20 Burst results for "Satoshi Nakamoto"

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Simply Bitcoin

Simply Bitcoin

05:07 min | 18 hrs ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Simply Bitcoin

"Conference. Network for fellow bitcoiners in Austin, Texas, August 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th, 2023, it's not a shitcoin NFT or blockchain event. We talk about Bitcoin, Bitcoin, and more Bitcoin. You can use the promo code, all caps simply Bitcoin to get a major discount to bit block boom. Anyways, update, what do you have for us today, bro? All right, guys. I saw this on Twitter. It is by memeing Bitcoin, but I think it's a little deeper than just a meme. This is, I know you guys have seen this on Twitter. That chat chat, GPT, I believe it's called. It's like an AI that everyone is playing with. And I saw this and not only do I find it interesting and kind of on the one hand, hilarious. But I think there's a lot of there's a lot of signal in this. And it's funny that an AI understands Bitcoin or quote unquote, understands Bitcoin. Then the normies out there. So let's jump into this. And then we will talk about it and see whether we can do a better job to explain Bitcoin to the NPCs out there. Anyways, artificial intelligence explains Bitcoin. So tell me the story of Bitcoin. And the AI goes. The world was in a state of chaos, governments and central banks had lost control of the economy and inflation was skyrocketing. People were losing faith in their national currencies and were looking for a safe haven to protect their wealth. That's when the machines figure known only as Satoshi Nakamoto appeared on the scene with this groundbreaking invention he offered the world a new hope, a decentralized digital currency called Bitcoin. At first, many people were skeptical. They didn't understand how a digital currency could be a safe and reliable store of value, but satoshi knew that by using complex cryptography and a decentralized network, he could create a currency that was immune to the manipulations of government and banks. People began to see the beauty and power of Bitcoin they could hold and transfer their wealth without fear of inflation or confiscation, they could make transactions without the need for banks or credit card companies and they could do all of this securely and anonymously without revealing their personal information. As the years passed more and more people adopted Bitcoin in the network grew stronger and more resilient, it became a force to be reckoned with and governments and banks began to take notice. But even as Bitcoin gained mainstream acceptance, it never lost its original mystery and beauty, it remained a powerful and enigmatic symbol of freedom and innovation.

Bitcoin Twitter Satoshi Nakamoto Austin Texas satoshi
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

05:24 min | 4 d ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"Needed to best make gold work as a money. Also made possible the Fiat world order. Without significant technological advancement, no sound replacement could be possible, let alone win over public support. Bitcoin fixes this. Doing your own verifying an indexing is the only way to be sure your index data is secure. Satoshi Nakamoto by 2009, the economy was well into the digital revolution. A number of key technologies had been adopted and widely dispersed, including hash trees, public key cryptography, peer to peer networking and sha two 56. A brilliant pseudonymous programmer named Satoshi Nakamoto brought these technologies together to make Bitcoin. Bitcoin solves what is called the double spending problem without a central authority. Any other existing digital cash system, including the present day Fiat currencies and payment infrastructure relying on them, as well as other digital currencies require a central authority to maintain and dictate the true history of a monetary ledger to make sure that the same units of money are not spent twice. Bitcoin instead decentralizes the bookkeeping and uses a proof of work system to maintain consensus between independent bookkeepers about the true history of the ledger. A Bitcoin full node is an independent bookkeeper. It connects to the Bitcoin network, downloads the entire ledger history and validates every block and transaction received against its adopted rules of Bitcoin. Each full node independently operates according to its own instantiation of software and the rules therein. Transaction inputs must be cryptographically signed by the correct private key or keys. Those inputs must be traceable back to valid transaction outputs. The sum value of the inputs must be greater than or equal to that of the outputs. Additionally, blocks must have valid transactions whose inputs have not already been spent. They must include a pointer back to a previous valid block. They must have an associated proof of work nonce that allows a partial hash collision of a certain computational difficulty. They must include only a single coinbase transaction, which does not have an input, but must have an output no greater than the current block subsidy plus transaction fees.

Satoshi Nakamoto Fiat Bitcoin
Debunking the ESG Attacks on Bitcoin by Spencer Nichols

Bitcoin Audible

01:57 min | Last month

Debunking the ESG Attacks on Bitcoin by Spencer Nichols

"Let's get into today's read. Again, this one's from Bitcoin magazine and its titled. Debunking the ESG attack on Bitcoin. By Spencer Nichols those who decry Bitcoin's use of energy failed to acknowledge that all things in life require energy, and there is no such thing as a free lunch. A PhD pamphlet of this article is available for download. The utility of the exchanges made possible by Bitcoin will far exceed the cost of electricity used. Not having Bitcoin would be the net waste. Satoshi Nakamoto no free lunch. Those who decry Bitcoin's use of energy fail to acknowledge a simple reality that all things in life require energy, and there is no such thing as free lunch. Much mainstream debate has been waged on concerns around Bitcoin's use of energy. Yet a significant portion of that conversation has been muddied by deep seated myopia on the part of legacy financial interests. A type of willful blindness toward recognizing the necessity of decentralized energy money in comparison to the compromised Fiat financial system of today. The fact is, any economic engine is only as good as the energy which sustains it. For a network to maintain its structure and persist despite the entropy of the universe, energy must flow. In monetary networks are no exception. Ever since government issued Fiat currency severed the link between energy and monetary creation, the currencies of the world have been steadily marching to their graves.

Bitcoin Bitcoin Magazine Spencer Nichols Satoshi Nakamoto Fiat
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

05:00 min | 2 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"In the world. It stands there forever to show that a person can, in fact, sacrifice wealth, power, and fame, to create and do what is morally good. It stands there forever to say, humanity can make good things that last forever. As Bitcoin grows, this will be a treasure that everyone in the world will look at some day in their life. This treasure will guide them into studying Bitcoin, perhaps only because they are driven by the greedy desire for easy wealth, which makes them curious about how they might be able to snatch a portion of this treasure. And when this treasure turns their attention to studying Bitcoin, it will ignite in many of them their own spiritual journey. They too will ask, what exactly is money? What exactly is pure money? What exactly is pure education, healthcare, morality, and more? They too will ask, who am I? Who exactly am I? What is the pure me? What do I do with my time and my energy? This treasure will send them on a journey that leads them to knowing truly for themselves. What it is they personally judge to be valuable. What they judge to be good, and what they choose to do with their life, because it will take them closer to knowing who they purely are. And so the lesson to be learned by anyone who looks upon satoshi's coins, whether it is with mere curiosity or with greed or with all, is actually this. Do not waste your time reaching for this pile of money. For if you do, you will waste your precious time on earth. This money is not yours, and does not belong to the pure you. This money is not, in fact, the real treasure of Satoshi Nakamoto. This is merely an incorruptible monument, paying tribute to the real treasure. The true legendary treasure of Satoshi Nakamoto, however, is actually available to you. And it is available to everyone. It is available at no monetary cost.

Satoshi Nakamoto satoshi
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

04:32 min | 2 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"In the show notes. Don't miss it. With that, let's get into today's read by tomer Stroud. And its titled. The legendary treasure of Satoshi Nakamoto. By tomer strow light prologue Bitcoin is a spiritual awakening. Money has not generally been regarded as having anything to do with journeys into the non material realm of the spirit. It is generally believed to belong to the material world. It can buy certain things. But it can not buy friendship, love, intelligence, or the answers to deep and eternal questions about the mysteries of the universe. In fact, money is accused of leading people away from these. This, however, takes us to the curious matter of Bitcoin. In 2009, a brand new form of money was created and released to the world. It was called Bitcoin. It went on to become the fastest asset in the world to reach a $1 trillion valuation. It garnered the attention of the entire financial world. Impressive, but not spiritual. Apart from that, though, quite unexpectedly, many people who study Bitcoin discovered that it arouses within them life altering spiritual journeys. When so few things in this world inspire such experiences, including many of the things that promise to do so, why does Bitcoin do this without making any such promises? Our search for the answer to this question begins at the beginning of Bitcoin's story. It is a story unlike any other. Part one the mysterious appearance and disappearance of Satoshi Nakamoto. Everyone loves a good origin story. Some are true, some made up and some a mix of the two. The true origin story of Bitcoin's appearance in the world is one of the most fascinating mysteries ever told. Yet these events all took place in the 21st century, a time when everything is recorded and can be recalled, investigated, and verified. This story goes like this

Satoshi Nakamoto tomer Stroud tomer strow
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

03:11 min | 2 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"Everyone loves a good origin story. Some are true, some are made up, and some are a mix of the two. The true origin story of Bitcoin's appearance in the world is one of the most fascinating mysteries ever told. Yet these events all took place in the 21st century, a time when everything is recorded and can be recalled, investigated, and verified. The best in Bitcoin made audible. I am guy swan and this is Bitcoin audible. What is up guys? Welcome back to Bitcoin, audible. I am guy swan the guy who has read more about Bitcoin, than anybody else. You know. We have had a

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

04:07 min | 4 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"Those can be fudged so easily. Another was writing style, not necessarily as much as the British versus English usage, but some of the things that style amateur have looked into that have pinpointed about four or 5 different people as being satoshi. But the real real important part of that research was the fact that the headline that satoshi encrypted on January 3rd, 2009, the genesis bop, that headline had to come from that day's print UK print edition of the times. The international headline would have been different. And because after all, it's a different circulation area. And the website had a different headline. And furthermore, the day I met Khan, he said, oh, I pulled that out of the print edition of the times that day. And so again, if I tried to put in this book only three examples, ought to be an idiot, but chapter 17 has 42 different. Bits of information, bits of circumstance evidence that lead me to believe there's nobody else who could possibly be the guy. And maybe Craig Wright thinks so, too, or he wouldn't have sent me such a threatening message on LinkedIn. So this is very fascinating.

satoshi Khan UK Craig Wright LinkedIn
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

05:35 min | 4 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"Because all those original transactions were through how Finney, you know, back and forth. So what was their relationship? Well, the relationship was that James Caan was about 14 or 15 years old when he started really using the not what he meant how, but when he started using the cryptography mailing list that was created in about 92 or 93. And how Finney was on there and so it was an example for that matter. Right. But in about 2000, he couldn't tell me exactly because he couldn't remember, but in about 2004, he started communicating with Hal Finney because he was impressed with our power. You know, reusable proof of work, which how came up with at that time. But he didn't actually communicate, I don't know if it was 2004, 2005. It's in the book is when he started. But that's when Finney said satoshi who Satoshi Nakamoto. And it's pretty clear to me based on what Khan told me, I think Hal Finney helped a lot more out on Bitcoin that he was than he's ever been given credit for. And another thing is that when I was talking with and I have the Scott text, he was telling me information and he said, well, you notice that one name I haven't mentioned is serious. Meaning Marty melman, he said, and the reason for that, you know, I have my questions about him now and I'll go over that with you later. I never asked him about it again. So what was his problem with serious that'd be a good question to ask to? You know, when we get emails all the time daily from people and of course there have been many claiming to know who satoshi is or claiming to be satoshi and usually I roll my eyes and tell traffic. All right, we got another kook burger. And so my first inclination was to go, hey, we got another cook burger, but let's look at it and see what this guy has to say. As I am going through this book, I am actually stunned at the angles that you're taking for proofs. I mean, you've got domain name registrations and you break down why this makes sense that Bitcoin dot org was registered by him. You've got how James talks and how satoshi writes comparing British English and British sling.

Hal Finney Finney satoshi Satoshi Nakamoto James Caan Marty melman Khan Scott James
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

05:16 min | 4 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"So I'm reading a quote by him by the name James Bilal Khalid Khan claims to be the founder of Bitcoin and this is something that an article that came out on looks like on Bitcoin dot com back in the day. 2019 said he said this on December 17th, 2017, Bitcoin reached its historical peak of $19,783, meaning my 980,000 bitcoins. He says bitcoins, but normally they say bitcoins. I don't know. There's a flag for me. Would have been worth more than 19 billion. And he goes 19 billion, 387 million, 398,000 a year to be precise. To this day, the memory of recalling all this information is very painful. I can not forgive myself all these years. Now the very reason I left Bitcoin is the reason for my comeback, as I have accepted the truth and we'll try to make Bitcoin. Better. So here's the guy, he says he's lost his Bitcoin because if you have 980 million 980,000 bitcoins, right, there's some governments who want who want to have access to some of that and like, oh, I've lost it. So that could be a BS story if he lost it, but if he did lose it, like, oh my goodness, that's way more than the 55 Bitcoin that I lost. Well, he's such an introvert that he didn't even tell his wife zada that he was Satoshi Nakamoto until their 8th year of marriage. They were married in October of 2010. And, you know, certainly there are a lot of opinions on who satoshi. If you go through all the names that are in the book, there's only one person who really claims that he's satoshi and that's Craig Wright. And right after this book was published, Craig posted a message on my LinkedIn site saying, ivy mclemore, you were a con man, and we will follow up in time with first a civil case and your bankruptcy. Then we will push criminal charges.

James Bilal Khalid Khan Bitcoin zada Satoshi Nakamoto satoshi Craig Wright ivy mclemore Craig LinkedIn
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

05:46 min | 4 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"Back. And then we have some other ones that we've actually had conversations about here on the show. We've talked about this criminal mastermind, Paul leroux, who was an early creator of encryption, right? And some of the code to Bitcoin is based on. There's also some that may be Sergei and azeroth in satoshi, and then also maybe the NSA. The American government created this. So maybe where did you start? Whenever you went back in and you started to go down the rabbit hole of Bitcoin like and you're trying to figure out first of all, you got to figure out what is Bitcoin and then you go who created it. So how did your journey start with going down the Bitcoin rabbit hole? Well, it's very unusual in May of 2019, my small firm responded to a blind cryptocurrency ad on upwork, which needed someone to reveal an identity and someone to promote a new product. And I was very leery of that because of the pump and dump schemes that are out there. And the individual who communicated me use the krypton Cicero and we Skype for a few weeks, and you know, I just said, look, I'm not going to go to sign a contract with anybody who I've never met. Or don't know his true identity. And so I said, finally, I said, look, I'll fly anywhere in the world at my expense. If your guy can prove to me that he's Satoshi Nakamoto. So in July of 2019, I took a flight out to doncaster, England. And spent hours with a gentleman who identified himself a very, very introverted individual who identified himself as James Caan, and for the next 7 months, we communicated, and we made an attempt to reveal him in August of 2019. He was great in The Godfather, by the way. Sunny. Well, he picked that name because he thought he was a godfather of cryptocurrency or something to that effect. It's in the book. But anyway, you know, I knew that the number one thing to do at that time, you know, Bitcoin has been 2019 at the time I was having these conversations, Bitcoin was only worth about $6000. And the big button to push was always move your bitcoins. And that may have made sense at that time. And I was probably fighting a no win battle at that time, but I haven't spoken to this man in three years. He kind of disappeared from the scene much as satoshi did in 2010 from Bitcoin. But every day I dealt with this as a former journalist, I kept asking myself, why is this not conceivably true?

Paul leroux Bitcoin satoshi azeroth Sergei Satoshi Nakamoto American government NSA Skype James Caan doncaster England
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

04:31 min | 4 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"Fascinating stuff. I'm going to say we have talked to a number of people on the show who, you know, either claimed or have speculated as to the nature of Satoshi Nakamoto and this book is the most in depth guide I have ever seen for determining who this person is. Very in depth and it's somebody probably never heard of before. I would almost bet money you hadn't heard of this dude before. His name is bob Smith. Never heard that name. Yeah. He's a Jimmy. Jimmy Jones. I'm the very Bitcoin. It's me, Jimmy Jones. It's Travis. There we go. We found him. There he is. So ivy is very credible. And the book is incredibly well sourced and we're going to get to our interview with him. Right about now. The speculation

Satoshi Nakamoto Jimmy Jones bob Smith Jimmy Travis
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

01:43 min | 4 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"Over the years, many have speculated as to the identity of the mysterious Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of the Bitcoin white paper. From Craig Wright to Hal Finney, we've entertained many a notion of who this brilliant and elusive genius really is. And today we may have finally found the answer. Ivy mek Lamar is a journalist who's been hot on the trail of satoshi. The trail has led him to a British man whose name we will reveal in this episode. Ivy methodically provides all of the verifiable facts and data surrounding his research in a new book titled finding satoshi. And today we've got him on the show to discuss this controversial topic. Are you ready to examine the evidence for yourself? We're just the conduit for the messenger on episode number 624 of the bad crypto podcasts. Who's that? And welcome to the red crypto podcast. We are Joel toshi Travis moto. How are you? That is true. And today, we found satoshi. Dude, he was hanging out in koala Lumpur. He's there with John McAfee. And a few other people. Yeah, he's actually. John McAfee, and Epstein. Oh my gosh. This

Satoshi Nakamoto Craig Wright Hal Finney satoshi Lamar Ivy Joel toshi Travis moto John McAfee Lumpur Epstein
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

02:20 min | 6 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"Not every Bitcoin scammer is merely an amoral businessman or investor. Many are outright fraudsters and con artists. When you buy a rug from overstock, at least you actually get a rug. When you send money to Ethereum, you may actually get a worthless ether token, eventually. You know what you probably will never get? Your butterfly labs pre order or your gox bugs. Some scams are pulled off by convincing other bitcoiners to not take advantage of Bitcoin's value proposition. That is, they convince bitcoiners that while they shouldn't trust third parties, this guy is totally cool. I'm looking at you, mount gox. Others convince them to play investment games that turn out to be Ponzi schemes. Sup, Bitcoin savings and trust. Some scams are the purest synthesis of Bitcoin or avarice and stupidity. Ponzi Io explicitly marketed itself as a Ponzi scheme, promising to send you back more bitcoins coming from the pockets of the next investors. Have fun. Their address? One Ponzi uj, et cetera received nearly 350 Bitcoin. Some scams are outright malicious. Scammers have resorted to malware and ransom. Crypto locker infected computers by encrypting the user's files and only gave up the private key if a ransom was paid in bitcoins within 48 hours. Scammers have resorted to blackmail. On September 8th a hacker gained control of Satoshi Nakamoto's email account using it not only to deface the Bitcoin source for it page, but to allegedly find out satoshi's true name. From a vice article, quote after inquiring what the hacker was trying to get out of all this, he said, Bitcoin's obviously. But don't forget the lulls. Scammers have also gone to the trouble of leaking nude photos of celebrities to get some bitcoins. Scammers will do whatever it takes to increase their Bitcoin holdings. You know this you scammed someone to get yours. You probably did not outright defraud or hack someone like the above, but you necessarily took advantage of their short term thinking. Merchants

Bitcoin Satoshi Nakamoto satoshi
Derek Khanna Gives Us the Bitcoin Basics

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:11 min | 9 months ago

Derek Khanna Gives Us the Bitcoin Basics

"In Bitcoin, is Bitcoin a generic like down from the south. If you order, if you want a Coke, you're getting Coca-Cola. It ain't a generic for perhaps or anything else. Is Bitcoin a generic term or is there a Bitcoin and you got Ethereum? You got others out there as well. Let's start off with a basics. Sure. Those are fantastic questions. And these are complicated topics. So I think sometimes people are almost scared to ask these questions, but it's great to start from the basics. And so for a while, people were trying to create a currency for the Internet. That would allow for commerce to be done, particularly international friction free. And one of the innovations of Bitcoin by this guy named Satoshi Nakamoto, it's not his real name, but what we call him that. Was to create a decentralized system. So there's no entity in charge. There's no CEO. There's no bank. There's no Federal Reserve. But yet through math, we're able to have a system that has now become known as Bitcoin with millions of users and holders. And so that was really the first and the only entity that was operating and doing this. And they've been around the longest. They have the highest market cap, the highest number of users, the most number of transactions. I should add that the technology has grown and changed over time. It's not like it stayed static. But all the other names that you've heard as well, such as Ethereum or other silly names sometimes like Dogecoin. They're not all silly, but a lot of them are named after dogs. Some of those have interesting different ways of solving similar problems. Ethereum in particular has grown quite large, so not as large as Bitcoin. Now those are more modern products in this ecosystem that generally have slightly different ways of solving a similar problem. But Bitcoin still remains the largest player. And we would argue that the number of users using this technology provides a bit more stability and concreteness to it having value for the future. But I'm not trying to give investment advice. As you noted, this is somewhat of a speculative asset. The prices go up, the prices go down. But I would know that actually the fluctuations have become a bit more constant than in the past.

Bitcoin Satoshi Nakamoto Coca Cola Coke Federal Reserve
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on BabyDoge Pow Wow

BabyDoge Pow Wow

03:25 min | 9 months ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on BabyDoge Pow Wow

"How did we get to talking about this narrative here on this podcast? Where does it all start? You know. Good question. You know, it's just like people say the father of Bitcoin was Satoshi Nakamoto. Who is that? Steady hands. Who do you think it is? Okay. So there's like a bunch of different theories out there. I'm gonna be honest, I think the way he did it, whoever did create this, you know, I think Satoshi Nakamoto is actually like a pseudonym for somebody who for some reason didn't want their identity to be known. There is somebody named, I believe Dorian nakamoto, so there is somebody with that last name. Some people think it's him. I kind of like to think it's him just because I think it would be funny and ironic. But like at the end of the day, like at the end of the day, this the entire blockchain and everything has been was created to perform or to provide a certain level of identity security. And so I think it's kind of only right that, you know, just like whenever you look at a certain transaction on the blockchain, you can't see exactly. Yes, you see wallets and stuff, but you can't see their exact identity. I think that was kind of why he went that route. So whoever did create thirst blockchain technology Satoshi Nakamoto, I think they did it right because it followed their principle of having something that is 100% safe and secure not only in each individual transaction, but also with people's identities. So you mentioned blockchain. So explains why listeners what exactly is a blockchain and how does it work? So I'll try and do it in like the simplest layman's terms possible. You please. So basically the blockchain was created as a way for two people to share information whether that be, I guess, sensitive information or monetary information through smart contracts and stuff like that. It was a way for them to send it securely without the possibility of it being hacked in a central location. So basically it was a way for P2P or person to person transactions. So the way it works is basically person a says they want to give person B something. And then a validator within the blockchain confirms that transaction, the transaction goes through and then it's complete. Those validators and computers within the blockchain are scattered all over the world, you know? So like, that's what makes it decentralized. So I guess the reverse of that would be centralized. So let's say, for instance, I go to the supermarket, right? I buy this half and half Lipton iced tea, half ice tea, lemonade, flavor with other natural flavors, okay? Remember this fine year of 2022. So I go into the supermarket. I want to buy this. There has to be an exchange of value for goods. So I go to the cashier, some people would say, okay, well, you're paying the cashier that's person to person. But the person I'm paying is not the final payee. They aren't the people that receive actual money. So I go and I swipe my Visa card, okay?.

Satoshi Nakamoto Dorian nakamoto blockchain
BITCOIN: What Is It and Why Should I Care?

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:49 min | 11 months ago

BITCOIN: What Is It and Why Should I Care?

"So let's start off with the basics for those out there. If you're interested in Bitcoin, is Bitcoin a generic lockdown from the south if you order if you want to Coke, you're getting Coca-Cola. It ain't a generic or anything else. Is Bitcoin a generic term or is there a Bitcoin and you got Ethereum, you got others out there as well. Let's start off with the basics. Sure. Those are fantastic questions. And these are complicated topics. So I think sometimes people are almost scared to ask these questions, but it's great to start from the basics. And so for a while, people were trying to create a currency for the Internet. That would allow for commerce to be done, particularly internationally friction free. And one of the innovations of Bitcoin by this guy named Satoshi Nakamoto, it's not as real name, but we call him that. Was to create a decentralized system. So there's no entity in charge. There's no CEO. There's no bank. There's no Federal Reserve. But yet through math, we're able to have a system that has now become known as Bitcoin with millions of users and holders. And so that was really the first and the only entity that was operating and doing this. And they've been around the longest. They have the highest market cap, the highest number of users, the most number of transactions. I should add that the technology has grown and changed over time. It's not like it stayed static. But all the other names that you've heard as well, such as Ethereum or other silly names, sometimes like Dogecoin. They're not all silly, but a lot of them are named after dogs. Some of those have interesting different ways of solving similar problems. Ethereum in particular has grown quite large, so not as large as Bitcoin. Now those are more modern products in this ecosystem that generally have slightly different ways of solving a similar

Satoshi Nakamoto Bitcoin Coca Cola Coke Federal Reserve
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Is that it actually does have a much higher transaction volume, capability than Bitcoin. And the cost of doing a transaction, the is very low. Like right now if you want to do it a Bitcoin transaction, the price of doing that transaction is very high. So you could not use it effectively for most things. And what could it even scale to a high volume? And when Bitcoin was started, I guess went around 2008 or something like that. The Internet connections were much worse than they are today, like order of magnitude. The way way worse in 2008. So like having us a small block size or whatever is and a long synchronization time is made sense in 2008. But 2021 will fast forward ten years. It's like comically low. So. And I think there's some value to having a linear increase in the amount of currency that is generated. So because some amount of the currency, if a currency is too deflationary or should say if a currency is expected to increase in value over time, those reluctance to spend it. Because they're like, oh, I'll just hold it and not spend it because it's scarcity is increasing with time. So if I spend it now, then I will regret spending it so I will just total it. But if there's some dilution of the currency occurring over time, that's more of an incentive to use it as a currency. So those coins saw it randomly has a just a fixed number of coins or hash strings that are generated every year. So inflation, but it's not a percentage basis. So it's a fixed number. So the percentage of inflation will necessarily decline over time. So I'm not saying that it's like the ideal system for a currency, but I think it actually is just fundamentally better than anything else I've seen just by accident. So I like how you said around 2008. So you're not, you know, some people suggest that you might be Satoshi Nakamoto, you previously said you're not for sure. Would you tell us if you were? Yes. Okay. Do you think it's a feature a bug that he's anonymous or she or they? It's an interesting kind of quirk of human history that there is a particular technology that is a completely anonymous inventor..

Satoshi Nakamoto
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"So I went out and got a couple hundred, you know, BSV. I mean, the all time high of it was like 500 bucks. And right now, it's like a 120 something bucks. So I don't know, man. We'll learn more about this. And hopefully it takes off because I have a nice amount. I have way more BSV than I have BTC. So let's have the flipping. Here's another interesting sentence that makes me go in this article in essence. The verdict amounts to a finding that Satoshi Nakamoto was the product of one man, doctor Craig. No, that's not at all. What the verdict says. It's just not. This could be resolved really easily. Move one satoshi from the wallets which are believed to be satoshi. Like we covered this earlier in the year in September. There was 20 some odd $1 million of Bitcoin that came from a wallet that had been inactive for what 9 or ten years. It was on whale. Number four or something. Yeah, it was one of the really early ones. 740 bitcoins, there were 740 in the address. I just found the article. And 640 of them were transferred to another wallet, July 12th, 2021, they'll address was last used 9.1 years ago. So we don't know for sure that that's a satoshi address. But all Craig Wright would have to do is say, all right, I'm going to move 21 satoshis right now from this wallet to here. And there, there's a proof. If you were so adamant that you were the guy, what? Wouldn't even need a court case. Right. If you're so adamant, you want the world to believe so much that you are this person. Why not just prove it? 100% prove it. That's all you need to do and whether you think Craig Wright is a good guy or a bad guy. It doesn't matter. I don't care who satoshi is. It doesn't matter to me. I just want just don't be.

satoshi Satoshi Nakamoto Craig Wright Craig
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on This Week In Google

"You glad you working it better dot com? They fired 900 people over Zoom. Well, how about I saw this headline? I was like, it's 900 people, so this one person was going to go door to door for 900 people? There's ways to do. People complain about getting fired over textbooks. The issue was that he then the CEO got on there. He was like, this was so hard last time. I'm hoping he'll do better at this time. He did it again. Oh boy. I come to you, he said with not great news. If you are on this call, 900 people. You're part of the unlucky group being laid off. Your employment here is terminated effective immediately. I don't know how there's no way to get fired nicely. Yeah, I agree. It's not a good thing over the other. It had to be done, unfortunately that was the more effective way efficient way to do it. So I when we were a small company. So if people need to be fired or laid off, I do it, or at least it does it in person. Never fun. This guy did not invent Bitcoin. I wanted you to explain this to me. He wins a U.S. court battle for Bitcoin fortune worth billions. He claims he claims he invented Bitcoin. And he's in a strength computer science. I'm not going to say his name. He went to he went to court suing the family of a deceased business partner that claimed the family claimed his own half of a cryptocurrency fortune with tens of billions of dollars the jury did award a 100 million in intellectual property rights to a joint venture between the two men. But the jury had found that this guy did not owe half of 1.1 million bitcoins to the family. These are some of the first bitcoins to be created through mining. They could only be owned by a person or entity involved with the digital currency from its beginnings, such as Satoshi Nakamoto, its creator. This guy claims to be the creator. He's not. In order, by the way, it's an easy thing. If you think if you say I'm nakamoto, well, satoshi has tens of billions of Bitcoin in his account. All you'd have to do is move, you wouldn't even do anything, but just say if you moved one resilience of a Bitcoin from that account to another count, said, look, I'm going to do that tomorrow. And you did it. That proves it. Yeah. You can't do it. So the courts and the jury to deliberate, they didn't understand it. Yeah, he's not a credible claimant to the role. Especially because there is an easy proof which he has never he's always said, yeah, I'll do that. It never does it. So. What does he think he's going to get because notoriety? That's why I don't want to say his name. Exactly. Thank you. Good call, sir. It's like that other guy who drove mask crazy. We won't mention..

U.S. court Satoshi Nakamoto nakamoto satoshi
"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"satoshi nakamoto" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"So really, how much money do you really would use the amount of physical paper money you actually touch Is probably a very, very small percentage. You're using digital money every day. You just don't look at it as visual money. In some countries, they've completely done away with paper money altogether. In these countries they on Lee use digital money. So Bitcoin is digital money, but it's just not controlled by the U. S government are any government for that matter. That may sound a little crazy, too, You know, maybe even sound a little bit scary to some people. If someone has a computer father represents $1. What would stop them from copying that five million times in creating $5 million for themselves? Let's face it. If I have a photo, I could make copies of it. I could make a copy of any file. So now we're back to the counterfeiting things and like I said earlier, counterfeiting is very easy to do paper money. But how about visual money now? This has really been the biggest problem in the creation and the use of visual currency, and this is actually called the double spin problem. The banks have a solution to the double spin problem. The banks use a ledger system on their own computers, which keep track of who owns what The ledger system they use is known as a centralized The ledger and centralized ledger systems or what the world has been using for money for many, many years now. The bank's ledger system keeps up with everyone's money. It tracks how much you put in the bank. It tracks how much you spend or take out of the bank. And since we trust the banks And the banks trust their computers. This centralized solution works and has worked fine in the US without many too many bugs for many years. Now. In 2008, a researcher published a paper Ah white paper describing how to solve The double spending problem without using a centralized solution. In other words, without a bank's involvement in his name, or her name was Satoshi Nakamoto. And they were writing about Bitcoin. It was described how you could make a ledger system that doesn't rely on a single bank, but instead used a centralized solution. He had invented a decentralized solution. They handle the double spin problem. Now you.

Satoshi Nakamoto US Lee researcher U. S