35 Burst results for "Saskatchewan"

"saskatchewan" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on WTOP

"Set a suspect had been caught. I want to reassure the community. That 19 year old Ezekiel Kelly is, in fact, in custody. No word on a motive. Police in Canada say they capture the last suspect in a stabbing rampage that killed ten people and wounded 18, but miles Sanderson died in custody. CBS was Christmas. He crashed into a ditch ending 72 hours of anxiety and terror for the province of Saskatchewan and his death leaves police with nagging unanswered questions. The biggest one? Why? Yet another arrest. This time in Nevada, where Las Vegas review journal reporter Jeff garman was stabbed to death. Police say Clark county public administrator Robert tell us, is expected to face a murder charge after being hospitalized with self inflicted wounds. Garman had reported on alleged bullying and tell his office and a relationship he was having with a coworker. Tell us subsequently lost a bid for reelection. Today's the day, Donald Trump's former adviser, Steve Bannon turns himself in and a fraud case. Correspondent Scott mcfarlane. His court appearance in New York today is just the latest legal battle for Steve Bannon being prosecuted locally years after being prosecuted by the feds for allegedly taking money from a nonprofit for the border wall and spending it on personal expenses. He was pardoned by former president Trump in that case. He's also still facing sentencing, convicted at trial of contempt of Congress for snubbing the January 6th committee. FDA advisers are now recommending a controversial and experimental drug to treat ALS more than 6 months after they voted against it. CBS News medical contributor, doctor David agus. His turnaround is certainly important, and now the FDA has to decide whether they listen to this new advisory committee recommendation actually allow the drug to be marketed. Are you ready for some football? Correspondent Steve futterman in Los Angeles. The

Ezekiel Kelly Steve Bannon Las Vegas review journal Jeff garman Robert tell Scott mcfarlane Sanderson Garman Saskatchewan CBS Clark county Nevada Canada Donald Trump David agus FDA New York ALS Congress CBS News
Official: Suspect in Canada stab rampage died after arrest

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Official: Suspect in Canada stab rampage died after arrest

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting the final suspect in a Canada stabbings rampage died after being arrested A tense three day manhunt in Canada for a suspect in a weekend stabbing rampage that left ten people dead and 18 wounded ended Wednesday near Rothschild's Saskatchewan This evening Our province is breathing a collective sigh of relief Assistant commissioner Rhonda blackmoore of the Royal Canadian mounted police For information provided stated miles Sanderson was standing outside of a residence northeast of waka and was armed with a knife As authorities responded to 32 year old suspect miles Sanderson sped off in a stolen vehicle but he was eventually forced off the road He was arrested by police and taken into custody After being arrested Sanderson went into medical distress and later died Authorities had discovered the body of the other suspects Anderson's brother 30 year old Damien Sanderson on Monday The RCMP is investigating if miles Sanderson killed his brother I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Sanderson Rhonda Blackmoore Royal Canadian Mounted Police Canada Rothschild Saskatchewan Damien Sanderson Anderson Rcmp
Second suspect in deadly Canada stabbing spree is apprehended, officials say

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Second suspect in deadly Canada stabbing spree is apprehended, officials say

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting a Canadian official says the final suspect that a stabbing rampage is dead at his own hand 32 year old miles Sanderson the final suspect in a deadly stabbing rampage in Canada died of self inflicted wounds Wednesday after his car was run off the road by police according to an official who spoke on condition of anonymity The Royal Canadian mounted police said Sanderson was tracked down near the town of Rothschild's Saskatchewan after police received a report of a stolen vehicle being driven by a man armed with a knife Sanderson had been the subject of a three day manhunt following

Mike Gracia Sanderson Royal Canadian Mounted Police Canada Rothschild Saskatchewan
Suspect arrested in Canada stabbing attack

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Suspect arrested in Canada stabbing attack

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting Canadian police arrest the second suspect in a stabbing rampage Authorities in Canada say the second suspect in a stabbing rampage that left ten people dead was arrested Wednesday afternoon in Saskatchewan The arrest of 32 year old miles Sanderson ended a three day manhunt that included the discovery of the body of the other suspect Sanderson's brother 30 year old Damian Sanderson on Monday The Royal Canadian mounted police are investigating if miles Sanderson killed his brother Miles Sanderson surrendered Wednesday after

Mike Gracia Sanderson Damian Sanderson Saskatchewan Canada Royal Canadian Mounted Police Miles Sanderson
Family says traumatic loss, not suspects' motive, is the story

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Family says traumatic loss, not suspects' motive, is the story

"A close knit community in Saskatchewan is grieving after a series of deadly stabbings The deaths of ten people in Canada is raising questions about why the main suspect with 59 previous convictions was on the streets in the first place but saskatoon tribal leader Mark arkan says his family's story is about the victims First nation's culture the matriarchal society She lived that He says his half sister Bonnie burns and her son Gregory were killed and another son was stabbed She was protecting her son Arcan rushed to the James Smith Cree nation reserve the morning of the rampage We shed a lot of tears in the last couple of days Audio courtesy CTV I'm Jennifer King

Mark Arkan Matriarchal Society Saskatchewan Bonnie Burns Arcan Canada James Smith Cree Nation Reserv Gregory CTV Jennifer King
"saskatchewan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:50 min | 3 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Deceased party, but didn't confirm an identity or cause of death. Surveillance video showed lies a Fletcher being abducted last Friday while she was running near the university of Memphis. President Biden says union workers were the reason why he was elected to office decades ago when he was 29. I wouldn't be here without cops firefighters teachers, nurses. I wouldn't be here without painters pilots auto workers, custodians, carpenters, grocery store workers. Speaking in Milwaukee, Biden touted his infrastructure legislation and the improvements that will be made, including to the labor sector of the country. One of the two men suspected in stabbing attacks that killed ten people in Canada is dead. Police in Saskatchewan say the body of Damien Sanderson was found Monday. His brother miles is still at large. I'm Brian shook. And I'm Brian Curtis in Hong Kong. Let's get you caught up on this hour's top business stories and the markets. OPEC plus has unexpectedly decided to cut oil output in October. The 100,000 barrel per day cut is the first in more than a year. After the meeting, Saudi Arabia said that the group will remain proactive, and crude oil is trading around $89 a barrel after that announcement. Russia may be facing a longer and deeper recession than previously thought. Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini has the story. Two of the three scenarios in a new internal report say it could take Russia's economy at least a decade to recover after an intensifying slowdown. The report prepared by government officials and experts says U.S. and European sanctions are really hitting Russia where it hurts and handicapping the sectors Russia has relied on for years to power its economy. The report also says as many as 200,000 IT specialists could leave Russia by 2025. Taiwan will resume Visa free entry for travelers from countries with which it shares diplomatic relations. But it will maintain a three day quarantine requirement. And China says it will accelerate its stimulus rollout in the third quarter. This as it tries to recover from a second quarter that was marred by pandemic related losses. Yang yin Kai, whose deputy secretary general at the national development and reform commission spoke at a briefing and said it is crucial at this time. Let's check the markets, the CSI 300 in China is flat today. The hang seng index is trading down about a third of 1%. The nikkei is flat. We are seeing gains in some markets like Taiwan with a Thai X's advanced about two tenths of 1%. Dalien one 40 46, the Aussie dollar 68.2 U.S. cents. Global news 24 hours a day, live and on Bloomberg quick take. In Hong Kong, I'm Brian Curtis. This

President Biden Russia Damien Sanderson Brian Curtis Brian shook university of Memphis Denise Pellegrini Fletcher Biden Milwaukee OPEC Saskatchewan Hong Kong China Saudi Arabia Bloomberg Canada Yang yin Kai
"saskatchewan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:08 min | 3 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're taking a deep dive into the generation that's got a lot of buzz. Generation Z I think some people more than others are change makers, obviously, but I think together collectively we want to make the world a better place. We're going to look at what makes this generation tick and there, vision for the future. I'm Melissa Harris Perry, and that's next time on the takeaway, weekly afternoon to three on 93.9 FM. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm a Martinez. Ten people are dead, and at least 15 others are injured following multiple stabbings in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The Royal Canadian mounted police are looking for two suspects in connection to Sunday's attacks. Here's Saskatchewan RCMP commanding officer Rhonda blackmore, talking yesterday at a press conference. At this stage in our investigation, we believe some of the victims have been targeted by the suspect and others have been attacked randomly. Police say people were stabbed in at least 13 different locations. Pick a jury is a Saskatchewan correspondent for the Canadian press joining us from the city of melfort. Mickey, what can you tell us about what happened yesterday? Thanks for having me. Well, so it started yesterday morning where the national police service had received a phone call regarding a stabbing that occurred on an indigenous first nation and one call led to another and eventually they reported that ten people were dead across 13 locations, another 15 people have been injured, but police believe that there could be more. And the stabbings occurred mostly in James Smith creation. It's a very small community up in the provinces north. It's located within a small farming community very rural, most of the roads here at gravel roads, and then another stabbing occurred about 20 minutes away from there in welded. And that also is a small town about 200 people, and I can say residents in the area are very much on edge as police across three provinces are searching for these two suspects. We heard earlier that some of the victims may have been targeted. What do we know about them? So police aren't giving as much, they're not even talking about motive at this point because they have said that they have reason to believe that some of the suspects, yes, we're targeted, but they also believe that some of the suspects were attacked randomly. They haven't answered any questions if this was a drug fueled or why these two individuals have done this. The suspects Damian Sanderson and miles Sanderson both share the last name. They also will not share the connection between the two men. I can say I'm staying in a hotel about 20 minutes away from the indigenous reservation and there is a heavy, heavy police presence. Officers from across the province have been deployed to the area and it really does look like a big manhunt. We mentioned that they had the same last name, but we still don't know if they're related, right? Right. I did speak to some witnesses in the area. They do say that they are brothers, but police have not confirmed that to media at this time. Okay, now the two alleged attackers are still in the loose. Do police have any idea about where they are or where they might be headed? Last we heard is that they were in Regina, which is the city's capital. Their vehicle that they allegedly has stolen was spotted in the city, which is about almost a four hour drive south of the location where these stabbings occurred. It kind of complicated things because on Sunday we had this huge football game in the area. And it's one of the biggest football games of the year. So police had asked everyone in the area to be alert and try to stay in their homes if they could. They're still advising people to do that. And they're also asking people and Manitoba and Alberta to be on the lookout. Mickey drew each is a Saskatchewan correspondent for the Canadian press, Mickey

Melissa Harris Perry NPR news Rachel Martin Rhonda blackmore Saskatchewan melfort national police service Royal Canadian mounted police RCMP Martinez Damian Sanderson James Smith miles Sanderson Mickey Regina football Mickey drew Manitoba Alberta Canadian press
"saskatchewan" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:32 min | 3 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on WBUR

"The water. And the big upset at the U.S. open tennis. First the news. Hello, I'm Neil Nunes with the BBC News. Voters in Chile have overwhelmingly rejected a new constitution that would have transformed the country's social and economic structure in a referendum 62% voted against the tax written to replace the constitution imposed by the military in 1980. Pounder Molina from BBC mundo said the scale of the rejection had come as a surprise. The reject by 62% of the votes, which is really something impressive in terms of what the polls have announced before. So it is a facet for president Gabriel bodied. But she has already announced that in Chile institute's work that democracy is stronger today and that they will begin to work in a new constitutional route one that will come out of an agreement between the political parties from the left and the center and that will take place in the Congress. Police in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan are searching for two suspects after ten people were stabbed to death, at least another 15 were wounded. The Royal Canadian mounted police are investigating 13 possible crime scenes, including the indigenous area of James Smith Cree nation, assistant commissioner Rhonda blackmore, gave more details at a news conference. Let me be clear, we are still looking for the two suspects. We are asking residents across Saskatchewan and our neighboring provinces to be vigilant. At this stage in our investigation, we believe some of the victims have been targeted by the suspect and others have been attacked randomly. The two suspects are Damian Sanderson and miles Sanderson. They are considered armed and dangerous. Hi, security is in place in Kenya where the Supreme Court is expected to deliver its judgment on a challenge to the results of last month's presidential election. The electoral commission declared the deputy president William Ruto the winner, but his rival Raila Odinga alleges the system was hacked to deduct some of his votes. A private jet with four people on board has crashed into the Baltic Sea after flying erratically across Western Europe, Sophie glass ran a ports. The cessna plane took off from her earth in southern Spain, heading for cologne in Germany, according to German media, it was carrying a pilot and a family of three. The build newspaper said the plane reported cabin pressure problems after taking off, and then lost contact as it left the Iberian Peninsula. The aircraft turned twice at Paris and cologne, then flew on past the Swedish island of gotland, the pilots of German and Danish warplanes sent to check on it, reported they were unable to see anyone in the cockpit or cabin. The private plane was later spotted spinning and crashing into the sea near the Latvian coast. This is the world news from the BBC. A Turkish warship has docked in an Israeli port for the first time in more than a decade. In a further sign of recently warming relations, a Turkish officials have the frigate was visiting Haifa as part of NATO maneuvers in the Mediterranean bilateral ties were shattered in 2010 when the Israeli military stormed a Turkish ship that tried to breach the blockade of the Gaza Strip. The British foreign secretary Liz truss is expected to be named as the leader of the governing Conservative Party and the next prime minister later on Monday. She's been ahead of the former Chancellor Rishi sunak in polls of party members throughout the campaign to replace Boris Johnson as our political correspondent Ian Watson. For Boris Johnson's successor, the time to campaign is over and it's time to govern as almost at hand. The new leader of the Conservative Party will be announced at lunchtime today and will give an acceptance speech its weighed the assumed the winner would be the pollster's favorite trust while some in the sunlight camps in the results will be close, then not predicting an upset. She will not, however, become prime minister until tomorrow when Boris Johnson travels to balmoral to resign to the queen and a more luck then asks his successor to form a government. It's expected the new cabinet would be unveiled and choose the evening. The power agreed operator in California has urged consumers to reduce their electricity usage as demand has

Neil Nunes Pounder Molina BBC mundo Gabriel bodied Chile Rhonda blackmore Saskatchewan Damian Sanderson miles Sanderson William Ruto Sophie glass BBC News Royal Canadian mounted police James Smith cologne Swedish island of gotland tennis Latvian coast Raila Odinga
"saskatchewan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:24 min | 3 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Communities in Saskatchewan. Police are looking for suspects in details are sketchy there. China extending COVID lockdowns in Chengdu for at least three more days. In Hong Kong, the health secretary denying reports there's a raging debate over whether to end hotel COVID quarantines, and in the U.S. healthcare workers are preparing to start giving out the new updated COVID-19 booster. Former president Donald Trump at a rally in Pennsylvania pushing back on President Biden has knocked on mega Republicans, Trump says making America great again would be great for America. Taiwan's foreign minister Joseph Wu says a Chinese invasion of Taiwan would be worse than Russia's attack on Ukraine, and in California grid emergency watches in effect crazy hot temperatures and wildfires proving a challenge there. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than a 120 countries. In the newsroom I'm Denise Pellegrini. This is Bloomberg Stephen. All right, thanks a lot, Denise. Let's return to our conversation now with Ryan nauman, a market strategist at zephyr. Thanks for holding the line there. Orion, obviously it's a long Labor Day weekend in the United States, so a lot of the focus will be on the Asia Pacific this Monday morning. Do you have a hot take for investing in the Asia Pacific? Obviously, as Denise just talked about the expanding COVID zero policies and lockdowns in China limiting growth there. But look at the king dollar with the yen at one 40 holding firm and also of course the yuan in China close to 7. What do you have a hot take? You know, I don't necessarily I wouldn't call it a hot take. I remain pretty cautious on the emerging markets and Asia right now. China had a Chinese equities had a fantastic run there during the second quarter. Really outperformed every other region. But there are some concerns there with COVID zero again. Like you just mentioned, but you also always have to be concerned about geopolitics, the risk there with Taiwan, so there's a lot of concerns there. I remain a little bit cautious. There could be some opportunities for some longer term time horizon investors buying some of those being up regions, but I remain cautious. We ran a couple of stories over the weekend about how Southeast Asia was kind of standing out as a safe zone. Have you looked at much of that region? A little bit. When I think of emerging markets, regardless of the region, you always have to be concerned about the U.S. dollar to the U.S. dollar is surging right now for multiple reasons. And that also plays into the role of why I'm a little bit cautious, but there could be some individual countries like you said that provide some opportunities for investors that are trying to diversify their portfolios and reduce some of the overall systematic risk. Ryan, what do you see for the fourth quarter? Are we going to be down on the S&P 500? Or will we get some sort of what I guess tailwind going into the next year? I don't think so. I think we are going to finish a little bit down. I don't see us being down 10% or 15%, but there are definitely some headwinds ahead with earnings. We haven't really seen a bunch of earnings. There are forecast change. So I think we're going to see some of that moving forward. But again, it's going to be the fed's higher interest rate softening U.S. economy that's going to continue to weigh on investor sentiment moving forward. I mentioned earlier that rising real yields are going to be a big challenge for corporates. Let's talk a little bit about what's affected the most by that. And where you see kind of more secure areas as a result. That's a great question. And obviously writing real yields on a macro level are going to negatively impact the economy, right? It's going to be tighter monetary policies, tighter financial conditions. More on the investment side, I think the first place you have to look at or is technology right, higher yields, higher real yields tend to impact those higher growth, higher valuation sectors. So would you be shorting there or would you just be avoiding? I wouldn't, I would just stay neutral to avoiding that. I want to short it necessarily. I think you just have to stay true to your investment objectives and not take any big wagers right now because of the uncertainties. But I definitely wouldn't be going overweight in technology right now. So where would you go? You cash. You know, cash is necessarily a bad thing. It considering what type of investor you are, but you have to look at alternatives. Maybe real estate REITs, even though housing real estate is really hurting right now. But you got to look at some alternatives out there. I think the outcome diversification to offset some of these rising real yields. All right. Ryan nauman, thanks so much for your insight on this Monday morning in Asia and

U.S. Taiwan President Biden China Joseph Wu Ryan nauman Denise Pellegrini Bloomberg Stephen Asia Pacific Denise Chengdu Donald Trump Saskatchewan zephyr Trump Hong Kong Bloomberg Ukraine
"saskatchewan" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

06:34 min | 6 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"Of politics. It would have to be would be like a deal breaker, but it'd be something we'd have to find out. And I'm assuming you're talking about finding this out before you start dating. After you find out your cousins. Well, no, it can be, it can be after you start to you guys know. We are just going to keep going. See my deal breakers, people don't respect time. Also one that I would be guilty of violating. Okay, well, thank you for engaging with my topic. All right. Deal breakers, holy cow. That would be interesting to do a whole episode about deal breakers. Okay, Ken, what's on your mind? Okay, what's on my mind is this. The university of Saskatchewan has done it again with an indigenous professor, this time on the other end of the spectrum. A real career who is a professor at the university of Manitoba was interviewed in an offered a job at the university of Saskatchewan. The interviewers were mostly other indigenous faculty at the university of Saskatchewan, and they know real family they know real quite well and they were very, very excited to offer him a job until higher ups the university said you need to prove your indigenousness with some paperwork. Okay, and he had none. Well, he didn't have because he's not because well, me too. There's no real let's put it this way. I think what the implication was, they wanted government paperwork of some kind. And the larger question is here. The panel that hired him and wanted him to work there were absolutely appalled by the university's administration making this need for him to prove his indigenousness. And so my thing is and how I want you guys to react to this is I just going back to something I've said before, again, how often is it that we as indigenous people have to be validated by a colonial structure above us to say, oh, this is indigenous, this isn't. All the time. Well, okay, so I thought the UFS had done it. We talked about it with Brock on a previous mini about how they brought in matey political group, which we were like, um, not so sure. Whether that's the way to go to help adjudicate or filter such applications, but in any case, as you say, higher ups who just decided to veto an indigenous candidate. Funny how that always works. Okay, on that end of things. Well, and it's not just vetoing the indigenous candidate, it's overriding the indigenous panel that wanted to hire. Exactly. Yeah. Which included my cousin winona Wheeler. So to me, but this is the burasa backlash. Is it not? Yes. Yes. As we know Carrie bourassa, high profile, public health, researcher, got a huge grant towards research share and then exposed as not being indigenous and stepped down and it was just an awful thing. So this is kind of like overly covering your ass. Yeah. So we go the extreme cutting off your ass despite your what? Sorry? Yeah. So in this case, no one gets hired. Wow, Kim, what do you think about all this? Said you heard about this? Oh, yeah. And I would rather talk about deal breakers. But yeah. I'm really interested. I'm really interested to hear from the insiders on the panel. I could be great if you could give a couple of them on Rick, although they probably can't, you can't talk about those internal process, the hiring process. The internal stuff. I mean, I read that article. I had a lot of questions after that article. I didn't like the framing. Was it a white person that wrote it? Who wrote the article? Yes, it was Jason ward. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I didn't like the framing at all. So I have a lot of questions about the internal dynamics. I mean, I've heard grumblings about the way these this committee work is going at you of S regarding vetting indigenous hires. I'm thinking about how we're going to do this that you have a so I had more questions than anything after I read that. And that's why I didn't choose that article. That topic to talk about. Do you think this will bring the whole concept? Of indigenous led vetting into disrepute? Because people aren't going to make the distinction. They're just going to say, oh my God. You went from the frying pan to the fire. Yeah, we knew this was not going to be easy. This is not going to be easy. And if we think that it was going to be easy to vet these cases, that's just not going to be the case. It's going to be a long process to figure out how to do this. And so that's why I'm really interested to know what the internal dynamics are, but around hiring, you can't talk about it. You know, people said somethings in that, yeah, and I do think if you've got community connected indigenous people on the committee with the emphasis on community connected, I don't mean traditional. I mean community connected, right? Then that should be the last word. I agree with that. I don't know what the dynamics are between that committee and the higher ups and administration who probably want cut and dried rules that they can put into a spreadsheet. You know, that's not how this stuff works. So it's going to be really tough to figure out how to do this. And I'm part of those conversations that you of a, and I'm really interested to figure out what the challenges are. I haven't. I've just gotten on to that committee at U of a. So I don't know yet. Well, it seems like when it comes to indigenous hires, we know what UFS deal breaker is. Written proof. Paperwork. Quote unquote. Yeah, yeah. Well, because it makes it, then they can wash their hands, right? And say, we did due diligence. With a piece of paper. Yeah. All right. Thank you, Ken. Okay, so my nugget is all about us leaving our mark specifically typography. It's on my mind because I just got an email promoting Asia shin, which translates to she or he leaves a mark in bemu. And this is actually the title of the first ever conference on native North American typography. And I like this because my interest in language revitalization includes literacy. And just what is typography? I had to look it up because I didn't want to just throw it around. According to monotype dot com, it's a collection of letters, numbers, punctuation, and other symbols used to set text or related matter. Although font and typeface are often used interchangeably, font refers to the physical embodiment, be it metal or digital, whereas typeface refers to the design, the way it looks, hosted by type director's club or TDC, the mid November event will facilitate conversation around the typographic needs of indigenous peoples and.

university of Saskatchewan winona Wheeler Carrie bourassa university of Manitoba Jason ward Ken Brock Kim Rick Asia TDC
"saskatchewan" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

04:48 min | 9 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on Unreserved

"That was the beginning. I remember a friend of mine whose dad used to work on the burial detail because he was also going to residential school. I think his dad was about 13 or 14 years old. And they would come on at night, to bear the baby, because they wouldn't do it during the day. They'd want their other children to see what was going on. But I guess he asked his dad, well, you know, do you know where they were buried, and says, well, they're very well over there. But basically they said, we've just buried them deep. That's where the blind kid from us buried them deep. These voices in my head they keep budding in. These are not my words. These are words that come to me from other people. My mother went through residential school in some of the stories come from my mom's stories. Come from people I've talked to all my lifetime. They may touch upon what the experience that residents in school compared to what I went through with it was just like a day. Sometimes on this wake up in the middle of the night and I'll jump up and I'll go write something because something woke me up so I'll go ahead and read it. And I don't question where they come from. Maybe it's a memory. Maybe something my mother said to me, maybe something like who comes in to me, I don't know. I just sit down and just write it. It feels okay. And then I see it. I just see it as well. What's becoming from somewhere, and I might do a little more work on it, but most of the time, whenever I write, I just leave it the way it is. Because I always tell people these are words that are being sent to me. It's not for me to change them. I have a, I guess call a mixed background. My dad was me T French and Scottish background because my grandmother, my cucumber, that's what we call country born her dad was a Scottish and her mother was creek. And she was raised in Lawrence Saskatchewan and when she married my grandfather, who was traveling back and forth in the Saskatchewan river, they moved around Saskatchewan to the park to move snake to chimo I went to Grand Rapids and then my mom being full blood cream. She got sent to residents of course, was 8 years old. But we were lucky once. We didn't have to go to residential school. I know some of the people claimed that they have actually went through a business school. I think it was just all the wrong side of the river. You're on wrong side of the river because I'm your rabbit, mister Bowers thing where I was born to be a tea community was on one side and I was on the other side. And so the ones on the mate said we had our own school. Agriculture actually built a school for the site. And the kids across the river, some of them come across, others would be would be sent out when we knew when they were leaving, but the planes would come in. We had cousins that were getting sent away and they were the kids would be brought back in the summertime. And then we took questions, but it would be the same thing again, we'd all run down to the river, but see the cleans land and see you as who was coming back. Some didn't come back. Some didn't come back. We always looked to see, especially my mom, she would love his box to see who children didn't come back. And then we would be asked to go visit those parents. Just to make them feel a little bit better. Lots of tears in these things. Because they knew that the kids were not coming back. And as a boy, a young boy trying to figure out what's going on in the outcome they didn't come to my buddy didn't come back this summer. I'll come back and never see them again. It wasn't until that much later when some of the older boys, when we started hanging out together and teenagers and started here, the stories.

Lawrence Saskatchewan mister Bowers Saskatchewan river Saskatchewan Grand Rapids
"saskatchewan" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

04:48 min | 9 months ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on Unreserved

"That was the beginning. I remember a friend of mine whose dad used to work on the burial detail because he was also going to residential school. I think his dad was about 13 or 14 years old. And they would come on at night, to bear the baby, because they wouldn't do it during the day. They'd want their other children to see what was going on. But I guess he asked his dad, well, you know, do you know where they were buried, and says, well, they're very well over there. But basically they said, we've just buried them deep. That's where the blind kid from us buried them deep. These voices in my head they keep budding in. These are not my words. These are words that come to me from other people. My mother went through residential school in some of the stories come from my mom's stories. Come from people I've talked to all my lifetime. They may touch upon what the experience that residents in school compared to what I went through with it was just like a day. Sometimes on this wake up in the middle of the night and I'll jump up and I'll go write something because something woke me up so I'll go ahead and read it. And I don't question where they come from. Maybe it's a memory. Maybe something my mother said to me, maybe something like who comes in to me, I don't know. I just sit down and just write it. It feels okay. And then I see it. I just see it as well. What's becoming from somewhere, and I might do a little more work on it, but most of the time, whenever I write, I just leave it the way it is. Because I always tell people these are words that are being sent to me. It's not for me to change them. I have a, I guess call a mixed background. My dad was me T French and Scottish background because my grandmother, my cucumber, that's what we call country born her dad was a Scottish and her mother was creek. And she was raised in Lawrence Saskatchewan and when she married my grandfather, who was traveling back and forth in the Saskatchewan river, they moved around Saskatchewan to the park to move snake to chimo I went to Grand Rapids and then my mom being full blood cream. She got sent to residents of course, was 8 years old. But we were lucky once. We didn't have to go to residential school. I know some of the people claimed that they have actually went through a business school. I think it was just all the wrong side of the river. You're on wrong side of the river because I'm your rabbit, mister Bowers thing where I was born to be a tea community was on one side and I was on the other side. And so the ones on the mate said we had our own school. Agriculture actually built a school for the site. And the kids across the river, some of them come across, others would be would be sent out when we knew when they were leaving, but the planes would come in. We had cousins that were getting sent away and they were the kids would be brought back in the summertime. And then we took questions, but it would be the same thing again, we'd all run down to the river, but see the cleans land and see you as who was coming back. Some didn't come back. Some didn't come back. We always looked to see, especially my mom, she would love his box to see who children didn't come back. And then we would be asked to go visit those parents. Just to make them feel a little bit better. Lots of tears in these things. Because they knew that the kids were not coming back. And as a boy, a young boy trying to figure out what's going on in the outcome they didn't come to my buddy didn't come back this summer. I'll come back and never see them again. It wasn't until that much later when some of the older boys, when we started hanging out together and teenagers and started here, the stories.

Lawrence Saskatchewan mister Bowers Saskatchewan river Saskatchewan Grand Rapids
Dinesh Speaks With a Real, Live Canadian Trucker

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:13 min | 9 months ago

Dinesh Speaks With a Real, Live Canadian Trucker

"Guys, I've talked off and on in the podcast about the truckers convoy and the truckers protest both in Canada and in the United States, but I haven't had someone on who actually drives a truck who's been part of all this, and can sort of give a firsthand account of it, so I'm delighted to welcome Gerard de Los Santos, he is a Canadian trucker, although originally from South America. He got his license for trucking 1993, he's been a trucker since 1995, so really over 25 years. Hey Gerard, thanks for joining me. Am I right? It looks to me like you're in your truck. Good morning, thank you for having me. The program. Yes, I am in my truck. Coming back actually from Ottawa. It's going to be it has been quite some time being there and a longer than what we thought. And just halfway back home, I will say. You said you're in Saskatchewan. Where are you making your way toward? Where are you going? I am going to saskatoon. Then amundsen, and then my way down to Calgary. Okay, terrific. Now Gerard looks like you've been in Canada a long time. You've been driving a long time, but you're originally from South America. Say a word about your background. Yes. I am from Uruguay. I came to Canada on the 89 April 89, so it's going to be April now. It's going to be 33 years that I'm here. In 95, I got my license and started driving 93. I actually got my license, started driving 95. And being doing truck you never change. Car hauling, this is my speciality, what I like to do. And do it to those, all this mandate was getting more difficult every day to deal with everything. And we decided to I decided to join the convoy and ask for freedom, basically. The only thing we were asking was freedom of choice. And to open the federal mandate to be able to cross the border to the United States.

Gerard De Los Santos Gerard Canada South America Amundsen United States Ottawa Saskatoon Saskatchewan Calgary Uruguay
Canadian Provinces Lift COVID Mandates After Trucker Protests

The Larry Elder Show

00:47 sec | 10 months ago

Canadian Provinces Lift COVID Mandates After Trucker Protests

"Man. Freedom wins, Canadian provinces of provinces lift COVID mandates after trucker protests, so four Canadian provinces have moved to lift their COVID-19 restrictions as a massive protest by truckers continued blockades in Ottawa on Wednesday, and that's a paralyzing the capital city, which you guys know, Quebec, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island provinces have all announced plans to eliminate or roll back some or all measures, for instance, Alberta dropped its vaccine passport for places such as restaurants, immediately, and they're getting rid of mask at the end of the month. The moves came this week after a huge strong of truckers shut down

Alberta Ottawa Prince Edward Island Saskatchewan Quebec
"saskatchewan" Discussed on 1 MORE STRONG-CAST with GODZOLA

1 MORE STRONG-CAST with GODZOLA

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on 1 MORE STRONG-CAST with GODZOLA

"Thank you frozen be there. Yeah, good to go. There we go. We're good to go. But for us in the states, Saskatchewan is one of the methods to go for like big whitetail, but it's so expensive for us to come up with an outfit or the last time I'd love. It's like $5000 to hunt whitetail. And I'm like, that's a little, that's a little pricey to hunt deer. Yeah, some of our buddies are actually outfitters, so they do the hunting tours or whatever you want to call them. Yeah. But are you an outdoorsy person? I know you're always out with your dog and stuff. Do you hunt her fish or you? I don't hunt or fish seriously. I like to shoot guns. I like to go go for hunting. I go fishing the odd time with Isaac, but I definitely don't take it as seriously as he does. Yeah. His life is like strongman and hunting. Yeah. And you, you're there somewhere I'm sure. Yeah, like I like, I mean, I grew up in a small town. I like the outdoors. I just haven't really gotten into being serious about that. Stuff, I guess. You have to have your hunters safety and your pal, I believe. Okay. Actually go hunting for stuff like that. So I've talked about it because it's such a big part of Isaac's life that I would like to eventually be part of that, but I guess I am just a little well, it's actually funny because I did, I think it's the hunter safety course that's like 30 bucks or something. So I downloaded it like purchased it. It's an online thing. And then you have to go in and rate your exam. So I purchased it. And then I kind of put it on the back burner and then when I went to go do it, it expired. So I've been an effort. Yeah, you'll have to get that done so you can go out and enjoy that with him. So I didn't want to bring this up, but what's up with the mullet mountain Isaac has? I know the last time I see him, he had the real big beard and he had to shave the beer so now he's going with the mullet? Yeah, well, he had to he started the mullet when he had the beard stole. I don't even remember how that started. Because I cut his hair actually. Okay. So that's why I moved to the city after I graduated. I came here to do hair school. Okay. So did her school and then I worked on the salon for a while and I kind of just decided that wasn't for me. But it's kind of just a skill that carries on with you for the rest of your life. So I was like, I cut most of his families here. I cut her body's hair. Yeah..

Isaac Saskatchewan
"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"Never was able to get it through. Went back to Saskatchewan, which is, you know, it's a geographically, it's a big state or a big province, but it's like Vermont. You know, it's got a very small population. So you can do retail politics really, really easily. When we used to live in Vermont and somebody made a joke to me once that everybody in Vermont, shaken Bernie Sanders hand at least three times. I think it's probably ten times as more accurate. I kept bumping into him wherever I went around the state. He was always doing a gig someplace. And so that's what Tommy Douglas did. He went back to Saskatchewan. He did this retail politics, one on one, all over the state for a couple of years. Got elected governor or prime minister or whatever the title is. It's neither, but a premier premier of Saskatchewan. And push through a single payer healthcare system. And Saskatchewan loved it. It was cheaper. It was more effective. The doctors loved it. They were getting paid all the time and so many a lot of poverty and Saskatchewan, a lot of doctors were just doing charity work. Everybody loved it. And pretty soon, you know, British Columbia and Alberta, they were like, hey, we want this. And so they were cloning it and then Ontario did, and then Newfoundland did. And, you know, by the end of the decade, the federal government of Canada jumped in so that they could create kind of a back backend system where if somebody from Saskatchewan got sick and Toronto, the Toronto system or the Ontario system would pay the bill and then they could recover the money from the Saskatchewan system via the federal system. And so that's how that worked..

Saskatchewan Vermont Bernie Sanders Tommy Douglas British Columbia Ontario Alberta Newfoundland Toronto federal government Canada
"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

"Country <Speech_Male> alberta <Speech_Male> is offering this hundred <Speech_Male> dollar incentive <Speech_Male> for people to get <Speech_Male> the job. What <Speech_Male> will it take <Speech_Male> to get. <SpeakerChange> More <Speech_Male> people immunized <Silence> <Speech_Male> the only <Speech_Male> thing that really is going to <Speech_Male> move the market this point <Speech_Male> and move it very quickly <Speech_Male> which is what we need <Speech_Male> is some type of <Speech_Male> passport program. <Speech_Male> Where again <Speech_Male> we limit <Speech_Male> Quite strictly <Speech_Male> non essential activities <Speech_Male> To <Speech_Male> individuals who are fully <Speech_Male> vaccinated with <Speech_Male> pretty much almost <Speech_Male> no exceptions <Speech_Male> other than four <Speech_Male> medical and religious <Speech_Male> exemptions. <Speech_Male> I mean the <Speech_Male> evidence has shown very <Speech_Male> clearly that that makes <Speech_Male> a difference. <Speech_Male> You look at manitoba. <Speech_Male> They've got you know. <Speech_Male> Vaccine rates eight <Speech_Male> to ten percent higher than <Speech_Male> ours and only <Speech_Male> fundamental difference between <Speech_Male> manitoba and scotch. <Speech_Male> When <Speech_Male> is that mandate <Speech_Male> that was put in place <Speech_Male> in manitoba gut <Speech_Male> rights and that is <Speech_Male> why again. <Speech_Male> They're in the situation. <Speech_Male> They're in right now whereas <Speech_Male> we struggle <Speech_Male> lastly <Speech_Male> the narrative <Speech_Male> around pandemic <Speech_Male> of the unvaccinated <Speech_Male> essentially <Speech_Male> just shifts blame <Speech_Male> it just shifts blamed <Speech_Male> individuals <Speech_Male> and the reality <Speech_Male> here is <Speech_Male> that as we heard from doctrine <Speech_Male> vani many individuals. <Speech_Male> We'd <Speech_Male> like to sort of this <Speech_Male> narrative that everybody <Speech_Male> is an anti vaccine <Speech_Male> and that is not <Speech_Male> the case the majority <Speech_Male> of people who <Speech_Male> are eligible but not <Speech_Male> vaccinated remain <Speech_Male> individuals who <Speech_Male> are dealing with structural <Speech_Male> and social barriers <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> to shift all of <Speech_Male> this to individual <Speech_Male> responsibility. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> it's just <Speech_Male> something that really <Speech_Male> really. I struggled <Speech_Male> with because in the <Speech_Male> end. <Speech_Male> It's our policymakers <Speech_Male> and our decision. <Speech_Male> Makers who have <Speech_Male> the responsibility <Speech_Male> to set good policy <Speech_Male> for us <Speech_Male> public <Speech_Male> health sphere <Speech_Male> and to shift the blame <Speech_Male> to individuals <Speech_Male> and to try to shift it <Speech_Male> away. From her policymakers. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> is not <SpeakerChange> a responsible <Speech_Male> narrative <Speech_Male> in a word or two or <Speech_Male> are you really <Speech_Male> were. Are you worried about <Speech_Male> what's yet to come. I mean <Speech_Male> this seems <Speech_Male> grim right now. What was <Speech_Male> just laid out by the two <Speech_Male> doctors but it <Silence> is the worst <SpeakerChange> still <Speech_Male> to come. <Speech_Male> Unfortunately <Speech_Male> i think it is. <Speech_Male> I think the best case <Speech_Male> scenario is <Speech_Male> that we <Speech_Male> double again over <Speech_Male> the next couple of weeks <Speech_Male> which would put us pretty <Speech_Male> much just <Speech_Male> out of hand completely <Speech_Male> out of and in <Speech_Male> a medical triage situation. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The hope from there <Speech_Male> from the models. And what's <Speech_Male> happened in the us <Speech_Male> has led. Maybe are careful <Speech_Male> peak. But we <Speech_Male> can't wait for <Speech_Male> that to happen. <SpeakerChange> We need <Speech_Male> to do something. Dr <Speech_Male> congo to speak <Silence> with you again. Thank you very <Speech_Male> much. <Speech_Male> Thank you matt <SpeakerChange> for the opportunity <Speech_Male> to alex <Speech_Male> wong infectious disease <Speech_Male> physician at the university <Speech_Male> of saskatchewan.

manitoba congo us saskatchewan
"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

"For more on how alberta and scotch when can get a handle on this crisis. I'm joined by dr alex wong and infectious disease physician in regina dr. Good morning to you. Why not what went wrong very simply. We did not have a high enough vaccine. Uptake and leaders chose to open on mass very very quickly so Alberta obviously July first and then us here has godwin july eleven..

dr alex wong alberta infectious disease regina Alberta godwin
"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

"Is it difficult when somebody comes in. And they're in front of you and they're denying what you are saying that they have covert nineteen. Is it difficult to do your job. Yeah it it definitely is. I mean we've Like you said we've been at this for eighteen months it's just Very disheartening that you know myself and my colleagues who've been trying to advocate to get this messaging out to do the right thing who are on the line seeing how terrible this can be and then to still have You know albertans where i am Not believe that this is true. it's Yeah it's it's hard to hard to work through that. Does that sound familiar. Dr abdul absolutely while wanting tonight realize. I think there's a lot of misinformation around on most of these species when they called me in. They actually feel very remorseful because they can see the ratio. They concede the frustration on the out. Gear walkers while it's our job is not to be judgmental and by telling them a lot like. I spoke to one of the guys he's only in his forties is in. Icu is almost close to being into baited. And anytime you call is very apologetic on his. Y'all say i made a mistake. I anti you know on is actually made a call. Even yesterday to advise most obvious friends who go get waxing because he knows is a preventable disease. You should get vaccinated in the face of that. What do you want from leadership in saskatchewan. You're in this position. Now what are you looking for. I'll be honest do while way adult does wear. No politicians politicians make those decisions balts. For weeks ago. I went to a stall and i was actually the only one with moscow and people were kind of looking at you and you felt so bad as a mosque. While you knew was a time i was just my all time. Dot students does call call by tossing the face. You knew you knew it was a time bomb. Oh you always all we hope we all. I'm sure politicians. Everybody knows it. Might it might all time it all time. These is going on on also all in the face and that's what is happening. You know what it means and we're just in the face. Windy fought saw. The first one wasn't as bad as the second second wasn't as bad as they thought and at least the fourth one is the was we actually being at and you know what i'm saying. I don't think he's gonna get better if we take all your politicians change the off the populist. What about for you dr. metheny. I mean you now have Elective surgeries in alberta. That are being postponed. Which has a domino effect. We have seen this in other jurisdictions that can lead to further complications When it comes to people's healthcare what do you want from the alberta government to get this.

Dr abdul saskatchewan moscow metheny alberta alberta government
"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

"What are you seeing Dust as my colleague said is actually very terrible we also as well as on imminent system collapse systemising crises on. I walked over the weekend. We are is six week old baby with covy and is the same thing even not medica. What's no molly does a form of non invasive ventilation. Would nobody used or not medical waltz while because our i see you is jammed. Jam-packed does know icu in any way in the province. So we have to make do with giving soap. Stunned dot get to patient will really needs critic on a medical ward within. We was what does that mean no. Icu and you talk about. A system collapsed if somebody needs an intensive care unit because they're seriously injured in a car accident. What happens to. I'll be honest. Do you have to make ethical choices. We'll get appropriate level of critic k on we'll get sub-standard gay. Because the way walks is that they saunter with policies them where you know what's going on in all the i see you in the province and as it yesterday. Most of those icu. I actually on bypass dummies. No bed available so if someone gets a real tropic oxidant and you know what. I'm saying you wouldn't be able to get into any icu. So you're giving up stunned. That two people were supposed to get a level of criticality does what it means dr matani. Eu are treating overwhelmingly Patients who have been unvaccinated. They're coming in on vaccinated. What are they telling you. But the situation that they find themselves in and why they have yet to To get the vaccine you know matt. It's it's a mixed bag So you know there especially when it's young people under the age of forty. It's a lot of times. it's why didn't think i would get sick or i just was so busy. I have just haven't gotten around to it yet. And and a lot of those are people Who have barriers to getting vaccinated social barriers to getting back saying it's so a single mom for example or you know someone who's working several jobs to care for their family and so those those ones are the most devastating Of course on the opposite end of the spectrum there have been on thankfully still rare occasion people who are still in complete disbelief that they even have coped. They don't believe what you're saying and There have been You know equally devastating on on a different in a different way these patients who just don't believe what you're telling them and just think kobe is still a hoax. Even older sitting there in front of you needing Quite a high level of care in order to be able to breathe. What do you say to those patients. here we just we. In the moment we treat them the same way as every other patient right. That's our job. Our job is to to do the best. We can for every patient regardless of what their background is without any judgment and so we try to you know comfort them and and and talk them through. what's happening. is that difficult. I mean there's a phrase that gets tossed around called compassion fatigue You've been at this for eighteen months. You said you're exhausted. I can hear it in your voice..

dr matani molly Eu matt kobe
"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Current

"Most of the country took a bit of a breather. This summer it has been a long pandemic and since vaccine rates have been up cases have been down most provinces relaxed restrictions or came out a strict lockdowns alberta though went farthest on candidate the chief medical officer of health dr dena hinshaw announced the end of almost all pandemic restrictions scotch win took a similar approach and now alberta and saskatchewan have the highest covert rates by population in the entire country. Both health systems are in crisis. Icu's packed elective surgeries and alberta are being postponed to keep critical care. Beds free in yesterday. Dr dena hinshaw took some responsibility very responsible for the narrative that has made it more complicated to try to would additional public health measures in place because whether or not it was my intention what was heard at the end of july was cobras over. We can walk away and ignore it And that has had repercussions that was talked to dina hinshaw alberta's chief medical officer of health. Darren markland is intensive care doctor in edmonton. He wants action. Not words some dr hinshaw. It's one thing to admit it. It's another thing not to make reparations. We have to have political leadership and it has to say that we're in a crucial juncture. This is an imminent collapse of acute care without measures. We're gonna be many backing people out of the province and we will be using innocent souls to this joining me now. With their perspective from the front lines are dr shasmi medani an emergency room doctor in edmonton and dr. Lukman abdul an icu. Doctor at battlefields union. Hospital in north battlefields of scotch when doctors good morning to you both good morning. Dr mathon just briefly. What's your reaction to dr hinshaw remarks. They're taking some responsibility for what's unfolded in your province over the last little bit I mean i'm glad that there is some responsibility taken but similar. What doc dr mark linn said in the clip while. I don't think it's going far enough into the honest. it feels like it's too little too late There are many points along the way where some action could have been taken and now we're in the worst way we've had and and people are dying every day. This the other part of it is how you see what's happening elsewhere in the country. I'm in nova scotia right now. Where they're slowing down easing restrictions and the chief medical officer of health says that caution needs to be the word of the day especially given. What's on the horizon. I mean how how does that. Strike you Honestly it's not surprising. Given how alberta has handled the pen dynamic over the last year and a half up until now it's always been The government's always drag their feet in terms of introducing restriction. This is certainly the worst gets band. I mean we've now been you know fourth way for weeks. And there's They're barely restrictions placing. So i mean what you said at the beginning. I'm certainly envious of other places. Who are doing this right And who are taking this seriously. What does it look like in your ear right now. It's terrible We're just seeing a massive influxes of mostly unvaccinated patients who are coming in with Complications and coming quite sick with kobe. Nineteen we're sending so many more people to the intensive care unit young people these ten security unit and Staffer just tired if it's demoralizing to be doing this yet again what about for you dr abdul in your icu in rural saskatchewan..

alberta dr hinshaw dr dena hinshaw Dr dena hinshaw dina hinshaw Darren markland dr shasmi medani Lukman abdul edmonton battlefields union Dr mathon doc dr mark linn Icu saskatchewan nova scotia government kobe dr abdul
"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"Turned our attention towards alberta more specifically edmonton when i read the piece is now the syphilis capital okay. Stevie of canada. Well then jimmy bet you contributed to that. Yeah because edmonton hasn't suffered well enough from from the eastern opinion of it being redneck. Okay redneck kind of sets them back. They were doing so well stevie okay. They're doing so well. I moved out here in eighty five. And when i when i was telling people it's twenty three when i got the gauge with molson. I remember mother just horrified going. Where are you going to edmonton knowing goes to edmonton you know. No one does right. You'll you'll die out there. It's cold and everything you'll never make it through a winter. You know and i mean it was a little sort of catastrophes and things a little bit okay. But that's the no-one like why people take. Why are you going to have it. And then of course the oilers put them on the map right map or the hockey the hockey map. Anyone probably contributed that. Yuck on so anyway. Then they're doing so well edmonton it's growing and they got a great hockey team and More and more people coming out west and doing just fine now this. Yeah yeah now this you know so. Dr meanacing is an infectious disease expert at the university of alberta she says right now are cases of the highest. We've seen since the nineteen forties. So that's pretty shocking. See those types of numbers and the saying there's no question everywhere in the world right now is spiking a little bit. Alberto is uniquely high. And it's all because of social media apps being i'm used to arrange contact and casual partnerships so unheard of the cases. They say they had anonymous partners. Right so get your act together. Alberta get your act together. Yeah i know a few buddies. I never been on the. I've never been on the dating sites. But i know a couple of buddies who were on it and it was sort of like okay. What what's up with that when i asked them. Okay stevie it was. It was one thing and one thing only. You can get plowed okay. Like there's these get plowed cites stevie. Okay right right and there's lots of them. There's lots of them actually. Madison tinder tenders dating app. But you can put your little preferences in there the so so. that's fine. do that okay. But but look what's happening to you got sieff anyway. There's a serious side to it as well so i should make too much of it but what's happening with treatable least you can get can get you. Take it down with a little antibiotics and such. But you can't really recover too well or too quickly from the pr. hit that. Alberta's taking right. Now stephen cole. Bear made light of it on his show on. Friday is pretty low hanging fruit. Let's be honest right but he basically talked about alberta and syphilis and of course schedule and is the neighboring province so he warned the folks in saskatchewan. You know what you want alberta rubbing up against regina right there. They're very excited. Low hanging fruit for sure. Let's move along to. Some sports is lots to get to henrik. Lundqvist retired on friday. Probably when you measure out an entire career obviously kind of limped toward the finish line at some heart problems actually..

edmonton jimmy bet stevie okay hockey Dr meanacing syphilis alberta molson Stevie oilers stevie university of alberta infectious disease canada Alberta Alberto stephen cole Madison saskatchewan regina
Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

Native America Calling

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

"The royal canadian mounted police has confirmed. They have been investigating allegations of sexual abuse at a former residential school in manitoba as dan carpenter chuck reports. The investigation has been ongoing for more than a decade. The large-scale criminal investigation was launched in two thousand eleven into allegations of sexual abuse at the ford alexander. Residential school officers traveled to ottawa to review archives of the school and to the manitoba archives. For historical information they ended up interviewing more than seven hundred people across america in the search for potential victims or witnesses since then rcmp officers have compiled a total of seventy five victim and witness statements. Here's dan vandal. The federal minister of northern affairs. The i think the fact that there's an ongoing investigation is Is something that that is is is justified. And we know that there were crimes committed the ford alexander residential school operated from nineteen zero five to one thousand nine hundred seventy it was built on the ford alexander reserve which is now the sad king i nation last week. The first nation began searching the former school site for any unmarked graves. Police say they will not be. Providing any further information about their investigation meanwhile rcmp in saskatchewan of opened an investigation into a death that is alleged to have taken place at a children's home which was not recognized as a residential school but which housed former matey and first nation students for national native news. I'm dan carpenter took

Rcmp Dan Carpenter Chuck Manitoba Alexander Dan Vandal Ford Ottawa America Saskatchewan Dan Carpenter
Saskatoon Preschool Plans Cause Controversy

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Saskatoon Preschool Plans Cause Controversy

"According to the saskatoon starphoenix a community association. Saskatoon has decided. It's not really cool with a proposed preschool To be owned and operated By the saskatoon travel council in their neighborhood. It's it's part of the tribal council aboriginal headstart program for indigenous children. The idea is to have a first nations based curriculum and that the preschool is expected to accommodate forty kits bracha. What's your understanding of what their beef is with. Having these these kitties plan their hood. Yeah i mean The reasons they're giving public and most of the people who apparently have raised concerns are not willing to come out publicly with their with their reasons for opposing development. One woman was willing to go on camera and she claimed she loves kids. Works with kids. But she thinks it's too dangerous to have them on that property and she gave the example of a kid running out onto the road. Which of course could happen anywhere so it. It seems that some of the concern here is as not being openly stated and certainly there. There's accusations that have gone out that if this were just a any kind of preschool. There wouldn't be the same resistance but because it's a first nations led initiative and an average head start program would be located there that that's actually with generating the the response the negative response to development and having lived in saskatchewan. That totally makes sense to me. I it doesn't surprise me at all that i've wait neighborhood would be resistant to having first nations. People have a business even preschool.

Saskatoon Starphoenix A Commun Saskatoon Travel Council Bracha Saskatoon Saskatchewan
Canadian Indigenous Group Takes Charge of Child Welfare Services

BBC Newsday

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Canadian Indigenous Group Takes Charge of Child Welfare Services

"Nation in Saskatchewan, where a groundbreaking agreement has empowered the first nation to take control of its child welfare services. And the end goal is one day there will be no Children in care. And every day we will roll up our sleeves to make sure that every child When we call them home that they know where home is. On Tuesday, chief CAD Mr Lorne was joined by Prime Minister Trudeau and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe in Cowes is for the ceremonial signing of the agreement. It's being celebrated as historic and long overdue. And it almost certainly won't be the last making a formal changes that suit our nation that through our people, and I would highly is strongly recommended First. They should take this on and let's look after your own Children. That's chief Matthew T. Pagan of the Pascua First nation. Near Fort Capelle in Saskatchewan. The prime minister's office says that dozens of indigenous governments are already seeking jurisdiction over child and family services, and that 18 agreement discussions are currently underway. But even as they celebrate this week's historic agreement, chief CAD missed alarm and his community continue to mourn after the discovery of 751 unmarked graves on their first nation just two weeks ago on the grounds of a former residential school. Near buckles is the chair of the Cow Assist Youth

Saskatchewan Cad Mr Lorne Prime Minister Trudeau Scott Moe Matthew T. Pagan Near Fort Capelle Cowes Cow Assist Youth
"saskatchewan" Discussed on Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"saskatchewan" Discussed on Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

"Is one that is more confident about being successful in being who it is And the way it describes the schedule culture it's come like get her done culture People just kinda roll up their sleeves and and there's advantages and disadvantages to that they just. They're they're great people who that's their culture. They just kind of get it down so when you when you transfer that to like growth economic development or even you know schools and education you see that and so it means that we have and i think that's why describes that we have. We saw small towns here But in larger municipalities. We have the vibe of a small town. But we're really a we're becoming big big cities right so it's like we've got one leg on each each kind of culture so big city small city culture both of those inter mingled and. I'm based here in saskatoon and that's very much true. We want to have sort of that downtown. That's very vibrant. And and you know that density downtown. That anchors our entire polity But at the same time those are still people that Have that small town by and know each other and when you go on the street you can still get that feeling. That you're in a very cohesive community so that kind of describes a sketch for me You.

saskatoon
Pope Will Meet With Indigenous Leaders About Canada's Residential Schools

Native America Calling

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Pope Will Meet With Indigenous Leaders About Canada's Residential Schools

"Canada's assembly of first nations will join may t- and inuit leaders on a trip to the vatican in december to ask for an apology from the pope for the catholic church's role in the residential school system. But as dan carpenter chuck reports the head of the af en says there are no guarantees. They will be successful in getting that apology in his final report released in two thousand and fifty the truth. Reconciliation commission called for the pope to come to canada to personally apologize to the survivors and their families for the abuses indigenous children faced in the residential school system. The anger over the lack of an apology has been heightened by the recent discoveries in british columbia and saskatchewan of hundreds of unmarked graves on the sites of former residential schools. Now assembly of first nations and inuit leaders will make the trip to rome in late december to ask for that apology. Here's perry bell guard the national chief of the a. f. n. the meetings been confirmed at the vatican's or we're going to take that meeting and then as well at that time. Take the opportunity to invite his holiness back to canada. At some point in the future and again there are no guarantees of any kind of apology or anything coming forward. There's no guarantee that he'll even come back to canada but we have to make the attempt bell guard. Says he is optimistic. He says the canadian government and the roman catholic church complicit in the operation of the residential schools. They were funded by the government and run by the churches about one hundred. Fifty thousand native. Children were forced to attend the schools from the late. Eighteen hundreds to nineteen ninety-six. Thousands were abused is not clear. How many died of neglect and abuse. The estimates range from just over four thousand to as many as fifteen thousand the three other churches involved in running the schools be anglican presbyterian and the united have apologized. The catholic church still has not for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Assembly Of First Nations Dan Carpenter Chuck Reconciliation Commission Canada Roman Catholic Church Perry Bell Vatican Canadian Government Saskatchewan British Columbia Rome United Dan Carpenter
Volleyball Player Averie Allard Pledges to Walk for Indigenous Justice

Burn It All Down

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Volleyball Player Averie Allard Pledges to Walk for Indigenous Justice

"Most recently every has committed to walk with her dog. Rory and whoever else is willing to join them in supporting the students that have been found on the grounds of residential schools. She has committed to walk. One kilometer for every child found and has already raised over nine hundred dollars in hopes to continue her fund raising through the summer. Okay so let's start by also offering this space to recognize what it incredibly difficult month. This has been not just only because of the recently more recently found bodies that have been unearthed in saskatchewan where you are and not very far from where you are from what i understand but also the two hundred fifteen that were found in kamloops the beginning of the month so when you decided to walk rory did you know that this would just be the beginning I wasn't sure because when the first group of children were found it wasn't really a canada wide search From what i understand. It wasn't curious. Search this residential school to find the children Kind of happened I wasn't aware that the government would put out the money to search the residential schools. Because as i understand two thousand nine there was a big push to do so and the government flat out said a million dollars is too much money to search these grounds So knowing that. I wasn't too sure if all the other schools would be searched and there are so many of them but knowing this i kind of said okay. Well if they do you know. I don't have to time my walk. i don't have to say by the end of the month. But if they do. I i won't keep killing myself to walking because at the end of the day i i think that every child that didn't come home deserves the justice and i think it's ridiculous that it's been eleven years since that was the first demand to search these grounds. And now we're finally doing it. I'm old enough to understand to do something about it.

Rory Kamloops Saskatchewan Canada
Latest First Nations discovery reveals 182 unmarked graves at Canada school

Native America Calling

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Latest First Nations discovery reveals 182 unmarked graves at Canada school

"Another grim discovery in british columbia the remains of one hundred and eighty two bodies near a former indian residential school. As dan carpenter reports the find was made using ground penetrating radar. The lower kootenai band says the remains were found in unmarked graves near the site of the former saint. Eugene's mission school near cranbrook. The school run by the catholic church operated from nineteen twelve to the nineteen seventies about one hundred members of the kootenai band attended the school. Chief jason lewis says. The ben's leaders met with survivors of the school in the community before making the announcement and louis added his voice to the growing calls for the catholic church to be held accountable for running the schools. The nazis were held accountable for their war crimes. And i see no difference in locating the priests and and the brothers that are responsible to be held accountable for their arts. In this attempt of genocide on indigenous people the announcement comes just a month after another british columbia. First nation found the remains of two hundred and fifteen children buried on the site of a former residential school near kamloops and the remains of seven hundred fifty. One bodies were found near a former residential school in saskatchewan. Other native leaders. Say the need for mental. Health services for survivors will increase as more graves discovered near former residential schools across canada for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Dan Carpenter Chief Jason Lewis Catholic Church British Columbia Cranbrook Eugene BEN Louis Kamloops Saskatchewan Canada
British Columbia Town Sets New High Temperature for Canada

Glenn Beck

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

British Columbia Town Sets New High Temperature for Canada

"And a village in southern British Columbia sizzled under a new all time high temperature for Canada Sunday, hitting just under 115 degrees that breaks Canada's previous all time high of 113 degrees. Set in Saskatchewan. Back in

British Columbia Canada Saskatchewan
Hundreds More Unmarked Graves Found at Former Residential School in Canada

Native America Calling

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Hundreds More Unmarked Graves Found at Former Residential School in Canada

"Another unmarked. Gravesite has been discovered in canada on the grounds of a former indian residential. School and scotch juan as dan carpenter chuck reports. The discovery comes after the remains of two hundred and fifteen bodies were recently found at a school in british columbia because his first nation in saskatchewan. About one hundred miles. East of regina. It's chief cadmus delorme describes what they found. We started dr penetrating research on june. The second of twenty one as of yesterday we have hit seven hundred and fifty one unmarked graves. This is not a mass grave site. These are marked graves. Delorme says the representatives of the catholic church removed the headstones. So today they are unmarked graves. It's not clear. How many of the bodies buried on the site of the former maryvale indian residential school where native children delorme says. There are stories that there were adults buried there as well. What we are going to be doing now is. We are going to be putting names to these unmarked graves. We want to honor loved ones. That lay there today. We want to make sure that we keep that place and preserve it so many could come here. And he'll delorme says. He believes the catholic church which ran the school from eighteen. Ninety eight to nineteen eighty-one will hand over records from the school. He says for now his band has just one book of records from a knowledge keeper and he says while he expects cooperation from the catholic church. He also wants an apology from the pope. The chief of the federation of sovereign indian nations. Bobby cameron says searches of residential school grounds across the country will continue as well as sanatoriums of indian hospitals and any sites where people were taking an abused tortured neglected and murdered for national native news. Dan carpenter

Dan Carpenter Chuck Cadmus Delorme Maryvale Indian Residential Sc Delorme Catholic Church Saskatchewan Regina British Columbia Canada Federation Of Sovereign Indian Bobby Cameron Dan Carpenter
Ransomware Gang Reportedly Drops Encryption

Cyber Security Today

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Ransomware Gang Reportedly Drops Encryption

"The babic ransomware gang says it's dropping the encryption of data of victims as a tactic instead will focus strictly on data theft and blackmail to enrich itself until now the gang did both stealing data from victim organizations and then encrypting the data on the corporate servers. The threat to the victim was pay for the decryption keys. Or the copy data will be released embarrassing. You and your customers. If the company didn't have a good data backup it faced to threats embarrassment and loss of business and the loss of data this double extortion. Tactic started being adopted by ransomware groups about two years ago but creating and maintaining encryption isn't easy some cyber security companies have cracked the encryption of a few gangs and are giving away the decryption keys to any victims m saw off is one of the companies that crack the babba code now. Barbeque has apparently decided that is easier and perhaps just as lucrative to only steal data and hold it for ransom a researcher adam soft doubts that other ransomware groups will follow this strategy by the way last week the babak gang gone into the computer systems of the washington dc police department and stole data. It is still threatening to release the names of police informants unless it is paid in an interview with the new site in poland babba claim. The police departments virtual private network was hacked. With a zero day vulnerability that is vulnerability that hasn't been disclosed. That claim hasn't been confirmed.

Adam Soft Washington Dc Police Departmen Babba Poland
COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

PRI's The World

01:57 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

"Is kind of the pulse of this. Pandemic globally right now alana. Where are we at with infections. Well the big picture of marco is that the world is actually experiencing a steady increase in infections leaders at the. Who again sounded the alarm today. Because it's been seven straight weeks of rising infections actually is some of the highest surges yet in the pandemic and it's been four weeks streep of reisen deaths would areas most impacted. We have a sense of that. So i talked with ali mokdad about this. He's with the institute for health metrics at the university of washington and he's been modeling this pandemic since the start he says what's going on in five regions really stands out so i that is an increase in brazil. That snow started to come down so brazil is the big one. Neighboring countries like argentina and chile are now starting to experience rises to and then here the other hot spots this a big rise which still going on in india pakistan bangladesh at bark that is an increase in europe and the middle east following. What's your doping seeing. That is a. It is in cases in the philippines and that this is in south africa and african country. That's now started to come down so the fact that infections are increasing globally even parts of the us. We don't want to forget that. That really worries him. I mean it sounds like overall the world is just not close to controlling this virus. Do scientists have a handle on why cases continued to rise even with vaccines. Is it now all about the variants. Not points to the variance and lots of scientists do variants like be one one seven have become a dominant in europe and this has been found to be more transmissible. But there's another strong message. I'm hearing from a lot of scientists like angela rasmussen. she's just at georgetown. And as of this month the university of saskatchewan which is that these rises are not just from variants like the breakthrough masking and distancing another really important prevention

Ali Mokdad Institute For Health Metrics Alana Brazil Marco University Of Washington Chile Argentina Bangladesh Europe Pakistan Middle East Philippines South Africa India Angela Rasmussen United States University Of Saskatchewan Georgetown
Canadian police discriminated against mother of slain Indigenous man, watchdog says

Native America Calling

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Canadian police discriminated against mother of slain Indigenous man, watchdog says

"Independent watchdog for the royal canadian mounted police found that the force racially discriminated against the mother of an indigenous man who was killed in two thousand sixteen has down carpenter reports. The twenty two year old was killed by a white farmer in saskatchewan. The incident took place during the summer of two thousand sixteen colton. Bucci was shot and killed when an suv. He was writing in traveled onto the property of gerald stanley. Near biggar saskatchewan stanley was charged with second degree murder. He was acquitted by a jury in two thousand and eighteen. He had testified that he fired warning shots and that his gun just went off an independent review found. Rcmp officers acted hurtful e when they informed bush's mother debbie battiste of his death when she had broke down in tears. They told her to get it together and questioned whether she had been drinking. They smelled her breath in searched her home. The complaints commission said on a second occasion they inappropriately visited bush's wake to update his mother. On the case. Perry belgarde the national chief of the assembly of first nations says the ruling by the complaints commission brought a sense of vindication for debbie baptiste. But she did say she experienced racism and discrimination. In nobody would believer the rcmp dismissed it but this independent oversight body proved it. They treated her with racism and discrimination and she persevered through that and now that we know that the big question is how do we fix. It has implemented almost all of the recommendations that stemmed from the reviews. Prime minister justin trudeau said the way the bucci family was treated was unacceptable. And the lawyer for the mother. Debbie baptiste says. Systemic racism underlines the entire case for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Gerald Stanley Saskatchewan Stanley Royal Canadian Mounted Police Debbie Battiste Bucci Rcmp Colton Perry Belgarde Saskatchewan Complaints Commission Bush Debbie Baptiste Assembly Of First Nations Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Dan Carpenter
From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

Unreserved

04:32 min | 1 year ago

From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

"You may have seen my guest today on the small screen and big screens or on the stage. Michael is is a man of many talents. He's a classically trained ballet dancer. Choreographer director playwright and renowned actor over his three decade. Long career michael has appeared in some of the most beloved first nation films like dance me outside and smoke signals. He has taken on challenging roles. Playing indigenous leaders like sitting bull wandering spirit to come see and crazy horse more recently. He's taken the small screen by storm appearing on hit tv shows like fear the walking dead true detective and the soon to be released nbc. Comedy rutherford falls. Michael is net. Oh and a member of the musket lake cremation in sketch. Juan and he joins me now from los angeles. Welcome to the show. Michael falen thank you so much for the invitation. Oh it's so great to have you here so you're in los angeles right now But i wanna go back a bit. Can you tell me about where you grew up. I'm from treaty. Six territory in saskatchewan My mom and dad are from reserves in the middle of saskatchewan. My dad's from moscow. And my mom is from sweet grass and my sister and my family. We lived in a couple of places where in the capelle valley. Of course lebron and then we moved to saskatoon and saskatoon was where i spent my boyhood until i was plucked plucked from the prairies at the age of ten years old to attend canada's national ballet school in toronto and my family and i we moved from treaty six territory to To dish with one spoon territory. So i could pursue dance as as a career potential career and so i wanna talk about your dancing a bit but first i want to know what was it. Like growing up on the prairies. What do you remember What do you remember about growing up on the prairies. So many beautiful things. Obviously that's home. That's that's that's my home. That's where i know about my family. My a my early years. I remember the sunlight of remember the sky. I remember my cousins and all my relatives. And i remember playing just riding my bike with my banana seat all over town. They need to make banana seats again. They're very comfortable. they do they do in los angeles. There's a whole like bike culture. We're fleeing be tricked out bike's banana seats. So you're known primarily as an actor now but as you mentioned you know you got into the entertainment industry in a different way. You started as a dancer as a ballet dancer. So how does a kid growing up in saskatoon and up in the ballet well by accident entirely by axes we were living in saskatoon and my mom was a teacher at the school for the deaf. A very famous School for deaf children in saskatoon and my sister. And i were doing you know little kid things. I was playing hockey of course and my sister was taking dance lessons so mumbai. I we used to week for my sister in the car and i was you know five six years old so i was like a super board super easily so it was like she died. She'd done and i would go up and check on her. I remember the classes at the university of scotch one and it was kind of like this wile experiences little kid i walk in. I'd look for her and then she be dancing with these little girls. In one day. I decided to really kinda pay attention to what they were doing. And i and then. I blurted got ceesay. Teacher overheard me. She said well. Do you think it's easy. Why don't you come on back next week. So i said A will and i told my mom all week. I'm going to dance next week. And she of course you know. I apparently said lots of crazy things as as a boy but as the days got closer. She was like okay he. He's repeating it. He's he's he's he's insistent about this. Why do you think you're going to death sex because the teacher invited me so with my mom and my mom used me. I'm so so sorry. Michael thinks that you've invited him. Smith usually oh yeah yeah yeah come on in. And that's how. It started precocious boy pushing his way into a dance class that he hadn't signed up for.

Saskatoon Rutherford Falls Michael Falen Capelle Valley Los Angeles Saskatchewan Michael National Ballet School NBC Juan School For Deaf Children Lebron Moscow University Of Scotch Toronto Canada Mumbai Hockey Smith