8 Burst results for "Sasha Pfeifer"

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

"A Crossroads Parkway crash here. The right lane blocked and traffic slow from Lorraine Astri. And in Pomona 10 eastbound at Mountain Avenue Crash block in the left lane there you're slow from the 57. This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. The writer Teetsi Dang Garamba has traced the history of Zimbabwe in a trilogy of novels. From the end of colonialism and white minority rule through the country's war for independence, too, in her most recent book this Morning bill body, the tyrannical period following the joys of independence, a period marked by crackdown on dissent. In July, Dong Garamba was arrested for protesting government corruption and is awaiting trial. And just last week this morning, the body was shortlisted for a prestigious Booker Prize. I was really fortunate to have this short listing happen at practically the same time that I had to go to court. It's very daunting to live in the circumstances that we have in symbol at the moment with increasing repression and the implosion off the economy. And basically the fabric off the nation not being so stable. And so it's really wonderful to have this good thing in my life that I can always look to And it gives me strength and it carries me through. Do you think it's also protective? In some sense? Do you feel more protected as your government cracks down on you? Now that you're getting so much international attention and accolades for your book, Definitely no government in the world would like to have negative publicity. I think I would not be exposed to some of the really terrible things that have happened to other people. That is one side but there is another side and that is the messages that have to be given to the Zimbabwean people. However, that message would appear to the outside world sexy when you say a message needs to be sent his Zimbabweans are you talking about the message? The government wants to send the protesters and also to the rest of the population. A government that wants to hold onto power needs to make it clear that they have the power to make life very uncomfortable for citizens so that citizens do not think that they are able to just stand up and demand things. Well, it seems that you were also trying to send a message when you were protesting in July and arrested. This was an anti government protest for our listeners who don't know what happened to you. Can you explain why you were there and how it unfolded? Yes, session. I was trying to send a message a swell on the 31st of July. Leader off one of the smaller opposition parties had called for a nationwide protest against corruption, and I decided to engage in that as the time for the protests. Drew near some of the people involved in revealing this corruption and exposing it were arrested and the government said that the protest was illegal, and President Mnangagwa said it was an insurrection against the government. Now, I could not understand this because the Constitution of Sim Bob gives Zimbabwean citizens the rights to demonstrate peacefully. And what kind of protest was this? I think I've read you were standing on a street with a sign. Yes, This is all taking place during Covad 19 restrictions, though the idea was that people could Gather in small groups in their neighborhood. So a friend and I met up and we walked down the road to an intersection so that we could get the traffic going both ways. And then we saw the right vehicle parked by the side of the road and we were asked to climb in. What's your level of concern about how this unfolds your fate in the courts and whether Jim Zimbabwe's justice system will be fair. I am concerned about the way the justice system handles cases at the moment. I was not charged with demonstrating because that is, in fact, legal. I was charged with attending a meeting with intention to incite public violence, breach of the peace or acts of bigotry. And clearly I wasn't doing any of those things. My friend wasn't doing any of those things, so I'm hoping that justice will prevail. In your writings over the decades, you've done a lot of basically political social commentary about Zimbabwe and its struggles. I'm wondering what it felt like to interact with your government. In this new way. I mean to be arrested to be facing a trial. So it was very disappointing for me, having become an adult in the 19 eighties after independence and having experienced the whole hope off the new nation and seen the potential It was really heartbreaking to come to a point where I am told I'm not allowed to exercise my right to demonstrate. And when I do the weight of the state comes down on me. It was a very sad moment for me as we've mentioned. This is the third book in the trilogy that unfolds toward the end of white minority rule in Zimbabwe, then called Rhodesia to the beginning of Zimbabwe and independence. For our listeners who aren't familiar with what was going on in Zimbabwe at that time. Would you briefly explain? Yes, the three books followed the life of a character called Tumbles. I see girls and this multiple body picks up the story after independence at the end of the 19 nineties, when we begin to see the change in the economy. Very obviously, It's clear that something is not right. And if it is not put right, it will continue to worsen and tumbled. Sai is unemployed, living in a hostel full of younger women in the city. And she has to leave the hostel because he is now over the age that is allowed by people for people living at the hustle. So it begins with her searching for somewhere to live. This character is somewhat of an anti hero. I mean, in a particularly dark place at this moment in her life. Yes, he she is definitely an anti hero and It was very difficult to write it in such a way that The reader would go with it, but I'm glad that it's apparently has words and I'm delighted with that. Your first book You said you were writing to encourage young Zimbabweans to develop themselves. What is the message You're trying to send now, given the despair of that main character in your current book, the message that I want Zimbabweans to engage with is that what happens is up to us because temples I, or she's concerned with is getting ahead in her own life. And I showed that that kind of attitude may lead to a person getting what they want for some time, but in the end The repercussions off that kind of behavior are going to be felt by everybody. And so this is what I am trying to bring Zimbabweans to think about because since the economy is so difficult People think I just have to put my head down and do what's best for me. But that doesn't solve the community and national level issues that we have to engage with city. Dang Garamba is the author of this More Noble Body, which was shortlisted last week for the Booker Prize CC. Thank you for talking and congratulations again. Thank you so much. In some countries, smartphone APS has become essential for Corona virus contact tracing in.

Zimbabwe NPR News Lorraine Astri Jim Zimbabwe Booker Prize Mary Louise Kelly Pomona Teetsi Dang Dong Garamba writer Sasha Pfeifer Drew President Mnangagwa Sai Rhodesia
"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

"Four or five. Also in L. A one on one North bound with 1 10 stalled car in the left lane of that connector to the 1 10 south bound traffic Slow from about Alameda Avenue. It's 3 50. This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. The writer Teetsi Dang Garamba has traced the history of Zimbabwe in a trilogy of novels. From the end of colonialism and white minority rule through the country's war for independence, too, in her most recent book this Morning bill body, the tyrannical period following the joys of independence, a period marked by crackdown on dissent. In July, Dong Garamba was arrested for protesting government corruption and is awaiting trial. And just last week this morning, the body was shortlisted for a prestigious Booker Prize. I was really fortunate to have this short listing happen at practically the same time that I had to go to court. It's very daunting to live in the circumstances that we have in symbol at the moment with increasing repression and the implosion off the economy. And basically the fabric off the nation not being so stable. And so it's really wonderful to have this good thing in my life that I can always look to And it gives me strength and it carries me through. Do you think it's also protective? In some sense? Do you feel more protected as your government cracks down on you? Now that you're getting so much international attention and accolades for your book, Definitely no government in the world would like to have negative publicity. I think I would not be exposed to some of the really terrible things that have happened to other people. That is one side but there is another side and that is the messages that have to be given to the Zimbabwean people. However, that message would appear to the outside World City. When you say a message needs to be sent his Zimbabweans are you talking about the message? The government wants to send a protesters and also to the rest of the population. A government that wants to hold onto power. Needs to make it clear that they have the power to make life very uncomfortable for citizens so that citizens do not think that they are able to just stand up and demand things. Well, it seems that you were also trying to send a message when you were protesting in July and arrested. This was an anti government protest for our listeners who don't know what happened to you. Can you explain why you were there and how it unfolded? Yes, sir. I was trying to send a message a swell on the 31st of July. Leader off one of the smaller opposition parties had called for a nationwide protest against corruption. And I decided to engage in that as the time for the protests drew near Some of the people involved in revealing this corruption and exposing it were arrested and the government said that the protest was illegal and president of Mnangagwa said it was an insurrection against the government. Now, I could not understand this because the Constitution of Sim Bob gives Zimbabwean citizens the rights to demonstrate peacefully. And what kind of protest was this? I think I've read you were standing on a street with a sign. Yes, This is all taking place during Covad 19 restrictions that the idea is that people could The other in small groups in their neighborhood. So a friend and I met up and we walked down the road to an intersection so that we could get the traffic going both ways. And then we saw the right vehicle parked by the side of the road and we were asked to climb in. What's your level of concern about how this unfolds your fate in the courts and whether Jim Zimbabwe's justice system will be fair. I am concerned about the way the justice system handles cases at the moment. I was not charged with demonstrating because that is, in fact, legal. I was charged with attending a meeting with intention to incite public violence, breach off the piece or acts of bigotry. And clearly I wasn't doing any of those things. My friend wasn't doing any of those things, so I'm hoping that justice will prevail. In your writings over the decades, you've done a lot of basically political social commentary about Zimbabwe and its struggles. I'm wondering what it felt like to interact with your government. In this new way. I mean to be arrested to be facing a trial. So it was very disappointing for me, having become an adult in the 19 eighties after independence and having experienced the whole hope off the new nation and seeing the potential It was really heartbreaking to come to a point toe. I am told I'm not allowed to exercise my right to demonstrate. And when I do the weight of the state comes down on me. It was a very sad moment for me as we've mentioned. This is the third book in the trilogy that unfolds toward the end of white minority rule in Zimbabwe, then called Rhodesia to the beginning of Zimbabwe and independence. For our listeners who aren't familiar with what was going on in Zimbabwe at that time. Would you briefly explain? Yes. The three books followed the life of a character called Tumbled. Zeiss Agok and this mortal body picks up the story after independence at the end of the 19 nineties, when we begin to see the change in the economy Very obviously, It's clear that something is not right. And if it is not put right, it will continue to worsen and tumbled. Sai is unemployed, living in a hostel full of younger women in the city. And she has to leave the hostel because he is now over the age that is allowed by people for people living at the hostel. So it begins with her searching for somewhere to live. This character is somewhat of an anti hero. I mean, in a particularly dark place at this moment in her life. Yes, he she is definitely an anti hero and It was very difficult to write it in such a way that The reader would go with it. But, um, I'm glad that it's apparently has words and I'm delighted with that. Your first book You said you were writing to encourage young Zimbabweans to develop themselves. What is the message You're trying to send now, given the despair of that main character in your current book, the message that I want Zimbabweans to engage with is that what happens is up to us because temples I, or she's concerned with is getting ahead in her own life. And I showed that that kind of attitude may lead to a person getting what they want for some time, but in the end The repercussions off that kind of behavior are going to be felt by everybody. And so this is what I am trying to bring Zimbabweans to think about because since the economy is so difficult People think I just have to put my head down and do what's best for me. But that doesn't solve the community and national level issues that we have to engage with city. Dang Garamba is the author of this Morning. All Body which was shortlisted last week for the Booker Prize CC. Thank you for talking and congratulations again. Thank you so much. In some countries, smartphone APS has become essential for Corona virus contact.

Zimbabwe NPR News Dong Garamba Jim Zimbabwe Booker Prize Mary Louise Kelly Teetsi Dang writer World City Sasha Pfeifer Mnangagwa president Sai Rhodesia
"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Sasha Pfeifer, the Korean boy band. BTS played NPR's tiny desk Siri's and shattered a record for YouTube views. You sort of get set upon by just like thousands and thousands of BTS fans were like Thank you so much for including them. This is a big deal for them. It's like it's a big deal for them. There's a biggest band in the world now news. Live from NPR NEWS. I'm Janine Hearst President. Trump says he will name his nominee to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the end of this week, and as NPR's Domenico Montanaro reports Trump will keep one part of his face in mind. I think it would be just a reassurance for evangelical voters that he's continuing to fight for them. I mean, I don't think it really changed much direction or move the needle very much for him with that group in particular. But he does have to weigh whether this person can be sufficiently against abortion rights. He's going to have to do a little bit of vetting on the records of some of these Candidates. Ginsburg's death and the pending nomination fighter raising the stakes and an already contentious presidential race, with Trump vowing to fill the seat before the presidential election, and Democratic candidate Joe Biden calling for that decision. To be left to the next president. Stock prices regained some of the ground they lost this afternoon but still finished lower. NPR's gyms are Oli reports. Bank stocks were especially hard hit. At one point in the morning, the Dow was down more than 900 points, but it recovered and finished. 509 points down. The S and P. 500 has fallen nearly 10% from its all time high earlier this month, airline stocks were among those losing altitude because of concerns the global economy is slowing. Delta was down more than 9%. Financial shares were also lower after a report from my coalition of journalist suggesting that money laundering remains a big problem in global banks. Meanwhile, the looming fight over who will replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg threatens to scuttle negotiations in Congress over another stimulus bill. Jims AA, roly NPR news and buy the clothes. The Dow was down 509 points the NASDAQ Down 14 the S and P. 500 down 38. You're listening to NPR news. Live from KGB news. I'm Raquel Maria Delon. San Francisco will receive $45 million to convert the hotel into permanent housing for more than 200 people who are homeless or at risk of losing their homes as Aaron Baldessari reports, the grant is part of project Home Key, a statewide effort to house homeless people during the pandemic. Governor Gavin Newsom plans to distribute a total of $600 million to cities and counties before the end of the year. The money will be used to purchase and create permanent housing. Newsome announced the second round of funding today, including the $45 million for San Francisco. The city plans to purchase a residential hotel on Centre Street, which will allow some tenants to stay in place and open more rooms for people who are now homeless to move into. San Jose announced it was getting $14 million last week as part of the first round of project home Key funding, the city plans to use it to buy a hotel, which will become a permanent home for 76 people. I'm Erin Baldessari kick you in the news. State fire officials say wild fires have burned more than 3.6 million acres in California this year. That's larger than the state of Connecticut. They say They're currently 27 major wildfires in California since August 15th when fire activity intensified. There have been 26 fatalities and 6400 structures have been destroyed. The weather has contributed to those fires. Warm and dry conditions persist in a large part of the state in Oakland. I'm.

NPR NEWS Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg NPR Trump San Francisco Mary Louise Kelly Governor Gavin Newsom YouTube Janine Hearst California Raquel Maria Delon Erin Baldessari Siri Sasha Pfeifer Connecticut Joe Biden
"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

"Much of generations. E will vote for the first time in November, and they've got plenty to say they're the most diverse and digitally connected generation in the US As the general election nears, you're going to hear from three young voters about the issues that matter most to them. That's coming up in the six o'clock hour, also coming up in the six o'clock hour. It's greater L A. You're going to meet Manuel Villanueva. He's a labor organizer with the nonprofit restaurant Opportunities Center. Since the pandemic began, he's been on a mission to help restaurant workers. He's been fielding calls from out of work cooks, dishwashers and bar hands, who Don't have anyone else to turn to. That's coming up on greater Elliot 6 30 Right here on K C, R w checking your roads Pasadena to 10 Bandits Here in Monterey Boulevard Still have this overturned car, blocking the carpal and left lanes flow traffic now from Mountain Street in Agoura Hills, one of one South bound past Chesbro Road. Gotta crash blocking the two left lanes there and you're going to find traffic slow coming away from about Canaan. Use. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. Let's say it's 2021. Scientists have already developed and marketed a vaccine for Coben 19. Now they face a new problem convincing people to actually get vaccinated with it. A Gallup poll last month found that more than one in three Americans would not get an FDA approved Corona virus vaccine even for free. Psychology professor Delores Albarracin studies behavior and medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. She spoke with our co host, Audie Cornish earlier today about why some people are skeptical of vaccines. We know that it can take years to develop and distribute a safe vaccine to everyone. And then, of course, just this week, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced that it was hitting pause on its trial to investigate and unexplained illness and one of its participants. So there are people who are concerned about potential long term side effects that who are worried about this process being rushed. Does that boost people's doubts? And is that wrong? Well, I think it's completely normal, and we should all be looking at side effects for any pharmaceutical product that we consume right. Among those who hesitate 60% fierce side effects 37%. I'm not afraid, but I just don't think it will work. And then you have trained per cent who are stone two posers. So the anti Vax group that's a small group. So for their folks who are fearing side of facts. I think news like the one you're referring to are going to be extremely influential, and they connect with Some pre strong and persuasive in narratives about Big pharma and we have data. Even I want my own data with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, showing that exposure to social media earlier on actually predict vaccination intentions in the domain of full later on, so there's pretty good data that those groups are not trivial. Wait, So help me understand this Essentially if someone sees anti vaccination social media posts that can actually influence their own decision about whether or not to accept a vaccine. Yes, it's similar to that. So he surveyed 3000 participants over one year following the flu season till months. So when we observe is what is going on Twitter. What misinformation amount vaccines is being distributed and where So when you look in that, and then you look at whoever lives in the county that has that kind of big pharma conspiracy in this information circulating on Twitter. Are less likely to get the full shot a few months later. Except Dad. They're not affected if they have discussions in really life, so if they can discuss this information with friends, family their physicians, then they're less persuaded by the misinformation, but otherwise the misinformation they encounter regionally affect them. What does all this mean for the public information campaign? How should authorities. Public health officials go about trying to convince people to embrace the vaccines should one come along? So this travesty In my view should be to communicate a norm clearly. So you need to tell people that everybody wants it. We all like it. We must have it. So something quite different from what we saw with wearing masks were there was a lot more hesitation in the messaging, right and contradictions, Silver months. So clear norm. You also need to be, of course, correcting for misinformation systematically every day through health education in schools and work. Everywhere. I'm seeing an explosion of misinformation and what the whole has referred to as an infant Emmick, and if we don't eradicate it won't make evade difficult to end that coffin 19 pandemic. That was the Laura's other scene. She's a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you. China's military appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft heads landed. Sure enough fuzzy satellite images napped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons..

China United States Urbana Champagne University of Illinois McDowell professor Twitter Pasadena Manuel Villanueva Agoura Hills restaurant Opportunities Cente Brian Weeden Audie Cornish Canaan flu AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force FDA
"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft head landed sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China McDowell NPR Urbana Champagne University of Illinois professor flu Twitter Audie Cornish FDA Elsa Chang Delores Albarracin AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force Brian Weeden United States Sasha Pfeifer
"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KCRW

"50 from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. Let's say it's 2021. Scientists have already developed and marketed a vaccine for Coben 19. Now they face a new problem convincing people to actually get vaccinated with it. A Gallup poll last month found that more than one in three Americans would not get an FDA approved Corona virus vaccine even for free. Psychology professor Delores Albarracin studies behavior and medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. She spoke with our co host, Audie Cornish earlier today about why some people are skeptical of vaccines. We know that it can take years to develop and distribute a safe vaccine to everyone. And then, of course, just this week, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced that it was hitting pause on its trial to investigate and unexplained illness in one of its participants. So there are people who are concerned about potential long term side effects that who are worried about this process being rushed. Does that boost people's doubts? And is that wrong? Well, I think it's completely normal, and we should all be looking at side effects for any pharmaceutical product that we consume right. Among those who hesitate 60% fierce side effects 37%. I'm not afraid, but to some think it will work. And then you have trained per cent who are pissed on two posers. So the anti Vax group and that's a small group. So for their folks who are fearing side of facts. I think news like the one you're referring to are going to be extremely influential, and they connect with Some pre strong and persuasive in narratives about Big pharma. And we have data even want my own day that with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania showing that exposure to social media earlier on actually predict vaccination intentions in the domain, a fool later on, so there's pretty good data that those groups are not trivial. Wait, So help me understand this Essentially if someone sees anti vaccination social media posts that can actually influence their own decision about whether or not to accept a vaccine. Yes, it's similar to that. So he surveyed 3000 participants over one year following the flu season till months. So when we observe is what is going on Twitter. What misinformation amount vaccines is being distributed and where So when you look in that, and then you look at whoever lives in the county that has that kind of big pharma conspiracy in this information circulating on Twitter. Are less likely to get the flu shot a few months later. Except Dad. They're not affected if they have discussions in really life, so if they can discuss this information with friends, family their physicians, then they're less persuaded by the misinformation, but otherwise the misinformation they encounter regionally affect them. What does all this mean for the public information campaign? How should authorities. Public health officials go about trying to convince people to embrace the vaccines should one come along? So this travesty In my view should be to communicate a norm clearly. So you need to tell people that everybody wants it. We all like it. We must have it. So something quite different from what we saw with wearing masks were there was a lot more hesitation in the messaging, right and contradictions, Silver months. So clear norm. You also need to be, of course, correcting for misinformation systematically every day through health education in schools and work. Everywhere. I'm seeing an explosion of misinformation and what the whole has referred to as an infant Emmick, and if we don't eradicate it won't make invade difficult to end a coffin 19 pandemic. That was the Laura's other scene. She's a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you. China's military appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft head landed sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities,.

China McDowell NPR Urbana Champagne University of Illinois professor flu Twitter Audie Cornish FDA Elsa Chang Delores Albarracin AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force Brian Weeden United States Sasha Pfeifer
"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"L u C dot I'd leadership funding for WNYC I see is provided by the drone Al Green Foundation, a proud supporter of New York City's major cultural institutions. It's all this nice. Clear, Sunny whether we've had for the past few days. Say goodbye. All that tonight a chance of showers and thunderstorms, mostly after midnight. Patchy fog tonight, too. Otherwise. Cloudy love about 73 tonight with more showers and thunderstorms possible tomorrow mostly in the afternoon cloudy through the day with a high near 82 degrees. Good afternoon. This is all things considered on WN My sea at 4 15. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. Let's say it's 2021. Scientists have already developed and marketed a vaccine for covert 19. Now they face a new problem convincing people to actually get vaccinated with it. A Gallup poll last month found that more than one in three Americans would not get an FDA approved Coronas fry exact Corona virus vaccine even for free Psychology professor Dolores Albarracin studies behavior and medicine at the University of Illinois at her Bana champagne. She spoke with our co host, Audie Cornish earlier today about why some people are skeptical of vaccines. We know that it can take years to develop and distribute a safe vaccine to everyone. And then, of course, just this week, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced that it was hitting pause on its trial to investigate and unexplained illness and one of its participants. So there are people who are concerned about potential long term side effects that who are worried about this process being rushed. Does that boost people's doubts? And is that wrong?.

Sasha Pfeifer Al Green Foundation New York City Audie Cornish AstraZeneca Elsa Chang NPR Dolores Albarracin Coronas FDA University of Illinois professor
"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"sasha pfeifer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lectures will rebroadcast a 2014 conversation with Dr In Davis contests. This contest is a neuroscientist and an opera soprano. She'll talk about the effects of music on the brain and the neuroscience of creativity. That's next time on city arts and lectures here on its ahead of data clock. The repeat broadcast is tomorrow morning, Wednesday morning at one right here tonight. A 10 minute, Campbell have our forum rebroadcast at 10 for him getting an update on the wildfires in Bay Area air quality. 10 20 a discussion about a recent New York Times piece on the life and death of Briana Taylor, the young black woman in Kentucky killed by police during a drug raid on her home, and Amina will talk to the New York Times correspondent responsible for that piece. About that case, the forum rebroadcast tonight a 10 on public radio. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. The new TV. Siri's woke from Hu Lu is both trippy and prescient in it. An African American cartoonist has a moral dilemma. Why isn't that his people of color? Always having to stand for something? You know, say something in our work and boy does he find out set in San Francisco woke also features an eclectic soundtrack with punk, hip hop and soul. NPR's Elizabeth Blair talked to the show's creator, aboutthe social conscience of this new comedy. Early in the series cartoonist Keith played by Lemorin Morris is on a career high, his comic strip. Stand better has been picked up for syndication. He's all about keeping the strip light until he experiences police brutality firsthand..

New York Times Lemorin Morris Dr In Davis NPR Campbell Keith Elsa Chang Briana Taylor Sasha Pfeifer Hu Lu Siri Amina Elizabeth Blair San Francisco Bay Area Kentucky