35 Burst results for "Sass"

'Race Marxism' Author James Lindsay Describes Critical Race Theory

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:20 min | Last month

'Race Marxism' Author James Lindsay Describes Critical Race Theory

"Me is doctor James Lindsay. He is extraordinary. Doctor Lindsey is the world's expert on all things critical race theory, postmodernism, queer theory, all of these ideas that are being put in the classroom. He is an expert on it. And so we're going to go deep in this conversation. We're going to get into the philosophical roots of what it's destroying our country and doctor Lindsay is the author of two books, race Marxism, and also cynical theories with doctor pluck rose. James, welcome back to sass. Thanks for having me, Charlie. It's fun to be at your right. That's right. James used to say he was a liberal, but I don't know if that's the case anymore. So James walker audience through, let's just start with the basics. What is critical race theory and what is so dangerous about it? Critical racer is a disaster. To paraphrase the president. Critical race theory is calling everything you want to control racist until you control it. It's really that simple. It is the idea that the organizing principle society is racism, created by white people, to benefit white people. And everything in society is organized to operate around that. So what you are dealing with in is a Marxist theory of race, which is why I called the book race Marxism.

James Lindsay Doctor Lindsey James Lindsay James Walker Charlie
"sass" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"sass" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"And so in the value of that in their valuing of that and their acknowledgment of those being critical things for a global financial infrastructure, folks can sometimes be less excited about projects that are shiny to others. And so I think that's what I hear when I hear people talking about Bitcoin maximalism. So I think that there's a very strong argument that some of the biggest Bitcoin proponents, that's the strategy that they basically take. Look, I'm focused on Bitcoin. There's other things. It's not even worth my time because focus is important. And if you go and I always try to lay it back on to the legacy financial system and the centuries of history that we have there. There's plenty of people who say, I'm assassin investor. What happens in consumer tech or in hardware or anything else? That's just not my thing, right? Like sass is my specialty. It's what I'm most interested in. It's a thing where I feel like I know the most. I'm intellectually stimulated and I want to go focus on that. And so I think that that would be a really strong argument of like, hey, I'm focused on Bitcoin, everything else. I don't really have an opinion. I think the piece that enters the conversation is that you can't put these general labels on entire groups of people, right? It's kind of just like politics. You couldn't say all Democrats are one way, all Republicans are one way. All independents are one way. It's a group made up of individuals and those individuals obviously have various kind of thought processes and extremism on both sides of their viewpoint. When it comes to Bitcoin maximalism, it feels like the smallest portion of that group is the loudest online, which is true of most groups.

sass
"sass" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

08:00 min | 6 months ago

"sass" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Crawford from blueprint and today we're talking all about go to market. But before we get to today's interview, we're gonna kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the mar tech podcast to help us answer a listener question in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is will Barron, who's the managing director of salesman dot org and the host of the salesman podcast, which is the world's most downloaded B2B sales podcast and a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. In his podcast, we'll help sales professionals learn how to find buyers and win business in a modern effective and ethical way. And will has been kind enough to answer a question from Katie rose, who is the director of sales enablement at spark post, which is one of the world's biggest email senders. Katie asked, what is the best way to scale and enablement program for B2B SaaS companies with limited resources? Okay, here's wells answer. Hey Kati, and thanks for the question. There are three things to consider when scaling a sales enablement program. Your influence, the software that you're using and your internal insights. So let me explain. Your influence because sometimes in the corporate world rightly or wrongly, return on investment, case studies and data is just 9 north to break through the status quo and to get things moving. And so I would focus just as hard on adding value and building relationships with your internal stakeholders as I would on the sales enablement, it's itself. Next software tools. Now, they're all pretty similar. It's the resources within the software that's going to impact the numbers, simpler sales movement software that gets used is way, way better than complex software that no one bothers with. And finally, your internal insights. If you've got sales reps exceeding the sales quota right now, they should be defining what your sales enablement looks like. Don't give yourselves team what you think that they need, give your top reps whatever they want and give everyone else what they require to become a top sales rep. Thanks, will. If you're interested in hearing more from will baron on the salesman podcast or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with the show, here's today's interview. Now, this week we've been chatting with Kyle Williams, the founder of brick stack brick stack helps B2B companies surface their best insights from their Tam. Now we've talked about market pain scoring context on mental models and the last couple of episodes we've been talking about case studies. So how do you take this pain scoring and actually do this live for a individual company. So we looked at I hear everything vendor hoppin and webflow and today we're looking partner management tools. But before we get to today's interview, I want to tell you about a new show that my company is launching. It's called the revenue generator podcast. As it turns out, us marketers are under attack. That's right, the walls between marketing, sales and customer success teams are all falling down and unless something changes quickly, your CMO is going to be calling him or herself a CRO in no time. And that's why we're creating the revenue generator podcast. The revenue generator podcast tells how innovators of the revenue generation orchestrate teams to deliver world class customer experiences that integrate data, SaaS, people and processes to expedite demand and increase revenue. The show is hosted by my good buddy Doug bell who is a 20 year technology veteran that has been instrumental in driving revenue growth and scaling marketing organizations across some of the world's best known brands and nimble startups. And in each episode of the rev gen pod, you'll hear how industry leaders integrate sales marketing product and customer success into a single business unit with a common goal of optimizing their revenue cycle. So if you're ready to join me and Doug bell as a member of the revenue generation, search for revenue generator in your podcast app or head over to rev gen pod dot com that's revenue generator in your podcast or head over to rev gen pod dot com. All right, Kyle, how should we kick this off with partner management tools? We got a lot of them to go through and not too much time to do it. Yeah, I'm gonna need some extra Jordan brainpower for this one. This one's gonna be fun. All right, well, I'm happy to provide it. Let's talk about sort of buckets of pain, just like we did yesterday. Maybe let's do this as before we look at the sites. Just you and I, we don't know a ton about partners. We haven't lived in the ecosystem, so you're my partner, yeah, you're my partner on this podcast here as it counts. Yeah. So before we look, my understanding and it's important to do this exercise and actually this is we're going to get philosophical here. I think in your life, it's good to make a hypothesis because it just helps the facts stick easier. But separate from that, it's good for this exercise, right? Because we're going to build our own understanding and then we'll turn that into the hot take, right? So maybe before we jump into the partner ecosystem, I know some folks. So this is not totally clean room, but my understanding is you're a company and you're building partnerships. They're going to help you with go to market. And so you need all kinds of things to both find partners, get them successful, train them, and then make sure they do the right things right. They're representing your brand in certain cases. You also want to make sure they actually talk about your brand and then you make sure you reward them and sort of keep them on board, right? Now that's my rough sense of what the world looks like, so these tools should all help with either of that entire life cycle or different parts of it. That's right. And I've been a partner of chili piper and drift and both of them have been so helpful to help me bring those tools into clients that I'm working with and those teams have been great because they're focused on my relationship with the client and helping me understand the value that drift and chili pepper can provide. So I imagine that that person basically has to kind of act like an entire company by themselves as the partnership manager. So I can see how tools might be helpful for them. So let's take a look first at what they say they do and the first H one, right? So when dropping on their homepage, what did they say they do? That would be header one for the uninitiated, right? That's right. We are on the Mark tech podcast. We've got about half of the folks. People knows H one, yeah. Yeah. So if we look at partner stack, it says everything you need to grow through partnerships. And then it says partner stacks all in one partnerships platform has proven to drive real revenue for SaaS businesses and their partners that tells us a bit. This is all in one. So I imagine it's going to help us get new partners and keep them on and then specifically for SaaS businesses. So we're talking about a specific section of the market. Yeah, that makes sense. They hit the next one. Let's go to all bound, grow channel revenue and improve partner experience, simplify and formalize your entire partner life cycle with all bounds partner relationship PRM software for partner onboarding to enable marketing collaboration and deal registration. Sounds like a lot. It sounds very similar, right? So we've talked specifically versus just saying all in one, so we have onboarding enablement, marketing collaboration. And deal registration doesn't specifically say SaaS, but I'm assuming just by it's very looking site. I don't know how to describe that. We need to brick stack. We should turn that into a categorization. It looks like it could be to be shape. It's very sassy. Yeah. They got a lot of G two logos, some trusted brands. They use jargon, which feels like a sas thing. So they're really speaking of their customers, very enterprise. Very enterprise, yes. Let's go to crossbeam, right? So cross beam, your ecosystem revenue engine, we have companies work together, their data often doesn't. That's where we come in. Partner ecosystem platform that helps companies build more valuable partnerships, keeps going are free, account mapping tools, industry leading networking and growing integration, marketplace brings partners, ships, and revenue together at last. And then there's big buttons to start account mapping for free. So I don't know if I caught every one of those bullets, but my understanding is we have different accounts. We need to understand what's going on. I'm a partner, your partner, what accounts are we both either selling to or want to sell to and can we work together on them? Yeah, and they've got a product led growth motion here, right? Start account mapping for free. So that tells us some.

Doug bell Katie rose spark post webflow Kati Kyle Williams Barron Crawford hoppin Katie Kyle Jordan
"sass" Discussed on CLUB KERRY NYC

CLUB KERRY NYC

09:30 min | 7 months ago

"sass" Discussed on CLUB KERRY NYC

"Move your feet step up to come before your body. All the late night conversations wait too many hesitations feel the doubt. I feel the doubt. In the memories I behaving but the good ones they're all fading fading out. They're fading out. Wish I could tell you there's no one to blame wish I could tell you I still feel the shape I want you to know I was never in vain and that's the last thing that you hear you hear. All the ways I try to reach you told myself that I still need you how you used to. The way I used to yeah I know just what you say, but the words don't mean the same thing anymore. Oh anymore wish I could tell you there's no one to blame wish I could tell you I still feel the same I want you to know I was never invade and that's the last thing that you hear you hear is your. Love. I love you. And that stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand back stand up stand up stand up no one look I walk by just one other day she will have been justified said no to ever again first into my heart anyway don't wanna know how I feel when I let the breath between my eyes one man walk away from me and think that my hands gave me stay up and back in the middle of my room everybody not even sorry these days anyway baby tell me living life. I love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love and I turn they wait for friends like I will I can never. Call my name don't change. My mind away from you baby you're a fan of before that you can do one man and I fall yeah before my love was all and that's it if I'm gonna love my rep in front of you all right all right if you didn't like it give me love. Love love love love love love love love you love. Love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love. So I walk fall down a line away from you maybe you're a dancer with more than I could do one man did not fall will he ask me what my love doesn't. End in the middle of my head for you all right I don't even mind damn it. I need love they lose everything but I need a little selfie but I need a little sympathy when you be standing in stand up welcome you could be standing in despair when you could be standing here standing for take me back don't you dare. But.

"sass" Discussed on CLUB KERRY NYC

CLUB KERRY NYC

32:26 min | 7 months ago

"sass" Discussed on CLUB KERRY NYC

"I've been away. Out here surviving no easy escape I'm getting used to the stylist I've been always so many nights. Sometimes that's sometimes all right. I can't admit the rhythm takes me. Yes I can be hard to find it can help you be alive but I am the only one saves me don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find a way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. I'm coming home to you I'm coming home to you do you do I'm coming home to you do you do you coming home to you do you do you do you do you do you do you do you. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. By my way. I'm coming. I'm coming. Don't fight fire without you you know that I want you. To fly and go far far you know that I want to. Rush to the floor and it's too long. From the. Road. Needs to never. And it's made always it's you and me always and it's your name only. You and me I'll wait. You may. It's you and me I'll wait then it's you and me only. You don't miss always. I'm tired of blessing in my own skin I'm cold. I'm tired of getting in yeah I'm not in my house I'm cold. I'm tired of being in my own skin I'm cold. I'm tired of getting in yeah I'm not in my own skin I'm a cold. Let's start over. Let me. Let's start over. Let me. Make it. Believe you're losing in your losing water I don't want you don't know what it is. You wanna find someone. Don't love you you can't be loving. Oh wow so tell me something so tell me something oh wow check out this one right there check out this one then oh oh gosh I dream to watch it love I told you oh do you wanna move in only have something you think on your house all day then. Hold on. Shut the long boots and look on all night long but for the wrong. Day so I know. This. They serve in patience but I never lie. They say picture but I never lie to you. Take a ride just take the two legs and place the way you wait until the sun is out can I be gone. We won't fall asleep take a shot and wait together forever. I go out and see your name I just can help answer again but I guess it doesn't matter do you win so. Far. I guess I'm just keep on feeling. Like. Giving you the chance to come come back home. How about you walk around giving you a chance to come come back home. Just to call you a chance to come and give a chance to come. Back home. Why will I be in pain. I'm not alone ready to walk alone giving you a chance to come come back home. I'm home. I'm out ready to walk alone and get in your chest come back home. No power in your soul there's a power in your soul there's a power in your soul there's a problem in your soul and I wanted you know there's no in your soul there's a power in your soul there's no in your soul there's a power in your soul and I wanted you to know. I wanted to know. Sleep don't sleep I'm still I'm down fine and the answer won't stop won't stop before I find a cure for this cancer sometimes I feel like going down so it's the nighttime somehow I know that I can't sleep I've been watching I've been waiting in the shadows one more time I've been searching I've been living for tomorrow all my life. That I must learn to do for I feel safe but I. Rather give myself. Sometimes I feel that I should go and play with love somehow I just don't wanna stay and wait for a walk I've been watching I've been waiting to shadow all my time I'm deserving I've been living for too long all my life. I've been waiting. All day. It's a treat in the morning. To be in the morning and I sick midnight in my body. You know it feels right take on you are you thinking it just tell me what you feel I feel it with you..

"sass" Discussed on CLUB KERRY NYC

CLUB KERRY NYC

15:05 min | 7 months ago

"sass" Discussed on CLUB KERRY NYC

"Little boots are required for this ride. Here we go. Welcome to the board. I am the aerialist has artificial intelligence. You can call the AR. You can call me AR. You can call me AR. I'll require systems. Staple. Oxygen level. Stable. Gravitational modulus. Stable. Music. On. Welcome for you. I'll require systems. Staple. Oxygen level. Gravitational. Stable music oh God. Oh look at your face. We just made it all this time we got it lonely nights for far too long and now it's you and I and I can't hold back you're the only one who makes me move like that baby the night is young and it took me beautiful we know right take your body to the floor and let you light me up there's nothing. We just say oh let me just say yes. Just say yes you're nothing better than we just say yes baby the night is young and it could be beautiful don't be no right wrong take your body to the floor but you like me there's no need to second guess nothing we just say don't need to take it so I'll show you where to go let's not pretend that this ain't physical 'cause I can't hold back every time we touch make me move like that baby the night is young and it could be beautiful don't need no right or wrong take your body to the light me up there's no need to second guess nothing. Let me just say yes let me just say yes I would just say yes you're nothing better than we just say baby night is young and it could be beautiful don't be no right or wrong take your body to the floor but you like me up there's no need to say goodbye baby just say yes. Let me just take this. Get nothing just say. Lost in the wilderness but I was surely falling apart the pain you caused could so deep truly was a work of art I'll tell what they say I'm gonna do it anyway oh. It's the only thing I see always perfect at me. I've been living the dark standing cold in the night memories of your taste I've been holding on tight falling apart and I'm living a life all of this time I've been loving and loving I've been looking at dark standing crawling tonight memories of your taste up and holding on tight my man I live in the night all of this time I've been loving it all. The time I've been loving for. Me and with your whistle sweet every time I ignore the sun pretends mine on the day of me falling for you was my own cry I don't care what they say I'm gonna do it anyway. It's the only thing I've seen always staring back at me. I've been living the dark standing cold in the night the reason of your taste I've been holding on tight falling apart and I'm living in life all of this time I've been loving life I been looking at dark standing crawling I memories of your taste and holding on tight pulling up my and I'm living in life all of this time I've been loving life. I'm a grown under. My heart's friend oh my God come on girl what my heart's about I'm not going under. Should this heart surrender I would go under. I feel like there's a dark standing crowd every taste I'm a little wild I don't even think all the time I love it oh my God oh my friend. The chance to last. I tried to tell you that the things we had. Is the end of the day tonight. I just knew that they had. Been better. I drank it we had. If I had no other chance tonight. I just knew that the things we had. Didn't if I had enough chance to know. I tried to let the things we had it would fall in love again. I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm running to get there I'll find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I'll find my way back. I'm coming home to you do you if you I'm coming home to you do you too I'm coming home to you do you feel you coming home to you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you you. Don't know how I'm gonna get it I find the way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I find my way back. Don't know how I'm gonna get there I find my way back. I'm coming home to you I'm coming home for you I'm coming home for you..

"sass" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"sass" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Have things like live search, change the game in significant ways? I'd like to say that the answer is yes, but it's not only milestones, you know, as much as we'd like for it to be. It's not just the features and the products that datadog has been releasing. The market itself is undergoing some transformation. Ten years ago when datadog was founded DevOps was a brand new kind of concept and over time it's become the standard. The same thing applies to complicated architectures, where, you know, we've been talking about breaking down monoliths for years, but the reality is that even companies that still have monoliths have very complicated architectures around them. Microservices that have spun up in support or in replacement of parts of a monolith, all of these combined and the kind of constant migration. Someone is always migrating from if historically, it was from on prem to the cloud or from host based environments to containers or to serverless, the reality is that almost everyone right now runs some form of hybrid environment. Hybrid in some sense. And then all of the tools that we've provided and we are providing and how we're obviously we're going to announce a few more shiny tools over the next few months, but all of these work together. The idea that you have a multi cloud or architecture that relies on actual virtual machines and on containers and on some form of serverless environment, all of those needs to be monitored together. And this single pane of glass that we provide is really, really powerful for those cases. If I want to take all of this combined and to answer your question, what has changed everything is more complicated is more distributed. It's less centralized and for that we've had to build more and more solutions, allowing everyone. Be it people in DevOps or SRE roles, application engineers on front end or back end, database administrators, all of them can come to one place, see all of their metrics and all of their observability data in one place and speak one common language. And I can't tell you that this is one milestone this is what happened. It's an ongoing process. But every release works towards this shared vision where all data and all telemetry that relates to your applications and your infrastructure, lives in one place and all of its users, regardless of their role regardless of the language that they speak can all work with it together. What with the robust offering like that, a smaller, simpler company doesn't necessarily take advantage of everything at the start. Maybe as they grow, they.

datadog DevOps
"sass" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"sass" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Not more of our users, everything that we build within the APM suite uses the datadog platform. We use what we call standard metrics that can be used to display on dashboards. They can be used in monitors and most relevant to your question, they can be used for SLOs. So service level objectives can be defined using APM primitives. Basically, that means that if you're trying to define uptime for a service or a user journey, you have all of the relevant information out of the box with our APM solution, and you can use it. So if I am this engineering director of a midsize company, I don't need to go into any particular part of the APM experience. I can have my own custom dashboard that has the things that I care about like the SLO, the high level business metrics are overall costs or anything like that, whereas all of the engineering teams that roll up to me can have views that are substantially more granular and can go as deep as an individual request or an individual line of code. And can we talk a little bit about live search for listeners who aren't familiar with that feature of the product? What is it? So live search is a capability that we released. I think around a year ago, and it allows customers to view all their APM events, so APM related events for 15 minutes, and when I say view, I mean, search across any dimensions, as well as something that is very important, do analytics. So when we say analytics, we mean, do counts, group bys, plot distributions, plot time series, et cetera. And so I think it changed a lot the way our customers view our products. When you think about observability in general, for a lot of things, it usually means sampling. Meaning you can not observe everything because it would cost you too much. And especially when you talk about APM and distributed tracing. If you imagine, when you do distribute tracing, for every request, every web request that you receive as a customer, you will send around a hundred events to a monitoring platform, like data. And for some customers, sometimes it's billions per minute. And at some point, keeping it all is cost prohibitive. And a lot of thought leaders on APM always said and you can find some videos about that. You need to sample APM. So you need to, for example, keep one out of 1 million events. And that generates a lot of friction with customers, because customers always wondering, what if I'm losing something? What if I'm losing an error? What if I'm losing a slow request? I won't be able to dig into that. When we offer life search, basically the value proposition changed a lot. You can view everything for 15 minutes. Sure, but everything. And especially in outage scenarios. So that means customers feel safer, releasing applications, they feel safer doing any type of migrations. And in the end, they feel safer buying datadog. Is there anything special about 15 minutes? Why not ten or 20? So 15 minutes was kind of the minimal time that was acceptable in terms of technology and to a low customers to view enough data. We are definitely thinking about extending that to when our, if not, if not more. Are there any particular use cases that have really been opened up that you couldn't tackle before live search was available? Definitely, I think the most common use case was the outage response. When you're in an outage, it can be scoped to something very minimal. It can be one specific endpoint of a given application that suddenly answers in ten seconds instead of regular hundred milliseconds. And in most cases, if it's something that is unfrequent, you don't have any data. And customers would not use data to solve their use case, they would use something else. And because we have life search now, datadog is usually the primary tool to answer incidents. Well outage response is going to be critical any major outage with a big company. You can measure the dollars lost in milliseconds some of the time. How does datadog play a role in a team in a critical state like that? How do they use it to get back on track? Datadog offers a very wide array of tools that supports this incident response coming from the APM side of the house for you Hugo and myself. The easiest take is that in a war room situation, one of the first places a user should go to is live search and live analytics, where being able to localize what exactly is going on, how can we see the impact of something and can we drill down into an example request that helps us figure out, okay, someone deployed bad code somewhere. Let's go and revert that. But then there are a lot of additional things that we can use. We've recently released incident management that helps us manage the entire life cycle of this incident. We have a lot of custom metrics in calculations that we can do to make sure that we capture the dollar amount or any other type of impact in the machine learning side of the house. So under the umbrella of what we call watchdog AI ops engine, we're also working on automatic impact analysis, which we'll be able to tell you, okay, here's how many users that were impacted by a particular incident. How many services here is the impact on your error budget? Or anything like that, and the idea is that datadog is here to support you when things are currently on fire. When you need to figure out what is the thing that needs to be fixed. And then later when you conduct your post mortem, when you do the optimization, when you understand the root cause, we are there with a very wide array of tools to make sure that you have everything that you need for that and to do it fast. Well, you'd mention that live search went live about a year ago, so you've had a great amount of time to see it and field. I'm wondering if we could rewind a little bit and explore the story of releasing it. How do you spend time, I guess, first off, beta testing something like this. That's a good one. I think at that dog, we have for any new feature or initiative, we have a very fast iteration process. Let me tell you a little bit more. At that a dog right now, so it wasn't the case a year ago, but you can imagine, we have now, I think over a thousandth engineers. And all of them are using most of the datadog suite. So, in a way, it's kind of cheating for us because it's simpler to develop a new product. We can assess the wheel internally to use it. We can access the product market fit. And we can very fastly iterate on it. So in a way, whenever we have an idea, we can start from scratch and build a prototype that we use internally and that can be used by thousands of users internally. And iterate very fast. And I'd like to add something else, we have.

datadog Hugo
DaaS: A Conversation With Auren Hoffman

Software Engineering Daily

01:24 min | 1 year ago

DaaS: A Conversation With Auren Hoffman

"Oren welcome back side. It'd be back your how many years into running a data as a service business law over four. Okay i've talked to a lot of infrastructures and service. Companies software as service companies platform as a service companies. Only one data as a service company. And it's more than four years into your company data as a service company. Well there are other datas service companies right so there. There are plenty of dass companies but of the successful companies in the world. If you think like sas versus dass is probably five hundred to one. Maybe even a thousand to one. So there's just way more sass unicorns than there are gas unicorns. Why are you the only non domain specific. Data's a service provider what we save. Graph is a domain specific associate data about physical places. And that's all the data that we have so our goal is to have on every single place in the world and every attribute about the place and we're we're very far from that goal today. So there's there's roughly the same number of places people worldwide and there's probably like ten thousand relevant attributes about a place. If you think of your home you might be the number bathrooms. Or what the soils made out of her what. The roof is made out of her. The last time that the sale price of the home are all these different attributes. You might search for right. So there's just lots and lots of attributes about a place and there's lots of different places in the world.

Oren
DaaS: A Conversation With Auren Hoffman

Software Engineering Daily

01:24 min | 1 year ago

DaaS: A Conversation With Auren Hoffman

"Or welcome back side. It'd be back your how many years into running a data as a service business law over four. Okay i've talked to a lot of infrastructures and service. Companies software as service companies platform as a service companies. Only one data as a service company. And it's more than four years into your company. Why are you the only date as service company. Well there are other datas service companies right so there. There are plenty of dass companies but of the successful companies in the world. If you think like sas versus dass probably five hundred to one maybe even a thousand to one. So there's just way more sass unicorns than there are dass unicorns. Why are you the only non domain specific. Data's a service provider what we save. Graph is a domain specific associate data about physical places. And that's all the data that we have so our goal is to have on every single place in the world and every attribute about the place and we're we're very far from that goal today. So there's there's roughly the same number of places people worldwide and there's probably like ten thousand relevant attributes about a place. If you think of your home you might be the number bathrooms. Or what the soils made out of her what. The roof is made out of her. The last time that the sale price of the home are all these different attributes. You might search for right. So there's just lots and lots of attributes about a place and there's lots of different places in the world.

Algolia's API First Model - Bernadette Nixon CEO of Algolia the Unicorn Search and AI Company - Voicebot Podcast Ep 221 - burst 02

The Voicebot Podcast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Algolia's API First Model - Bernadette Nixon CEO of Algolia the Unicorn Search and AI Company - Voicebot Podcast Ep 221 - burst 02

"Lot of different people in the software world that has done things around databases or things like that but it seems to me that like around discovery and surfacing information within within the enterprise. This is an area that you spent a good deal of time in your curb even before i'll go you. Yes that's right. If you in fact if you look at the competitive set in the market in which i'll go competes. They're really sort of two bookends to that competitive set one end of it. You have purpose built sass. Apps typically for one specific use case quite often ecommerce site surge and then at the other end of the spectrum. you've got the open source. Players like elastic solar and they can solve many different types of such Problems indeed as we as al goalie can win neither one of those. But i have experience of both both of those bookends. If you like of competitive set But the way to think about us is sort of in between both of those ads because we have. We give all the flexibility that you get with the open source but yet we are an api. I model which we can get into what that means really means a lotta people bandied that about. I'm actually hosted so fully the sas business model if you like. And that's one of the reasons why i came to. I'll go earlier in. May of last year. Because i truly believed in the positioning of the company having had experience in the such market before we are hearing a lot more about api first businesses. These days it would be useful for you to talk about what what that means in. Why that's a model that we're seeing a lot more of your absolutely. I mean it festival if you think about you know the the old ways of Satisfying problems you either went out. And you bought a big monolith or you built your you built the application from. Scratch yourself on what we're finding. Is that both of those paradigm 's are cracking a little bit right now under the strain the strain created by the need to constantly. Hr eight because the market is moving so fast. I mean take a look at the last twelve months. Kobe didn't start any new trends. It simply spend the ones that were there up if you think about it and so what we're finding is that people are wanting to find a abed away to build and use some building blocks so api's have been described as the picks and shovels of the information age because you can compose your applications using multiple api's but the difference between an api company and a platform that has some api You can interface with it is an api fest. Company really means three things at least while going. I think too many of the other folks out that in the api first economy as well one. It means at flexibility as in you're able to handle a broad set of use cases so in our case that's not just ecommerce such it's Internal search behind the firewall using us as the The search service when you're composing your own internal applications and many other different cases in between so being able to handle a broad set of use cases. That flexibility is one of the tenants of api. I approach the second Is speed so we build speed into our api so that our customers don't have to do that. Performance tuning As they would have to if they were building from scratch. Let's say using open source. And the third which i personally think is probably the most important is the backward compatibility developers want to solve big meaty business problems for the companies. They work for and they wanna move onto the next one. They want to minimize the amount of maintenance that they have to keep up with and so we take that burden on. And we guarantee the backward compatibility of our

Amazon Api First Backward Compatibility Economy Flexibility Performance Tuning Enterprise Search Al Goalie Kobe
What Are the Quirks That Come With Being a Developer

CodeNewbie

02:09 min | 1 year ago

What Are the Quirks That Come With Being a Developer

"Let's start with you telling us about your coding journey. Where they're all begin for you. I i started getting into coating during college. I started out as a psychology major and was pretty intent on finishing up. Undergrad getting a master's degree and being a counselor About couple years into it. I realized i liked the more hard science a lot. Better than sort of the sop science and social science part of it. And i had taken a statistics class. Like just a psychology stats. Class really looked to that. So i got into statistics and changed my major to that and at that point i had to take a bunch of like stats computing type glasses. So for instance statisticians tend to use programming languages like our or sass or even just like sql database management. And so that was really my first introduction to programming at that point. Like i realized if i to look at the t. between statistics and computer science actually like program a lot more than i liked the stats part of it. Nah i landed up graduating with degrees statistics. During that time. I just did a ton of learning on my own. Did a lot of like could academy courses recode cam fluoro- site videos whole time. Packer rank exercises. I even read through twenty programming textbooks now on just java script html and just building stuff just trying to make little side project snack things together. And after i graduated from college. I landed my first programming job. So what was it about that stats class. And then getting into programming. That resonated with you so is taking ard says stats programming. Which are and it was really amazing. Nina we could like run simulations and experiments just for typing a few lines of co dried. We could run simulations of very simple things like let's flip the coin hundred times and see how many times it lands heads or tails or even just like data visualization like we have data set and using just a few lines of code. You could use like a stats package like something like g plot to create this beautiful chart. That was really cool that you could like essentially build something out of basically nothing

Undergrad Packer Nina
Zero Trust: A Change in Mindset.

The CyberWire

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Zero Trust: A Change in Mindset.

"I have been a a c. So i think sony for just under a year and we're building and formalizing relatively new security program i don't have to carry the burden off. What many would consider legacy environments and therefore we designed our security processes that now all employees have to be able to work remotely. We can no longer assume that people are in the same office connected to the same network that we might consider trusted and therefore we can no longer grant special privileges just on the basis of the network that people are coming from especially for newer and smaller companies. Their entire world is sas applications and that new landscape is ripe. For zero trust architecture we has enterprises are very very quickly moving towards sas provided applications. Which means that you've got your data to which to control access sprinkled all over the place. And the reason i bring that up is because now we have no choice. We have no choice but to consider these zero trust design patterns because we no longer have this network where our business applications reside the firewall. That sits franco of franco. That we control either just doesn't exist anymore. Everything's sass and what that means. Is that even. If the see. So like the idea of zero trust architecture but couldn't really gain support of the organization to consider what cultural or technology changes need to happen. Now is the time to bring up the need to use your trust today because you've got the support of everybody else. Everybody else wants to use these sas applications. They have no choice

Sony Franco SAS
Interview With Eric Siu

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Eric Siu

"Fellow. Risk-takers this your worst. Podcast hosts andrew stotz. And i'm here with featured guest. Eric su to rock. I'm ready to rock. Thanks for having me andrew. I'm glad to have you on the show. And in fact i went to cal state long beach so i used to be in the la area for a long time so it's good to reconnect with lovely l. a. What i used to call the center of the universe at that time. So let me introduce you to the audience for those people. That don't know eric. He is the ceo of content intelligence software. click flow. Which helps you grow your traffic while looking like a genius and who doesn't want that also owns an ad agency single grain and work with companies such as amazon airbnb salesforce and uber to acquire more customers. He hosts to podcasts. Marketing school with neil patel and leveling up which combined have over forty eight million downloads to date. He's also frequently around the world of marketing and software as a service and he's recently publishing a book called leveling up. And i happen to tell you. Eric doesn't know this. But i've managed to get an inside person to give me the first copy of the book. Let me find it and there. It is whoa. They sent it to you know. Just kidding i made myself. I made included on a little book that i had. But that's what it's going to look like folks and it's called up and right now you can get chapter number one which i've been through and i'm really excited. So maybe you can just tell the audience a little bit about yourself and what they're gonna get from this book and what they could do now to get some of that in wednesday coming out all. Here's the fiscal copy. Here's what is gonna look like boom. This is what it looks like. It's coming out february. Twenty four th. But my name's eric su. So you know to your point couple of businesses. I kind of my go-to level at the world through marketing. So the business you mentioned but we also have any events business. We have an education business and we also invest other mar related sass and to podcasts. You mentioned i just love learning. I love teaching to articulate my thoughts. And i'm here on this podcast to talk about my worst investment. I think there's a there's a theme here. I'll try to tie everything together without me too. Wordy that's great. You know it's interesting. Because when i read through the first chapter and also i'm a listener of your podcast. Both of them. What i get from us that we come from a slightly different generation. Let's say i graduated from university and cal state long beach in nineteen eighty nine. And i didn't really. I wasn't in the gaming realm at the time and i wasn't when it started really hit. I wasn't that interested in it. So what i notice about about you. And i suspect that this is what people were going to get out of the book instead. You focus on some really short actionable things and it's feel like whether it's your podcasts. Or when i read your book. It is a lot about getting to that next level in little steps. And that's the way i was brought up. I was born with heavy big content redes- whole book and then tell me what you learn. Is that correct to think of it that way. Or how do you think how does your mind. Yeah it's so. I have this turtle in front of me and i got from puerto rico and i visited puerto rico for obvious reasons but it reminds me to slow down and to understand that you leveling up one percent everyday just trying to get a little better every single day. That's what it's all about because if you think of decades that be results in decades you'll be amazed by what you accomplished and you have short term hustle and long-term outlook. It's the same thing as investing at the end of the day. So i think it's You know. I'm glad that you noticed that we'll actually never thought of it that way but yeah that's exactly what it is. Yeah in fact before we get into the question. I just quote one thing out of the book and that is you say just because you have struggled in pass does not mean you're entitled anything to play at the next level you'll have a new set of struggles and that's something that really hit me because first of all at the age of fifty five. Life's supposed to be good and easy and all that no no. There's still struggles that you gotta face. That's the first thing. But the second thing that i took away from that this again this kind of incremental way that you look at things focus on the struggles in that one little level and there's always going to be those new struggles so that's a big thing that i've taken away from it. I'm looking forward to getting to the whole book someday. I'll have it by the way. Like i noticed a little warm buffet character in the back. I think that's what it is and so if you think about it. Eighty four point. So i think he's worth eighty five billion eighty. Four of that didn't come until after his sixty fifth birthday. So you talk about patients there. You go right there. Poster child for not

Andrew Stotz Eric Su Long Beach Neil Patel Salesforce Uber Andrew Eric Amazon Puerto Rico LA
How Best To Sell Your Company

Startups For the Rest of Us

02:51 min | 1 year ago

How Best To Sell Your Company

"I often get contacted with private questions. Folks don't want to appear on the podcasts. It's things like ham thinking through an exit. You know potentially. I have a acquisition offer some interest or i need to potentially fire co-founder pretty tough things that you can't have on the air but one that i do get relatively frequently and i think it's because i've been so public about during drip and then and then selling it is should i sell my company. Should i think about selling my company. What does that entail or even have an offer or have someone sniffing around. And i'm thinking about selling what should i do and i'll tell you. I received these emails and it is such a life. Changing moment there can be such a huge swing from selling for net profit versus selling revenue. And knowing how to do that and wants to put in place and that process that i just wanted to make it's almost a public service announcement that if you're up and doing at least seven figures and era in my opinion you should not sell for net profit multiple. You should be selling for a revenue multiple and these days. Those multiples are pretty healthy. Can listen back to the interview. I did with david. Newlove quiet light brokerage twenty thirty episodes ago and i was saying. If you're doing a million maybe get two to. Three x. And i believe he came back and said no. It's like three to four. Maybe three to five acts. And if you're doing five or ten million. The multiples are even larger. And so it's something that i think there's potentially some confusion if you're doing six figures and you're probably gonna sell for at net profit multiple but once you get into the millions there are so many buyers private equity strategic that are willing to pay healthy healthy prices life changing money never have to work again money. And frankly. If you're thinking about doing that. I would encourage you to reach out to me. Drop me a line. Whether even if you've you've had an offer you've had someone sniffing around or you think about doing that. I'm always happy to at least have a minimum. Have an email conversation about sometimes. I'm able to jump on on a phone call. And i know people who who who who do the sell side representation of sass apps and maximize that value and there are a couple founders. That have asked me for advice. And i've essentially laid out the options as i see them you know. There are brokers are sell side representation representation much like discretion capital which is was founded by interval. Set a tiny seed and you know depending on where you are and what you're thinking and what you wanna do. There are ways to maximize value. And it's something maybe. I'll do whole episode. Get on here at some point and talk about how to maximize that value. We have chatted about that on the podcast a bit but in my mind. It's just very important that the value you build your company if you're going to exit be deliberate about it because it can be the difference between selling four million dollars selling for five hundred dollars if you sell it well and you run the right process.

Newlove Confusion David
"sass" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"sass" Discussed on 600 WREC

"In East Texas says the pastor was killed in two other people injured in a shooting at a church this morning. According to the Smith County Sheriff's Office. The pastor confronted a wanted man hiding from police in the church near Winona. Overnight. The pastor drew his gun, but the suspect grabbed it and shot the pastor. The man was arrested after fleeing the scene in the pastor's car. At least a dozen Republican senators plan to object when Congress certifies the electoral College Wednesday, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell urging colleagues to refrain from challenging the results. Other high profile Senate Republicans are not on board with this challenge. They include names like centers to Me, Sass Borkowski and Romney, all encouraging GOP colleagues to rethink opposing the results. We heard from Mitt Romney, he writes. I urge my colleagues in the strongest possible terms. Reconsider the likely consequences of their actions for I fear they will do damage to our democracy and our global credibility that cannot be easily repaired. Senate Democrats equally outraged, They're promising to block what they see. Really, here is a long shot effort. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, writing to President Trump on Twitter quote. It won't happen. We won't let you steal Joe Biden's landslide Win. Fox is Mark MEREDITH in Washington, The star of Wonder Woman, 1984 announces a new syriza documenting accomplishments of women gathered that took to Instagram to announce a brand new National Geographic docuseries. The focus is on women across the globe. It's titled Impact. It's a powerful docuseries that tells the story of exceptional women making a true impact in their communities that continued about six part series have stories from women making a difference from California all the way to Brazil Wonder Woman actress also revealed the serious first trailer, which features various spots across the world. It featured women in different scenarios, one dancing a ballet while another was surfing and oceans, wild waves. Day for release has not been announced. Michelle Pelino Fox News. I'm Steve Rappaport. And this is Fox News. Mostly clear conditions. Some.

Mitt Romney Mitch McConnell Fox News Senate Smith County Sheriff's Office Winona Joe Biden East Texas Chuck Schumer Steve Rappaport GOP Congress Fox Twitter Brazil Sass Borkowski
GOP senator rebukes 'dangerous ploy' to fight Biden victory

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

GOP senator rebukes 'dangerous ploy' to fight Biden victory

"A Republican senators criticizing the efforts of his party to disrupt the final certification of Joe Biden's election victory next week Nebraska Republican senator Ben Sasse has issued a pointed rebuke of the GOP on social media urging his colleagues to also reject this quote dangerous ploy senator Josh Holly was the first to say he's going to raise objections when Congress meets January sixth to affirm Biden's victory other Republicans are expected to join Holly sass disputed the GOP allegations of voter fraud in key states and criticize trump raising more than half a billion dollars for his legal defense when it's really a blank check calling that swampy politics Jackie Quinn Washington

Ben Sasse Senator Josh Holly Joe Biden GOP Holly Sass Nebraska Biden Congress Jackie Quinn Washington
Being a one-man-band in business

Startups For the Rest of Us

05:46 min | 1 year ago

Being a one-man-band in business

"It so if folks want to check out what you're working on. Its use slingshot dot com and your h one is your easiest swag campaign. ever quality branded swag accustomed. merchandise store for employees fans and worldwide fulfillment. And where you stand now. You're the only employee you're single founder. And you do. Have you told me many contractors. Who are doing design or development or fulfillment or just filling in gaps can't handle on a day-to-day basis as founder. Do you wanna give folks an idea of where the business stands whether you are willing to to share revenue just some type of size to give an idea of the stage you launched it. It is december of two thousand twenty and you launched january. So it's about a year old. But i'm guessing you had worked on it for quite a bit before. Then go on that at all. Basically twenty nineteen when i launch it actually. The january first is almost two years. Got yeah totally different model. That was working pretty well. We had about ten clients on that model was month the month. It was neat. Swag story giveaway points and you can kind of transfer those points in to like. Hey he did something. Great there was a kpi or a birthday or start date. I'm really fun. But we knew it was one of the things that wasn't a requirement at a company. They'll still trying to build that really fine. Product market fit for the necessity. And it's hard to do and kobe and march and so when that hit this year every single person quit except for one. We're still trying to build up that market and find out what that was. And since then i've met with a really smart people since then that helped me kind of guide my way to the troop paddock market. That we now have an awesome platform that had of now. We're gonna hit around two hundred thousand by the end of this year and revenue. I saw him the only employee. And i'm wearing billion hatchets. My wife knows and other than that. I am able to really export and pay premium. People don't actually physically. No but i paid for you know fulfillment and some warehouse and now i pay people for marketing and down the building new product releases but allowed me to really focus on sales client relationships etc. So we're doing really well. It's a totally different changements. Still in the same vein that we are giving away grape swag to people deserve it and that's the thing is is your background is in design and you x and if folks want to check you out dribble you've john howard is your username and you actually started an agency called black airplane which is at black airplane dot com that you exited about four or five years ago and he sold it to someone who could who could level it up but i mean the logos on the homepage of that are coca cola. Mcdonald's home depot the weather channel. So i mean those were. I'm assuming clients many clients that you closed right so are you. Are you the double threat of an amazing designer and also an enterprise sales person. That'd be a little braggadocious for me. But i appreciate i think really look at things more for user experience side. And that's what he has given me. An ability always wanted to start a business. I think that was my first love. I lost my job at an agency. That i worked at and kind of forced me into. Hey why not start an agency love business and you love doing design work. That was the kind of love story there. And because of that. I put all of my effort into making that happen. That was black airplane. I did not do any development. There was just a dying we ended up working with some really amazing clydes that you mentioned some of those cola being one of the most recognizable here in atlanta. And because of that. I kind of handed that off at one point that i really wanted to go build a product company especially working with products all the time and people who are doing products and keeps you energized. And i handed off people much more formidable to me to building an agency building that up and they're just doing a tremendous job now and they made it now the full gamut of design and development. So it's really grown. it's blown up. I think eighteen people now. And when i left it was two people and we had eight contractors so big change for you. That's that's cool to know when to hand something off and you know when to let it kind of take wings and give it to someone who perhaps can can take it to that next level if it's not something you want to do. I'm curious then. So you were running this agency. The description on the home pages were a digital product design and development firm in woodstock georgia and we're on a mission to make sure no digital experience gets left behind. You obviously have the chops weather. Your own design skills or through the network of contractors or employees that you worked with to build full on digital products web and mobile whatever. Why start something. A physical component basically a swag not a swag shop. It's it's a. You started a product that allows other brands to launch their own swag campaigns or swag shops versus just going building a suffer product. A sass or whatever because you obviously have the skill and the experience to do that. Yeah and i. I've done that before If i could show my rap sheet of how many things have failed might give you a long list done a lot that they they made minor successes here and there. But i've learned a lot along the way. I'm really fascinated with physical and kind of marrying digital world to a physical product. And i think i've really been obsessed with that for a long time and we'll be excited about it was at Black airplane we didn't slap and i don't know how the slagle it's now there but it's always been great. Slept our websites and name to we're about on people swag. We just gave them really great swag every single time. People would brag on that we had. I used to joke that people would wear the black airplane swag out to the park or on a date they would rip the sleeves off and there and cut grass with it. You know. it wasn't one of those types of shirts that you hated or hats or whatever really nice stuff and i saw. The people got really excited about that and there was a neat. And i'm really obsessed with your experience i wanted to build. This product platform had married that experience of getting something from an employee your colleague or boss and in receiving that in your hand and physically seeing that side of things as well so i got

Cola Kobe John Howard Coca Mcdonald Atlanta Woodstock Georgia
Upgrading a Software Product with Machine Learning - with Dr. Pavel Dmitriev

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

06:24 min | 1 year ago

Upgrading a Software Product with Machine Learning - with Dr. Pavel Dmitriev

"So pablo glad to be able to have you on the program. We had nanny your ceo on not that long ago. And you're the data science guy here. So i want to really open up with you. I say outreach billion dollar company growing very fast fast platform now it's about taking it to the next level with what are really those opportunities in upsides of taking up popular sass product and layering. Ai why is it worth this. Additional effort of of baking a into the mix. Yeah thanks them credit to be here. Yeah it's very interesting. I feel like At outage the moment To build a in a. And i think as you mentioned it does not start as a companion by that's moments Started building a. yeah. I was actually very good. Good moment to start when we already have had a pretty good user base. Yes yes and very active. Here's our base is very important. Bidding this one aspects of companies. We can collect a lot of raw data from those users and head into All a good amount of data available is kind of a requisite for being able to building a into the product and Heads it if it is already had a good number of customers allege amount of data and actually a lot of insights into the problems of those customers more so at the point where the solutions kind of needed to be developed as unjust not just five on customer but but for many customers. That's that's a very good moment or staff to bringing bringing in anything said that opportunities. That is a clear that ability to solve some of the some of those problems customers ahead him at scale. So i think that's gonna ring true for a lot of the audience. I think people will understand like okay. We're gonna use to solve important problems or pursue important opportunities. Obviously some of that you've been able to do just with the assassin platform itself. You know the company itself. Oh well you know here. We have a problem. Okay build a feature. Push this button and it's going to send an email okay. That's that's a feature. He know he didn't need for that. But then there's other kinds of problems where maybe we do need i. Maybe we we. We do need to leverage like you said the data of all these users we have. Do you think about that. There's some there's some problems where there's no reason to use. Ai would be overly complicated. And then there's others where we do need it for you you know. Why is it important to to go after the i. Opportunities there instead of just the additional sas features. You know what what is the. What's big upside here. Yeah yeah look. At the outage three phases. The kind of the evolution of product and filler step is a step before outage before sales engagement products appears self process was very disorganized. It was kind of like what you're seeing. The contacts ends are good. Luck gone closet and it's ready to Plan and farkas kinda process. It's very hard to understand. Buds is a swedish propagates station. So that's spenders asians. That is very important. A dozen telling me the i. And that's what outreach at standardized the sales process secure but then the next stamp is optimization. The way i think about it is that off. You take a tender outage products and then you take your sales process you would. Outrage is great gun around a lot faster however you spend the bad sales processing place. Now you have a bad sales prosperous minor really fast as opposed that is still By the values bedding might shed. He'd use so helga now customers. The ability of the sales process is is. The next step is the look at what is happening. In aggregate in the government hewlett huma even Across all of our customers and tried to use a to come up with this broad acts of communications on the types of fish which start improving the efficiency of the sales process for example if companies especially those companies who did not have an automated kind of as sales and you kind of sales still in the past sales process tends to be very shells To project prostate the few times small number of times but we know from best practice is that eggshell intakes of seven fifteen or even in some areas. Maybe after source you digest extra Prospects so those kind of best practices can be just baked into the product That can be used to discover those kinds of insights so that the second stab the sword step once wednesday were able to optimize the process. A little bit than the step is personalization because even though we can have as sales process which is on average of optimal on average is good in evidence. Specific situation forever sales. You might even for evidence sell them. They can extra little better than average. If you can tailor what is suggested commends Unique skill since disaster unique situation. So that personas asian aspect is bad guy is really an affront and said that he cannot do it without a because the volume of of people themes and update is too high to be able to manually

Pablo Farkas Helga Hewlett
"sass" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"Areas nine elevens and having stray away for a while really to appreciate a porsche. You've had cars from from america. Maybe even some other german brands to kind of get a sense of horror. Porsche really fits in the whole family tree of sports cars. That's true and highly recommend that obviously porsche. He's been my focus for most of my life and probably will be for the rest of my life every now and then. I've had a couple of otis's next to the portion my garage. Right now punishment archie. They're amazing cars though honestly. Neither of them were really that bad. You know everybody jokes that it stands for lots of trouble usually serious but it's more like lots of trouble usually a minor irritant which models of your head. i had no land and in esprit. Well there's not much better looking than an esprit. That was what is jaros. Greatest and it was an earliest brady. So it was like the original giral. We're going to take a short break. We'll be right back. Welcome to life done. Better listen to the weekly episodes where supermodel and health coach. Jill young talks to some of the world's most inspiring women in health and wellness. It's the place for all the unicorns who strive to create a life on their own terms. Join us to explore. Discover and create a life done better together. Listen and subscribe from kurt co media media for your mind. Welcome back to cars the matter back to porsche so it your garage. You've got a little bit of italy but asleep porsche. Were to honestly. It all goes back to that. I seventy two seven s. I went to the twenty four hours of la. I always been a car person. But i'd had a lot of british stuff and abortion really never seemed at least for a twenty something like it was anyway going to reality but not eighteen went backpacking in europe and we went to the twenty four hours a month and it was during the glory years the night sixty two. The rothmans liveried cars. That looked so good. Oh they look tell. You was really easy to see why tobacco advertising motor sports. Why they banned it. Because i didn't smoke but seeing those guards. I wanted to smoke and had french cigarettes and so or i may well have taken it up. Do totally effective on me. But after that i just couldn't get porsches off my mind wanted one in the worst way i had a sixty five austin healey free thousand. It's a nice car. But i was going to school. The university of colorado and it was pretty daft card own in boulder colorado by wound up selling it to an abnormal psych professor. Perfect tweet cap. Tweed jacket and everything else the kappa alpha theta who live next door to me restore nearly happy to see the cargo. 'cause i was running like glass pack and nothing else. I made money on the car and saw a white nine eleven with a for sale. Sign on in town and sixty five hundred dollars for it. I bought it for six and sommese. It was like a complete stripper. Acid had no options whatsoever. That's exactly what you want. No sunroof nowhere. Though sports seats leather at gas heater in that was really bad it. I've wonder where cars today. I've never run across it again and i'm pretty certain that i've ever sat in that car. I would know that car will. I'm sure somebody is enjoying it somewhere unless of course it made its way to the glue factory in the sky. I hope not because it costs me literally. Every time that i made on every summer job that i had to keep the car on the road. That is the negation clearly. The dedication paid off. Because you're now is dedicated to the mark. Is anybody on the planet and really kind of keeping the big flame of the club. Live through this magazine. The what's the circulation of the magazine. Rob does everybody. Who joins the club get the book. Everybody who joins the club gets the book circulation as well over one hundred thousand but the pass along rate which we've never actually calculated is gotta be just tremendous. I've seen them everything. I to the dealers. They got all the indie shops and the number of people that circulate in and out of ood go to hair salons and doctors dentists offices to. I've seen him everyone who circulate in and out of indie shops and dealers. Who don't wanna look at a two month old copy of people magazine. Pick it up. So i think our advertisers are getting. Just an absolutely phenomenal deal. Because i've seen it in some absolutely bizarre places but you know every time. I'm ed porsche. Ag whether in your life or somewhere iraq magazines and panorama there it blows me away. Actually segue right into one of my next discussion points. Ma kind of connection. Do you have with the porsche factory. Because i know that in some cases with other marks clubs don't have particularly tight connection their role and their relationship is probably not as close as yours is with the mothership. We have an extraordinarily good relationship with him. Obviously were independent of them but they treat us extraordinarily well just in terms of access they inouye take the club or the readership for granted. I mean they treat us in most ways like they treat any other publication. Whether it's our driver run track we go on same press trips and retreated essentially the same way. I've been enormously appreciative over the years in terms of the access. And how well they treat the club and how much they valued the club in the members and would you pull push out single amount. Put a spotlight on them. Obviously they're enjoying revenues and sales worldwide that other manufacturers would envy as even some of their compatriots in the vw. Stable seem to be faced with challenges. Porsche seems to be just absolutely incapable of failing. Their margins are incredible. You know how to work the option list who hasn't racked up twenty granted options without even trying when they're working on the configuration deviated stitching takes on a whole new meaning doesn't it. I did a story early on. I bought a nine twenty four in seattle for two thousand dollars and decided to two thousand mile. Road trip is two thousand miles in two thousand dollars four shift and one of the things that we did in the lead up to the story was we just went down the nine eleven option list to see how many options there were were more expensive than this entire car was a lot of options. But i mean who doesn't love it honestly in the secondary market win guys like us with looking for us nine or something like that. We totally geeked about any of cool option. And of course now everybody me as guilty as any totally geeked up by the whole concept of paint sample and so many of the things that really distinguish one porsche from the other cash. Yeah what a franchise. Or she's built their their entire instagram feeds. That are nothing but p. t. s. cars and they've got like a half million fossils. You've started a site. is that right. That helps people really kind of get in their drill down and see what these colors look like. Yeah it's rainbow dot org. It is over five hundred different colors over five thousand images that have been large crowd source submitted by users and fans of the site and the coverage of the entire porsche palette from three fifty. Six era to date is remarkable. They're very few colors. That don't have an image or e. n. n. b. o. w. r. e. n. b. o. w. Yeah there are very very few colors. that don't have an image associated with them but there's also content site also has stories that are both original and curated that deal with porsche. Colors there is also some commentary about the color is basically. If you don't know what amaranth is the site tells you what the origin of the color name is and also a rating scale. It's purely subjective. Ins meant to be fun. Not necessarily based on production numbers. But it's one to five pink and scale so one paint can guards red grand prix white five pink cans mint green and two three and four in between. But it's kinda fun. Kissed the next two hours of your life. Goodbye when you wake up at three o'clock in the morning and you need to see what apricot really looks like. You've got a reference point. We just put an apricot an instagram feed. I'd never seen it well. It's a fantastic color. Isn't it is. I'd never seen it before though. Somebody submitted a picture of an apricot beige and sixty four coupe. That was the year of the early nineties when some unusual colors started great. The guards red monopoly guards red silver black grand prix white. Nearly ninety started to get speed yellow. Green apricot ruby stonewall. Those colors that are just legendary. Today had their roots in the early nineties. That's right when i see a maritime blue car riviera blue ruby stone speed. Y'all like why did not order these colors. We'll all pay like a thirty percent premium now for them or more but back then. There were bolted to the showroom for the dealers never.

porsche esprit jaros Jill young kurt co media media rothmans university of colorado otis archie Tweed boulder italy america la colorado europe
"sass" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"And not the first time. Customers have been surprised sitting in the car that was a previous shock deporting. That's exactly cayenne people were rending their garments and threatening to jump out of ten storey balconies over this car again. I think it was a shock to a lot of people that torture could make a car. It's five thousand pounds. That has this high center of gravity handle this well and feel like a porsche. You don't hear that conversation very much anymore when for should introduces a new variation. Cayenne client coop or mccown. Gts or something like that. That dialogue is sort of over the fact that porsches making four door cars and crossover suv's porsche people. Do i mean. I went back when all of the pushback was going on over. The kind of went back and looked at some old issues of panorama from nineteen sixty four and there are tons of letters. Were absolutely up in arms with a six cylinder. What do you mean a nine eleven eleven. Six cylinder porsche. What have you done. This is heresy. You're dead to me. We can have an awful lot of fun with those nine eleven ours the first series forces at all that. But what do you think. They're taking that car in the future. What would you like to see from a nine eleven to see it evolve having just been fresh from spending a lotta time in every flavor the latest iteration. That the nine two. It's really hard to say particularly drive. A neutral s. How they're gonna make that. Car appreciably better. Andy warhol used to joke about people doing the quarter mile in negative seconds. How quick can you get a car. Is that really what it's all about. I'm beginning to wonder because honestly things have moved really quickly. Maybe it was ten years ago when breaking the three seconds. Zero to sixty barrier was a huge deal. That was something you did in aviation not an automotive check. That's the analogy going for. It's probably felt a lot. Like the eddie breaking the sound barrier. Didn't forty six. it's out there. Theoretically it can be done but is anybody ever gonna do it. And now that's really commonplace. I think obviously even to the nine eleven in sports cars some form of electrification i think is fate accompli. I mean that's going to happen at some point whether seventy teen morphs into something physically electric whether the nine eleven gets a hybrid drivetrain of some kind. Those are all things that are fair to guess. I don't know if you saw this wild back. We did some playing around with just this sort of speculation and one of the things that we of throw out there was bring back something like the nine fourteen only make it an easy there tons of possibilities porsche has made me not fear the future i love the internal combustion. Engine is much as anyone and i don't think that were really near writing last chapters of the internal combustion story yet. But i've seen what a fully electric car can tune the ticon and we've all watched what the nine nine did in the l. n. p. one classic lama with a hybrid drive drivetrain. And of course the road going nine. Eighteen made a bit of a splash. When at touchdown and shook up yeah exactly so. I don't think there's really anything to fear. I mean that said. We're always gonna be able to get our analog car fix. I don't think that internal combustion cars you're gonna be legislated out of existence outside of really congested city centers. were always going to be able to enjoy. Let me put you on the spot. What's your favorite new porsche. And what's your favorite old porsche. Technically new new but the gt three touring. I adored the no argument from me. Old porsche. seventy three to seven r s or sixty. Seven battle of an are probably. Those are amazing. We had a chance to talk to freeman recently on the show. And of course talking about the original argh rupa. And you're done a lot to promote the efficacy and desirability of those cars whether they're originals or whether they're contemporary hot rods in fact in this october issue. There's a great feature on a hot rod alec and they said oh. Well let's peter in l. a. Bought that car. Incredible the yellow card. It ready well shot so here you've got an old style nine eleven that's equipped with a relatively contemporary engine. And it's kind of the best of both worlds. I am sadly old enough to remember when people were front dating cars. I hate to admit this. But when i bought the seventy two nine eleven s all i wanted to do was make it look like a new medal of career. I put some flares on it. I blacked out. The beautiful bright trim around the windows. Dankali never did this. But i was gonna buy like the kid for the back and do everything that you could to try and make the car. Look like a newer car so really. I think it's really actually kind of amusing. The the backdating craze took hold or people are taking impact bumper cars and making him look like long owed cards and what goes around comes around but boy none of us had ever any notion that these cars would come around the way they did. Maybe four years ago these early nine elevens were absolutely on fire. Couldn't keep on the shelf. I think things have settled down a little bit. Twenty fourteen two thousand fifteen. They really sorta peeked when a really really good early as three hundred thousand dollar car. I mean that seemed a bit excessive when you were looking at cars and the three hundred fifty range. But they've come down a bit even to seven our asses if settled down a little. Bit right now touring. His goodwin might be what six seven hundred thousand dollars. Sir i are still in the nine hundred thousand dollar range. But i mean i've seen driver quality touring four fifty even in the threes for cars with the same needs. They've come down a decent amount since the absolute peak but no. I never would have. When i bought that i seventy two s back in the late eighties. Who would have imagined that. The one thing that i always think about when i bought that car i think around nineteen eighty six. It was it was a fourteen year old car and it had about ninety thousand miles on. It had some rough starting in the door jams. The paint was faded. Dash was cracked. There were a lot of things going on with that car a few years back. I own a ninety nine nine six with about the same number of miles out of the car head. Probably ninety thousand miles on it and i realized that in two thousand seventeen this nine nine six was actually older than my seventy two s was back in the eighties when i owned it and the paint looked like brand new. This nine nine six. The interior barely had any where everything worked perfectly makes you realise as sixty the new forty. It just made me realize that new cars are really pretty good and it's not like old porsches weren't assembled. With as much handmade care is they possibly could have been the bill. Quality was amazing. The panel gaps are fantastic. The paintwork was good. I think it's just the advances in assembly technology and robotics metallurgy paint. And everything else to say. I'm impressed by what they did. Forty some odd years ago. You know. I think what makes porsche so interesting. Nine oh for me as a quote unquote work stiff. Who never got a car given to him. A porsche is an aspirational dream. But it's a dream that can actually be realised cars like ferraris and lamborghinis and clarence. That's rare air is tough to do much more than aspire for a lot of enthusiasts but a porsche especially some of the older ones. Those might be within the grasp of an enthusiast. And i think that's the magic of porsche. The performance build quality. The look the feel the experiences all there and yet the cars are almost within reach of a real working stiff at. I think that's what's made them so incredibly popular with the new cars. We certainly have taken their place with the other aspirational brands. But they've got such a back catalog of cars to choose from ferrari and number guinea which in their best years built a handful of cars. Porsche was building seventeen. Twenty twenty-five thousand cars a year. That's a lot of cars when you look at like a ferrari daytona like that. That's considered to be a fairly common for ferrari in their fifteen hundred of those no idea. What the total production number of the nine forty four was but it's probably wandering eight hundred seventy five. It's a lot of cars. There's a lot to choose from but you're right. I've been a confirmed bottom feeder by whole life. But i managed to sneak in just before the ferrari. Three hundred eight market went kind nutty and enjoyed that for four years and it's a surprisingly good car. That was actually a car that you could own their fifty percent more expensive than they were when bought mine but can still buy three later mondiale. And they're perfectly nice cars. They are not build quality. Wise or shes for is kind of late to galvanize steel. So you do a lot of rest bubble chasing three hundred eight but it's a fun car and it's a car that very much was viewed as a competitor through it in the free twenty nine eleven back in the day so it's kind of neat to have that sort of comparison of spending a lot of time in.

porsche mccown Dankali Andy warhol alec freeman lamborghinis goodwin ferrari clarence guinea Porsche
Using Financial Analysis To Make Data-Driven Marketing Decisions

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Using Financial Analysis To Make Data-Driven Marketing Decisions

"So I'd say some of the biggest things that people are I think usually struggling with is they like to think they make data-driven decisions, but they don't so like we all say no. No, you know once there's Roi will scale spent like, you know, once you see a little bit of a break I can't tell you over seven years how many people actually grow their spends like not that many people actually grow even when they're seeing success because so many other things break, right the customer success team can't hire fast enough Engineers can't fulfill the roadmap don't have enough. Like there's a lot of reasons why you can't just turn on growth. Yeah. That's the biggest thing is like most organizations. Most dementia marker don't have a financial model that gives them confidence of where they should spend their next dollar or how much your current dollars are making like, they don't have an LTV CAC model at the channel so that they know the LTV CAC of kept Arrow versus Google ads versus software Vice verses LinkedIn versus content syndication vs. Programmatic versus webinars versus events versus s t e r s versus doing an acquisition of a new tool or launching an extension or doing a new integration and they have no way of deciding what to do other than gut and so And then when they do something they have no idea how to tell if it's working or not because they don't know what their costs pressed UL should be they don't know what their cost perhaps you should be and you don't have a blanket cost from two L's you have cost press two L's that are a ratio of your acquisition cost. And so as you start to learn the game and you get yourself a little bit more organized with your financials and you know, like if you can like if your sass marketing your in-house, I think one of the things you can do is get build a relationship with the finance team and most frankly don't have one. They again given a budget and try to make it work instead of trying to craft with the CFO who ever like hey, how are we determining this budget? What are we getting measured by what you know is this online with with the board wants or the CEO wants and and actually getting into the number and I think that's probably the biggest mistake. I still see almost everyone in marketing make is they're starting to get better with sales and they're starting to work better with sales, but I don't see them still working well enough with Finance dead. And because of that it's really hard to push growth and make a case for why you should get the next dollar instead of sales development or account Executives or whatever. That is dead. Yeah. That's that's an interesting point. I've actually never heard that one that you need to Buddy up with the finance team as a marketer, but it makes sense. Like now that you're bringing it up at a hundred percent makes sense wage.

LTV Dementia Linkedin Google
Creating AI Products That Are Easy for Non-Technical Users with Bryton Shang

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

07:10 min | 2 years ago

Creating AI Products That Are Easy for Non-Technical Users with Bryton Shang

"So, Brighton a wanted to talk to you about your journey of building an AI chronic for specific market. You guys are any aqua cultures face using computer vision to monitor the health and size in growth of gigantic fish farms. Very, very big important industry also not industry at least what strikes my mind as as one that's eager for AI zone sake. You know we look at financial services and They might just like the sizzle obey but I, imagine a fish farmer doesn't they just want something practical. You got to go through this journey of finding a fit for a and for hardware in a market that really just wants an outcome topless about what that journey was like, what made the idea click, and then we have to go through to build a product that would be a business. So I I. Think Certainly. A are not like we really started with the customer need and and so clearly, there was a need for being able to Count Sea lice on the fish and as well as understand way in grows. And so whether that could be solved by air not that s really allows the. Clear from Farber, tops the number of farmers than an consistently said that that was number one problem. Solving that I mean there has been companies have tried to work on it using. More traditional computer vision or via other techniques and and really the idea being that I, mean there's been technologies developed economy striving and other industries social media that have developed deep learning and other AI models that have been really successful at identifying objects in images and doing three D. reconstruction, and so for for that was inspiration for us to be able to apply similar technology to. Get. Started is a bit challenging. So of course, weakness gather training data and this is something where basically taken lots of pictures of fish from being able to annotate those images or see lies and even like determining the way to the finish this is not something you can determine from an image actually after go physically. Way Them in war and so generally challenges around the data collection aspect but. Really I. Mean I think the company it's I ended saying that it's likely companies is sort of like raisin bread like company is like, Brad. In is just like the reasons that make it special. But the end of the day we're still solving for that cornea farmer one, hundred percent I mean if you could girl billion dollar firm with not live ai more power to you, you know what? I. Mean, we just happen to have a focus on a I use cases here on the show, but we certainly don't doubt toy ai for its own sake, but it sounded like the problem was suited and so bought a being right. You're not going to be able to build software that takes a look at fish. You know the old school methods of computer vision of looking at lines or something like the the. Videos of how computer vision you storage just never going to skin the cat you gotta use them Al and the kickoff for the company which you mentioned in our previous interview was actually regulation which I found to be interesting. So there was a regulatory act in Norway and I don't know if this district place in other countries are just in Norway where they had to count the leisa certain amount on their fishy certain amount of sampling. It seemed like that was actually the catalyst almost to the business is that safe to say? I would say, so I mean, certainly, there is businesses economic incentives in the also economic driver for them to manage sea lice because something that does Chech- environmental concerns as well as food safety concerns. It is something that is intimately tied with regulation and and in this case pretty much every country that grows fish in the ocean has some form of regulation of parasites. That's that's interesting. I think obviously most of our listeners are not familiar with aquaculture space. But curious to see that this regulation there you know when I think about the sectors where we might do a little bit more coverage or certainly where we do our market research work like financial services when someone is selling a document search and discovery software very rarely saying, well, you know here's how this can tangibly improve efficiencies. People try to find these of documents for mortgages, tons of documents for insurance underwriting. There are a lot of time using the argument of, Hey, you're really gonNA get regulatory slapped if. You don't I dunno change these kind of library bore clauses now that that legality has gone away or if you don't remove client data on their requests and if you can't find all of it, that's still your problem and this is going to help you. So regulation in the fear of those consequences honestly is something that financial services vendors lean on especially when they don't have other ways of measuring our why curious to see that it's also potentially a lever to kick off a need for technological innovation your space to this is something that's me people kind of have to adapt if you will. Absolutely. One of the differences though for we're talking about kind of. Companies. In some of the challenges we through is not just the farmers understanding that it's not the not like a thermometer like you drop it in it tells you the. In Data Adler. I I'm and. How many do you buy and it just gets better over time present get worse over time but fundamentally does work differently and so there is. But that's just sort of like the challenge of the system. So to speak is that like it's it's all mechanical system it is a dynamic system. That's the challenge for Mel, across the board in these living breathing systems or somebody's got to of keep tabs on things. Now, I presume now some markets. Well aware of this plenty vendors that we've had on mean from data data robots of a Yazdi's to Lord knows how many are essentially providing folks with tools where their in house data scientists are also going to be able to use these tools to get a job done maybe detect money laundering maybe detect cancerous tumor is on patients or whatever the case may be. These are tools for in house technical folks, and maybe in house non, technical folks, there are some vendor companies try to keep as much or all love the actual data collection processing in kind of that, we call the heavy lifting of. Keeping a living breathing in else's running in house in the vendor then they're only giving the user more or less a SASS products. Now, of course, it's more complicated than that. But for the user, it's about that simple. My guess in aquaculture is the in house data science staff is rather limited at these firms. You're essentially having to do the latter company where you're giving them. Here's the hardware plug it in. Here's the dashboard you're gonNA look at it but just know Mr buyer that there's a lot going on in terms of labeling in upkeeping heavy lifting that you don't have to do that we're handling. I presume that's what you've had to to bill. That's right and I mean for us the machine learning AI component is more. It's more like a cafe thing rather than for for them they prefer. Likely it's more important for us to be off, Walter. Company delivering Wade Send House in Yemen sorta not exposing so much of like the ID. Yeah Yeah.

AI Norway Count Sea Brighton Data Adler Farber Brad Chech Wade MEL Leisa Yemen Lord
Tracking the Trends: AI, WebRTC, Crypto, and Full Stack Startups

a16z

08:34 min | 2 years ago

Tracking the Trends: AI, WebRTC, Crypto, and Full Stack Startups

"Today's episode is a conversation about four big trends in the tech world. Any one of these trends would be notable on its own, but we cover all four in this hallway style chat as a sixteen z general partner Chris and talks with Sept. Campfire professor of media, arts, and sciences at MIT, and now co founder of cryptocurrency platforms, Selo and Eli Gill an investor in the CO founder of Health Technology, company color genomics, and formerly at twitter and Google. This is a wide ranging survey of some of the major shifts in technology right now but it's really a Meta story of how innovation happens, which is most definitely not in a straight line. So here, the translate cover Crypto, of course, a and machine learning including GP three. You can also listen to our explainer episode on what type and what's real there on our show sixteen minutes full stack startups, which Chris I wrote about in two thousand, Fourteen and collaborative web collaborative enterprise social including RTC or real time communication within the browser, which is where the conversation begins the first voice. You'll hear his Chris followed by talking about Web RTC and then set wants the conversation turns to Crypto. So it's a lot I. You and I have been talking about this in a negative excited about it. This kind of this feeling that there's a new stack of web infrastructure things like video audio. Collaborative Video Nadia rather who's having infrastructure now that it works in a way that it hadn't in the past and that's a mocking a whole new way of interesting applications people are always looking for the next platform and what the next big platform shift is and I think I kind of May have snuck up on all of us in the form of Web RTC Web Gio and then related. API. Companies providing sound or other things that have been built on top of by. Many other companies and I think the shifted substantiate itself in two different ways and almost call it the collaborative web and then separately the collaborative enterprise and if you look back ten years, people kept talking about during the first social way everybody talking about how there's going to be a social enterprise and how every SASS product was going to be more social and collaborative in that largely failed and it feels like that shift is finally happening in part due to things like what? You see fig for example, is the first really strong example of a Web jail enabled application along you to collaborate in real time with other people. In parallel with RTC is really allowing for really interesting concurrent sessions around video and tell you starting to see that in terms of a lot of products being built around virtual office rooms, virtual conference rooms, and I really do think this is the moment where collaboration is finally being built into the enterprise world and enterprise products, and then in parallel Web Jalen. Web RTC really seem to be enabling really interesting social experiments right now in terms of new social products, you have really amazing video and audio quality. So the time lag has gone who can do things that clubhouse. There's lots of interesting video experimentation. So you can see almost like degraded forms of your other things happening in browser or so I think now is a really exciting time of innovation around this new webstock. Point sneaking up on us, we've obviously had the ability to have conference calls group audio for decades. Right. But like a club house fact that there's so low latency and you've got like the visual representation of the room means that to me it's like if you remember the old days in the conference calls, Hey, always have people talking over each other partly because of whatever thrown is remarkable how the conversation switches from person to person. The latency I mean we both houses. This was zoom right like the fact that he doesn't stutter. The fact that very rarely does. It somehow Kinda Crossover. This point of good enough where finally hitting the point our in terms of video quality and the ability to stream concurrently across multiple users in terms of audio quality were hitting that point where the web infrastructure is really supporting the ability to have extra latency. A new platform excited at the examples. But when you say platform you that means you did they'll be thousands of examples. Are you think it's GonNa? Be a whole new wave that goes? By ten years. I think like any a quote unquote platform they're going to be a handful of things that really matter. That will really be the important things on it, and then a lot of things will be experiments that fail or don't work and I don't know ten years from now, what's going to be the main setup applications? I just think it is a shift that enables a bunch of applications to be built particularly the social or collaborative enterprise. One example that I think is worth noting in terms of what's coming due to see is it's quite possible that if you. Look at virtual reality or Vr the predominant use case in the near term mackey shift to the Rouser, and so I think right now in order to experience the are you need a headset you need some cases client software etcetera in. So there's more obstacles in hurdles to be able to participate and I think one of the things I found really interesting about where to seeing what jail is the ability to suddenly create like experiences where you just drop it. Can show up and so the big question in my mind is is oculus almost like the desktop computer versus mobile devices where the desktop really helps you do powerful tests, but you can do a lot on your phone and it's sort of the mainstream use case for most of the Internet today so I think that's another thing that we'll see if it happens or doesn't happen over the next decade, but that may be one interesting long-term trend to watch relative to web RTC. In. Jail. crypto rolling all involved in this allowed, you invest in Crypto Zapped new coupons company Selo in Crypto Abbasi's been my time besting. tells. A little about why you're excited about it in the second ring on. So I'll start off with general principle that I think is true for all of the technologies that we're talking about. There are certain class of technologies that increase the expressive range of a certain medium and when you increase the expressive range of a medium. Things pop up that were not possible before because you now are playing in the new design space. The historical example that I always love to point to is in the eighteen hundreds. The invention of the metal feral in painting is the little piece between the paintbrush and the paintbrush handle and collapsible easel. Those two things together allowed people to a brave paintings outside and be start to paint with a new breastroke that them too quickly DAB, paint onto the canvas in those two. Ended up, giving rise to form of painting that we now know as impressionism, and still it's interesting to think about impressionism was a result of technological advances painting and you see that same thing with the web and the Internet in general there were technological advances in the medium of text and so all of a sudden people could send texts more quickly anybody could be a broadcaster you start putting texts together with code to create different things in that vastly increased the expressive range of texts in a way that led to all of these things that you could not predict in advance. So for example, in ninety, four, ninety, five, when the web was starting to become popular, one could not imagine that. Will one day I'll be able to press the button and order my groceries on this and have my groceries come to me. You know and so I think those are really interesting from A. Technological point of view. Why I'm excited about Crypto is that Crypto does this for money? It increases the expressive range of the technology that we know is money, and that I think we'll follow very similar to the Internet you know at the beginning of the Internet. You saw allow people to pass messages. More quickly to one another across the distance in a way that was just qualitatively different than facts, and that is the first thing that you started seeing with Crypto it has direct implications to things like remittances or making the UNE banked. But then on top of that, the second implication of the web was that anybody could become a broadcaster with youtube anybody could have their own TV station and in the context of Crypto, you have the same democratization in financial services. So you see this kind of rise in decentralized finance open finance. And third is most exciting as it allows money to become programmable in the same way that the Internet allow text to become programmable and that I think, I mean we're seeing some early things today but that's I think the aspect that we're still the earliest and it has the most legs and is the most powerful and the most difficult to predict the stage. Since we're in such an early phase

Chris I Crypto Abbasi Co Founder MIT General Partner Twitter Selo Professor Youtube Cryptocurrency Nadia Health Technology Google Eli Gill A. Technological
Do I have to sell as a SAAS?

Side Hustle School

03:22 min | 2 years ago

Do I have to sell as a SAAS?

"Hi Chris. This is Diana from Columbus and I've been listening to the show since episode number one. I'm starting an online service and I'm wondering about my pricing as you probably know over the past few years, the SASS model software as a service has become increasingly common where the pricing is always monthly or annually instead of just paying a one time fee but I'm put off by the idea of forcing people to get another subscription. It seems like it's Harder to convince people to commit to that. Instead of paying a one time fee don't get me wrong. I like the idea of recurring revenue. I just think that maybe I should go the other way when everyone else seems to be doing the same thing what are your thoughts on this thanks Chris and I look forward to hearing what you have to say. Hey Diana thank you so much and congratulations on your new service. Look forward to hearing more about that, and this is a great question because anybody who is starting a service and online service. Especially Service, it's not just one off. It's something that people will continue to access. This is something that they're facing. How do I decide about my pricing and so to your point to Diana's point of where she says, you know maybe I should go the other way when everyone else seems to be doing the same thing. So overall, a big fan of that philosophy. I think there's a lot of things you can do in life by constantly asking okay. Everybody's doing this one thing what is Either the opposite or a third way something that people are missing etcetera. But I would say when you're thinking about your online service, like keep in mind why so many companies do this like why do they price that way? Because it works it allows them to be less dependent on the sales of any particular period like if you got a down month while you still have this money coming in from customers who signed up long ago, I, it allows them to forecast revenue far into the future it allows them to pay for upgrades features, and for customer support I think that's one of their main arguments, lot of these companies while we have to actually support this software. So we might actually losing money on someone who pays once, but then requires a lot of support, for example. So for a lot of businesses pricing on some kind of recurring basis whether it's monthly or annually like I mentioned, sometimes there's an option for either you can get a discount if you pay annually that very often good decision. But of course, let's be fair. That's not what she's wondering. She's wondering is it the only way and my answer to that is no of course not like you know if you want to sell your service with a one off fee. You could argue that might actually be attractive to potential customers who are just like she says, you know tired of all the subscriptions, I totally get it. So this is not a perfect analogy but whenever I'm looking at the APP store on my phone, I see different games available on thinking Oh maybe I'll try out this game. One thing that I'm really put off by is all of the in-app purchases and so many games these days are like. One dollar two dollars to buy the game or maybe it's even free but you're going to be bombarded with all these requests for in-app purchases. I would much rather finding game. That's you know ten dollars or twenty dollars pay wants and not have to deal with that in APP purchase thing. Okay. So as I said, not a perfect analogy, but there definitely would be people who are attracted to the idea of. Just be aware of all the benefits of the SAS model. So lots of compelling reasons to use that model, but there is certainly no requirement to do. So you always gotta do works for you.

Diana Chris Columbus SAS
Trump pushes forward with executive action on economy despite legal questions

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Trump pushes forward with executive action on economy despite legal questions

"Surrounding President Trump's multiple executive orders on Corona virus relief lawmakers raising legal questions about his authority to take actions on his own. What we are doing is entirely within the executive capacity of the president. That's White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany. Defending Trump's move. Nebraska Republican Senator Ben Sasse criticized the executive orders calling Trump's actions Unconstitutional slop. ABC is Katherine Walters joining us She's in Washington D. C. You're watching this unfold. Catherine Sass not alone in his criticism, but the president fired back at the senator. Yeah, he definitely fired back at him. Mary said that he has gone rogue, the president and the administration. They gave himself this self imposed deadline of last Friday to come to an agreement with Democrats and agreement that never came to fruition here. So the when Let alone signing. You Know one executive order a three memorandum over the weekend. And, frankly, is you mentioned that on and other Republicans. But, of course, all the Democrats raising concern about his authority to act unilaterally here since Congress handfuls of the power of the purse Now they also raise the fact that he's Cover. You know four different buckets. They cover extending on point and benefits covering the payroll tax, curbing evictions and deferring student loans. They don't address a number of of other items that need funding such a cool additional aid for testing in vaccine development support for that PPP of program for small businesses, So that is another thing that Democrats are worried about here. And the question is, Do you know what it'll get back to the negotiating table were so waiting to hear what Happens asleep between Democrats and White House negotiator debate for that extra 400 bucks and unemployment benefits. The president is taking that money from the Natural disaster fund, and that's right before what a lot of people expect to be a very active hurricane season, and the feds would pay 300 bucks states would have to pay $100. How do you force states to pay that money is on interesting issue because there's a lot of confusion among governors as to how this plan would be implemented to that 400 Dollars, 300 of which the federal government will agree to pay. Now it's a question of units and whether the state will pay $100. But as of right now, the way the order is written in the way that the Department of Labor has so far given guidance city states in order to even get that $300 from the federal government What it needs to make a commitment to pay that $100 so reading from the order is not entirely clear how this would be implemented states to be able to move around Suns that they've already allocated and other portions of their budget. But it's something that Republicans and Democratic governors have in a way Stern's about and where additional funding, for example, would come for schools and other items that may need to fund in the fall. Do the president's actions really have as much power as he's saying they do? Yeah, another question that debate as well. We'll see how the $400 program hands out here. It already seems like there's a great deal of confusion over at the other is the executive order on renters. The one with the curb. Eviction is unclear whether that really has much Keith because it doesn't say that it's going to stop affection, just orders the federal government and federal agencies to attempt to slow these down, so that's one thing we're hearing from Democrats on Capitol Hill over the weekend and today after the president sign, he's memoranda, and these orders is they don't really carry much weight, but they don't really have a Keith as some of the supporters of these orders. ABC is Katherine

President Trump Executive Donald Trump ABC Katherine Walters White House Federal Government Senator Ben Sasse Kayleigh Mcenany Keith Press Secretary Congress Catherine Sass Nebraska Senator Mary Stern Washington
"sass" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"It's. Crazy like it shows that rock and roll. This is still alive. How many videos have you done over like a God? Since, I started rock girls, just stories. It's like what I earned. It was two videos a day now. It's like five to seven videos a week, so it's probably. Or hundred. Stories! And more we shot the next three months. Where at the Stop so we already go? So who so hold on said. Goodbye good by the way because I'm the post production guy, so that's why he jumped out this, but anyway carry on. Sorry. It takes Greg like we'll be. We'll be lucky if you're episode. Comes up before we find a cure. or Four for covert. Nineteen. I want to ask you this actually. Like. How why how did you get started in? In doing this why? Like. Why this don't you know you could blog easier? He could take a photo and upload it. You made these, and it's not just you videos like you're putting together. You'd have to research. You'd probably have to put together a script. You gotta find all the images and videos like. Y. The big question is why. Well the. Easy answers I passionate about it and I. I love doing like And You know the whole thing really started in twenty, seventeen, twenty, sixty I had started as it goes channel. I and I started doing these star news videos about Ben because they reunited and then I started doing these true story episodes EPA stories about and people really liked it, but you can only do so many stories on a bad right run out of stories and I was trying with the idea of a rock roll stories channel because there are some channels do that stuff, but more like the history of this band. They don't get in a specific episodes about like living color loss. Do History in color see normally get everything or specific details. And I feel like I don't know if you guys live in east right like about -Tario. Alberta. Spent the last couple years feel really volatile from a career point of view. And I, just feeling like I needed something creatively to to kind of put my attention towards where I'm kind of just doing everything on my own I. Don't have to go through this whole. Bureaucratic structure with red tape so that's kind of I started. Admit really enjoying it a lot. His a lot of freedom like especially with coded on the I. Never Thought Kobe what happened, but now that the able to keep doing this work from home. It's Nice because you talk about your career I. Mean at the risk of really signing.

Greg EPA Alberta Ben
"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

08:20 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"House wine. In the Green Room at night because I felt that. We should as Canadian show. We should have a Canadian wine in in our green room and Lo and behold. Some fantastic wines grown right in Niagara. Niagara. and. So that's how I. Originally got involved with Brian and we kept in touch over the years. And one day I woke up. I. Would this idea in my mind? This is how stuff always happens to me. I wake up in the morning and it comes into my head and I wouldn't be pulled to make a wine. Love Nico Wine I love wine wouldn't be cool to express it that way. And I thought well who the I wouldn't. I haven't the faintest idea how to get into the wine business. Just as I hadn't the faintest idea to get into music business and I thought well Kudo I. Know who knows anything about Wine Cana? Oh, my friend Brian, so he said come on down. To the vineyard and let's have lunch and looks. Listen Scott and. I can see. Where would I go grind? Who Toy talk to you? What's the first move I would make? He said come on down. We'll discuss it so me and my manager Peter Down and we're having a fabulous lunch with my dear friend Brian who's just one of the greatest people ever? In my opinion and we're talking about all kinds of stuff. Blah, blah, blah, Blah and all listen I remember wait. I'm here to find out. who or how would I go about making a wine? Price say this to Brian and Brian looks at me and he goes back. We're GONNA make wine. Don't worry about it, and then he changes subjects and talking. To. Each other like what the F. to happen. Watch. I can't think of anything I thought I would start. Like here, you have a great. Many of these two together, and then you can talk to the first person, and then after that you can talk I had no idea I was going to go straight into it and. That was the genesis of my wine journey so far, and it has been nothing but a pure delight. And very successful. I. It's been a fantastic expense. Yeah, all round. So, SAS not only. Are you in Greg Musicians. Lovers of wine. You've both been managed by Jake. Gold Well, now Greg. shared what was. It would've been huge Solo. No no, that was, that would've been with the initials I N. B. We're back, then analyze. It was. Sorry. Go ahead, go ahead. Yeah, it was when it was when the hip were just about to release the first album and I think we opened up for visa V at Lee's palace and one of Jake's. Kick, myself I can't remember name longtime ago. saw US Open for vis-a-vis at least Alice and Nelly. I think so. Yeah and am said Jake, you gotTA. Talk to these guys, so jake sent us down the road. Um, well, they were releasing the hippo. Well what do you know? This is way before my time. Of course, that's when I was in the state. I don't really know I. It's funny. In those days when you live in Los, Angeles, you were pleat. We cut off from anything Canadian. was just like a distant memory. But that time. So I. I heard they rumblings about jake gold and they will never good. Back in those days I to my. Ten Am my American record, label. At the time. and then how I met Jake was to Canadian idol. How was that for you? A fabulous I mean it was. It was absolutely amazing. We had the greatest time ever it was is a blast. But I didn't really know much about Jake when I met him. And he had a heck of A. I found out later on hack of a reputation. The. but he was. I we always have best time together. And she was terrific when I was with him, and I loved the guys like a brother in so many ways, and he's never been anything but fabulous of me because. I guess it was that. Was You know? The relationship that we have right from the start was because we learned even playing field Yeah. While you guys were with? Canadian idol. Any I. Don't remember where I can't remember the child I remember when it was cancelled, and that was shocking to me because it was, it was a huge ratings, said far as I remember. Were there any axe bands? Musicians came out of that. That, made it big at least nationally. Do you remember? Out of Canadian idol Yeah Oh my goodness. Yes, Oh what's his name? was a huge scandal within two. Oh God. Jake J J. Uh Oh! Okay! Well, let me see. Thank you, Ladies and gentlemen. I have. This is. Jason, Jake Jacob hogarth take him home guard. I got it and so his band, whatever I can't remember the name of that, either, but because you know Henry Headley Hadley. Yeah, but but but that, but he was a comp- contestant on Canadian idol. So Ham! There was Melissa O'Neil, who became she was A. She won the show and she. is now a pretty. Successful, actress, On a show called the rookie. But she was on a show, called dark matter, and she also did Broadway and she's actually a phenomenon. I think she's my. One of my favorite singers from now show that six years of that show. Oh Carly Rae Jepsen. I didn't know she was there, okay. Oh my God, yeah! I was the one that said you are star. This is many many moons ago and it was before she was one so so so. Jacob hoggard a whole guard or whatever is had Lee at. Melissa O'Neil Carly Rae Jepsen I think those are the biggest one, but there are other people that did that have done a lot of stuff that. has done quite well. Yeah, and you'll have to forgive me for not being up on it because I just you know. Nowhere else you live your life. You talked about acting. You had the acting bug once upon a time. No I did not I. I never had the acting bug. That's actually not true. What happened was I was asked to do these things and I and and I thought Oh, well anything that sounds fun to me. I'll. I'll do I mean anything if it sounds fun and it doesn't scare me all. The time I should be scared. I should have been scared. I was a hole for not being scared, but because I wasn't scared. I, get it..

Jake Brian Carly Rae Jepsen jake gold Green Room Jake J J. Niagara Lee Jake Jacob hogarth Melissa O'Neil Peter Down Lo Greg Musicians Jacob hoggard Scott Henry Headley Hadley Alice Greg. Los TA
"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

08:39 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Can you tell me about working with Stevie? I've I've recently. I've probably heard a bunch of stuff but I recently. Have, discovered Dick who he is and stuff. and. He's someone had loved to to chat with. Other park has but tell me about working with him I. Really I can get you in touch of that'd be awesome. Are you kidding me? He'd be thrilled. Trust me, Oh my goodness. Yeah okay. I'll get you that inflation. Tell you about him, he he. He. Was Pistol that kid. He was a pistol. And It was. It was very intense and it was an intense time in my career to I. Mean it was like the early nineties? When we worked together. The most And I, as common with. A lot of artsy people. There's a lot of emotionality and it's not necessarily the easiest thing that you'll ever do. That's putting it mildly. So yeah, I mean he's an extremely talented guy. That's for sure yeah. Yeah there's I. Don't know if it's just you or other artists have a bunch of these, but you've got the best rock ballads. Believe Sun's GonNa rise. You don't have to remind me. I'll written stevie. All say Oh, my goodness! Okay. Yep. Are Those. Like I'm curious what your favorite type of song to sing for you is. No. Ballads I. It's funny. How interesting that you say that because I think I'm one of the most the least. I'm one of the artists the least amount of ballots in their in their catalog. I I'm not. Generally Jurong just slower stuff it's it's it's more. Oh God that's. Something that I don't know how to say how to articulate this properly. To me I think one of the main things that I was drawn to with rock type music. was that it was a very. Powerful outlet. Anger. And first saw him and it which is best. voided from the body, too. Heavy faster. Sound. You know! When you! And I it's it's it's. It's easy to divest yourself of. This intense anger that a lot of were born with. Store like what the Arkham I doing here. Pardon my language. But and when you get into a ballad, you're getting into the much sort of deeper in the sense of more vulnerable side, and that more difficult to. To share, even though in the end got what people really want well, they won't both they won't vote. You know I like both but I. I'm very particular about a ballot because I have to be able to bring it every night to be able to relate to it every night and and. It and it's not just the energy of the crowd that will get you through the song with a ballot. It's you also have to reach into the very deep. Emotional vulnerable side of yourself. Yeah? So I. I WANNA. Ask you this. You know this is A. We talked about you know during this past three months it's it's sort of forced everyone to. Stop slowdown. Smell the roses if you will. One. And the Shit's Oh. That is so true, isn't it? Yes, it is, but that's. Out of so. Are. Some curious if if you are. Writing songs if you're thinking about the type of music, you WanNa you WANNA create, is it? Is it. The angry stuff is the sentimental stuff right now. I'm wondering about that Oh. Wow, what a great question! I liked question. Okay and because. Fascinating Lee enough. I haven't felt even the slightest twinge. Or urge. To Express. Through music. In the not. How Weird Wow. Yep isn't that interesting and I think it's because. It's a jess station period. Because so much is changing so rapidly I have not yet come to the point where I'm going to be able. To. Translate this into my expression because I. Don't know really what I think yet. It's still in the state of. One day. It says the next day is that it's a a a a sensation of flux. I I. Don't know what the hell is happening and I don't know how I feel about it. Yet are just. Surface stuff. Yeah, so it's like you're you're you realize you're not writing necessarily right now? You're not angry. With that fact, you're not happy with that factor like okay. This is interesting. Yeah, completely good with it. Okay, everything feels exactly right. I really want to do another record of this blue stuff in completely enamored with that right now. And I don't have to write. The song are already written. You know what I mean unless I unless unless I come to a point where I'm ready to express. In this. in. In this frame and this framework. That's coming out of. Something I'm making up. you know but other than that. The the. The Blues. Music that's already out there I can take all these feelings so I've been having in the past three months. and. Find a song that expresses it perfectly. Emotionally and that's. I'm more interested in that right now. At this moment, which will change because I'm an artist. You know the, but this is how it's. It's just it's. Meeting journey to me and I'm good with it I'm good with it in every which way? Okay, it's good. That's good to me. I know I've asked you about musical collaborations. One of the collaborations I wanted to ask you because I'm in the wine business is your collaboration with Brian Vineland? You're the wind we need. I'm sorry. We need talk baby do. After. We gotTA talk. I was interested in knowing more about how you got involved with Brian Vineland and the collaboration I'm not. Well, how involved was back in the Canadian idol? Days I got. I I was introduced to him. By, the familiar at the hotel, I always stayed at, and she was the first person who introduced me to Canadian wine. That was in my opinion drinkable, not only was it drinkable. It was great because before that I like most of us, you know. Was Unaware that Canada produce any wine. That was drinkable. was just you know shit? Basically everything that I had tasted and so Brian. Was My mentor. And not and I got hit. I got. A vineland states wine.

Brian Vineland Stevie vineland Dick Jurong Arkham Canada Lee
"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"My sweet Lord. That just shows you the. Level of. Pay. But Anyway He goes. We'll even know. The notes were. In the know. On the base and you can just. We just saw a GIG in two weeks per sure did whatever I can do it. And so I did. I'm quite sure that I. IT sucked royal balls, but nobody seemed to notice a care. And then I of course started getting better because we kept playing and playing and playing and playing into landed upping Shirley good at it until. Broke up the band in nineteen eighty. One or eighty I can't remember whatever it was again a hot minute or go now. And then I put down the base and I just concentrated on because it was much easier to carry a voice around than it was to carry a base and it wasn't really. The ease, the best way for me to express. What I need to express if to my voice. What was what was the the the to move into vocals? They start working with a number of axiom that time into the next few years. What was it like around? The Montreal seen at that point that assuming error in the Montreal seeing that time Oh, yeah! I'm like you know like it again. This fast forwarding a few years, but like one of my favorite bands a Montreal. The box like it was a real, you'll san happening around that time I was hoping to touch on that a bit well. Yes, full so the PINUPS, which is the man that I was the bass player and singer in. coasting because we had a lead singer and I was the other lead. There were to leave him. was very much. What was called at at the time new ways? It was called new wave music. I Rana clearly what was included under that banner were bands that you would never know million years put under that banner today like Tom Petty and cheap trick and You know stuff like that, we we did the stones, and the WHO and the cause and Blondie and all that type of stuff And the box actually was more mid eighties. Right, so the scene that I was in live with the new wave stuff or depend on was an extremely healthy bar scene, and we toured in most of the time we and come back and the maritimes first time I ever went to New Zealand. Land was the pen on, and they were still fishing the cod back then. Oh. Yeah Oh my God, this stuff I'm telling you us. That happened. anyways it was. So that'll happen, and then when I disbanded when I left depend on. An eighty one I eighty one I and decided I just wanted to go full time. Singing and I wanted to be a solo artist because I didn't want to have to deal with band bollocks anymore. For the word the word naive comes? Like. What was it I mean? When you tour, you tour. It's a band. Out How. Was it about actually being any band. Well being being part of a band where it's more like a a a a a democracy. which we all know doesn't really exist. It it's it's a lot tougher because you have to come to agreement as as a group. You know and so if you have to against to, it gets very sticky and a ball. You know pain in the ASS, so as a solo artist hiring band while the band has been hired by you, so they're gonNA. Do what you say. You see what I'm saying. You're the boss Sarah Enough and that was probably. A Better Position For me knowing my personality. Yeah Yeah. So you. Did you know. Were you a I know? You did a lot of work with in the box, were you? Know. I was a backup singer so. Yeah? We were hired to do the show through the license I sang. On one of the record I I did some backup someone who the records closer together, which is a big records for them, but ironically although. Although the video. Stars me and not. Who was the other thing at the time? It stars us in another trip featured in the video those box closer together, but in fact it is not knee singing. Singing on that track. It's not it's it was it was a? really successful and well known at the time, because singer by the name of consent Clive. She is the one who who actually sang on that track. How was it going slowly? There was no back. Yeah! That's true I think that song I think of the. That's your voice that I'm hearing well. Yeah, because it's so misleading because of the video and the video was a big huge video. So you know it makes sense I mean I understand why people would have thought that I would have thought that sure. But I cannot take credit. Videos, is something that is. Almost, coming gone, it was. The DODO? Yeah, yes, it used to be like if you got on in. If you've got on much music. You know you had made it. Yeah and now it's like what what's much showed videos like. Now Yeah I exactly how how important was was much music for artists back in the day. It was huge. It was everything it was everything MTV much music, but it was. It was huge, and that's really how I became known pretty much overnight. was when my first video came out and got got put into high rotation because it was Canadian content. Yup and there wasn't a whole lot of it at the time because this was early days. In the late eighty well late eighties.

Montreal Sarah Enough New Zealand Tom Petty Shirley MTV Rana Blondie
"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"World is a massive blocks. I see change. Complete and total on every level, not commensurate economic economic on every single level. that. We know of in our modern life. Everything is changing. And and rapidly to I mean you know right when you think you're getting use for something? He changes again, you know. And, what are humans more freedom than Cain? and. And, yet what can we count on Ward and Change? Let's say. There's a stability unchain. Yeah, it's true though, isn't it? I mean it's so. So the gender thing I just. At, this point, I don't see any any reason to change the original gender. That song was written and it was. It's not even for the most part I would say. The songs aren't about a gender their about a feeling and emotion that is. Actually the same across any gender. You know whatever because you know. There are five or something right? Yes. There's more than one or two I'm just saying. Anyway, so yeah and. At this, point it almost. Doesn't seem to have any. Meaning anymore gender. In a lot of ways with that's bullshit, but I said but. I mean at certain levels of it sure. Yeah let's go way back. To. To I guess when you sort of discovered. Not, just that you liked music, but that you'd like to claim music. As I was doing some research, there was one song that really had. A huge impact on you. And that was a song by the band the night they drove Erin. Dixie Dan, can you? I had a chance to go. See I think it was. Last September I went to tiff. And I went to sleep. That I went to see that Robertson the band movie. Oh wait. Not The old one, no, the one that he just released documentary of the documentary. Brothers Yeah Oh my goodness. I need to see that so good is a really neat to see that Oh anyway. I don't know it was it was it was a great and obviously the songs, and and they've just got songs are so timeless, but I'm really curious. What did that song due to you, don't if? That? I for yes I can. That's like that was a seminal moment in my in my life so i. definitely remember, but it was more about. Up until that time I think was about years old up. Until that time I had been very sequestered in my little bubble of life with my parents who are British emigrants. in Canada and we had just spent a year in India. We lived in India for a year and I have had been only with my parents and the only music my parents ever listened to was classical. I had also been exposed to You know different types of Indian music while I was in India. which was absolutely mesmerizing and very powerful for me? And then when we got home. Back to Canada, but my brother and I discovered he could change the dial on the radio and instead of classical music. Come out all of a sudden. This sound came out and what I think I remember. The most about that song could have been any song, guys. But it happened to be that one. It was the drums the sound of drums. And Electric Guitars. And this kind of. Very intense, Luzi feel. which I now know, that's what it was at the time. I had no idea it was just a completely different sound from what I had been used to, and I felt like that. It was like that. Is it now that? I have to do this. I have to make sounds like that. Wow, that's what I gotta do. Yeah, so it wasn't even about. A lyric it wasn't about which of course in later days became paramount in a lot of ways. Although nothing ever takes away from the wisdom. And Well the rhythm of a song from me I mean that's really. Live will dictate. The story to me most of the time you know and the chords and the coral structure, but it was really it was the fact that. That it had beeped. And and these drums these guitars. It was that it was like never heard anything like that. and. You also I. That would be your first. That song was sort of your. I love of music and I know. Your first concert was was a Bowie concerts in fact the F.. Yeah! That's crazy. I like! It was a diamond. Dogs Tour Montreal Forum, which is now long gone. Yeah! I saw many concerts there, and I even played there before it was destroyed. Thank God because it was such an important part of my childhood. It was part of setting me on this world of music as well Yeah, it was. The diamond dogs tour. Holy Hannah I. Winner group opened and Winter Group. Oprah Oh wow. Come women take a free. chiller did. How old were you when you went to that show? Thank. I would have been. He Sh- on. Let's thirteen, twelve or you're. Playing music. So now you're not gonNA. No fourteen was the not hold that the whole Shebang started and we sort of just. I knew what I wanted to do. I had no idea how to go about doing it I. didn't have the first clue I don't think. I mean it was a very very different time. There were pterodactyls at that time. It was. It was just a completely different landscape. I mean anyone. Days couldn't understand it unless they lived through it, you know. So it started by I, had these friends and they played guitars and these, and then they started playing the songs of the day on the guitars, and we started seeing long me and my best friends at theriault. Vicki and.

India. Canada Cain Ward Montreal Dixie Dan Erin theriault Robertson Vicki Winter Group Sh
"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Fit I didn't say. I didn't. Just using that word, I'm like. Yeah It's a great. It's a great feeling. Reading vibe to it like. What was? What was the process in wing? Something not different but a little. It is different in the sense that it's. It's a lot more Classic Type Blues Approach to the Blues Nice I've done before I WANNA guys 'cause it's like. Here might going back to a real root. Of Music, because I consider blues and jazz and classical to be the new of everything we do musically I mean those are the true roots. And here I am going back to like. A A real root. Of Music. In a time when I think. People! Are Sick. And tired. Of! Any kind of artifice. Out there, I this music is very. Authentic. and. It's it's very stripped down. It's not You know it's not all parted up. It's not. the word I want is like there's no icing on. The cake is just the cake you know with with pure organic ingredients in it. There's no farting around in it and I think it's so bizarre the timing of it. It just came out right now. When that's what we need, we want to hold on to to something authentic. That's feels. Like it has a root in something sort of depend on, you know. It's It's Kinda spectacularly. You hear more of that. Do you think we're going to hear more of that moving forward from like? Other connections and lake musicians really going back to two more the basics, but the roots of the basic some Yeah, no, you're right, it is it is the basic it is. I. Can you know what it's so difficult for me? To. Say what anyone else is GonNa. Do I I really don't know I. I think it's entirely up. There's nothing wrong. With other kinds of music I mean there's nothing wrong with it at all this trim package of my favorite word tremendous. artists in all kinds of music in all kinds of music and there's authentic artists. Everywhere it's you know, but it's I just I it. It actually seems to have been a trend that happened. That was starting to happen already. To be on it, that's that's the way I see it Nice Sas. I have to ask you this question because it sounds like you're in paradise. Appearing birds, you immunity more heard sounds and I have and I'm on the man a tool, and right now so i. you're you're. You're you're on the MANITOU and island? Oh my God. I am so jealous. I'm just in the backyard. Sitting outside, talking I like looking at cheese and stuff that was like a lovely backyard. Oh it is it's it's it is the heavenly nice seven on earth I say. There's a lot of that on this earth, but we just gotten so far away from it, and this is our reset button, kids. Choice. That is true. That is so. you said something about this album. I sort of want you to sort of unpack a you said. I find that not messing with the original gender is particularly relevant in today's climate. Well Yeah. I mean if you look. At. boy. That's so deep. I have to find a way to. Our leaders digest my thoughts on that because that could be an entire podcast. That way back when before the album was even released. Yes absolutely right. And Says interesting sorry go ahead. So in today's climate because everything. Feel like. There's just a I'm a huge amount of confusion. Over gender? Over Roll over expectations. Of of. You know the roles of genders. I it..

"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"sass" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"So my initial reaction was. Well! Tell you the truth. This is actually. Great in a way because I feel that people are gonna be spending a whole heck of a lot more time at home. And looking for something to do. And in fact I think this is actually probably better. It actually gives the the the record a real. Chance because. Nobody's got anything else to do you know I obviously they do, but you know what I'm saying. It's like it. It's like you know. I'm GONNA be playing. I'm going to be listening to music checking out stuff I have ever had the time to do. Pardon me. You know so it's like. In the end for me I think it was actually. In in that sense, it was helpful rather than a negative thing. How how have you pivoted in terms of supporting the album release with this new reality now? See. Ordinarily what I would have done is exactly what we're doing right now. We've been talking to people about it. Whoever wanted to hear about it and I would eventually. Started touring behind it. I am still I'm still talking to people non stop. It's like incredible and I think and obviously the touring part will be happening in the future at an undisclosed at this moment date, 'cause who helped who the hell knows, but it will happen, and you know 'cause you can't keep us down forever, kids. Later so, yeah, yeah! So in the end. Really that. Much of a disruption, it was very much disruption for tour. That was already. happening. Already, you know. Playing shows and stuff like that that was that was brutal. But, other than that you know everything's been postponed to next year most of it. I think there's some stuff still in October and November spot. Who knows right and you know? Who knows, that could go away as well or get PERSPEC- as well so. Yeah? You must be happy though with the Success Afar rebel moon blues. Tremendous Yeah Mendez I sound like. Trump..

Majority of Americans who lost a job or wages due to COVID-19 concerned states will reopen too quickly

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Majority of Americans who lost a job or wages due to COVID-19 concerned states will reopen too quickly

"Well with unemployment numbers skyrocketing you would think that people who recently lost their jobs would want businesses re opened a sass survey by the nonpartisan pew research center says sixty eight percent of respondents who suffered pay cuts or lost their jobs they they don't want states to rush to reopen while sixty nine percent of people whose pay has not been impacted echoed that sentiment saying they're concerned states will open too quickly the survey also indicated those who felt the economic impact of the coronavirus personally are more likely to say restrictions in their region need to increase overall the survey found nearly one in five Americans blame the coronavirus for their job

Pew Research Center
The Most Impactful Marketing Article Neil & Eric Read for 2020

Marketing School

04:23 min | 2 years ago

The Most Impactful Marketing Article Neil & Eric Read for 2020

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them. To a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream. Host DOT COM slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about the most impactful marketing article that needle and I have read for twenty twenty so I'll go first and Neil. You can feel free to chime in but one thing I read the other night. It's from this guy named J. J. A. Y. Couso Oh it's a C. U. N. Z. O. I think butchering the name again. I mentioned it to episodes ago if you Google Marketing. Show runners experience steph troms. You'll be able to find what I'm talking about and I think this is probably one of the most important things I've read in a while because you realize that everyone talks about especially. We talked about this on the PODCASTS. All the time we talk about Oh you have to produce content yet to produce content produce content but like you realize that there's just like this entire sea of garbage content and people are just producing CONTO CON. It's very transactional people are doing. Keyword research on Uber suggest whatever it is and it's just they're covering the answer right there but the problem is create transactional content. What happens is people? Come they get the answer and they leave. And that's it bounced that's it right whereas if you create an experience transactions the first part of the spectrum on the very far end of the spectrum as you take people on a journey right. It's about eight thousand words or so but it caused me to rethink everything we do right. It's okay how good are we? Driving an experience with our blogs with our podcast with the events that Neil and I do they're all at different ends of the spectrum like the products that I put together right or products that Neil does too. It's all about the experience. And if you don't create a good experience if you don't obsess over customer near contents do anything so in that post it was actually talking by making like a show that people love like marketing podcast. Which is funny. Because there's no mention of us and I'm like men may be were very transactional podcasts. I don't know but part of me thinks dot what we've been able to do with this is to be able to take people we've been able to build a community around it so the community is right before the journey right so it's literally you have a transactional of content. That's the first step. The second tier might be. You have an expert so I mentioned an expert might be like a sports analyst so I hear might be sports scores. The second one might be a sports analyst giving you the scores and that might give a little more authority there but then you cross over to building a community so at community example might be Neil night doing the growth accelerator group that we have right that is creating experience. That's creating a bond. That's very hard to duplicate anywhere else. And the beyond that. You're taking people on a journey so I really think everyone should read this at listening to this because it will reframe how you think about things and caused you to think twice about going out there and producing content for condensate. Because that's why a lot of stuff doesn't grow doesn't grow that quickly. It's because it's very ho-hum US neil yet. So my favorite article for the year so far and session at article two video but it's on marketing is Russell Brunson's Ot owes of your on Youtube search for Russell Brunson. Oto otiose stands for a one time offer and he breaks down no matter what kind of products service you're selling SASS product subscription ECOMMERCE. It doesn't matter you can make money through a upsell upon your checkout and you can have multiple works so well do you do it. Yeah and you guys already all know this so I'm not gonNA say hey you need add up saw because everyone already knows that but what he does. He breaks the copy. You should use. You don't have to be as aggressive as him. He breaks down the layout. You should use and what you need. A copy step-by-step and it just works and it's an easy way to make more money and it's not rocket science. I everyone can do it. It's super simple if you guys have a website your website because a chance. Are you trying to sell something? Or people subscribe something or generate a lead and his process teaches you the exact page to us to make more money from whatever type of business you have doing up cells right and people. Can I mean if you guys want to see examples of this you can go to click funnels DOT COM and Russell? Brunson actually has an active challenge called the one funnel away challenge and in there. You can basically WanNa buy his product You County. You can basically funnel him. That's a term that he uses to see how that one time offer works. So yeah I mean I think both contexts pieces

Russell Brunson Neil Patel You County Analyst Marketing School Google United States DOT J. J. A. Y. Couso Eric Su Youtube