a reduction in carbon emissions resulting from hydrocarbon production in the region by more than sixty percent.

Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salm Saudi Middle East Prince Mohammad
Bloomberg News Energy Reporter Robert Tuttle Explains the Suez Canal

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Bloomberg News Energy Reporter Robert Tuttle Explains the Suez Canal

"Reporter Robert Tuttle joining us on the phone in Calgary. Hey, Robert. Love your story. You can ask my tea when I'm like. Oh, we've got him yet because I feel like Let's explain the Suez Canal. I think these are things we either learned about in great school history and then just kind of threw it away. Just take it for granted when it comes to moving trade around, but it it's really important. Yeah, I mean, it's it's hugely important as you said it was built more than a century ago went into operation in 18 69. It's played a central role in the last. In that sense, it's been open. It's played a central through two World wars. Revolutions. It's been a really important conduit for the world to you. One could say it almost helped told together the British empire and from some extent for a while there Uh, yeah. I mean, it holds today it carries about 12% of the world's trade goes through it. It's Zoe, the biggest prize. The most important aspect of that trade is, of course, oil. You know, the Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest exporter, sends oil through the canal to Europe in the North America oil comes the other way as this, uh, To reach Asian markets from wherever West Africa from the U. S. But it Zab slightly essential plays a central role to the world trade until it blockages costing quite a bit of money. Holding up about $10 billion a good today. They're just waiting there. No,

Robert Tuttle Suez Canal Calgary Robert ZOE Saudi Arabia North America West Africa Europe
Saudi Arabia offers cease-fire plan to Yemen rebels

Bloomberg Markets

00:18 sec | 3 weeks ago

Saudi Arabia offers cease-fire plan to Yemen rebels

"For more help from the U. S to defend its oil facilities. Saudi official who asked not to be named, says the requests have been put to the Biden administration since January. Today. Saudi Arabia also announced the plan to offer Yemen's Houthi rebels a ceasefire in the country's long running warrant to allow major airport to reopen in its capital. Global News

Biden Administration U. Saudi Saudi Arabia Yemen
Oil giant Saudi Aramco sees 2020 profits drop to $49 billion

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Oil giant Saudi Aramco sees 2020 profits drop to $49 billion

"Saudi Arabia's state backed oil giant Aramco says its profits newly housed in twenty twenty to forty nine billion dollars Saudi Arabian oil co released its annual financial results a year after the pandemic sent the price of oil crashing to all time lows but the price has edged up as movement restrictions ease still analysts caution that a pagan demand may still be far off despite the drop in net income irem Kerr says it will continue paying quarterly dividends of eighteen point seven five billion dollars to to the commitments the company made in the run up to its initial public offering nearly all of the dividend money goes to the Saudi government which owns more than ninety eight percent of the company I'm Sarah Bassett

Saudi Arabian Oil Co Aramco Irem Kerr Saudi Arabia Saudi Government Sarah Bassett
Riot Games Loses Alienware as LoL Partner, Denies Allegations Towards CEO

Esports Minute

02:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Riot Games Loses Alienware as LoL Partner, Denies Allegations Towards CEO

"So we need to talk about Ride game CEO and the allegations against him on the dreams and the sports minute from E Sports Network have to say my last two weeks in the show. Certainly haven't been overly wage doesn't and today is no different. Here's the background on January 7th. Former Ride Games employees Sharon O'donnell filed a lawsuit against her former boss right game CEO Nicola rent in that lawsuit O'Donnell alleged that Lorenz had created a hostile work environment and had fired her after she denied his sexual advances among other issues that lawsuit is still ongoing but this week sought a big piece of news around it. The first was Alienware a major partner of the Legends Esports cutting its deal with Riot games short. According to Jacob Wolfe now at. E sports that deal was set to continue through January 8th 2022, but Alienware wanted to terminated ten months early wolf also has reported that ride games image impacted by allegations like the ones with the rent as well as the ongoing discrimination lawsuit home. And the neon controversy of the last summer played an important part in Alien, we're leaving the deal early right games is still in that lawsuit with many former female employees around sex discrimination in the workplace is an issue that came to light with the Kotaku article from 2018 Ride Games is currently focusing legal efforts in that case on pushing the lawsuit to arbitration the neon controversy centered around right about accepting a sponsorship from a new city in Saudi Arabia at faced immediate backlash from fans casters and parts of the community do to Saudi Arabia's poor record on human rights in a variety of different areas. But the most topical impact on Ride Games image is those allegations towards threat yesterday right games announced that the right games board found no wrongdoing by the rent and recommended no sanctions following a third-party investigation the recommendation of no sanctions came from three people doing the investigating of a law firm to review of the allegations that law firm was hired by Riot but it was not the same Law Firm that is representing them in the case against O'Donnell the three people reviewing the law firms report were young May Moon a Harvard Business School professor and part of riots board as well as two unnamed male c-level Executives at 10 sent the Chinese company that owns Riot for his part. Loretta has denied the allegations in a company-wide email while O'Donnell's lawyers have pledged to follow this up in court.

Sharon O'donnell Ceo Nicola Alienware Jacob Wolfe Donnell Lorenz Saudi Arabia Wolf Harvard Business School Loretta
What's the problem with the EU vaccine rollout?

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:17 min | Last month

What's the problem with the EU vaccine rollout?

"Eu has exported almost thirty five million doses of the coronavirus vaccine to nations such as canada mexico japan and saudi arabia. It's led to questions being raised about. Why so many doses of being exported while there remains an acute shortage of people in the block and claims of emerge that not. Everybody is being generous. The suggestion that outside the e u the uk and now perhaps even the us could be unnecessarily with stocks of the vaccine well to discuss this latest development in vaccine diplomacy. I'm joined by matina. Stevis gridneff brussels correspondent for the new york times covering the european union. Good morning tina morning. So just tell us. What is this argument or boiling down to in terms of the exporting of e you vaccines when countries such as france italy germany as saying where it our share it's really become a politically toxic situation in the european union which has had a an underwhelming to be polite rollout of the vaccine the eu was a few weeks behind the us and the uk in striking agreements with pharmaceuticals that wasn't catastrophic. But what's really bedevil. The rollout has been made supply shocks of vaccines Due to problems with production by the pharmaceutical companies in particular in the first quarter of this year that's really set things back and europeans have watched. Americans israelis british people just race past them In terms of getting vaccinated just as an indication six and a half percent of european union nationals have received at least one dose of the bow of a vaccine contrast that about a third of brits at eighteen percent of americans so it really stinks at the same time. They has come under criticism for vaccine nationalism for curbing experts in particular when Last week at stopped small shipment of astrazeneca vaccine to what are stories revealed is that in fact the eu has consistently been at the top of the a game of vaccines in the word. It'll as you said. Nearly thirty five million doses. Since february first so that's raising questions in the eu why we not forcing the pharmaceuticals to keep those doses here since they're not making hole on their promises for what they should be distributing to the e year where. It's a decision being made here. Is it astra zeneca or saying. We don't have enough supply that's been reported or is it a decision by the european union itself to make sure that it is seen right around the world as being generous. I don't think this is about generosity. I think the eu we all have to remember is primarily a free trade block and once aspires to be a global powerhouse of of exports It would be catastrophic. They think to their reputation to stop. In any large numbers such exports at the same time it would also be self-defeating in the long run because the global supply chain for the components to make vaccines is incredibly diffuse the easier based manufacturers just depend on certain many countries around the world to source the materials that go into making the vaccines so really initiating global trade war over the vaccines is not smart for anyone the unified one else but tell that to the europeans who are dying to get back to life to get back to work and can't initially. I mean we have reports today in germany saying that they have a big problem that they're going to surge speaking to friends in italy there. Yes yesterday in milano. Saying we're just about to go back into lockdown. If we're not careful so this is a genuine problem is possibly creating a more longer term. Trust issue when it comes to european people looking at what the e u is supposed to have done for them to protect them in a way that many a single the uk is doing without any problems outside the european union. Well the issue here is an again. It's just this whole topic is incredibly complex. The issue here is first of all this. The problems of the eu faces with a slow rollout are not just down to supply while germany complains very rightly. so it's in fact performing worse than many poorer. Eu countries in his rollout out is not is also the fact that they're doing a bad job logistically getting those vaccines out to their people on the ground. There's nothing really to do with the your. And were the with regards to what the u k and indeed as we're finding out today from reporting from my colleagues in america the united states are doing is well not stopping exports of the vaccines. They are effectively telling the companies. Well you need to keep those vaccines in our countries because we have bought them up. Which means that in terms of making sure that those vaccines are also getting to other countries. They're potentially can be criticized that they're not doing their fair. Share in particular in the case of the united states which is a massive manufacturer vaccines and exports virtually zero. As far as we know so

EU Matina Stevis Gridneff Astrazeneca UK Germany Saudi Arabia United States Italy Tina The New York Times Mexico Japan Canada France Milano
Saudi Arabia Increases Its Bet On Electric Car Maker Lucid

WSJ What's News

00:38 sec | Last month

Saudi Arabia Increases Its Bet On Electric Car Maker Lucid

"We are reporting exclusively that electric car maker. Lucid has committed to build an assembly plant in saudi arabia. The american startup hasn't publicly disclosed such a promise which it made after accepting more than one billion dollars in funding from the saudi public investment fund. In two thousand eighteen. That's according to people familiar with the matter. Saudi arabia didn't return a request for comment. The kingdom has struggled to attract western companies in the wake of the murder of saudi journalists. Jamal khashoggi lucid said. It's near term. Goal is starting production this year at its site in arizona but it expects to establish more manufacturing facilities in the future

Saudi Public Investment Fund Lucid Saudi Arabia Jamal Khashoggi Lucid Arizona
Saudi-led coalition strikes Yemen's rebel-held capital

NPR News Now

00:17 sec | Last month

Saudi-led coalition strikes Yemen's rebel-held capital

"Yemen is again escalating. The saudi led military coalition battling iranian backed rebels in yemen. Says it's conducted air strikes on who the military targets across the country after who. 'this launched armed drones toward saudi arabia.

Yemen Saudi Arabia
US flies B-52 bombers over Mideast again amid tensions with Iran

3 Dimensional Wealth

00:18 sec | Last month

US flies B-52 bombers over Mideast again amid tensions with Iran

"Mideast today, the latest such mission in the region a minute warning. Iran emits tensions between this country of that one. The military Central Command says the two B 50 two's flew over the region accompanied by military aircraft from nations, including Israel, Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Elsewhere, the South

Military Central Command Iran Saudi Arabia Israel Qatar
Goodhart's Law in Reinforcement Learning

Data Skeptic

04:11 min | Last month

Goodhart's Law in Reinforcement Learning

"Student at university. College london minds researches mauka manipulation if you have self trading algorithm does it learn to manipulate markets. And then going from that. How'd you stop it for many players in the market on cutting more generally how do you tell algorithm which runs a policy. How do you tell it. The certain things are illegal. Should be done. So it's kinda taking me on more security journey than i thought it would because of going into the world of experimental psychology lower because not market knows very interested in intent lieutenant and they're also interested in coz -ality my work at the moment is trying to establish will Like for an hour them and the what the beginning to be talking about today is connected to quality so is an area that really came up in my kinda full mold machine learning education and it was only probably just over a year. When i read a book by judy. Appel will the book of why a restarted get interested in the subject to causality and realize that it's something but isn't tool on isn't handled while a machine learning at all. And if you read the book. Paul is very adamant about the importance of alexey. In housing types of analysis simply can't walk without taking into account so it drew a question in my mind is wide or how machines machine learning techniques reinforcement dining. what when there's no explicit treatment of causality. it's all so that led to the dog brought to pipe official quoted by fulminate cool cool combo good health law enforcement butting so a reinforcement learning should be all about causality. You have an agent. He chooses actions that she's actions. That somehow changes the world. They receive some kind of award the world changes and so on so you think that reinforcement learning calls aleksey guy well together and actually if you to believe bill. They can't walk reinforcement. Dining should be able to work if causality isn't explicitly treated. But if you look at sutton a barter which is the canonical text on reinforcement. Learning a search for the wet causality. Causal anything like that pays exactly zero times in the book. So someone's gotta be wrong. Eva wrong in saying that actually k. nikon generate any kind of policy to solve a problem or reinforcement dining extremely lucky so far in the Questions that they've studied have contained any kind of interesting causal structure. I agree that the word causality is suspiciously missing from most of the reinforcement literature. Books and papers. I've encountered but it almost feels like it could be there implicitly. Could this just be a matter of semantics. Well that's the great hope from deep reinforcement dining. I guess that ye somehow by involving date neural network in order this somehow in that your network which is unknowable. Mysterious does the job of analysing causality. It doesn't automatically so you don't need to think about it. And it's done you don't need to worry about to me fulfillment dining works. So let's move on. And i guess there is an element of that because reinforcement dining does work. But it just made me think about if you look in science. In general there's a long history of humans discovery techniques which work with before actually understanding why they work so i was thinking about i on the on age was five hundred bc even saudi arabia and to make land. You need to take on all you. Smelted with coke and the coke burns in the air that produces carbon monoxide to carbon monoxide displaces. The oxide in the side which then lacey with real on so at what point in human silenced. It be realized that was happening. Probably two years lights may be seventeen eighteen. Hundreds ole is time. We still had on tools. Said he didn't really matter that we didn't know why what it did kind of walk on. I like bit to reinforcement learning. Maybe the process. Which does what. It's a bit mysterious. Maybe ego to do things to get it to work. But the actual understanding as to white wax isn't diane. I think without an understanding of sally cardi understand. Why rainbow sledding works. I can pull out a textbook or maybe go

Appel Alexey Aleksey Judy London Sutton Paul EVA Nikon Saudi Arabia Coke Lacey Sally Cardi Diane
No justice in sight as Jamal Khashoggi's murder trial resumes

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:26 min | Last month

No justice in sight as Jamal Khashoggi's murder trial resumes

"In turkey today the trial is resuming of twenty. Six people accused of involvement in the murder of jamalco shoji in london. One of mr khashoggi's friends. He's been in touch with his fiance. Says they're trying to stay positive in spite of the grim. It's more than two years. Since the veteran saudi journalist was suffocated in his country's consulate in istanbul his body sawn into pieces by a squad of assassins flown in on private jets after four nine denials. Saudi arabia has admitted that the missing journalists jamila shoji died during his visits to the country's constitution is the trial will be of little consequence. None of the suspects is in turkish custody and it poses little threat to mohammed bin salman saudi arabia's crown prince and facto ruler who many believe to be ultimately responsible. America's reaction to the grisly murder is a window into how the country thinks about dealing with its historical and the power dynamics in a region riven by religious divides and proxy wars. The trump administration held back a report on metric a shoji's murder a report that the biden administration published last week concluding the crown prince approved the operation despite imposing sanctions on some saudis. Mr biden didn't impose any on prince mohammed. America's president now out how to navigate the country's relationship with saudi arabia and with the region as a whole

Jamalco Shoji Mr Khashoggi Jamila Shoji Saudi Arabia Mohammed Bin Salman Turkey Istanbul London Biden Administration Shoji America Mr Biden Prince Mohammed
Why Has the US Sanctioned Russian Officials but Not the Saudis?

All In with Chris Hayes

02:52 min | Last month

Why Has the US Sanctioned Russian Officials but Not the Saudis?

"The. Us treasury department sanctioning russian officials in response to the poisoning the attempted assassination of a russian political leader and dissident alexi navalny ni With novacek. Do you think this is a good idea. I do i do i. It was just unacceptable for the united states to be silent in the wake of russia's most important opposition leader being intentionally poisoned now in prison by putin's government. I mean if we don't lead the global fight to protect democracy and stand up for pro democratic movements in places like russia no one will and what we see is that the forces of despotism are on the march democrat democracies that we took for granted just ten years ago are now slowly sliding away from self determination even in and on the edges of europe and so by standing up to one of the world's most brutal bullies vladimir putin We are also. I think sending a signal to nascent democracy movements and fragile democracies that america is back on the democracy promotion stage so speaking of that. There's a there. Of course. Also the release of the previously classified report about the intelligence communities findings about bin hamad bin salman that he had greenlighted at the very least the operation to capture or kill but those are the words. They're a jamal khashoggi. Newspaper columnist the washington post. The biden administration not doing anything personally. Mohammed bin salman not revoking visa. Travel rights were personal sanctions. Saying the emas recalibration not a rupture. We've been very clear with a saudi. This is an historic partnership. It's lasted for seventy five years. What do you think of that. I mean i think you can sort of connect these two conversations. There's no question that vladimir putin ordered the poisoning of alexei navalny but we didn't announce sanctions on putin today largely because We tend to not levy sanctions on the leaders of countries And i think that is probably part of the rationale for why m b. s. was spared sanctions but i would make this argument on saudi arabia. I frankly think that Nbs weapons matter much more to him than his visa. And so what i would argue is that we should recalibrate. Our security partnership with the saudis. I if they're going to be in the business of chopping up dissidents or targeting them all around the world and we shouldn't be selling them weapons and so. I think the administration is right now. Having debate about what our security partnership looks like and if we make changes to that well. It looked like a personal sanction on. Mvs you'll have a big impact on him and his priorities. Senator chris murphy. Thanks for making time tonight.

Us Treasury Department Alexi Navalny Novacek Russia Bin Hamad Bin Salman Putin Vladimir Putin Jamal Khashoggi Biden Administration Mohammed Bin Salman United States Alexei Navalny The Washington Post Europe NBS Travel Saudi Arabia Senator Chris Murphy
Journalism watchdog files criminal complaint against Saudi crown prince

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | Last month

Journalism watchdog files criminal complaint against Saudi crown prince

"Media rights group Reporters Without Borders has filed a criminal complaint against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. The group alleges the crown prince and his top aides committed crimes against humanity in the killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Kashiwagi. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports. Reporters without Borders filed the criminal complaint in a German federal court because German law authorizes a judge to pronounce on human rights abuses against non citizens committed outside of Germany. The filing also alleges that Saudi officials are responsible for widespread and systematic persecution of journalists in the kingdom, citing the detention of more than 30 journalists. Head of Reporters Without Borders, says the case is meant to send a message to those who silence imprison, assassinate or target journalists that they won't get away with it. Saudi Arabia is ranked 170 years out of 180 countries on the reporters without Borders. Press Freedom Index. Eleanor

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bi Reporters Without Borders Jamal Kashiwagi Eleanor Beardsley German Federal Court Washington Post NPR Saudi Arabia Germany Eleanor
Khashoggi's fiancé says Saudi royal must be "punished without delay"

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:35 sec | Last month

Khashoggi's fiancé says Saudi royal must be "punished without delay"

"After the Biden administration condemned but did not sanction Saudi Arabia is Crown Prince for the more Order of the Washington Post columnist. There's now push back Jamal crucial. Gee's fiance is calling for Saudi Arabia is Crown Prince. To be quote Punished without delay a teacher Cheng Keyes has world leaders, beginning with President Biden must decide if they're prepared to shake hands with a murderer, A U. S intelligence report released Friday. Found Prince Mohammed bin Salman had approved Kush. Oh, jeez, killing at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. The U. S. Has declined to impose sanctions on the

Biden Administration Crown Prince Saudi Arabia Cheng Keyes President Biden Jamal Washington Post GEE Prince Mohammed Bin Salman U. Saudi Consulate Istanbul
Biden to reexamine Saudi relations after release of declassified Khashoggi report

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:07 min | Last month

Biden to reexamine Saudi relations after release of declassified Khashoggi report

"Turn now to president biden promising and announcement monday on saudi arabia. After that intelligence report on the killing of us based journalist jamal kashogi he was last seen entering the saudi consulate in istanbul. In twenty eighteen that report finding the saudi crown prince ordered the assassination but no direct punishment for him and tonight growing calls for justice. Here's abc's alex birsh tonight. One day after the release of that report blaming the saudi crown prince for jamal kashoggi's brazen murder president biden with this warning. Monday with chris. Botti reagan while the us has taken action crown prince mohammed. Bin salman is not faced any direct penalties overnight. Biden said he'd put the saudi king solomon's father on notice weird hold them accountable for human rights abuses in two thousand eighteen kashogi. Us resident and journalist was lured from his home to the saudi consulate. in istanbul. He was then brutally murdered and dismembered the now declassified four page assessment cited bin salman's control of decision making and support for violent measures to silence dissidents abroad before. Now now i. I believe he will never come back. After the report's release kashoggi's fiance. I teach shaky posted this photo. She took of him in their home. The white house imposed visa bans on dozens of saudis and sanctions on one former official but not the crown prince still some democrats and republicans are questioning. Why bin salman has not been penalized. I think it's fundamentally a problem. If you conclude that the crown prince ordered the capture killed but only hold people that follow the orders to account with the white house had no further guidance. On what monday's announcement will be. The secretary of state said that the us doesn't want to rupture but recalibrate its relationship with saudi arabia. The saudis have called that report inaccurate

President Biden Saudi Consulate Jamal Kashogi Alex Birsh Jamal Kashoggi Bin Salman Botti Reagan Prince Mohammed Istanbul Saudi Arabia United States Kashoggi King Solomon Prince ABC Biden Chris White House
Saudi crown prince reportedly OK'd Khashoggi capture or killing

Rosie on the House

00:30 sec | Last month

Saudi crown prince reportedly OK'd Khashoggi capture or killing

"A declassified intelligence report released Friday holds the crown Prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman, responsible for the 2018 killing of Washington Post journalist Jamal Kashiwagi, but he is not part of In the report. Some were hit with Visa issues, and House Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff tells ABC. I think it's fundamentally a problem if you conclude that the Crown prince ordered the capture, killed but only hold people that followed the orders to account. Saudi Arabia denies the Crown Prince's

Mohammed Bin Salman Jamal Kashiwagi House Intelligence Committee Saudi Arabia Washington Post Adam Schiff ABC Crown Prince
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:40 min | 11 months ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"These ideas we hear these things but it's also quite liberal and liberal people there also where women ask me. Hey you seem lost and I was. I was lost Help you which I found fascinating because we had that you like old. They're not allowed in the beginning. I didn't know how to talk to women. In Jeddah is a completely different world than other places. Come interesting that being the gateway city but also having the international influence. I'm fascinated by that difference arriving. Okay what do you expect? But Yeah you arrive there for example cinemas opened up. I think they said two years ago that's started to have cinemas again and one of the first ones was in Jeddah and a lot of the concerts that are happening of big artists. They are injured as well. So there were telling me a Was just there and David Guetta. So that's because it's a bit more liberal interesting. That seems like that's just wrapped up the ten area that you were pitching to me. Is that correct? That's it. Yeah that's correct anything. We want to talk about jeter before we get to some of our wrap up questions. Maybe one thing that I would say Jeddah. There's this beautiful water promenade again. Take a stroll. They're really really beautiful to see big contrast to ultimate besides idea. That's that's one thing that surprised you about Saudi Arabia. I don't want maybe difficult to I think because it is so different than what we Ayoola used to. At least what I was from Germany or Europe. So there's a lot of surprises that you will encounter but the biggest one for me was how friendly in kind the people were. And I've said this before. It was by far the biggest surprise. I mean starting from the box of oranges in the cap to being invited to people's houses for food being invited for tea when they take you out. They don't let you pay for anything even if you try to fight for it is very very kind and welcoming culture and definitely was mind blowing. That really was mind blowing no matter what if a Muslim or not they always tried to treat me. The best could and there was said you a foreigner your gift of God and we want you to have the best experience and therefore me was mind blowing this attitude that encountered from pretty much. Everyone there one time when it felt very familiar completely could have been at home and one time that it felt very very foreign. Okay very familiar. They have all off the fast food chains. We have which actually they have more of the fast which we have in Germany. It was insane Baskin Robbins which I've never seen anywhere else. Outside of the states. They have literally all the fast food chain so when walking around in the modern parts. And you're you're sitting McDonald's. It's sitting in McDonald's in Germany Munich. You have the young Saudis who have the the modern clothing and laughing over the phone and it would be ailing female so it wouldn't matter no bacon no bacon or ham on the egg. Mcmuffin would be different. I'm sure but other than that. You wouldn't find out most foreign. I think most foreign when I was standing in front of the Prophet Mosque in Medina. And everybody was mapping the traditional outfit going into the into the mosque because for me it felt beautiful beautiful experience but out of this world because we always see from TV or you hear about it. So that's when I fell the most foreign unsafe or something unfamiliar. Well you mentioned safe. Are there any warnings that you would give that one thing? You should really know before you go to Saudi Arabia. Good question because I told my family that going to Saudi Arabia and the frustrations like Oh my God is that is it safe like. Are you sure it's okay? It's absolutely safe. It's really no problem at all. I think one little thing to be aware of that. The border to Yemen all the way in the south there could be some issues but overall Saudi Arabia is a very very safe country and really nothing to worry about. It probably would be one of those countries. I would try not to get into political argument. She just have some concerns that way and and there are multiple countries that that would be included in my country. I would try and had to do that absolutely agree with you. Chris and I think it's always you have to separate the people from politics. Also it's two things but yeah of course maybe a side note here. I was in Medina and I was traveling with the friend. I met there and we saw this. Little Hill said okay. That would be a perfect overview over the city. Let's climb up there so we really climbing up this hill and suddenly we hear the sirens and the police. The police the road waving us down and what doing illegal story like. We did know there were. There were no science. We didn't know that we not allowed to go there and there was a little way so we thought it's okay so I think be aware that it can still be a conservative country in a lot of waste and of course you have to be aware of those things but safety wise. It's absolutely found to go in terms of dress code for you as a tourist. Anything that you would advise people different from going to any other Muslim country. Yeah so interestingly. Because they open up the borders Petursson. They got quite moderate When it comes to clothing so for example women. They don't have to wear the headscarf or the long dress. The Abaya but they said okay be decent and respectful usually known as no shoulders. Exactly Sony's no shoulders. If you want as a woman you might WanNa have a head scarf around when you go for example to Medina just to be more respectful. But in general snow sleeveless shirts or short dresses. Even guys no sleeveless shirts to understand what flow is saying here. This is not the place to where your wife beater tee shirt or so. I think there's any places of tourist wearing that Polynesian Eighty. It's very hot country but try not to do that. Because that's probably will get you could get you in trouble or you will get a lot of looks for that but it might make things less comfortable for you and that's and that's really one of the reasons that we want to talk about. Things like warnings is if you're going to go we want you to have a good experience and being more sensitive to the culture is going to help you have a better experience some excellent. You're standing in the prettiest spot you saw in Saudi Arabia. Where are you standing? What are you looking at? I think the prettiest spot I saw was when I was in the middle of the desert in Riyadh close to show the world absolutely nothing around this huge desert this nothingness. It's mind blowing and to think that this goes on for miles and miles and miles and there is nothing that blew my mind. Excellent one thing that makes you laugh and say only Saudi Arabia. When I arrived in in Jeddah the Saudi guy took me out. And he's like he's like I'm GonNa take you to the best restaurant in Saudi Arabia. It's the best thing like all the Saudis knows like. Okay probably going to be good restaurant and you know we went to. We went to allback Albuque- most famous fast food chain in Saudi Arabia. It's pretty much Casey. But I thought that was hilarious in Saudi Arabia. The Best Best Restaurant would be pretty much a KFC. And I can tell you it's fantastic. It's really really good but I did not expect it. Would we drove up to interesting? I remember my guide in Jordan saying that for dinner when they WANNA treat they. Don't go out to the traditional restaurant that would have traditional food because they make that at home and makes that really well and so they go out to Taco Bell and so somewhat. It's it's a treat to do something. Different is probably one of the reasons why it's popular is that we make traditional food at home and so we don't need to go out for that exactly the same thing. I mean it was my for me because this restaurant existence in one thousand nine hundred seventy four did they tell me. It's been popular since then so it very very very interesting but very good excellent and if you had to summarize Saudi Arabia in just three words what three words would use hospitable different and three and you were there in February. We should underline that. What do we say that it was hot is one of your three words so possibly not a place to go in July excellent definitely rather than line I mean I immediately a somber the first day and they were always laughing because they were saying? It's cool right now. So it's excellent. Our guest against has been flu Miller from Munich and flu. You don't have a travel blog that we want to send people to. I started a youtube channel which it's called flow. Nfl Oh if you type in flow and Saudi you probably see a knee roaming around in Saudi Arabia. Excellent that something you will. Not You want to see before you go there will. Then I'll put a link to that in the show notes at amateur traveler dot com and thanks so much for coming on amateur traveler and sharing with us your newfound love for Saudi Arabia. Thank you so much. Chris was a pleasure to review the community. I did WANNA thank some of the patrons who've been supporting the show especially the new ones. We have since the last time we recorded. I'd like to thank Peter Sewer Marshall Denki and also Ryan Miller who raised his pledge. The pledges do help support the show. And so I thank you so much for that. I know that not everybody's interested in doing that. I also not know that never be can do that so I really appreciate that and just as reminder those who support the show through Patriot and we're doing a monthly get together on zoom and they also get a version of the show without ads usually get a day or so early. Colin left a comment about the show that we did recently on Senegal went for ten days in two thousand eighteen and it was a really wonderful time. The friendliest people gorgeous country. Thanks con patron. Jeff's left a comment about the show did on West Virginia at Pipe Stem State Park. You can write a cable car down to the river and walk. The trail into bluestone national river between Fayetteville and Greenbrier is a unique cultural arts and Crafts Center called Tamarack with award winning restaurants and their two additional national rivers adjacent to New River. Gauley and Bluestone. Thanks so much Jeff. And with that we're going to end this episode of Amateur Traveller. If you have a question sent an email to hosted amateur traveler dot com or better yet. Leave a comment on this episode at Amateur Traveler Dot Com and thanks so much for listening..

Saudi Arabia Jeddah Medina Germany Amateur Traveler Dot Com David Guetta Chris Prophet Mosque Ryan Miller Europe Amateur Traveller Yemen jeter Riyadh Baskin Robbins Ayoola McDonald Mcmuffin Jeff
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:32 min | 11 months ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Riyadh will one big thing that I would recommend to do his driving into the desert and see edge of the world okay. Two to three hours away from Riyadh and it's this beautiful beautiful cliff in the middle of the desert and it literally looks like it's the edge of the world because falling down and it's beautiful beautiful site and one of the big things to do in Riyadh because in the end Viet is a big city. And when you definitely want to experience the desert and because the desert is so close to leave the the city and you're there and this is one of the most sees when you re at the edge of the world can only recommend that this is is that the same place yes everybody would call it edge of the world. Say Edge of the world there is towards available to go to the edge of the world which is probably your best bet because you wouldn't need a four wheel drive you can do it in the morning for example for sunrise and then in the afternoon next. Gloria great end edge of the world. So you're at the top of a cliff looking out on the desert. Exactly you got mentioned. You're in the desert in front of you. There's a cliff falling down. And and the desert continues all the cliff in the middle of the desert and skillful scenery. Anything else in Riyadh. It's a big city. Don't spend too much time in. Riyadh if you have time I found it very fascinating to go to the boulevard. You said was. I was surprised that it's seven million people. I didn't realize that Riyadh was that biggest city nei-neither until I was stuck in traffic there. It's it's really it's incredible you. GotTa imagine everybody's driving. It's a huge city. Pretty much stuck in traffic all the time. If you will go from A to B Consists pretty much of malls because they they love them also in Saudi Arabia and I mean one last thing what I found very fascinating about was the boulevard. It's a newly built. You could call. It is mall restaurants shops there and they just built that where people come together. They play music have concerts there and they were actually hosting the wwe either. And I found that fascinating if you look at history of Saudi Arabia which was very conservative. In the last years to really you can see how it's opening up and having shows there and the different side than would we see from the from militant excellent. Were tune you're in for treat because it's a long right through the desert so next step would be Allah which is a area on the west side and it's very famous for its first world site there so that Saudi Arabia's first Website called Modane. Sally and you probably I don't know. Have you been to Petra in Jordan? Yes so the same ancient kin- Bill Petra the Nabataeans they were also there because there was a huge kingman and they also build the sites. They're so pretty much Allah Lula. The Saudis always explained it's Petra without the tourists. It really is like that. I mean it's really beautiful buildings. I like the ones in Petra but there's not many tourists. They just starting to opening this up. They were supposed to really open this up in October this year. Two Thousand Twenty but they still trying to figure out how you can visit so when I was there the best was to go there with a tour because certain sites you only allowed if you have booked assert experienced a call until either you in one of the hotels there or with a tornado. And that's also what I will recommend to go there with a tour from Riyadh. Probably the easiest will end. You mentioned the nicotine and so the Nabataeans our contemporaries with the Romans. Just put this on a timeline. It's about two thousand years ago and they're a trading community but there's basically as far as I understand pretty much constant sites from here all the way up to Petra prefer about one hundred miles so this was the center of the Nabataean Kingdom back during that time period. I think this is actually from the sixth century. So a little later on. I think Patrick dates back a little earlier. But in fact I know that there is a Roman part of Petra so yes no. You're absolutely right and from what I've read is dead. Lula was the second biggest city or second-biggest settlement after Petra just to give a perspective also about the importance of this place. There's tons of beautiful sites along the way to pay. This is one of the biggest from back in the days will. I'm curious because I'm not seeing a lot of photos of all on the Internet yet. And would you go to Petra? There's only one photo in the sense that so many people go and take a picture of the Treasury building where it's really quite a large and interesting place and the you don't usually see that in photographs. Is there one particular spot or one particular site that is the crowning achievement in Allah? Yes you would have something similar to the Treasury in there. Yes it's called mother. Insulate it Saudis first UNESCO world site and usually when you type in a Lula in Google. You'd have this building come up. It's like a single rock. They build a temple in that. So that's face that people know from Hula. But there's many other buildings around so this one just for those. Who aren't looking at the versions. Well I guess the only version of the show that comes out now has pictures who aren't looking at the pictures in the version of the show that you're listening to you is so unlike Petra for instance which is built into a cliff site. This is take a rocket car away. That doesn't look like a temple so excellent anything else about before we move on a lot of different sites along the way. And that's what you would do with a tour because they can show you them. It's interesting because depending on what you're looking for I mean they're trying to build up luxury hotels. They're and they're trying to put modern buildings there. I think they still trying to find out a way of Calcutta this area for tourism and they want to make this their number one stop for tourists in Saudi Arabia. After Day of to I would suggest heading south to Medina and why to Medina. I think for me for me was was very interesting because I didn't know as mentioned that I was able to go to Medina and for the history and importance. It's a beautiful beautiful place to experienced staff. Would you say the history? Let's not assume that everybody knows what you're talking about. It's a significant city because because so the Prophet Muhammad which is the Prophet. Any slum is actually buried there so he there's a mosque where he's buried and People come there for pilgrimage as dwelling to visit the mosque. And it's the second most important lost after Mecca well in basically win Mohammed had to flee from Mecca. He came to Medina and founded. What became Islam that would back and captured Mecca? What I found very interesting there is as well in the beginning of Islam. Apparently they were praying towards Israel. Oh and then. They changed the direction towards the Mecca. And that also happened in Medina during during prayer ran apparently the profit changed the direction. So you have a lot a lot of history and the small city which I find amazing I think is very interesting to go there and experienced that firsthand as a non Muslim. You're not allowed to go into the mosque. But you can go to the entrance and you can watch everything you can see. And when I was it was very interesting to imagine that all these people from all over the world come to this one place to visit the mosque and visit that to the prophets. I found a very very interesting experience. That firsthand about all the time was very fascinating to see that and you say the entrance. Can you go in the courtyard or do you have to stay outside the walls? I assume you have to stay outside and what you see is two huge mosque. I think it can hold almost up to a million people so it's very very big so you can look into the courtyard and what you also can do. Is You can actually be there for prayer time and watch it from outside. I wasn't sure that be respectful with think this would be respectful to them. In the contrary all the people I met the they're very very willing and open to share and happy that I was interested in the history of that. So if you do that recommend go to the most. You're able to see a lot of it from outside and also walked should during prayer time to see how that is done so.

Bill Petra Riyadh Saudi Arabia Medina Mecca Petra Muhammad Treasury Lula wwe Modane nicotine Google Sally Israel Patrick kingman Nabataean Kingdom Jordan Calcutta
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:57 min | 11 months ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"The bags back on the road and read. It's real passport. Camera Traveler pursued seven hundred and five today the amateur traveler talks about mosques a magnetic hill and malls Nabataeans hospitality and the edge of the world. As we go to Saudi Arabia. Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Christianson. Let's talk about Saudi Arabia. I'd like to welcome to the show flow meter. Who's come to us from Munich Germany but come to talk to us about Saudi Arabia flow? Welcome to the show. Thank you Chris. Happy to be here. Saudi Arabia is not a place that well actually. It's a place that a lot of people have gone on Hosh. It's one of the most popular travel destinations in the world but for people who are not Muslims. It is a relatively new destination very true yet. Open up its tourist visa in the end of September so everything is very new. There and for me was the interesting part of really yet. Go to a country where tourism really hasn't been a part of the history in the last year. I guess that answers the question of why you went to Saudi Arabia. Was there more to the story than just it opened up. The opportunity was available. I mean Saudi Arabia. There's so much so much to talk about. I mean first of all landscape. I think we always think about at least to me. It was okay. Saudi Arabia desert oil encampments. That's the first words that came to remind but the landscape boys. There is so much more to see. I mean the Sea of the mountains zero than history wise. I mean a lot of ancient kingdoms coming from there the history of Islam being from there but for me it was one of the biggest reasons why a went to Saudi. Arabia was the hospitality of the people. I heard such amazing things about that. I've been around in the Middle East and I wanted to experience it for myself and as soon as I heard. They opened up the doors for tourists. I said okay. I'm going to jump on that wagon and I want to see for myself to really see how it is. And what kind of an itinerary? Are you going to recommend for us when you look at the map? Saudi Arabia is a huge country. So I always say it's better to have more time than less. But if you have about eight to ten days that should give you a good idea overview over the country so I did it. I'd recommend always starting in Ria. That's the capital on the east side. And then making your way for the West stow after that a Lula which is a beautiful beautiful historic site than to Medina which is super interesting because Muslims go there as well now and then to Jeddah and then from Jeddah head back to Fly Back from Jeddah which options whatever works best for you excellent before we get into that in more detail one place. You didn't name and I WANNA talk about why you didn't name. It is a place that other people might be interested in going. And that's Mecca and there's a reason why you didn't name Mecca and we OUGHTA address the elephant in the room as it were so if he would want to go to Mecca. I'll give you the picture you'll drive on the road and then you see a big sign which says non Muslims go right and Muslims go straight celebrate as a non Muslim. You're not allowed to go to Mecca. And that of course has to be respected now of course if you are Muslim than that's entirely different and you in fact are encouraged or required depending on how one looks at that to make a trip to Mecca at least once in your life if you have the means to do so. So but we're not gonNA address Mecca in this particular episode. We're not going to address going on Hajj because most of the show can't do that so excellent you started us in Riyadh exactly so the beauty of Saudi Arabia is that everything is pretty new so I mean arriving day you arrive at a Super Bowl Airport. I first of all said okay. I'm GonNa take the metro into town so followed the metro signs only to find out that not. That's not billed yet. So that's how earlier wasn't the country so back out of the airport into Uber and into town. We think we always have this idea that Saudi Arabia is a very rich country but maybe a bit old school. That definitely didn't find that the case Uber which works fantastic they have all the amenities modern buildings amazing and paired with all the history that comes with it and there was amazing for me on firsthand arrived in the country. I get into Uber. You drive into town takes about forty five minutes because traffic is crazy and we start talking and suddenly he stops and he gets out of the car and he comes back into the car with a box of oranges. And I'm super perplexingly. Okay what would you know? He's giving me this box of oranges and I was like okay. Maybe we did the picked it up for his wife or his family and he's like no no no. This is for you and this was the first time really experienced hands on Saudi hospitality. Which is insane. I mean I've been to a lot of places but never ever did uber. Taxi driver gave me a present for just arriving in the country. And that would be a new one for me as well. It's really insane. And this was not a one time I arrived in is expensive. There's a lot of hotels but they are quite expensive when expensive sixty seventy USD. For I would say the the cheapest room. That actually doesn't sound expensive to me agreed. I think I always if you compared to the surrounding countries. Yes okay I always said okay. I've I've been in the surrounding countries compared to that it was more expensive than expected but amazing place. Huge huge city. Lots of traffic because they just building public transport so you pretty much have to use a car to go everywhere but still a lot of history and it's interesting because via just started to really grow in the nineteen fifties so it's quite a new city and there's a beautiful place called Old Town. Where have the old fort were all started? And from there you can explore to the old markets and then also completely after a few minutes. Go to the modern part where you have for example the kingdom tower which is a huge huge skyscraper. We have a bridge on top where you have an overview of the whole city in the old fourth that would be the Mascara Fort exactly the Muslim for exactly. Can we have this little apart with Ford in the middle where you can walk around you have some bazaars but then when you venture further out you have all these modern buildings the kingdom tower with a bridge on top where you can see everything and also on my first day? Something that I heard before but I think that's always very interesting when you there. Is the shops actually close five times during the day. So you actually have to be aware of when you want to eat when you to buy something. Because when it's prayer time they will close a shop and you wouldn't be able to get in for twenty thirty minutes okay. Well and that's true in some other Muslim countries as well so just interesting. I think four Oscar not used to this on a daily basis to experience but very very fascinating will in. I'd say most of us who are listening to the show are not experts in Saudi Arabia. How much did you read up on Saudi culture or history before you went? I'm guessing you were not an Islamic history student or something like that beforehand that this was an opportunistic trip. Did you do a lot of reading? Was this all jumping in new. To be honest with you. It was more jumping pursue. What I expected you to say. That's all right. I mean of course read up on some things on the Internet but I mean because there hasn't been a lot of tourists country. There isn't a lot of information for tourists and there was very interesting because usually when I go into country tried to look pay. What a typical tourist routes that did not exist for Saudi Arabia. How did you put together your tannery then going to the country and talking to the people and then okay. I want to go to Riyadh. I WanNa go to Jeddah but for example Medina. I wasn't really sure if I'm allowed to go there. I was surprised when you said you were. Yeah yes so. This was not on my list and then actually people recommended me to go there and so yeah on the go. Put together my travel itinerary. I was lucky in that sense that I didn't have restrictions on time. I said okay. I'M GONNA be here for about two to three weeks so I had the flexibility to adapt on the girl. Excellent anything else. We want to remember to see well..

Saudi Arabia Mecca Jeddah Arabia Riyadh Chris Christianson Medina Camera Traveler Middle East Old Town Munich Germany Nabataeans Hosh West stow Mascara Fort Ford Super Bowl Airport Oscar
"saudi arabia" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by MD Anderson Cancer Center home to one of the nation's largest cancer clinical trial programs of its kind providing hope to patients through new approaches in detection an advanced therapies more at making cancer history dot com. This marketplace podcast is supported by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation Evan Lyle of rush enterprises. This is a big fan of Michigan as he put it. The future mobility is going to be decided right here in this state visit planet dot com to find out why that's P. L. A. N. E. T. TM DOT COM Washington business goes on despite the political firestorm. I'm David Brancaccio in New York. Whistle blowers ars impeachment investigations military aid to Ukraine blocked and unblocked that said there is other crucial business that also has to happen in Washington. Monday is at the end of the government's fiscal year in less polarized times. There'd be a plan for how to fund the Government for the next fiscal year. There is not both the House and Senate have instead passed temporary prairie extensions keeping the government open through November the twenty first and there's a new estimate on what a government shutdown costs marketplace's Sabrina beneficial reports four billion dollars that is what the last three shutdowns cost U s taxpayers according to the Senate Subcommittee on Investigations they cost a shutdown isn't so much additional tax payer money. It's more punch money. Have we raised it. Mark Goldline is with the committee for a responsible federal budget when the government shuts down still ends up paying federal employees pays operate government buildings. Even though work isn't getting done and that's just money down the toilet millions of federal workers and contractors weren't able to work for fifty two who days in the last three shutdown twenty nine thousand nine hundred eighteen and twenty thirteen on top of that there was lost revenue from parks for example project delay costs but four billion dollars wasted AH low balling it according to Matthew Shapiro Director of the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan it understates the cost of shut down because of all the indirect effects restaurants restaurants that lost business purchases not made contractors who were never reimbursed taking all that into account the CBO estimated that the last shutdown alone the longest and US history at thirty five days cost three billion dollars all told in New York. I'm sure for marketplace. Let's check the markets. The footsie index in London is up one point one percent here the S&P futures of three tenths percent the Nasdaq futures up four tenths percent on its first day of trading yesterday stock in the exercise with the bike company. Anthony Peleton closed down eleven percent that poor performance is one reason Hollywood talent agency. Endeavour has decided not to launch its new stock today has his planned there are many stock exchanges to choose from even within just the US a stock in trade wherever but it can only list on one it's where a stock launches. Is this week one. US Stock Exchange. I E X got out of the listening business. I X is an exchange known for what's called a speed bump and intentional slight delay in in prices to mute the effect of Super High Frequency traders the CEO and Co founder of I x came by to talk about his decision. Mr Brad Cut Ziama. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me so bread to list with the stock. Exchange means you kind of home to a stock this DACA trade anywhere on different exchange but there's a home your home home but your stock market. I E X got outta that business this week. You think teaches a larger lesson about the stock markets that we live in you. No I think it was an opportunity to talk about the difference between listings and trading. I'd meet someone at a at a school party for my kids and they say can you only trade one stock stock. You know you only have one listing. I said no trades six thousand stocks a day. enlist want. I think what we learned is that you know enlisting. We saw the problem and we were selling solution in trying to educate companies on why they should care. I think that was a much steeper hill than we thought you know after year of being in business just it just wasn't right for us if ever there were David Brancaccio stock that I wanted listed. Why would I have gone to I xe. What was your invented enlisting with you? Instead of New York stock is sure yeah. I mean for us. It was partly about values and in an education that I x was built upon important pillars of fairness and transparency and performance for Cheryl. There's really important the place we had the hardest time. Competing was was on the ceremony in the events around listing New Yorker Nasdaq. Wait the thing in the morning where the new stock is listed and they ring the bell over at the absolute change. It gets on brand x cable television station yeah. That's sort of a marketing thing they were offering yeah. I mean it's it's like the Disney world moment right. It's I think the exchanges have done a great job of making that experience ah part of the decision to list and we found ourselves being forced to you know consider competing impeding as an entertainment or events company and that's just not who we are where we are technology company so what you see on. TV is not the Stock Exchange that remind US I E X. He's still trading in six thousand stocks. why would one trade there instead of one of the other places nobody goes to great lengths to protect investors than I xe are speed bump technology technology. We've built machine learning signals on our six version of a signal that helps predict price changes to protect people from trading stale prices so we obsess over protection of investors were having a record year in profits in revenues in volume and market share. I think for us it's it's about discipline red cuts. Yamasaki John Co founder of a Stock Exchange called X. Thank you very much. Thank you cuts. Yama is the lead character pushing back on high frequency trading in the Michael Lewis Book Flash Boys Voice Marketplace helps you stay sharp on crucial matters related to business the economy and money and to help you do some numbers of your own. You can get your very own marketplace pencil pack and you become a marketplace investor today. It's it's a set of six pencils each stamped with a favourite marketplace quote yours fro donation of just five dollars a month support public service journalism and get your pencil pack today at Marketplace Dot Org and thank you. This marketplace. PODCAST is brought to you by indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have have time to waste. You need help getting your shortlist qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot. COM POST A job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor jobs new users can try for free at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot dot com slash marketplace terms conditions and quality standards apply four eighty dollars and a few clicks online. You can get a visa to tour Saudi the EURABIA starting today. Here's the BBC's Grant Ferret on the Saudi tourism play. Saudi Arabia has been contemplating this move for years. The Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman is keen to diversify the economy and reduce its reliance on oil exports until now visas have been largely restricted took pilgrims and business people from today. They'll be available to tourists from forty-nine countries. They'll be no restrictions on unaccompanied women or the non all Muslims still won't be allowed to visit the holy cities of Mecca and Medina but Saudi Arabia's deeply conservative social attitudes and ban on alcohol combined the controversy over the killing last year of the journalist. Jamal Khashoggi might push off many potential visitors. That's the BBC's Grant Ferret reporting in New York. I'm David Brancaccio with the marketplace morning report from APM American public media. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed when when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waste. You need help getting your shortlist qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot Com post a job in minutes set up screener questions than Zero Irwin on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard and we need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs. New Users can try for free at indeed dot com slash marketplace ace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace terms conditions and quality standards apply..

New York David Brancaccio Government US Marketplace Dot Org Michigan Saudi Arabia Anderson Cancer Center founder BBC Washington New Yorker Nasdaq Jamal Khashoggi P. L. A. N. E. T. Ukraine Evan Lyle London
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Are still at a very important factor in overall global economic indices sees and so you saw markets react very strenuously particularly in Asia which is of course more and more tied to Saudi energy supply even as the United States becomes he comes less least individually dependent on oil coming out of Saudi Arabia so I think you know first and foremost that's one of the reasons why we have to give a rat's ass is but the reason is simply that we can't walk away or disregard the conflicts that have been raging in the Middle East simply because we have paid such a high price in terms of both blood and treasure on the part of the American people these conflicts come back to haunt us in a very immediate way in terms of our own security at home in terms of our security of our allies and partners around the region and around the world but they also have an enormous effect talk on the people of an important region of the world and this idea that you know a war in Yemen we can simply tolerate because we we needed to give the Saudis a little a bit of running room after signing a nuclear deal with Iran which they found of Horri- I think was an incredibly horrific calculus on the part of the Obama lead ministration which effectively was in a position to green light and did green light the initial decision on the part of the Saudis to launch this conflict there you know the war in Syria has had a tremendous effect both on on obviously a Syrian people and the wider region on the prospects for a peaceful he's fun and prosperous Middle East but also of course on on refugee flows into Europe and on European politics and so the idea that we can simply sit back back and watch the prospect of another war a war that would engage this long-standing sectarian and geopolitical rivalry between the two most important countries. He's Today in the Middle East and that we would who we simply shouldn't care. I think is both inaccurate in terms of the security implications and incredibly really inhumane so I have experienced a kind of weird Iran whiplash over the last couple full of months where we've gone from being within a few minutes of attacking them to John Bolton leaving and a half for being fired and a half to wanting to meet them socially in New York to now suddenly family saber rattling about this incident in a fashion that is certainly suggestive of possible military action so I'm I'm wondering is there some way to understand the US side of the US Iran relationship that makes any more sense of it than I am instinctively able to make or does it simply not make sense. That's a very open ended question of I think you know the trump administration undertook a policy toward Iran without really thinking through how would play out beyond the immediate initial and overwhelming frankly success that was achieved in reimposing sanctions on Iran and having a massive economic doc cost for Iran. There was either magical thinking that somehow there would be regime change for wholesale capitulation and neither one of those assumptions has any bearing reality but there wasn't a sort of fully thought out appreciation of how easily something like this would come to pass and of course there was widespread anticipation that this kind of escalation was almost inevitable when president trump made the decision to exit the nuclear deal all in May of two thousand eighteen it took another year before the Iranians began to react in any serious way and even then these attacks that we saw over the course of the summer the efforts to begin to back away from their own commitments under the nuclear deal were relatively incremental relatively small scale L. and enabled us all to sort of go back to forgetting that this was in fact a very live a point of friction in the international system. I don't think we're going to be able to forget in the near future. Scott WanNA finish with you when you look at this it's a real mess of sort of interrelated plated issues that range from Yemen to in the immediate crisis since this attack to in a larger sense the the US Iranian frictions that are driven by the withdrawal from the JCP oh as well as a lot of issues in Iranian behavior that lead to escalatory steps like this one and all of it takes place against a sort of international law backdrop in which sh there's a whole lot of nested relationships and sets of obligations that are dicey and complicated and and fraught. What do you see as is is there anything here that is meaningfully guided by international law or is this simply what the different pressures the different parties can put on each other at any given moment in time. I think the simple answer is that it is both because because the international law really structures what is seen as a degree of legitimate state to state behavior among the different states it has a long term effect of empowering or potentially disempowering states depending on the degree to which they can make a credible case that what they're doing it. It was consistent with it in this case the trump administration has been pursuing action against Iran that violates certainly at least international political commitments in this form of JCP. Oh it was not a treaty but it was a political commitment that also strains various cases of territorial sovereignty in regards to secondary sanctions that pushes is the envelope in regards to a lot of other international law and policy and that makes it harder for it to rally support and make credible threats against Iran because it seems seems to have thrown stuff so willing to depart from international morals and standards much the same can be said about Saudi Arabia so while you know national lock in surface a constraint the short term and sometimes can seem as a weakening element on states abilities in that kind of timeframe in the longer term it it can also help to empower them if if they can build a case as to what they're doing is correct and therefore get more support from it from the international community here none of the relevant actors that are on the receiving end of the strike have done so and I think it weakens their ability to response and limits their options. We're going to have to leave it there Gregory Samantha Suzanne Scott. Thank you all for joining us. The law fair podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution thinks this week to Gregory Johnson Johnson Suzanne Maloney Samantha Gross and Scott Are Anderson for coming on the show. Please share the law fair podcast. Give us a five star review on itunes. The podcast cast is edited by Gen Patio. How audio engineers this week where Michaela Fogel and Jacob shots are music is performed by Sofiane as always thank. Did you for listening.

Iran Middle East United States Saudi Arabia Yemen Gregory Samantha Suzanne Scott Asia Obama Syria Europe Gen Patio trump Brookings Institution president Scott Wan Michaela Fogel New York John Bolton Sofiane
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Calculus may shift a little bit whereas a little bit of a Greyer picture they'd be worried about that supports new mash community they would want in the event of an armed conflict and that may be leading them to take what is so for at least it's been a little bit more of a conservative approach even than American officials in trying to attribute this attack says Suzanne. I bet you have not sat at a whole lot out of tables in which people have asserted that countries other than the one you study are even more unpopular right now than Iran but that actually actually is what Scott suggesting that that that Saudis may be being cautious because they look bad next to the Iranians. Do you have a sense of like assuming assuming you're Saudi Arabia and you decide that you need to back from this. What are your options. Let me just stipulate that I don't in any way disagree with what's already been said by Scott and others here about the cat of PR problem that the Saudis have they've poured billions into reputation laundering ring and and lobbying over the years and I think if anything there is just no purchase among the American electorate and more widely among long domestic publics around the world for the kind of sales pitch that MBBS tried to launch a New Vision Asian for Saudi Arabia and a close ally and friend of the United States that said I don't think the Saudis ever look beyond one address when when it comes to considering their own security and who has their back and that's here in Washington and obviously there's you know real precedent for that in terms of prior administration policy in coming in and a very strenuous way to try to ensure that we in fact did defend the Saudis against I any prospect of an attack for example after Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait was the concerns about his future mindset and and whether Saudi Arabian oil production and the autonomy and independence of of the Saudi Kingdom would be preserved that helped to mobilize an an American effort to generate international support for a coalition to defend the kingdom and I think if anything that you know this kind of us preeminence in Saudi security mindset has only intensified since in the thirty years since that time I do think that from the perspective of how might they respond to Iran there once again looking to Washington the Saudis have some considerable capability when it comes comes to at least actual arms purchases one of the leading arms importers from the United States in a number of other western industrialized countries hasn't always translated to military effectiveness which greg can speak to and much greater detail than I can particularly in the case of Yemen but I I'd also point to the sort of history of some reticence on the part of the Saudis to go up against the Iranians directly this is a very different time very different leaders in both countries different political context all around but if you think back to nineteen ninety-six when a terrorist attacked a housing compound near Dhahran nineteen American in military personnel were killed in that attack the Clinton administration trace the the attackers to orchestration from Tehran the Saudis Saudis were very averse to cooperation in prosecuting that attack miraculously or perhaps not in two thousand fifteen the purported ringleader actually turned up in Riyadh and I think justice was settled on the part of Saudis from there so there is a I think a different way of doing business that was a very different kind of an attack as I said the political context in both Saudi Arabia Iran was very different at that time but I think it's not inconceivable that the Saudis will choose news to look for ways to de-escalate with Iran just as we saw happen with the Mercedes after the attacks which targeted targeted ships in their ports this summer in fact what we've seen is a at least briefly some new life for a diplomacy between the Iranians honey in the Mercedes I think suggesting that at least some within the Emirati leadership where we're happy to engage in support for US pressure on Iran Iran but when they recognize that there was a real cost to their own security into their economy they were they were more interested in diplomacy all right so one area where the Saudis have not ratcheted things down as Yemen and they've kind of not facing the Iranians directly have really I've been very aggressive and so gregory just give us a sense all of this may involve Yemen directly or it may not but it certainly involves vol's. Yemen to the extent that the huskies have claimed responsibility for it so what is the state of the Saudi involvement there again which is of course the backdrop against which all of this takes place right so the Saudis went into Yemen back in March of two thousand fifteen in their idea what what they were telling people in Washington here at the time was look. It'll take a six weeks. We'll push the WHO tease out of out of the capital Sanaa. the legitimate government. President Hattie will be able to return turn he was in exile in Saudi. Arabia will just bond them. They'll flee back to the mountains. Everything will be taken care of for now. Four and a half years on the Saudi strategy of airstrikes is not worked and so now Saudi Arabia's faced with I think militarily they have basically three options they can withdraw completely leave the Hutus in control of the country and that then the who these will clearly declare victory. Saudi Arabia doesn't want that to happen. They're worried that WHO `this will be essentially Hezbollah south than their border. Saudi Arabia can double down on what it is that they've been doing over the past four and a half year send ground troops in an attempt to push these out but that would be bloody there'd be a lot of a lot of Saudi casualties and there's also so no guarantee of success so they'll they're unlikely to do that so that means that they keep doing what it is that they've been doing for the past four and a half years which carry out airstrikes which kill a number of civilians kill sympathy fighters but have very little impact on the ground and as Scott said Suzanne said is everyone around the table that said as this war has gone on the UN calls Yemen the world's worst humanitarian humanitarian crisis everyone who touches it from the US to Saudi Arabia to the UAE is really being tarred with this new see this just a couple of months ago the UAE am drawing down UAE clearly looking for an exit in in Yemen the US would like not to be associated with this in back in April president trump vetoed the the joint resolution from from Congress asking to cut off US support US logistics and intelligence support the Saudi led coalition so Saudis Prosecution of this war despite their massive amount of military spending over really decades has not really shown that they have a military that's capable of up defeating this this tribal militia in north so they have extensive weapons they have state of the art technology and they're not able to to defeat the WHO these and it's unlikely that given four and a half more years bombing that there'll be any more successful than they have been over the past past four and a half years so Samantha when I hear all this in part of me says where you started is exactly the key point that yes this is a big facility for Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia doesn't matter as much as it used to and it's got this quagmire in Yemen. There's no obvious response ons for it against Iran if it tries directly and therefore it won't and so they will come looking to us to do something but we care less about them than we used to and by the way they're super unpopular right now and congress isn't itching to pass a sort of authorization to use force to defend Saudi Saudi Arabia which wants did right as recently as nineteen ninety-one and so my question is this is Saudi Arabia kind of on on its own here. Is this the sort of Kashogi in Yemen chickens coming home to roost where you really piss off the entire world and then somebody destroys your oil facilities and the world's Kinda like deal with it. Did I think there is some truth to it. You said I do I think the Saudi is are are much less popular than they used to be. I think Mohammed bin Salman really tried to paint himself as a reformer and he did some things he brought music to the Kingdom and in cinemas cinemas and let women drive and a lot of things that he he did to make himself look like a reformer whereas Baha behind the scenes he was causing all kinds of troubles with the war on Yemen with the Kashogi murderer Peter with continuing to imprison dissidents and political enemies and so to some extent it is I think the chickens coming home to roost but also I mean Saudi is still absolutely crucial to world markets. I don't WANNA I don't want to downplay their importance and even to the United States we still import oil and the prices that we I also at the gas station and we drive by and stopped to fill up our influenced by what happens in Saudi Arabia probably more than any other country but yeah they have kind of alienate alienate a lot of folks in the world and the other thing that this is that's happening in the background is it oil markets are pretty well supplied right now. There's been issues in Iran. There's there's been issues in Venezuela and Libya taken small off the market the by and large markets are still pretty well supplied and they've kind of shrugged off those disruptions. If this disruption is is short they can probably shrug this off to and so that kind of changes the world's calculus toward Saudi. We're concerned about Saudi for the most apart because we're concerned about their oil and we feel like markets are well supplied. We we do back away from them a pet to have help themselves out but that that reality stands so Suzanne before we turn back to Iran this morning or yesterday Washington Post columnist Elizabeth Bruni tweeted tweeted who gives a rat's ass if Saudi Arabia was attacked in kind of reflection of exactly what we've been talking about and you responded. I thought were particularly interesting tweet. You tweeted. I've been thinking about this tweet that is Elizabeth Brunettes tweet and my first reaction is how does a Washington Post opinion writer have so little understanding of energy and the global economy and so little regard for the potential implications of Middle East conflict for people in the region as well as elsewhere and so that seems to me to put a interesting bracket on the principle of you know you're on your own Saudi that we've just been flirting with so obviously one of the things that limits that principle is the impact on global oil markets and global global able other markets that are influenced by oil but there's more to your tweet than that. There's a you can decide you. Don't care or give a rat's rat's ass about the Middle East but the Middle East may still give a rat's ass about you. What are the things that limit that principle the ability to just say Saudi Arabia. You're kind of on your own on this one even if they're really unpopular and even you know even if they they're making the Iranians look good these days right well. I think the primary interest that the United States states has with respect to the security of Saudi Arabia and particularly in the aftermath of an attack like this is fundamentally about the health of the global economy and this is where I think you know some of the rhetoric out there that we are energy independent the sorts of things that Samantha said in her description of trump administration policy on USO S. O. Energy Production at home has been problematic because it's giving Americans the idea that somehow we are completely divorced from anything that might happen with with respect to energy supply coming out of the Gulf in fact of course because Saudi Arabia is such an important reliable low cost producer of energy anything anything that happens in Saudi Arabia will have an immediate ripple effect on global oil prices and global oil prices despite changes alternative.

Saudi Arabia Yemen Iran Arabia Suzanne United States Scott Middle East Samantha Hezbollah US Washington President Hattie UAE Washington Post Sanaa. Gulf UN
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:18 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Gulf port in the United Arab Emirates pipeline in Saudi Arabia and oil markets effectively shrugged off those attacks and while there was a little bit of Saber rattling and a little bit of concern particularly after the Iranians down an unarmed drone that was surveilling the coastline in the Persian Russian Gulf. there really was no military response of any significance from the United States and I think the Iranians haven't quite gotten what they needed out of that escalation. They need need an exit strategy. They need a mechanism to persuade president trump that maximum pressure is not in his interest and the best way to do that is is to threaten the global economy and by virtue that threatened the prospects of his reelection and strike the takes out a significant proportion of global spare energy capacity acidy will have that effect all right. Scott so let's with that as a factual backdrop. Let's consider the law of all all of this. You know you have a significant strike that may or may not be either conducted or aided or inspired fired by the Iranians may have hootie involvement or may not and is against the Saudi Arabian economic sort of vital organs. What are the tools reasonably immediately available to whom including especially especially given that the president has a kind of rattled sabres on twitter in response if you were still at the State Department at Ah the legal advisers office. What memo are you being asked to write today at this stage lawyers in the trump administration are gonna be I looking yet? The question of what sort of legal case can be made that the United States has a legal right or capability to respond militarily early in a in a variety of different ways and there may be other non military tools that we could discuss as well in regards to military solutions the international law side of this question. really is pretty straightforward. There's very little doubt that Saudi Arabia is a subject of an armed attack other. Maybe some dispute about the scale of it but the level of harm and hostilities here. We're talking about got a major attack in a major facility. I haven't seen fatalities numbers. It's hard to imagine there were no fatalities but regardless it seems to pretty easily qualify for an armed attack. Jack in which case Saturday we will have a right to kind of respond against in a necessary and proportionate should say as against the perpetrator that that tax comes down to a question of attribution whether that credibly be Iran or whether it be who t's have already accepted responsibility and that question of credibility really allies in the eyes of the Party undertaking the military action in this case perhaps the United States were Saudi Arabia or their allies or in the broader community whether they accept that legal justification as valid Saudi Arabia's the one with the right to respond in self defense but it can ask the United States step in and cooperate with us in with an exercising that right and what is called a collective self-defense and if the United States does and there is clear evidence linking back this attack back to Iran or go to another party that they ended taking military action against. It's a hard case to imagine that many people would object to there being some sort of right of response here although again it has to it'd be kind of scaled appropriately even in our community that's very skeptical of the trump administration and its position on Iran and that to some extent is why this is such an escalatory. Orien- exceptional move from a US domestic law perspective. The executive branch has maintained a for a number of decades across administrations. Now the president has has the authority to engage in the use of military force abroad under two conditions one in pursuit of national interests and to so long as the use forces out of a scale that quote unquote constitutes a war for constitutional purposes here. There's little doubt that the executive branch is going to be able to identify national national interest at play here regard the impact on the global economy and the US economy US security commitments say allegations in the region but certainly longstanding policy towards the Gulf region of variety of factors will kind of allow them to make that case people make contest it but the bar is very low. It's a pretty subjective standards not very constraining training on the executive branch. The real constraint then becomes well. What kind of level of force can be used. It's not clear illegally exactly where the line or the executive branch thinks the line is about what constitutes a war for constitutional purposes but the big factors tend to be something like the use of US ground troops or the use of major escalatory escalatory hostilities large scale civilian casualties things like that so at the United States wants to pursue a relatively minor response such as set up airstrikes strikes it likely feels it has legal authority to do so already again. That's controversial. Some people don't agree in particular some folks on Capitol Hill Disagree that the president has that authority forty but executive branch maintains that it doesn't has for for many years if the president however believes that this requires a much larger military or spots and extended military military campaign or that. There's a substantial risk of it escalating to such a military campaign factor that the trump administration itself is really emphasized and it's legal analysis the prior situations then they may feel compelled or at least feel that the strongest legal argument is that they do need congressional authorization for that and if that's the case swell than they have two options essentially one they can go to Congress and try and get that authorization or they can look to other laws on the books to say will do any of these. He's reach the situation. We've heard murmurs from the trump administration at various times that the two thousand and one authorization for military force. That's the same law that authorizes is the war in Afghanistan and bill travers al Qaeda could reach Iran potentially as well based on some Iranian ties to certain al Qaeda members on prior to nine eleven and afterwards. It's a weak case. I think it's one that lacks a lot of credibility. I think it's one that's not likely to be well received but it's it's hard to say it's absolutely Salihi outside the realm of possibility for an argument that the trump administration could choose to advance so it's at least an outside possibility although again I think it would entail major political risks the last step all this. They'll ask actor think about really is Congress. we saw. Congress earlier this year. Try and pass a statutory provision that would have prohibited pivoted president from engaging the use of force against Iran except in certain self-defense circumstances that would reach to the circumstance we saw it fail in the Senate simply because because it couldn't reach the sixty votes necessary to defeat a filibuster so you have congress kind of on their record majority of Congress really expressing reservations about engaging in this sort of military action and I think that sort of factory even though institutionally may not limit the president's legal authority is really likely to weigh in here as the administration considered a response Congress has been very skeptical of a major military campaign against Iran and you know the trump administration may reasonably fear ear that pursuing that sort of policy even if it thinks it has legal authority may result in more conflicts unless support from Congress than it would need particularly in the lead up to an election year so maybe more hesitant to pursue that path even if it's legally available so Samantha. It seems to me in the first instance. The question is what the Saudi government does right they are after all the victim of the attack although the perpetrator of a lot of attacks in in Yemen which which will talk about in a moment but they're the target of this attack and they are a famously impenetrable political political target to understand at least for me other than that they don't like the Iranians and will likely blame things on the Iranians. What what should we anticipate in a Saudi response both politically and militarily. It's a difficult question to answer. I think something that's GonNa play into into the answer to that. Question is I feel like this attack was a really specific personal affront to Mohammed bin Salman and here's the reason why the Saudis are really focused focused right now on the IPO the initial public offering of Saudi Aramco. That's come back to life recently and something that's really being pushed forward the idea behind this is that they'll use the revenue behind that IPO to invest in the economy to help move the economy away from its dependence on oil. This is something something that the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman has been super focused on an Israeli staked his reputation on and this attack is a real blow to that what it does it demonstrates that the production there is much more at risk than anyone knew there never been an attack this successful flow on that facility before and I think they'll recover from this attack. We'll know more tomorrow but I think they're likely to recover fairly quickly but this ability to attack their production has been demonstrated right now and so this is really an attack at the heart of the Saudi economy and a heart attack at the heart of what is trying to do with the Saudi Saudi economy so that certainly argues for strong action on the other side. Nobody wants a war in their yard. I mean they they have this enmities where it's the the the Iranians however a hot war with Iran is not something that does anybody any good and so the balance between those two factors the really deep strike get their heart verses not needing any more problems erupting in their neighborhood. I think that's the calculus that's going to have to take place within the Saudi government and assuming they feel that they cannot not respond to it. The Iranian military is quite battle-tested and a lot of areas the Saudi military careers had its hands full in Yemen other than kind of getting off involved. What is their actual leverage to respond like. What are their options. That is a difficult question. I'm trying to figure that out myself actually because they're already the beating the WHO is to death in Yemen and you know going after the Iranians by proxy. I'm not sure where they have the ability to go from there. I'd be interested to hear from our other panelists so gregory. Do you have a sense of that where if if you're Saudi Arabia and you WANNA hit the Iranians back in response to this. What do you do he will it depends where the attack comes from right so if it comes if it came from Yemen if the Hutus are correct then it's part of this broader ongoing war and that sort of limited in a sense that the Saudis have an immediate target they can go after a raw by by hitting the Hutus who they see as running proxy but if it's launched from Iran if it came from Iran then this is something whereas I think it was said earlier. We'll know oh pretty soon where the attack came from then it's something else entirely and then Saudi Arabia either has to respond or they're in a position where they may invite invite more tax if you take the view that Iran has slowly been escalating over the summer. What do you think Scott One other consideration. I think that has to be entering into into Saudi. Thinking at this moment is that it is really in a position where it's goodwill with interesting probably approaching a Nader never necessarily a high sold it to begin with but we have seen in Saudi Arabia come under incredible criticism for the conduct of the were Yemen for the Democra- Shoghi murder late late last year and really the trump administration has been one of the few allies. It's really still bolstering. Saudi Arabia other countries are maintaining military ties and a couple of other relationships and of course oil purchase ties but they're under increased domestic pressure and domestic strain and from the perspective of Saudi Arabia. I kind of suspect that their confidence at the International Ashley Unity we'll have their back if the event of a conflict with Iran is dwindled even if there is a strong case to run as taking a brazen attack the.

Saudi Arabia Iran president United States Saudi government Saudi Arabian Yemen executive Saudi Aramco Congress Saudi Crown Scott United Arab Emirates trump twitter State Department Persian Russian Gulf.
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Daily

"Might be a little bit skeptical of that but then we saw that there were seventeen different strike points and that became evident from some satellite photographs those satellite photographs showed seventeen separate strikes that it didn't quite seem to add up with ten drones the second thing is that these strikes were deep inside Saudi Arabia and it would have required a flight of a five hundred miles or so for drones to be able to get there and that seems well beyond the range of what we've seen the WHO tease be able to do before four and then as we looked more and more at these satellite photographs it seemed clear that these were precision strikes in fact there was a hole in the Dome of some of the storage facilities that were each in precisely the same and they were neatly board little holes. Does that seem to suggest a missile strike not a drone that just was carrying some explosives so the initial story just didn't seem to a match with what we were looking at in the photographs and then what happens well then the president took to twitter and he said on Sunday that I'll Loreto Saudi Arabia. Oil Supply was attacked. There's reason to believe we know the culprit are locked and loaded depending on verification. Shen but are waiting to hear from the kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of the attack and under what terms we would proceed kingdom is referenced instead of Kenema Saudi Arabia so here we have the president United States in charge of the world's largest and most powerful intelligence agents and military forces saying that he is waiting for the Saudis to tell him who they believe triggered this attack and tell him what terms they would proceed on well. It sounds like they're discussing some kind of joint response but the United States for the past two hundred plus years decides on its own whether or not it is going to come to the defense of an outline conduct conduct a military strike or any other kind of response. It's somewhat remarkable to hear that they're waiting for instructions from an ally which is what the president's tweets sounded like he was saying and David. It's not just an ally right. It's Saudi Arabia and we're coming up on the one year anniversary of Jamal Khashoggi Steph which there's a significant amount of evidence that Mohammed bin Salman leader of Saudi Arabia ordered so it also seems somewhat extraordinary for the US to defer to Saudi Arabia given that track record. That's right the administration had been under tremendous pressure. I sure after the murder to identify. NBS as he's called as somebody who was involved but the administration ignored it all and I'm not how can you tell a country that spending hundreds of billions of dollars and has helped me do one thing very importantly keep oil prices down so that they're not going linked to one hundred and one hundred and fifty dollars a barrel right now. We have oil prices in great shape. I'm not going to destroy the world economy yeah and I'm not going to destroy the economy for our country by being foolish Saudi Arabia so I think the statement wait a minute so in some ways this this is a big challenge to nbs but it's also something of a potential political gift to the administration because they can make the case to who congress and others that while Saudi Arabia is no perfect government or society that the Iranians are in fact more evil actors in the region and that's essentially the argument they've been making in the past forty eight hours this attack would potentially have the impact of you've drawing the US in Saudi Arabia closer and giving the trump administration rationale for being closer to Mohammed bin Salman Saudi Arabia. That's right but there's also the concern inside the Pentagon you not let Mohammed bin Salman drag the United States into a new mid-east war it was only a week ago the people in the Pentagon and elsewhere in the administration or showing a big sigh of relief that John Bolton had gotten unfired is national security advisor because their concern was that Bolton would lead the United States ultimately into a conflict with Iran now with Bolton gone a series of unpredicted events may in fact push the US and Saudi Arabia there or pushed the United States to back up the the Saudis Strike Iran so just a review. POMPEO has said it's Iran. The president has said we're locked and and loaded. We're going to let our ally Saudi Arabia lead the way in determining who it is the Hutus are claiming credit but why would use claimed to have done this carried out this audacious sophisticated attack if they had a great question. I'm a bit confounded did myself. The WHO of course are backed by the Iranian so it's conceivable the Iranians ask them to do it. It's conceivable that they just thought that by taking credit therefore they would look more powerful than they really are and maybe in some way they were involved but the most important element of this is that the Saudis came out on Monday the Saudis specifically are pointing their finger at Iran with whom of course they're involved in this proxy war and declared that their examination Asian of the evidence was that this attack was launched by Iran specifically right now however while saying that these were Iranian weapon systems and they are saying they are still investigating precisely where those weapons were fired from they have however ruled out. Yemen as being that base they provided no evidence and that evidence may not exist.

Saudi Arabia Loreto Saudi Arabia Kenema Saudi Arabia United States Salman Saudi Arabia president Iran NBS Mohammed Salman Oil Supply twitter John Bolton Yemen murder Pentagon Jamal Khashoggi Steph Shen
"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on The Daily

"Described the scene in Saudi Arabia on Saturday Michael. We're all still trying to piece together but what we do know. Is that about three thirty in the morning on Saturday morning in Saudi Arabia. There were a series of explosions at a number of refinery facilities line and of course it was dark. no-one exactly what was happening. Fires were burning it wasn't clear where these came from and it wasn't until the sun rose that they saw a really remarkably extensive amount of damage and what they discovered was that a number of their big oilfields were burning than when you look at the satellite photographs you see classic oilfield kind of operations big tanks lots of pipes and obviously lots the facilities that if hit by a weapon can burn and that's exactly what happened this was bigger than anything we had ever seen done to the oil fields in Saudi Arabia at any time in history and David help us understand the significance of hitting oilfields in Saudi Arabia. What's the impact of that also Arabia obviously is among the world's biggest oil producers these facilities account Michael for about six percent of the oil pumped around the world every day while the Saudis themselves produce roughly ten million barrels a day. These facilities are capable of doing somewhere between five and eight million of that so this is a significant a significant amount for world production but it's a huge amount for the Saudi production right so if someone is interested in striking Saudi Arabia and striking the global economy. This is a very good target. It's the best target you could find and what is the original understanding of what has happened and who did it before. There was understanding. There was a claim of responsibility Leah Thirty Huggins Emotional Russian all the WHO tease who are engaged in pretty desperate war with the Saudis in Yemen immediately claimed credit for this. GonNa shut we promise the Saudi Arabia team that are coming operations will only grow wider and we'll be more painful than before so long as their aggression and blockade continues they don't they said that they sent ten drones into Saudi Arabia and that those were responsible for the hit so is the initial sure report came out on Saturday. The hootie movement from neighboring Yemen has taken credit for the attacks the Saudi government as been backing the Yemeni government's fight against awesome rebels of that seemed perfectly credible explanation intil you dug into the facts a little more.

Saudi Arabia Saudi government Yemen Michael Leah Yemeni government David ten million barrels six percent
"saudi arabia" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

13:34 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"It'll be a better outcome if in fact the at least one house of Congress Congress pushes back against trump if he makes a decision to go after this in the same way it would have been great to have seen actual pushback against Obama when he entered a Libya without any form of congressional authorization in fact there was push back against Obama after during that Congress. I don't know the exact mechanism but it was sort of a formal censuring. Hey look you know you're violating the war powers act you could declare your emergency within the first sixty days ninety maybe but I think it's sixty but after after that you need to come to us directly and the Obama administration used the marvelous euphemism ongoing Connecticut exercise as opposed to actual warfare is different is because kinetic. You know it's different than war. Even though we're warring on the most exercise as kinetic ask ask yourself what about planking. Peter Plunkett a said most excellent points excellent point. I Catherine President Trump this morning seemed to indicate strongly that previous shoot down of a US drone was conducted by Iran on on despite Iranian denials there is that how do you pronounce a causes or Casas belly cash clay is that Cassius clay to WHO to get to send a bomb of our own somewhere. You know this is a this is always like there's this idea that there is some kind of objective standard right. There's this idea that okay well. You know somewhere sometime. In the you know in the formation of the nation state some official rules were encoded wherein war is either justified or unjustified and of course that's not true and so there's there's you know there may or and I may not have been acts of aggression. There may or may not be aggression every single day. These things are purposely done in such a way that they are often opaque so that both sides have plausible deniability ability because nobody actually really really wants to have a war right like they sometimes feel like they must and so that is why we have wars but nobody's like woo. Let's have a war unless they're literally insane which John Bolton. Some world leaders are and occasionally some moustachioed advisors to world leaders are but for the most part even John Bolton I would prefer for us not to be at war. I suspect I want to give him the benefit of the doubt wow and and so nothing has caused a spell I unless you want it to be and and that is the unfortunate truth of realism is guests and certainly it's extremely true. In this case there will be a bunch of small things that may or may not add up to war and it will actually be at the discretion of world leaders unfortunately not at the discretion of Congress at this point whether or not we engage in war and it is it is silly to pretend that at some point a red line is crossed and then the US has no choice or then. Iran has no choice. That's not how it is. That's never how it is. It's worth pointing out that we almost attacked Iran earlier this summer we came according to President trump within about ten minutes of allowing an an attack to go through and he planned it all day and had given the go ahead and then suddenly pulled back and give it a thumbs down when he realized this is his story sorry when he realized that it it could cause up to one hundred fifty fatalities this was after Iran apparently attacked shutdown. I believe a US military drone in June and and it was trump who pulled back trump who had been pushed by his advisors into doing this into sort of setting up the attack and putting it on the road to being real and and so you know we talk about Congress should be restraining trump. What's actually interesting. Is that in the trump administration. The president has been the person who has restrained himself has restrained the administration has restrained the military from acting in ways that I think this is this is trump's best quality is that he genuinely does not not seem to actually want to go to war. He likes bellicose talk tweets. He likes to Brag about America's military. He wants to spend way too much on the Department of Defense but he does not appear to have the let's go to war over every little slight instinct that virtually all presidents and since World War Two had although I would add that after he fired John Bolton last week and or Bolton resigned whatever he made some comments. I believe again on twitter saying that Bolton wasn't strong enough against Venezuela Cuba more than right so he claims to be more hawkish on Venezuela which is insane and there certainly have been reports and rumors over the last year or so that the trump administration driven by president trump wants to you have at least a military standoff maybe not an actual conflict but at least a standoff and maybe a conflict with Venezuela and it's crazy and that's the sort of nutty thing that you get from a guy like president trump on the other hand. What I said was trump really likes the the language of war. He likes military rhetoric. Marshall Rhetoric he likes to threaten to use America's military because America's military is big an awesome and that's in in a way that appeals to someone like Donald Trump but given given the opportunity to actually send bombs to send troops. He has been pretty wary and this is a pretty reticent. This is a thing that has been fairly consistent assistant with him certainly more so than any president in my lifetime and more so than pretty much any other. Republican contender that he was against in twenty any six hundred fifteen two thousand sixteen probably more so than Hillary Clinton speaking of both Democrats and reticence arguably about the only bright spot lots of last week's presidential debate in Houston of ten leading contenders for that particular thrown was kind of a discussion of Afghanistan in particular particular and and what should be done there and there was surprising to me amount of support there for restoring congressional authorization Asian for war haven't heard a lot of talk like that in a while you Pete Buddha judge was talking about sunsetting authorizations after three years and a lot of people were talking about getting the troops the hell home out of Afghanistan Catherine. Is there a reason to expect any optimism that Democrats have had more of a change of heart on this particular topic. I don't think that I have any optimism at all on the procedural point well maybe in general but more narrowly on the procedural point the idea that the Democrats should they win the White House will restore the balance of power by returning some more powers to Congress strikes me as absolutely laughable and and wildly unlikely to occur. I do think though that it's fairly likely if Democrats take the White House that we will see a drawdown from Afghanistan 'cause we're maybe sort of seeing a drawdown from Afghanistan Ghanistan. Now it's sort of weird bipartisan transpartisan nonpartisan thing that's just drifting around inside our politics like a plastic bag in the wind no-one on so you're welcome for that for that metaphor a little bit of American beauty for your day so yeah. I think I I do believe I believe Pete Buddhis- When he looks in the camera and says forever war is bad endless war is bad. You dislike him. I like him. I mean I like him less than I do when he first emerged 'cause he has sort of was like guys. Don't worry I'm going to tell you a bunch of substance really soon and that dude seem smart. He's probably going to deliver on that and then he didn't but you know I do believe that the anti war sentiment on that stage was sincere with regard to Afghanistan. I do believe that though many of the Democrats grads on that stage are more likely to draw down than Donald Trump has been despite his occasional rhetorical promises to do so but I absolutely do not I believe that under any of the administrations and the people on that stage that they will defer to Congress about the declaration of war. I started this by saying that it was one of the only highlights here I will. I will yield the floor to anyone who can mention any other policy related highlight that they heard word at the democratic debate. Anyone cared of volunteer would mean there was a somewhat interesting discussion of Medicare for all and how are you going to pay for it. In the first forty minutes or so Joe Biden actually seems to have studied up a little bit on his plan versus Bernie's plan and made. I think you really show Biden's best case which is not necessarily to say the greatest case but the best case that Joe Biden has made so far against the impossibility possibility of of just raising taxes enough to finance the thirty two trillion her so that would be necessary to fully pay for Bernie Sanders Medicare for Auckland. I know that the way these plans get written isn't that the candidates themselves originate the ideas and yet there's always a link depressing to me about the idea that these dudes have to like swot up before the debate to be ready to talk about the thing they would do so it's also that he he had to swat up to be ready to talk about to criticize is effectively the thing that Bernie Sanders wants to do yeah and Biden ahead made some attempts to say well this this goes too far. It's too expensive in the past I but he did the best job that I have seen him do again. This is a this is a qualified praise of talking about the kind of you've just the practical impossibility of getting Bernie Sanders plan implemented and he said I mean he actually started his criticism. Bernie Sanders plan with something that I thought was kind of interesting which was that he said well. We'll my plan costs seven hundred and fifty billion dollars over ten years. That's a lot of money it it is. He's right here just happy. It's it's it's like relative to all of the to the seniors plan. Actually it's a tiny amount of money but seven hundred and fifty billion dollars over a decade is a huge amount of money and Biden actually seems to recognize that and seems to be aware of the kind of political and economic limits that would face any healthcare reform. I here's how unlimited the general a notion of spending is attract a lot of comment but a Comma Harris at some point just sort of casually through that she plans to give two trillion dollars to really twice as much as the ten ten year price tag on obamacare initially to historically black colleges and universities just for that go ahead Catherine. Yeah I was actually going to say education highlight as well which is cory booker who has who has gone back and forth a little bit on his record on charter schools and school choice in general saying yes we closed poor performing charter schools but Dag Nabet we expanded High Performing Charter Schools Tag Nazi literally said he actually said that she said it twice because he also referred referred losing out to the March of the Dag Nab Penguins when nominated for the documentary about his efforts was nominated for that's not a lot better than okay. I WANNA fight you on this. The use of data by like one of the youngest people on the stage was really a delight to me and I think actually a pleasing so y'all note listeners to this podcast no but especially my reason colleagues know that I liked colorful language and and I have been deeply annoyed by Beto Oryx plan to prove his seriousness by just saying fuck Allott and it's because I think he's robbing the rest of us and the chance to use that word when we really mean it against him again and again. This goes against his gun policies. He yells at Hell. Yes he's going to take our fifteen and our AK47's you know now. We have Tulsi saying that. We're we're not Saudi Arabia's bitch like I guess just a thing where if you don't have a lot to lose you might right as well try to win by being a straight talker. I am surprised to find myself in the category of saying you know what maybe people who literally we wanna be president could just scale back the language a Smidge Wa holy on the debate stage or on CNN and so. I appreciate the DAG bag nabet did Catherine just become beckel. I don't know what happened but I I understand when you're president you need is sometimes drop f bombs and sometimes drop actual bombs but I guess I would prefer that they do so only rarely in traditionally connected. You see anything that was positive that hasn't been mentioned so far and worth where they've comment. Andrew Yang had a nice riff about the historical role of immigration and of the United States as a magnet for immigrants as a positive force which I thought was nice to hear but overall you know it from a libertarian perspective. It was a deeply disturbing showing because first off it's becoming coming increasingly clear that the race at this point Israeli between Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden and none of them you know from from a libertarian perspective has much to offer. I mean they all in various ways want to either maintain the exact status quo or much more common..

Catherine President Trump Congress president Joe Biden John Bolton Bernie Sanders US Donald Trump Afghanistan Iran America Obama Obama administration planking Cassius clay Connecticut Peter Plunkett Venezuela White House
"saudi arabia" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

Tha Boxing Voice

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

"You're happy despite has taken place in saudi arabia. Would you prefer to in the u._k. Or the united states i know that on this show we suggested definitely making boxing great and having it in a foreign country <hes> similar to thrilla in manila hello or <hes> you know the rumble in the jungle but is saudi arabia that is it thrilling manila. Is it rumble in the the jungle. You tell us this is what we will be discussing. Administer gibbs on skype to be part of the conversation. You know you can do that. <hes> just add any t._r. B._b. Let me head on out to my co hosts in indiana production <music> sparta's dot com state these dot com coach yoyo job good morning good morning good morning everybody out there to t._b._b. Universe back with another one and then look here. It's been a lot of things said edmund. A lot of articles out there about the dangers of this area versus the dangers of that area. I'm just here to say me dangerous everywhere. We we are are living in the united states. We had to mass shooting at the past week. We had a guy in california who's got fifty. One counts up stabbing people on like friday or friday or thursday fifty one counts of stabbing people for people that i'm seeing all this to say this. Should we have fucking. Nightclub should lash it. We had a shooting at a church in south. Carolina is dangerous everywhere in the world no matter if you take precautions or not every place you can be dangerous..

saudi arabia manila united states edmund boxing gibbs indiana california Carolina
"saudi arabia" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Worldly

"It's not like what is good for Saudi Arabia objectively it is what Mohammed bin Salman wants to do to maintain power and to assert his own authority and distract from these Doba calls and human rights violations that Alex was describing. He wants other countries to know that if you go after Saudi Arabia's human rights record, you will face retaliation. So he wants to generate running room for himself and whip up national sentiment at home and Canada. It's not like the United States. It's not the most powerful country in the world, Saudi Arabia's prime patron. It's not an e you country so you, you know, he started trying to one of them. Then you get into a major, fade worth entire trading block. It's a western country, a big and prominent one, but one that you can take on with relatively little economic cost, though some, but not the tremendous cost that you would incur by alienating more powerful. Patriot. So it's a perfect country to go after if you want to send a message to other ones stay away from human rights record best. My money is a Middle East expert at the university of Waterloo in Canada, and she wrote this brilliant piece. Zach, I think you actually flagged to me in the globe and mail newspaper, and she has this great essay. You should definitely read. It will link to it in the show notes, but just wanna read one quote from it. She says, this is less about Canadian foreign policy than it is about the Saudis. This is a new, bold Saudi Arabia, trying to make its Mark global and regional affairs led by the young, very brash crown prince Mohammad bin Salman. This latest move is yet another red line that is being used for rial up nationalist and assert Saudi dominance. And that's exactly how to understand what's going on. It has nothing to do with Canada candidate didn't do anything differently than it's always done. What's different is MBA s. what's different is what's happening in Saudi Arabia and what he's doing. And I think that's where we'll leave it for the segments of the one last thing I want to say is that my fiance he was Canadian has been getting. For us for not talking about Canada enough on the show. So Honey, I hope you're happy and you know on the next segment on elsewhere, we'll be talking about something very different, which is some great reporting that Alex did about the North Korean nuclear program, something different, good reporting..

Saudi Arabia Alex prince Mohammad bin Salman Canada Mohammed Zach Middle East United States Doba university of Waterloo Honey
"saudi arabia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"This is a global news podcast from the bbc world service media and in the early hours of sunday the twenty fourth of june these are our main stories saudi arabia lifts its decadeslong ban on women drivers does imbaba and president emmerson mnangagwa suggest the blast at an election rally in bulawayo was an attempt on his life tens of thousands marched through central london commanding a second vote on britain's departure from the european union also in this podcast i hope that they'll keep to the front of the agenda the knowledge that libya's nasha safe place we collect testimonies on the inhumane conditions the torture the violence the sexual violence you leaders from a nurse on board the migrant rescue ship the aquarius and he set up the korean central intelligence agency the us official wants described it as a combination of the gestapo in the soviet kgb look back at the life of the architecture of south korea's once notorious spy agency who's died at the age of ninety two i after more than sixty years spent stuck in the passenger seat saudi arabia's fifteen point one million women have finally been allowed to take over the wheel at midnight local time the ban on women drivers officially ended it's being seen as part of sweeping changes of traditional norms by crown prince mohammad bin salman but the country raines one of the most restrictive for women and many of those who campaign to get the ban lifted remain in detention from riyadh or garin reports hi how are you today fine lesson let's go well we're just sitting off now for a driving lesson we're at the campus of princess nura university outside riyadh we have a female driving instructor and a female pupil can i go forty or you can be voted but not more than fifty cleese driving teacher ashok muhammed who has spent years in the uk provides plenty of reassurance terrified roundabouts do you remember yeah you're gonna terrified can do it it's easy nice cars my name's nandy ah how are you nice meeting you will okay so far so good i'm looking for a car i'm very interested in the range rover i like to big cars i don upmarket showroom in riyadh businesswoman nadia i'll huzzah is checking out the latest models so this is this port this is not the biggest one in the past when she bought new cars she only ever looked at the back seat every time i bought the car had the til in my thinking oh my god i i'm not going to be driving it's it's the driver who was gonna step you know have the first step on it and that kind of us to break my heart because it's my money it's my car i wanna be i wanna be able to be the first one to drive it off from the showroom back to the house but that never happened and now it's happening it's evening time and i met the tiber suk it's one of the oldest markets here in riyadh there are arched ceilings and the shops are just opening now many of them selling gold and plenty of them selling a buyer's the floor length black cloak that women still wear here when you look around you don't see much sign of change the women are all fully covered they all have their heads covered some have their whole faces covered but talking to people here you do get a sense of change of a desire for change my name is ryan guebuza was born here actually for thirty two years i'm with my wife and with my daughters the driving will be soon for the latest so we relax a little bit you know we'll sit home they will they will start doing their own things by themselves yeah it'll will be nice i mean change you know they start to be equal in these things i mean why not it is the normal life it is normal life and we start with the normal life and i'm happy with it spoke to our correspondent in jeddah hanan razzaq most women here are very excited and and the are looking forward to actually change their day to day lives we've been talking to women in jeddah and they've been telling us that now the the will be able to drive themselves to the work place they can go to the doctor appointments without having to wait male driver to.

saudi arabia bbc thirty two years sixty years
"saudi arabia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"When ahead and on air force air force one enroute japan said a shot was taken by iran in my opinion at saudi arabia and our system knocked it down that's how good we are nobody makes what we make and now we're selling it all over the world and then he gets off the plane in japan right and is at a press conference and he gets ask and then he says that japan will be able to shoot down north korean missiles shoot them out of the sky is actually what he said just like the shatt the saudis shot this missile doubt you can't see me but i'm just shaking my head and looking at the ground because it's literally uninformed speculation but uninformed nonsense from somebody who should be better briefed you know what it also is it is donald trump waving a big red tape at the cns oh saint team so you said well farc we know it support divides system we could probably find what they were defending and work backwards absolutely and like i say we just started early on we had started because we were trying to just place things just to understand which videos were real and an which videos were not and early on with something caught our i that bothered the hell out of me and it i know what it is but tell the listeners so there were videos showing the debris in a neighborhood and we were able to jio locate that net neighborhood is in the northern part of riyadh helpfully in a parking lot in in a parking lot between not between because they're sort of caddie corner to one another but like you know next to a a shopping mall and a boy school.

japan iran saudi arabia north korean donald trump riyadh
"saudi arabia" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

"A a lot of talk bernard about now these asset a grabs by nbs either in saudi arabia or attempts on to get money back to saudi arabia from abroad which i assume is a much more difficult task now it is that then really about ending socalled corruption or is it a message to this very very large royal family that look the good times are coming to an end you cannot live off of the backs of the oil revenues anymore you can still be princes and royalty in live a good life but maybe not the life the two which you've become accustomed yeah and actually it's more about your behavior is unsustainable and you know you the way you've operated is impossible if the countries to reform itself economically so i i think that it's an attack on a culture of a debt had become dominant in amongst the royals and among some of the business community and basically a culture of impunity people who you know we take on government contracts and never deliver or overcharged for government work he wants to end that culture and to do that you really have to show unity do a greedy brutally i think in the way that in the way that he did although it is important to note that there was no bloodshed at all and there hasn't been so far and second you know they're not actually in in jail or in prison there in a fivestar hotel.

bernard saudi arabia oil revenues fivestar
"saudi arabia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"saudi arabia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"So why has saudi arabia done this and how significant is it i asked damage zaki from bbc arabic there is a huge government and loyal support for this new body groups like alqaeda or isis have been going to have biz's them or the teachings and the walks off mohammad bin abdel wahab as a form of the ideology of their extremism ideals you've come at the knob through hab walls one of the most important figures into a saudi history with south and can be and he formed the first saudi a state so mohammed mahbool hep teachings or allow habilis him until now is forming a huge part or sunk off the saudi eucation system so what is mohammed bin samantha new crown prince and his father the king is trying to do is to shift as a society from this culture of extremism to a culture of fighting such groups and opening the society four different thoughts and how important will it be do you think it's important because it's coming from saudi arabia and saudi arabia is presenting itself as the most important soudini country in the islamic world and medina is the second most important religious city in saudi arabia and also it will not only be formed from saudi islamic scholars but it would be formed from schoolers coming from different countries inside stomach world and it zaki from our arabic service thousands of a hindu muslims fleeing the violence in myanmar thought to be trapped on the border with bangladesh with limited access to food and water they are among more than half a million who've left draconian state since august when the burmese military launched an offensive in response to alleged attacks by hindu militants.

saudi arabia zaki mohammad bin abdel wahab myanmar bangladesh burmese military mohammed medina