20 Burst results for "Sartre"

"sartre" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

06:18 min | Last month

"sartre" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"Perhaps you'd expect a driver being paid handsomely to defend their team to the hills, but you know, if you look at McLaren three, four years ago, you say, well, the reason they can't win is because a wind tunnel is an up to spec. So that's why they're getting their brand new shyly one online for 2024. But we know that him will facility at Sauber is amazing, all those LMP1 cars at a designer and then go on to blitz circuit Della Sartre and all of that, it's a cracked facility, but they're not, yeah, and as you mentioned they're not operating at the cost cap. So some of that means they're slow with parts so they can design something pretty mega but then can't construct it, can't get it on both cars. But also if you're not operating at cost cap, you know, this is why the arguments for breaking the cost cap with the allegations at Red Bull are so strong because there is performance to be gained there. So if you think Alfred have taken it or sailboats, we should probably start referring to taking that decent step forward. They're now midfield contenders, which is no mean feat, considering that car would not do two or three laps without going bang in pre season testing, but now a bona FIDE midfield contender with some more investment with the more loving playing field of the cost cap. So again, if they keep on investing, they would expect them to start to begin to catch up. So if I could use a poor analogy, I'm an Aston Villa fan Martin and we've just signed a new manager in Unai Emery, and it's not about going and winning the Premier League in the next three seasons. It's about being the best of the rest, which I think is the next target for that Sauber operation that we did sign of the chassis. And then it's about what they can do when they're running well. They probably the Audi side is probably been through a couple of team leaders to find the right one and then you start investing together to build incremental gains with the engine and whatever. And then in their words, take on or be the best German manufacturer in what was that awful they did something like the rings of the new stars or something which basically means move over Mercedes. And I think when they probably put that out what they're anticipating is beating Mercedes at the top rather than thinking Mercedes have regressed to where they are now. Okay, look, let's take a quick break and when we come back we'll talk about how it might work from a team versus engine perspective, many teams do split those two bases and successfully in some cases and will have a look to what they could be doing over the next three years to ensure that they have the best drivers from 2026 to take on that three year plan of getting to the front of the grid. Those are stories are on the way. Okay, let's talk a little bit about Matt, your opinion on how it might work. Audi have their obviously their base in Germany, their motor sport base. But as you've mentioned already, actually, the henville facility, the wind tunnel there, which has been around a long time now, but I gather has been updated and is still used very much as a source of revenue. As a business line to rent out. And it's still very if not cutting edge is still very, very good. One of the best in the world. Many teams do split. So the world champions, Honda and Red Bull, Red Bull powertrains based here in the UK and Milton Keynes. And then some of the, I think the stuff that Honda are very, very good at. They would say the combustion engine side is still done in Japan. Also split, Renault, Alpine. If you like France and perhaps less successfully, you could say lots of teams split engine and team and some have it all under one roof. I know the Christian Horner recently has been using that phrase that Red Bull power trains and Red Bull is able to build a car and an engine under one roof. I think it was an interview with Fred. A Ted sorry when he went to his house over the break and he was talking a lot about Red Bull powertrains. It was interesting that he was making that and sort of before the re loving with Honda. I guess, but what's your opinion on how it could shake out? Because it's not like Audi are going to buy their way into Sauber. Close down their base, which is not the biggest, but nothing to be ashamed of and move it all to Germany. So they're going to have to split it, not a million miles apart physically. How do you think it's going to shake out? Well, the one Barrett that would be the enormous cost and two if in rising does retain this small percentage. He'll say that that doesn't happen. But I think it's an interesting discussion, isn't it? Because then where do you draw the line? So, you know, like you talk about Red Bull being based in the UK and Honda in Japan. But what about Mercedes with the engine being done at brixworth and end up being an hour's drive to the chassis in brackley? What about even Red Bull when they go with their Red Bull powertrains online? Well, they're still separated by a factory rule in Adrian newey. It might be masterminding the design of the car, but he's not over same engine. Look at auto sport, we have the distinct magazine and the website. Has that necessarily changed from when we always used to be in the office together to now us communicating on Zoom and Microsoft Teams and other online software since pandemic not necessarily. So I don't really buy that as a barrier. I can see why it might be a handy excuse or whatever, you know, you think of maybe a better way to look at it rather than sort of the physical locations getting bogged down and that is the philosophy to use a really grandiose term. The concept that the approach, but that's why the McLaren Honda partnerships fell apart so much because one was had Mercedes sorry, because McLaren had designed this what it thought was a class leading better than anyway. I was size zero Coke bottle shaped package. The Honda engine barely could fit in. And so because it was basically crowbar in there, it was getting too hot and kept going bang all the time. So you can add these two class leading organizations, but unless they integrate well, it's not going to happen. So that's when you would say Sauber is still Sauber engineer is and there will still have this minority ownership and stuff. But effectively, if they're all using Audi headed letter paper, you'd expect them to run with the same approach and therefore they can integrate well and be harmonious. So I don't see it being a major issue. And in terms of Audi, bigwigs or the marketing department with the ideally wanting all in Germany, yeah, I get that, but does it really matter? I mean, it is the same way so I was speaking to someone and I'm sure people can take an educated potshot who it was, but someone very high up in the Porsche 9 one 9 program. I said, well,

Della Sartre Sauber Honda Unai Emery Audi McLaren Red Bull powertrains Aston Villa Red Bull Alfred Premier League Germany Christian Horner Martin Milton Keynes Japan Renault UK Matt
"sartre" Discussed on The Ed Mylett Show

The Ed Mylett Show

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"sartre" Discussed on The Ed Mylett Show

"Never. No, but then but then it's a long even when you get the validation of everybody and everyone loves you and thinks you're the best. And you finally get it. Yeah. And then you go, oh, is that all there is? Because wait a minute, I'm still it's still me. I still wake up. It's funny you say that. My dad did say to me. I'm loving everybody gets to hear this, by the way. One thing my dad was a wise dude, my dad, you see him and he goes, just remember this, man. Whenever you get to this level of success that you think you'll be happier when you get there that house or like whatever people reading a book or whatever your show or whatever it is, he goes, just remember you have to bring you with you when you get there. And I was like, that's really because my dad had worked on himself and his sobriety, right? He's like, you're going to bring you when you get there. There's nothing more true in the world than that. No. I'm sure you still do this now to this day. It's like, I still mean when I'm there. It's still me in the car alone when I'm driving no matter. What the car is or where I'm going, it's me and how I feel about me. Of course. What I really believe about me. But speaking to your audience, because for anybody listening to this, I think the most powerful tool that changed everything for me was my mind. This is everything. And I know you know this. Because we've read the same books, Phyllis stiller, I read in one of her autobiography, the magic of believing. The magic of believing read that book, and I started to read that when I was like 28. And but before that, I had read existentialism in philosophy class. And what is that about self determinism? You can choose your life. This idea is radical. Sartre choose choices, and I went, oh, you're right. Life can push me around, or I can move the ball. And to me, this is the biggest lesson that I try to teach my boys. Hey man, if you don't take charge of this whole thing, it's going to take you away like a current. Man. Right? And they don't teach you this in school, really. Yeah. And it makes me nutty. You can choose everything is a choice. Everything. And read and read it, read a book and it makes me sad other than, of course, the power of moral hello. That the reading is like, guess what?

Phyllis stiller Sartre
"sartre" Discussed on Philosophy Bites

Philosophy Bites

04:16 min | 4 months ago

"sartre" Discussed on Philosophy Bites

"So she didn't get married herself, was she saying, in her choices, that this is authentic for her not to get married then. Yeah, it was authentic for her. And what I particularly admire about the choices that she did make was that there was a huge amount of pressure for her to get married and settle down, but she pushed back against that. And even before she met her lifelong partner, Jean-Paul Sartre, she decided that she was going to question all the expectations placed on her. And she chose otherwise and she thought that those choices to choose not marriage, for example, or to make choices other than what's expected of us, is a core part of authenticity. Where do you think this authenticity comes from? It's not as if her choice to be single in her particular way came from nowhere. Yeah, and so this is what makes bourbon's idea of authenticity a little bit different. Is that there isn't some kind of jewel at the heart of our being, some kind of blueprint that we just need to dig deep and uncover, rather bois understanding is a much more existential view in that we don't just have freedom that we are freedom. And where the sum of our actions certainly, so we are what we do, but we're also our intentions and goals. And so what that also means is that we are free and at the core of our being is free will and we should be able to have the options to choose against what's expected of us. That's really interesting what you said in that answer that it's not as if you look within yourself and find a blueprint, because often when people talk about authenticity, they describe this as being true to yourself, as if introspection will reveal what yourself really, really believes as if there's a little book in there somewhere that has the ideal story of your life and then you read from that book and then apply it to the world.

Paul Sartre Jean
John Zmirak Zooms Out of Uvalde to See the Bigger Disturbing Picture

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:53 min | 6 months ago

John Zmirak Zooms Out of Uvalde to See the Bigger Disturbing Picture

"John, I have to ask you, what's happening in America? It's happened gradually. But we're now at a point where the breakdown of the family, what happened in the 1960s, the breakdown of the family has led to this. In other words, it takes time, but now you have the mother of this shooter is a drug addict is a confused person. There is no father. The 18 year old is deeply disturbed. When we were kids in school, you'd say, well, he's a weirdo. You'd be kind of worried about him or something. They're just something they're not socially fitting in. But now, as you said earlier, it's out of bounds to point that out. It's out of balance and say, something's wrong with that person. Now you have to sort of celebrate their madness. You said it's been cross pressure. I don't know what else was going on. But the point is that you're not allowed to talk about that until he kills 19 children. And then when he kills the 19 children, it's the fault of law abiding gun owners in Wyoming. You see, it is part of a program. These antique family laws were put in place for a reason to break down the family, so that everyone is just an isolated individual, an electron whirling around the nucleus federal government. The goal, the goal of the sexual revolution was always more sexual liberty for wealthy good-looking people, more power for the government and the power of the government will be will be wielded by the aristocrats. The song comes from the Marquis de Sade, a perverted aristocrat who came up with the ideology that became the sexual revolution. Popularized by Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de beauvoir, it is now the official religion of the west

America John Wyoming Federal Government Marquis De Sade Government Paul Sartre Simone De Beauvoir Jean
"sartre" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

06:43 min | 6 months ago

"sartre" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"A very proustian claim. What do you make of that? So I think that there is something, especially I'll say noble about unrequited love. So I think that all kinds of love are sublime in the kantian sense. Now, what does this mean? It means that love, gestures, at something, beyond our understanding. Beyond our capacity to make sense of, so Kant, when he talks about the sublime, he talks about the mathematical infinity or about mountainous landscapes. Looking at nature and recognizing that it cares nothing for us. And feeling awe and terror in its presence. And I think that love is exactly this kind of thing. And I think that unrequited love, the very fact of having one's love, not returned, makes this feature, this sublimity, even more palpable, now why should this be? Well, this is because you might think that having our love not returned would be a reason not to love. Right. If someone doesn't love us back, this might give us a reason if anything does. To stop loving them. And yet we don't. We need it. Our love can continue even against the reasons. And this reveals something really interesting about love. Namely, that it is a rational that it doesn't operate according to reasons. What do you mean exactly by a rational? Is that the same as irrational or is it something different? Irrational, typically suggests against the reasons. So knowing that a certain course of action is correct and doing something different anyway. Whereas a rationality implies not pertaining to reasons whatsoever. Reasons are irrelevant here. Something like that. Okay, right. And so this takes us back to Kant because we can't write about a faculty which surpasses every standard of sense. Is that what you're getting in there? That's exactly right. I think that love is exactly that kind of faculty. That love, the reveals exactly that kind of faculty that is. Well, I know from your work that you have experienced unrequited love yourself. Let's get back into the phenomenological description. What does it feel like? How would you describe that experience? Oh, it's torturous. I think anyone who has loved someone and not had their love returned would agree. But I'm inclined to say that it is a sublime torture. Because it has this immensity, this incredible feeling you are just powerless in the face of it. And this is what I mean when I say that love is sublime in the kantian sense. It's got this just incredibly overwhelming power. I get what you're on about here, but there's also the question of just how good for you is unrequited lover. I mean, there are lots of things that are sublime, but not necessarily healthy. And given that unrequited love can lead to poor health outcomes, it can affect your judgment and lead you to make regrettable decisions. Am I being just very unromantic in thinking about it like that? Or is there a persuasive argument to the effect that in spite of everything you're saying we should still try as hard as we can to get over unrequited love? Because it's just not good for us. Absolutely. So unrequited love hurts. It causes us to do things that we may regret. It may have, as you say, poor health outcomes, all kinds of things. It pains us. Surely these are reasons for us to get over our love if anything is. But I think that if we're able to endorse our love rather than reject it, what we can do is avoid a kind of self alienation. So I've said that love is the kind of thing that we can't help, but do. And this is due to its a rational nature. If we reject it, all we're going to cause is a kind of alienation of self. We've got this emotion. We can't help but feel it. And yet we wish we didn't. If instead, we can endorse this attitude with a kind of radical acceptance to use the language of mindfulness. Then we can avoid that kind of difficulty. That alienation that to use Sartre and language, bad faith, that inauthenticity. Right, we're feeling it. It's there. It's part of who we are. So we just have to honor us in some sense. That's exactly right. If we think about the ways in which love can grow and I guess here I'm dipping back into the relationship directed attitude. Love starts out as attraction and then over time it deepens, then as a relationship develops, it continues to go through various stages. And all of that might happen over decades, or it might happen over a very short period of time. It could happen over a single day or a single night. But the conventional picture is that it's that process of development that makes love what it is. In the case of unrequited love, which, by virtue of the fact that it's unrequited, hasn't been able to grow or develop in that way. Aren't we talking about something more in the order of infatuation, perhaps? Is that a meaningful distinction to draw? Is the phenomenology of infatuation different from the phenomenology of love? So I think that the phenomenology of infatuation is going to be much more closely analogous to the phenomenology of desire, so desire for the other person, desire to spend time with them, desire to form a relationship, all of these things. Whereas the phenomenology of love is going to be at least sometimes characterized by that experience that I've called arrested attention..

Kant Sartre
"sartre" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:15 min | 7 months ago

"sartre" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"John's mirror. John, you were just talking about how everybody knew and everybody knows that abortion is wrong. And the Marquis de Sade, one of the most genuinely wicked human beings in history, of whom we have a record. He was dramatically pro abortion. Are we surprised? He argued that women needed abortion so that they could be equally as depraved and detached from the consequences of sex as men. So if women wanted to be happy libertines, the way he considered himself to pursue pleasure at all other costs, regardless of childbearing the needs of the future, the needs of other people, he regarded the ego. And it's a certain of its will. To the only good. The Marquis de Sade considered themselves the liberator of mankind. He was going to free us from Christian morale. Free us from having to care about other people. He was going to free the strong from having to care about the week. Remember, this is someone who for his own sexual amusement would kidnap and torture prostitutes. That's why he ended up in prison. People today pretend that he was imprisoned for his ideas. He was imprisoned as a violent film as a sick, aristocrat, who used his money and power to prey on poor helpless women who were otherwise starving and to physically torture them for his own amusement. His ideas were as close to pure evil as we can imagine. He advocated incest, child rape, child murder. But in his quest to advance pleasure and to free people from Christian morality, he said abortion should be legal. Abortion should be accepted. Abortion is fine. It is the only way for women to be a sexually furry as meant to have the same ability to walk away from the results of their activity to sleep with strangers and walk away. The only way you could do that, that women could be as free as men would be to have abortion widely available. Most people were horrified by this, even the leaders of the French Revolution considered de Sato, a dangerous lunatic. His ideas were revived in the 20th century by Simone de beauvoir. The common law wife with John Paul Sartre. She actually published a book in defense of the Marquis de Sade called must we burn. Must we burn his books? This pretense that she was just speaking up for freedom. But if freedom of the press, but in fact, her book is a defense and a promotion of his ideas and in her book the second sex, she takes decides argument without giving him credit and says that abortion must be legal so that women can be libertines just like men. And she signed with great petition in France that led to its legal proportions, legalization there. So the pro choice movement, via Simone de beauvoir, goes straight back to the satanic rituals and torture fantasies of the Marquis de Sade. It is a direct election. Yes, let's connect the dots here, folks. If you care about women, decide a powerful, wealthy man used his power and his money to torture poor women who had fallen into prostitution. It doesn't get more obviously evil. And this is the man who was arguing for abortion and let's go to Simon de beauvoir in my book is atheism dead. I talk about at the end of his life, Jean-Paul Sartre comes to faith and what's amazing is that Simon de beauvoir was outraged, utterly outraged. You start seeing that there is a satanic animus behind these things. This is not simply like, oh, I'm for free love. There's something deeper and she was so offended. She was absolutely outraged and betrayed that this man who comes to his senses at the end of his life. That he would dare even to voice what he's thinking, that he would be a free thinker. She felt betrayed by him. That's kind of where we are, folks. We're getting clarity here. We're getting spiritual clarity on what is behind some of these things. That's right. And we have to remember that just Jean-Paul Sartre's argument against the existence of God was not a rational. It was not that there wasn't evidence for it. It was not that the arguments didn't point to it. He essentially said, it's intolerable for there to be a God. And for us not to be him. In other words, the human will can not stand the idea of having an omnipotent master. So we must reject him so that we can feel omnipotent in ourselves, which is to serve in heaven. I mean, it's that satanic ego. It is at the very heart of its human pride, which goes all the way back to Eden. It is so dark. It is so evil. That's what we're talking about. In case you're scoring at home, that's right. And that's what we're facing here. One of the two political parties in America. I mean, political parties in America is the party of the Marquis de sa. It's the party of Sartre. It's the party of Margaret Sanger. It's the party of killing the innocent for the sake of our sexual convenience, but really for the sake of our own sense of omnipotence, our own sense of absolute sovereignty over ourselves. And one of the things that helped suppose this, the same people who think a woman should be able to abort her 8 month fetus and insist that even if it survived the abortion that the doctor kill it, because her bodily sovereignty is that absolute. Those same people didn't want to give that woman a choice of our whether or not to have the COVID vaccine. It is madness..

Marquis de Sade Simone de beauvoir Paul Sartre de Sato John Paul Sartre John French Revolution France Jean Marquis de sa America Margaret Sanger Sartre
"sartre" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:14 min | 7 months ago

"sartre" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"I mean, it's the same idea except Sartre uses men and Belo uses just like people wear the same. We're the same a pair of spirits, practically alike. I don't know, I think it struck me on my first read because I think it's a very famous sentence to French ears. But yeah, apply to a love relationship or a male and female relationship. It's different. It's very strong. Yeah. I feel like there's such a shifting view of women in the story. I mean, in the first half, I think every woman who appears is referred to as difficult. His mother's being difficult, Jones, so difficult. Even though women, the mother on the subway with the little girl, she seems really difficult. And so there's sort of a distaste for women. He doesn't like the cousin Jones lives with. He's feeling put off about women and how they behave. What they ask of him, I suppose. And then you get the kind of his sort of cry for equality. Yeah. But at the same time, his cry for mothering and nurturing. And when he finally gets it, at the end, that's what calms him down. That's what brings him back, you know, from the sort of abyss, his mind has fallen into. Yeah. Yeah, I feel it. I feel like if the story continues two minutes later, he's again angry about something else. But it's nice that it stops there, but I don't think this hair wash is going to solve everything for him. But I almost see it in light of the last monologue that he actually doesn't give to Joan. It's almost like all the women being seen as difficult before. It's almost like he's jealous of them. Because they don't have the same burdens that he does, yeah. Yeah, yeah. I mean, not that it excuses his nastiness, but it's an explanation. Yeah. I mean, luckily, all of his nastiness is internal..

Belo Sartre Jones Joan
"sartre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 8 months ago

"sartre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wow It just looks like island here One day it will be Thank you very much You're welcome Tour guide Amy Hampton on is herding a group off the beach only 375 people are allowed per hour and their hour is up For me as long as people can follow these rules it's going to be fine I've been talking to them like what we can do what we can not do what we should do what we should not do And lucky me my customer they are so nice They listen to me and they do what I ask for Marine biologist tan Tom rong Nawaz await at Bangkok's cassette Sartre university spearheaded the effort to save Maya bay Originally set to last just two years he worried it wouldn't be enough Then came COVID with pandemic travel restrictions that two years turned into four and Maya bay he says flourished So now we have evidence to draw other people if we give my furniture a chance She can come back So that four years mean a lot more than two years And as long as the government keeps limiting the number of visitors and keeps them out of the water he sees no reason why Maya bay can't continue to flourish And serve as a model for other nearby destinations For NPR news I'm Michael Sullivan in Maya bay Thailand This is NPR news This is doubly NYC Coming up on morning edition a second COVID-19 booster shot may soon be available for Americans 50 and older many doctors approve I think it's the right thing to do The evidence is very clear that immunity is waning after the first booster Critics say there isn't enough evidence that another shot is needed and would provide stronger protection That story later this out Then at 9 it's the BBC NewsHour on 93.9.

Maya bay Amy Hampton tan Tom rong Nawaz Sartre university NPR news Bangkok Michael Sullivan NPR Thailand BBC
"sartre" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

The Mad Mamluks

04:32 min | 9 months ago

"sartre" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

"Now, in the absence of a slam strategic framework and an Islamic normative reference in Islamic intellectual framework, then it is only inevitable in the absence of these frameworks that instead of engaging with the left and the right, we're going to be subordinated to the left and the right. Again, because there is no vision. There is no point of reference. There's no frame of reference and so forth. So I think part of HD had she had that we need today is to begin to think about, okay, what is the identity structure of Islam? What are the commitments of the Muslim? What are the policy preferences? And what are the strategic preferences of the Muslim? And I think if she had, you know, is literally part and parcel part of this process of identifying those commitments and identifying what is strategically in favorable to the Muslim world. Is there anything in closing that you wanted to discuss that we didn't talk yet on this show? Regarding yes, of course, this article is there something that because I really, really want people to read it. After having this backdrop, but this is a really, really, really important article. I think for Muslim, just to understand where they are, you know what I'm saying? Sometimes you don't know that the very framework that we're operating from is not going to bring us any type of progress or what type of progress and what is progress, right? I think essentially what also you're referring to in here is a certain type. Everyone has this need to progress, right? Exactly. So I think one of the key things that we need to reclaim a key, a key. Fact about what it means to be a Muslim, right? Or more so, what it means to be a human being. So human beings are distinguished from other beings because they have the capacity of choice. They have the capacity to choose. So John Paul Sartre, who is a French existentialist when the Germans invaded Paris, he came out with an article which.

John Paul Sartre Paris
"sartre" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Evidence, dare to look at the evidence. Yeah. And people refuse to look through the telescope. And he joked about it at one point, but I feel like people are so dug in. Yeah. Excuse me, people are so dug in. That they don't even want to look at the evidence. They just batted away. And I think, well, that's the thing. You're just asking people to keep an open mind. Just keep your mind open to what we're going to present here. That's what you can't prove God on in other words, God himself has to touch a person's heart. So there's a great mystery there. But you can try to understand the facts. It's kind of like if you study math or science or history, you just want to know what is. And I think people can become so entrenched that they don't want to know what is. They don't want to know the truth of the facts. That's bad. So I want to say to people, I try in the book to present it as fair mindedly as possible. I've discovered three or 5 ridiculous typos, which we have to change. I think I say something crazy like the diameter of Jupiter is 900,000 miles across. It's 90,000 miles across. I think I say something that Pluto has no moons, technically, that's not true. There's a couple of things like that in there, but we're going to fix them in the second duration. But none of that will affect the basics as you'll see. But I say that just so that we know when you're rushing a book to print, you miss stuff like this, but I just think the evidence is so overwhelming that I want at least people of faith to acquaint themselves with these facts. Because it is, it's overwhelming and almost nobody knows this. So I'm a popularizer. I put the stuff in a book to make it easy for your average reader, you know, you don't have to read the books that I read, but you can at least grasp the basics. And I'm telling you, we're living in exciting times right now. This is very exciting that this knowledge has not been known on a popular level. Yeah, you know what? And I don't think this is in the book. I haven't gotten to everything. I'm a few pages from the end, believe it or not, but John Paul, sorry. He's dying words, apparently recorded by a guy named Pierre Victor. He said this. This is amazing from SARS. He said, I do not feel that I am a product of chance, a speck of dust in the universe, but someone who was expected prepared prefigured in short of being whom only a creator could put here and this idea of a creating hand refers to God. And that's amazing. Those weren't his dying words, but they were near when he was near death and he wanted to write this down to make it clear. Yes. That this wasn't the doddering ravings of an old man, but that he had thought this through. But it's more dramatic than I even remembered. When you just read it right now, I thought, that's Jean-Paul Sartre. Yes. Like the idea that he who was this arch atheist philosopher that he wrote this and it made his atheist Friends very angry. Oh, we're going to.

Pierre Victor John Paul SARS Paul Sartre
Why Do Atheists Try to Convert Others to Atheism?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Why Do Atheists Try to Convert Others to Atheism?

"Now this month is the publication of your new book is atheism dead, so the questions are all around that. Okay, so these are thematic questions for ask me, taxes. Yes. And we're going to start now. Go, go, go. Okay, why do atheists try to convert people to a ha. That's a great question. Yeah. Okay, I deal with all this stuff in the book because we know that, I mean, I think one of the central theses of the book is that atheism is intellectually. Confused. If you are a genuine atheist, if you actually, we're not saying you believe, oh, I hate Christians or I don't know if God exists, but you say, I know that God doesn't exist. If you state that and you say you're an atheist, it follows logically without any question that follows logically that there's no meaning in the universe. Everything is random accidental, there's no good or evil. These things follow logically. There's no way around it. But typically atheists live in what Sartre, who was an atheist until the end of his life, which I talk about in the book, he called it bad faith. It sounds better in French. But it's like malfoy. I can't say it. Forgive me. But bad faith means that you're living with two things in your mind and the two don't they disagree with each other. So the idea of an atheist is saying, I believe in atheism that there's no God, but I'm gonna try to convince you of it makes no sense because what does anything matter if there is no God. If there is no God and we are utterly random, the idea that you would benevolently try to lead somebody to the truth, I would simply say to you, where do you get that idea that you should

Sartre
"sartre" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Continue your story. So what was the point. You're about to make the point. I was just going to make is that. I don't think anyone knows. I mean no one and i give details in the book. The to maybe. The most famous atheists of the twentieth century jean-paul sartre and albert camus. They were intellectually honest friendships. Essential lists trying to make a way forward in a world without god trying to think. How can we know. There is no god where alone in the universe. How can we create a system of ethics both of them at the end of their lives. And this is the news that no one knows in one thousand nine hundred sixty for camus and in one thousand nine hundred eighty chart. Both of them came to faith in. God isn't even in the christian. God then no one knows this and when i discovered this i said i'm gonna put it this in the book. It's going to blow people's minds the two people who looked atheism squarely in the eye. Not like hitchens dawkins who basically pretend to look into it. But they're extremely shallow. Those two men came to faith. That is a headline. Yeah it's analogous for me to the woman who was the anonymous. A pregnant lady in roe v wade who became an antiabortionist ashley to and also the big. This is from the jose or initiative the biggest abortion clinic Row per person. Run them and who who propagated the ideology that is just tissues. He came to god before he died as well. There's this is another reason to read. Is atheism okay. Talks about archaeology. Talk to us about two misbehaving boys. Let's have fun about. Let's let's broaden the amateurs well there are three things in the book the first stuff all the stuff from science And stuff with james tour in houston is again news-making news breaking nobody knows about it and i got very excited about that. But the archaeology. The news breaker in there. I met a man in albuquerque Who purported to have discovered biblical sodom. When when you hear that you think excuse me. Sodom that's seven hundred bc. That's abraham the patriarch that's the mists of prehistory. And you're saying you've discovered it. It sounds fanciful. I looked into it. The details are just deeply astonishing. But here's the key. He wrote a book in twenty twelve outlining every detail and to this day. No one still knows about this until two weeks ago today. The scientific journal nature one of the premier academic journals in the world published a very long super Analytic peer reviewed paper the work of twenty one scientists. None of whom is far as i know is any kind of a believer in the bible and they conclude in this extremely long article published two weeks ago today. That exactly what. Destroy this place that dr steven collins says is biblical sodom which it is is consonant with the description in genesis and others twenty. Twenty-one secular scientists in one of the most prestigious journals peer reviewed journals corroborating. This information so today in newsweek magazine. Newsweek dot com. I've i've written article about it but the chapter in my book gives you obviously much more color. This is blockbuster stuff. My friend What they have pulled out of the sands of the middle east over and over and over again. It proves the history of the bible and again part of the reason. I wrote the book. Is that the news kind of doesn't cover. This they might throw out dribs and drabs but the welter of evidence from these various fields has become so overwhelming. It's time somebody says time's up. Let's vote and the vote is overwhelming. I don't think anybody can be an atheist for homeless..

paul sartre hitchens dawkins roe v wade albert camus camus The scientific journal ashley dr steven collins albuquerque houston abraham james newsweek middle east
"sartre" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Not that's what the realm of the subject but others you know in the middle ages we were created in the image and likeness of god in in the pre socratic age to be was to be what she's up and lingers for awhile and fades away the paradigm of of what is we're thunderstorms and the anger of the gods achilles battle fury and it overtakes everything and stays for a while and then leaves the the flowers blooming in spring and that's very different from the way we experienced ourselves and so the the question is What what are we supposed to do in the face of that and heidegger thanks. That's the the presupposition that's motivated. Everything from the pre socratic forward is that there is som- entity that's the ground of the way. We understand everything to be for the middle ages. It was god that was the entity that made things be the things that they are for the enlightenment. It was us. Maybe for sartre. It's us and thanks Whatever it is that stands at the ground of what we are is not another thing. It's not another entity and we're relating to it in the way if we think of it like that there are some way and he'd this partly why i was interested in meister eckhart he says. But there is is there's giving going on in the world and.

sartre meister eckhart
"sartre" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"As a human in the view of existential ism should take on so like isn't all isn't the basic conversation delegation responsibility just holding hand there. You're putting the response some of the responsibility into the court of the other person and For the waiter if your existence society you are generally trying on a roll. I mean they. All of us are trying on a roll. Me wearing clothes is me trying on the role that i was told to try as opposed to walking around naked all the time like. There's there's like standards of how you operate in. That's not that's a decision that's not my own. That's me see what everyone else is doing in copying them. Yeah exactly so. Sartre thinks that s- in the ideal. You should try to resist that other existentialist think that that's actually a clue to how you should live. Well yeah so. Sartre sard says somewhere else. Hell is other people. Why is hell other people for a while because other people are making choices also and when other people make choices they put some pressure on me to think that the choice they made is one that i should Copy core on that. I should sort of promote. But if i do it because they did it then i'm in bad faith for start so it it is as if starts view is like we would be better if we were all alone. I mean this is this is really simplifying starts position and this is really just mostly sartre in a certain period of his of his formation. But anyhow we can imagine that view. And i think there's something to the idea that starred as attracted to it at least in the mid forties. Can you dig into hell is other people. is there some obviously. It's kind of a almost like a literary like you push the point strongly it to really explore that point but is there some sense in that other people ruin the experience of what it means to be human..

Sartre sard Sartre
"sartre" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

Lymphedema Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

"Watch me in that is lymph oppressed. And i probably don't have to remind you guys that i'm a superfan of lymph apprentice. I talked about them all the time. anytime i am on social media or in any of our olympic groups. I'm talking about their great options on their great customer service and really just the friendly people that i have grown to know in love as friends oven. I feel like it's not just as colleagues so it's really fine To be able to share more with you today about limp oppressed. Because this is a topic that i've been wanting to talk about for a long time limping. Ema podcast is made possible by the support of aerospace medical. Brian's feet foundation. Dr jenna wish new at lamb vascular and associates jusoh compression many usa and the national limiting network for more information and to browse previous episodes visit limiting podcast website. So joining us today to answer your five curious questions about pneumatic. Compression is president of lymph oppress. Eric and sartre eric. Welcome to.

Brian's feet foundation Dr jenna olympic usa sartre eric Eric
"sartre" Discussed on AoS Coach

AoS Coach

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on AoS Coach

"Oh oh syn say if. I was to buy this xango sky fires in a zinc book. Yes they're a little bit more expensive time based to ten. So it's fifteen points cheaper sango. Same exact war scroll over one at a four units can be chaos and what happens is they just gave as each keyword and so now. They're in my list or one out of four and so until they come out and say you have to take it from us each each faction at the more expensive points. They're less expensive on beast. Have at it. The only difference would be that wouldn't have the disciples of key would on the but the but that's not important. Your keyword just wanted to each point signs. They're only what you were doing them like. Wait a second. I haven't been rebranded as as said sound salsa. That's it's definitely it's definitely suss. Gw's part i guess on meet for being a little cheeky with it but It's in the game you know. Tiger woods plays with his whole arsenal. He doesn't just play with butter. Yeah i love it and the fact is well. We'd coalition as well. The what you lose is that they just can't be battleline they just come bad line and they copy your general if you will bringing something from like slaves to darkness on your Your social medical cu. It's be general If you bring in a battleline kessler is a copy battleline they they can be. They can be nicole battalion. They just can't be a align. Sartre interesting you've also got build poodle and your soul snare shackles. And then you've got your you two battalions being the command entourage magnificent and the battle richmond and you've taken extra audifax coming.

Tiger woods kessler Sartre richmond
"sartre" Discussed on Sonidos de acá

Sonidos de acá

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on Sonidos de acá

"So newsletter. Noble where as soon I can see and can be so come on. When I can send video country in English and really simply, the video comes here and I'll see you next time. Ryan Adams. They don't know. And I still know that these Coke Akira 30, even Sartre and I'll go home to the last consumer and see, personally, I'll get in real as consumers know. This capital of central zone is more liberal. Community head on. Don't say Camila espanol. In most cases you can be able to not see the person don't tell. Yes, the import is to make it in the sultan Pokémon Asperger Ponte.

Coke Akira Ryan Adams Sartre Camila espanol
"sartre" Discussed on NakedChats

NakedChats

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on NakedChats

"I think he's a heavy. I'm excited to be here. I'm excited to have you hit. Because you one of the founding members of grams haney and i recall when the course was running i was always saying your name pop up in the community group and he really stood out to me because you would always leave the most genuine comments and feedback for hateful and i always thought i need to learn more about aleisha. Like what is his story. Sartre fossil months. And you're here now on the puck cost so it's so funny 'cause usually like i'm the passing that seats back into observe. Everybody else having a conversation. I was like no this time. I'm gonna like each action. You know they involve am different side of me but yeah it was awesome before we dive into learning more about you. And what do i would love to. Shed two things about yourself that most people don't know about you and you knew it was coming to the fun. 'cause i was like what can i say probably i think people always really struck me. I say how old i am. Because i'm only twenty two But everyone always says. I'm like an old so find out like when they're working with me like clients. Oh my gosh. you're younger than me. How you only twenty. So i am on the very young baby And the way actually got one of my job. It's not really an unknown factor. Timing interesting story. And the way that my job at the gym. That i look at. Which is it. We change alongside. Okay maui jim i apply the job and i go off of the job before i got my certificate as a taytay. I was so excited. And i was like this is so i went away fly fertile. And then she's got the job and i was like. Oh my god. I haven't even got my certificate yet. Have an avian any of this stuff. She's joe justify for it..

grams haney aleisha Sartre jim joe
Wrapping Up Some Hand Histories

Podker

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Wrapping Up Some Hand Histories

"We are wrapping up some hand histories that we started lost episode with melissa burr. This time we're talking ten dollars twenty dollars at crown casino. You started with two thousand dollars where we are on the table right now. A look. You know we've been going up and down but that's just bring a stand into the big blind angus. I'll be giving you this hand. 'cause as hands are there'll be serious they say this business big blonde with ten and the seven officer a real power. Has todd cheese and you got bet to pass and effective. The middle position are fifty dollars. The large at kohl's net button kohl's kohl's so now this game just so we. I don't know if anyone was remembering from las wake. Said the game was really tough at the start and we'll building it now. The game is built. It's very much underway Said the ship safari fast and furious. It's for ring game. Some guys have saw bits on. It's really it's really going sartre. We call in the big blonde. We tend to seven officers. Our main you could fall but not just putting thirty bucks in you. You just calling seven seven rot. That's that's exactly right so there's five ways to the floor. I seven three rainbow. The small blonde looks like he wants to. He doesn't wanna bet into everyone's Checks what do we do. We check road we check. It goes checked her up. Look ten officer on the turn. I seven three ten for bar. I student like this and then you go to pair. I don't like this for a couple of reasons. Because jack is certainly handed would've limped along and now they've got so maybe i'll put a feel out of like one hundred twenty. Most importantly dr is the small blind bets into everyone. For one hundred seventy terrifying. It's terrifying especially considered they wanting to the previous picture eight. Yep what's the. What was the flip again. I seven three. I couldn't have three by could have raised. That could even have at seven zero fraud and pocket. I'ts bake also have things like ice. I know i night. So i mean cooling but i love it in fact wacoal heater and then a very good playa kohl's behind and then aleatory pliers followed. The river is an ice. So now if you'll sign a sites i seventy central wants to bet. Now that's hands bathing us. That was terrible view avocado. I'm guessing small vixen again. Dr this tomasson chicks. I think he schick. Coal are while there. Maybe our mike terrible plight. He but on really bright River decision put up Huge and it goes followed. Solve value to be hadid is obviously went for too much. Yeah absolutely i mean. Some people could argue that you could follow prey floppy basis. I pointed contention audit thinks especially in a game. Lock these Rising the turn is certainly something you could do. Considering i could have things like ten no on but you block that It could have our sets he can rise and then decide. What happens if you get free or something like this. Just the charge them Sometimes people to have a bit of a body of the apple when it gets checked and on the flop and certainly on the river We've sort of bombed it harping that what like top paige colza soul. There's so many repairs. There was sort of getting value from with his laws bet like and if they have mighty isis up and i told us what we lose like the hall hand applied is discombobulated. A nonsensical really. I mean i don't know what was going on. This is just a catalyst bad hand with lots of interesting situation. So i think sure we can call but maybe just to turn about. I think we got a bit smaller. We gotta get value and this is not the way.

Kohl Melissa Burr Todd Cheese Las Wake Crown Casino Playa Kohl Angus Schick Jack Paige Colza Mike Apple
"sartre" Discussed on Talking Automotive

Talking Automotive

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"sartre" Discussed on Talking Automotive

"Staffing practices discipline matters looting Records management went back to airing bring is when jeff kennett chemical public So we were looking at performance of departments against the is as planes to rod apps on the department heads performance as well as doing some public policy stuff. All right. the very first chunks of exhorted police not Of service a few things Machinery gamma giants waiting to treasury Ago i worked with in premiums asked me to come to police unaudited ena renton payroll system for a number of east in any event two thousand and one now go to ask lie on another color. If i were coming to fleet and much of that flight they said but we need somebody will be bad management south or the. Be the fun sorrow wanting to prison jogging now. Ifo truth as what it was exactly the sinai christine. Nixon standing batori police that it was a lot of reform happening me was a bit of a baptism because we just come out of a situation way two people died in the ever divisional which really say shockwaves through the in through our organization lodge really coming in static program of reform and to get out of the business of modifying vehicles a draw. Get the manufacturers. The games to work with us to develop proper police vehicles fit for purpose. Harasser transferred the risk of ass modifying vehicle onto the. That was a pretty challenging task. Sartre unissued with the ditty. Then we forward in holland stop making purpose-built penalties and we would just basically put a padlock on a pedal inputs boy. Mischeivous lead is in asia. Did even you prison apart. Well i will. We come up with something else. Just very quickly. What he developed a pod with an engineering company ended four hundred sixty kilogram fiberglass mitchell pod in the back of the holden use modified suspension. Everything the us as a prisoner time..

jeff kennett treasury Nixon christine Sartre holland asia us