39 Burst results for "Sars"

Fresh "Sars" from PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:10 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Sars" from PRI's The World

"Judges sort through nearly fifty thousand images submitted by professionals and amateurs. The winner was announced by the Duchess of Cambridge Kate, Middleton Katcha that I could announced this year's wildlife photographer of. Is. Sergei Gorshkov, his image, the embraced the embraced is a wonderful image of a Siberian tiger sitting up and hugging a large tree in Russia's Far East. The bark is well worn contest judge Tim littlewoods says that shows that this is not the first time. The big cat cozied up to this particular trunk. He's like rubbing post for the Tigris a bit like domestic cadillacs rub against a tree or a branch scent marking. It's a picture that's almost unreal. Looks kind of like a painting little would describes a winning photo as having an autumnal look with light peeking through the league onto the Tigers orange striped coat and the Tigris is kind of. An ecstasy she's got her eyes closed faces into the sun. It's very captivating. It is a cat in utter bliss. Other finalists include a monkey meditating and Southeast Asia a translucent frog grasping onto a branch in the Andes and playful palaces cats bouncing through field. In Tibet a scene took six years to capture judge Littlewood said, the photos don't just highlight natural beauty. They also remind us of the need to preserve natural environments we need to do something before we start losing all of these species and we're losing them at such an enormous right. You can see the winning images and also enter next year's competition at London's natural history. Museums website. You're listening to the world. Support for this podcast comes from Port of entry. The podcast explores interesting and unexpected ways. The US and Mexico are inextricably linked despite the wall running between us. You don't have to live anywhere near the border appreciate these cross-border stories about human connection from ktbs. NPR, ex port of entry is available now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen get details at. Port of entry pod DOT, Org I'm Marco Werman your with the world in Nigeria's largest city legos reports are coming in of security forces opening fire tonight on unarmed demonstrators the demonstrators had been protesting in fact against police brutality according to several eyewitnesses the live rounds hit several people details on casualties have not yet been confirmed. This evening's violence erupted after the Lagos State government imposed a twenty four hour curfew in response to the growing protests against police violence. Yesterday protesters blocked a major expressway in Lagos and also targeted the main airport shutting down terminals Judeh John was a lawyer and journalist and Lagos earlier today I asked him how people in the city were responding to the curfew. People in a frenzy panicked people are constant appointments people are running home. Lagos notorious for heavy traffic transportation is a nightmare and so I've just feel so sad for people who would have to be rushing home and David cuts under ruled. It's well before many people usually get home from work. I've even seen suggestions on twitter cautioning those not close to home to head to a hotel. Why did authorities take such action what prompted this Nigeria's security systems if the mess that incentivized protect powerful on the privilege against citizens The government in this atmosphere of chaos. Must have made strategy conclusion that the easiest thing to do is keep everybody hope. Just a sense of will not have the capacity to contain spiraling protests on. We should do the easiest thing for us to do to keep this on their ups. The problem with that is that citizens expect that the government should be taken action to protect constitional protests citizenship but the punished. For the government's inability to secure life on property, which ironically is the point of the protests in the first place. So while I can send me a tree she, it's the thinking that led to this. It said Selena against them because even though you can see, yes, people understand that we care on this trees the government was trying to get control over fluid situation. Students expected mental thought of a better way to do this that doesn't infringe on the rights of peaceful protests on the rights of freedom of assembly. So today when you say the police system in Nigeria a mess, a lot of Nigerians point I two SARS a special anti robbery squad, the unit that actually prompted all these protests and now the demands of the protesters have grown beyond just a narrow focus on the SARS unit. What are protesters calling for? Now any serious blended engaged government should have anticipated that the conditions that covid nineteen hundred presented would stimulate already restless citizenry to get on the streets in Nigeria. Young people overwhelmingly. Tired, of bad, governance, they're tired of what appears to be disengaged disconnected. Government, that's the crux of the matter people just feel like the government's a disconnected from the demand the desires of every major ends what people are really tired of is Goldman that doesn't care when citizens die. That's the problem and onto citizens believe that the government is not just going to react to the protests at the time. The government understands that this is about disappointment in the system. The demands will keep on multiplying. I know the young people of Lagos especially incensed and have been on the streets. They've got a lot of popular support from celebrities who won't let the government off the hook like the massively popular musician Burnham boy. I'm actually spoke to the BBC jeff to understand the Nigeria is the biggest black nation in the face of the. If Nigeria kind over common I do reach its full potential and the youths come. Make sure that happens by rising up for their rights like they're doing this. then. That's just. Tell me victor drifted world. Judeh is a federal government in a Buddha mistake government in Lagos getting the message and are they going to provide some satisfaction to the protesters? They don't yet understand the depth of the discontent. Because it is surely. Those who voted for this president of which I have one have been saying his being profound disappointment. Now. That's undestanding has eluded the authorities. And even now they zero them that young people will leave. This treats ACTI- shots while they've never witnessed protests like this as far as doing history but then give the global diaspora of Nigerian protesting Texas protest in DC participant New York protested Montreal Professional Tarot Protesting Pretoria was a protest this week in. Trafalgar. Square London. The rather Donna Humbly, confront the disconnect between their assessments on the assessment of the major on public. All they're trying do is to end the protests. Unfortunately for them that.

Government Nigeria Lagos Sergei Gorshkov Judeh John Tim Littlewoods Southeast Asia Russia Tigers Marco Werman London Kate Twitter NPR Sars United States Selena Texas Square London Ktbs
Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

Coronacast

04:54 min | 6 hrs ago

Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

"Say Norman. Let's talk about a place, which is now imposing a five Columba travel limit You can't go to the body shop anymore he conquered the beauty salons jeans I'm not talking about Victoria I'm talking about I land and it looks like pices in Europe adopting some USTRALIAN stall approaches to curbing coronavirus. Yes. Because despite all the complaints about lockdown in Victorian has unnecessary M- should. Just. Let it go climbing from some sources and how in complaining not letting up quickly enough lockdown is actually all you can do when it's getting out of control I mean as a Stralia being used as an example to the world or is this just best practice? No matter where you are let's talk about Ireland for a moment, which is a country that's got a smaller population than Victoria bending how you define. It is right about five million people in the past month if at seventeen thousand cases past week seven, thousand by yesterday twelve, hundred cases in a single day. So. That's getting pretty worrying from them and they they're locked on looks remarkably similar to victorious yet they're going into heights lockdown of his six weeks well, in Victoria. That wasn't long enough. Do you think they might extend it? Well, it's hard to say and it goes on modelling the Senate got more cases and more virus circulating and as we've said. Before on Corona, Cast University of Sydney modeling showed that for every day you delay lock tone when you're out of control, it's a week at the other end, which is one reason why Victoria has gone on a bit longer they try to ring-fence thirty six suburbs. It didn't work and that delayed things by a couple of weeks and we've probably shortened it by lot. At, the end effect on that but that's engine. Now the sorted out and the hopefully, we'll get done very levels, but it depends on how much virus there is around week or so ago a senior person at the W. H. O., the World Health Organization was saying lockdowns shouldn't be the primary way that countries control Khurana, virus, and that sort of headline went out. And I think a of the new Scott got in it because we are seeing countries using lockdown and it can be effective. So where's the? Where's the nuance here? So that's certainly not what was being said last week courting the World Health, organization and we for Monday's synthetically report I interviewed Dr Dave Navarro. Who's in fact, the same health official he's professor of public. Health. Imperial College London and his Special Envoy to World Health Organization on Covid Nineteen, and he feels that he's been misrepresented his view is that sure down is not the first thing that you do. It's not your primary means of control. Your primary means of control has to be testing and contact tracing and quarantine in isolation of the people you find in that process. However he does say that you can get to a point where locked is the only thing that you can do and you should use that lockdown to improve your contact and testing regime. And in fact, if you look at Victoria, that's really although in the first wave, that's what we did as a nation back in March we got our act together in terms of contact tracing. There are still deficiencies in Victoria and they have used the last few weeks to get much better and so the contact tracing regime now in Victoria is fantastic there. quickly, the locking off mystery cases in super-quick time, and that's what you've gotta get. So then fighting the of used that time well. It's not that they're against lockdown. It's just that it has its place. and. When you when it's out of control, the way it is in Europe you've actually got to be able to do that another problem. And, I don't know what they've done in Ireland here. But the problem is the borders and it was a really interesting study the other day looking counties in the United. States and showing that cross-border flow was a very important factor in both the sustenance and the growth of SARS COV to infections. and. If you don't control your borders and you still got people coming in from outside, it's very hard to get this done and on control it. So so really European. Countries are trying to do this with one hand tied behind their bank. Britain and Ireland could control their borders because they're islands but it's harder for other nations exactly and can we just come back to smoking before about Australia and we are doing the numbers that are coming out now looking really really promising do how close are we to having zero spread here in Australia, we're almost there new south. Wales still has cases popping up Victoria might get there before New South Wales because they're still in lockdown and those extra few days of Lockton make make all the difference I think New South Wales it's going to be really hard but they're. You know they're getting on top of it too. I think we're going to be very, very tiny sprayed, and maybe in Victoria, they'll get done to zero spread. And that will make it much easier to open things

Victoria World Health Organization Ireland Europe Dr Dave Navarro Norman South Wales Wales Senate Lockton Imperial College London Corona Scott Australia Cast University Of Sydney Lockdowns Official W. H. O. Britain
Fresh update on "sars" discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

01:51 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sars" discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"No writer when I was there in March. I had left. I kinda fled la to go because when I got back from from eight my tour in Asia I saw. Like just cova hysteria in Los. Angeles and I was like I gotta I gotTa get Outta here and your state really wasn't dealing with any hysteria at that time in March you guys were still comfortable. The restaurants were open and no one was freaking out so like I had a great time in. And then after I got back to La then you guys you guys freaked out like you guys a little. We're GONNA we're. GonNa slide breakdown. Yes. That's what really got crazy. We're opening back up. Opening backup like before we are. That's good I'm glad that Arizona provided a little bit of. You I had my impression was. Golfing that's what my impression was golfing. Golfing and fat people. That was my that was my question. That is a very fair assessment. We have the big. We have the most amount of golf courses per square mile in Scottsdale Arizona, more than any other city in the country and I think we're second in the most amount of obese people. It depends on where you go I think Phoenix is larger Scottsdale is. I think everyone's kind of fake at that point they're like having last Iq. So Wealthy place right. Yes. Very. Far from beaches to have the like like that pressure to have good bodies all the time. Oh. Yeah. You're right. There is a pressure when you're near the yeah. That's a California thing to be fit all the time like there's no beaches out here. Really. So there's no every. People from, tanning. That's for sure that is true God but anyway, I wanted to talk a little bit about you had mentioned being Asia in you're an internationally touring comedian and. In your bio, seven different countries I think you are in four before or while the outbreak had started and so I wanted to ask you a little bit about that because I had read one of the articles that when we first started talking, you sent over and it was fascinating to see such a low number of cases or in some countries there weren't even cases but there were temperature checks at airports they were some of your shows are getting shut down So I wanted to ask what was the experience like and what we're what was going on in your mind you're thinking Oh. This stuff serious because the stuff they're doing or were you thinking? As might be another SARS or or a bowl or something because there aren't any cases practically. Of course I was wondering why they were reacting so hard you know I thought it to me it seemed like an overreaction and and I. I wasn't really abiding by their suggestions and all they were were suggestions. It was like you know you should wear a mask in but everybody did that lived there it seemed. I don't know I. I didn't really put a mask on until the end of my trip when I was in Japan. So I to me, I was like there's no cases I. Don't understand why everyone's freaking out. And then. You know, of course..

Asia LA Arizona Golfing Writer Angeles LOS Japan Sars Phoenix California
Texas 14-year-old wins $25,000 for developing potential COVID-19 treatment

Kottke Ride Home

01:47 min | 1 d ago

Texas 14-year-old wins $25,000 for developing potential COVID-19 treatment

"A. Potential lead on the search for a cure to covid nineteen Marianne then discovered by a fourteen year old girl from Texas the need Cabrera Lou from Frisco. Texas recently won the three m young scientists challenge for discovering a molecule that can selectively bind to the SARS cov to spike protein, and that binding could prevent the virus from entering the host cell and would prove extraordinarily useful in drugs that could treat or cure covid nineteen. Quoting vice the Nika used in silicone methodology methods and experience that make use of computers to screen millions of small molecules. She originally planned for her project to focus on the influenza virus but pivoted once covid nineteen hit and she realized the severity of the pandemic and quotes. Wall. Number of treatments have proved effective in certain cases currently, no specific treatment for Covid, nineteen has been developed on top of that. There are over one hundred and seventy candidate vaccines in development being tracked around the world by the WHO but it's not anticipated, any will be ready for a safe mass rollout until next year at the earliest. As, he could told CNN quote my effort to find a lead compound to bind to the spike protein of the SARS COV to visit this summer may appear to be a drop in the ocean, but still adds to all these efforts. How I develop this molecule further with the help of urologists and drug development specialists will determine the success of these efforts end quote. And, whether findings prove instrumental in the discovery of an effective treatment or not this is Dang impressive for someone who was only in eighth grade when she submitted her research.

Covid Nika Texas Cabrera Lou Marianne Frisco CNN
Fresh update on "sars" discussed on BBC Newshour

BBC Newshour

01:12 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sars" discussed on BBC Newshour

"Are trying to tell them and obviously know our demand is Sue. Eradicates us. Stop them, not Toby. You know President again because we don't need them that dystopic finish every way. If one day arrives the way you're driving, they do what ever they like, So we don't need that anymore. That's our way. Well, the eradication of SARS is something that has been conceded. But getting rid off. A police unit is not the same as deep rooted. Police reform more than 60% of Nigeria's population is under the age of 24. And they have been feeling let down for some time. There's talk first with our correspondent Miami Jones. She joins us from Lagos. Money just outlined for us the potential impact off this indefinite curfew in a city such as Lagos. Yeah. I mean, it's hard to quantify exactly how disruptive this curfew is going to be. This is the country's wealthiest city. It is most populous city on already assumed as a curfew was announced. There were widespread reports off traffic sneaking around those people try and get supplies and trying to get home before the curfew hits at 4 P.m.. Many people worry that they that they own the streets. Then it may lead to exactly the types of abuses that protesters have been complaining about harassment by police extortion on general confrontation with Dawn forces who already lots of disruption and it looks at that said to continue for the next few days and all they're still protestors out in the streets on DH at the airport to we understand the airport was closed. The access to the airport was blocked. It's unclear where the protesters have currently left. Some have still stayed on the streets. Others online have encouraged to many of the protesters were out and about to get home. They say they don't want Tito any injuries or deaths of protesters who are currently out and about in Nigeria. I think the interesting test off this movement, which is quite unprecedented in Nigeria, will be whether people continue to protest after the curfew on DH. What kind of clashes this may lead with the police. Indeed, the governor of Lego says imposed this indefinite curfew because He says that the city can't tolerate anarchy, and he talks about criminals unleashing mayhem that there has been some violence hasn't there Yeah, There's been some violent, particularly since the weekend. But many of the organizer's online isn't one organizer of this protest was quite keen to know have one figure head on because they felt that that person could easily be targeted by the authorities. But many of the young people who have been at the forefront of organizing logistics on bringing protesters together have said that A lot of the violence hasn't been perpetrated by their supporters that instead the's are armed frogs. They accused him of being state sponsored, but we found no evidence of that yet. Andi that these are armed folks that have nothing to do with the movements that are causing mayhem, setting up road blocks around the city and trying to extort people for money, So it's a very murky picture. Over the last 48 hours. We've seen multiple reports of violence, not just in league hospital's been in city and modeling yourself, as well as in Canada and the north of widespread violence and insecurity. And it's unclear whether this essentially organized what age is just a coincidence. Miny Jones correspondent joining us live from Lagos. We have been trying all morning to speak to somebody from the government, and we thought we'd come close, but they didn't come on air. Let's speak now, then to Dr Abu Baqa Curry, a political scientist at the university off Abuja. Welcome to the program We heard from Miley Jones there. We heard from Miami. Jones said that these protests are unprecedented. What How do you reflect on them? Yeah, it is all so unexpected, And it's just Ah, civilians spontaneously. Uh, nobody had expected something like that. And I think Government has not Group int prepared for each even though to be frank. It has been allegedly consigned to the capital Abuja and most of the southern states. It has not been quite active in the North, apart from one or two isolated cases. So when you when you say that the government has not been prepared for it, they clearly feel that they're trying to get a handle on it. Now the Disbanding off SARS, which was the initial demand has been met. But presumably that isn't going to be enough for the young people who are demonstrating Exactly because Nigerians are deeply suspicious of government on in any case on at least three occasions in the past. Ah Government Hut either disbanded outfits or purportedly carried out some changes in his operation, but that proved to the old territories. So the protesters are still eating that say they need to see something on ground on. It's not, and presumably, is not just about police brutality. It is also about potential futures for these young people. Yeah, that is what makes the whole thing complicated on DA. That is what is foiled in suspicion in please the northern part of the country. They it has also been gradually finding the embers of Sean along original religious and ethnic lines. Because the protest it'll have kept changing the demand when government as he did to the Indiana fine this as ah, they came out which of the Do you mind in fights that humans have been changing by the Ah, the fact that the likely does she they like A coherent structure has made it very difficult for the company to relate with them onto but dress their problems, But But we heard, of course, that the possibility of them identifying a leader could result in leaders being targeted. And that speaks to the suspicion on the part of these demonstrators off the government. Does it also tell us something about The general level off poor governance off Nigeria since independence. Well, it depends on the way you look at what other people are saying is that you cannot have a movement as strong as peace without leader, a sheet that somebody has to be in charge. At least. Record net I related government on DH. It is also very clear that in spite of their lack of leadership, they have quite coordinated and resourceful. They have been able to achieve so much on DH that has also become a problem. Ah, there are accusations that they have been funding from Ah, brought off by the enemies of the government sold a lot of confront so swishy ated. With the movement and that petition. Just very briefly. Dr. Gary, do you feel heartened by the strength of these protests? I mean, given that they're unprecedented on that young people have never consistently come out in this way. Yeah, it is quite encouraging. But out of in happier even it has minus five track upon Nigerian. Ah Participation..

Nigeria Lagos Miami Jones Ah Government Hut Sars Abuja Toby SUE President Trump Miny Jones Dr Abu Baqa Curry Lego Indiana Tito Miami Dr. Gary Group Canada Harassment Dawn
Morales aide claims victory in Bolivia's election redo

BBC World Service

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Morales aide claims victory in Bolivia's election redo

"The Socialist candidate Luis Arce looks set to win Bolivia's presidential election without the need for a runoff. Exit polls suggest he's won more than 52% of the vote. His Nicholas, Russia. If the results predicted by the exit polls are confirmed with SARS is Socialist Party will have made a remarkable comeback on Lee. Last year, It's veteran leader, former President Evo Morales went into exile after an election that was annulled because of fraud allegations. Not yet clear whether Mr Morales will return to Bolivia for the time being, though Mr Darcy has made it clear he'll try to heal the bitter divisions on govern for all Bolivians at the time when the country is facing a difficult economic

President Evo Morales Luis Arce Bolivia Mr Darcy Socialist Party Bolivians Sars Fraud Nicholas Russia LEE
Fresh update on "sars" discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:05 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sars" discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Nice Guy. You've been here for five hundred years is a disaster Dr. factory responded by saying he just wants to focus on combating the virus saying quote that's the only thing. I. Really Care about that other stuff. It's like in the godfather nothing personal strictly business as far as I'm concerned. I. Just wanted to do my job and take care of the people of this country. He said, well, trump attacks voucher his campaign. Continues to run an ad that uses foul cheese words out of context falsely giving the impression that Fao she endorses the president's handling of the pandemic. This comes as Cova nineteen cases or surging again across the United States on Monday. Nearly sixty thousand people in the united. States tested positive and four, hundred, forty, five people died in Kansas a corona virus outbreak in a nursing home is killed ten people and infected old residents in an unspecified number of staff New Mexico. Governor Michelle. Luhan Grisham. tweet quote if Kovac Nineteen continues to exponentially spread like last week, New Mexico will not have the healthcare and hospital capacity for every new Mexican who needs care meanwhile in California Governor Gavin Newsom has announced the state will conduct its own review of any covid nineteen vaccine before it's distributed in California on Capitol Hill. Senate Republicans are planning to move forward a measure on the paycheck protection program today before a larger vote Wednesday on a five hundred, billion dollar Bill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin are instill talks over a larger corona. Virus Relief, Package Democrats are pushing for a two point two, trillion dollar aid bill. And a victory for Democrats in voting rights advocates the Supreme Court has ruled Pennsylvania election officials can count incoming mail in ballots for up to three days after election day afford of four tie on the court. Leaves in place a ruling from a lower court which extended the deadline to count ballots dude pandemic and delays and postal deliveries. Voting rights groups warn the deadlock decision by the Supreme Court signals trump nominee, amy coney Barrett will cast the deciding vote in any election disputes. If confirmed during her Senate hearing, she refused to say whether she would recuse herself from an election case and refused to say whether president should commit to a peaceful transfer of power. In other voting news Florida shattered its record for in person early voting Monday as over three hundred, fifty thousand people lined up at polling sites to cast ballots across the US over thirty million people have already voted in the election which represents about one fifth of the total number of votes cast in two, thousand, sixteen shattering all previous records. Early Voting Starts Today in Wisconsin and Utah. And more election news the presidential debate commission announced Monday. It will mute the microphones of president trump and Joe Biden during parts of Thursday's debate Mike's will be muted while the other candidate on stage is responding to the moderator's question an effort to avoid the chaotic interruption filled scene that unfolded at the first debate when president trump interrupted Joe Biden. Well, over one hundred times. Ava Morales said Monday he were returned to Bolivia. Following his mass party stunning victory in Sunday's election the former president overthrown in a coup last year and replaced by far far-right government did not specify a time line for his return. His hand picked successor Luis Arce celebrated his win early Monday. Conscientious. But I've ever covered. We have covered the mysticism of this process. The people have made this possible with their disciplined recovered. This change for all the election was postponed twice by the interim government of right wing President Cheney Ananias who cited the pandemic protests rock Bolivia for months ahead of the election condemning on years for delaying the vote as well as her government's military and police violence against indigenous communities and Moss supporters who have more on the elections in Bolivia after headlines. President trump's announced plans to remove sedan from the state sponsors of terrorism less than a move that pays the way for Sudan to establish diplomatic relations with Israel. The move may also allow sedan to relieve its debt through international financial institutions and court new foreign investment in other news from. Sudan. The International Criminal Court has begun talks with officials in Khartoum over arrest warrants for senior political figures including former President Omar Bashir who is overthrown last year after a mass uprising and is wanted by the ICC on charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. In Nigeria protests against police brutality show no signs of slowing down even after police disbanded the controversial special anti robbery squad known as SARS earlier this month tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of the capital Lagos. In recent days bringing traffic in the bustling city to ascend sell the capital is actually a buddha an estimated fifteen or more people have been killed and dozens more injured since the demonstrations started protesters also say they doubt SARS officers will be held accountable for their abuses or that excessive force by police. will be curtailed despite recent reforms in news from the middle. East The Wall Street Journal has revealed us. Officials traveled to. Damascus in August to hold talks with serious intelligence chief to discuss to missing US citizens, the journalist Austin Thais and a Syrian American psychologist named, Magid? Kamal. Moss. This marked the first high-level talks between the two nations and over a decade according to reports in the Syrian press the two sides also discussed sanctions and the US military presence in Syria to see our interview with Austin Tyson's parents democracy now dot org. In Palestine Maher, I'LL AKRA say prisoner WHO's been on hunger strike for eighty six days to protest his indefinite imprisonment is on the verge of death according to rights groups. The forty nine year old was arrested by Israeli forces in July but as being held without charges from his hospital bed alacrity cold on the international community to help free the Palestinian people he said I refused to give in to the decisions of this occupying state, our ally, the return freely to my children and to my people or I will die without submission unquote. Tens of thousands of people have been displaced in over one hundred have died after heavy storms battered Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, triggering massive floods and landslides across the region. Vietnam. Ninety people were reported dead dozens missing neighboring Cambodia at least twenty five people have died. This comes as the third cyclone is expected to hit the Vietnamese coast in the coming days in Columbia thousands of. Indigenous leaders and activists have moved in the capital Bogota is they planned to join the national strike this week against the Government Social Economic Policies Union student groups, and others are also expected to participate in the massive protests to demand the government of the right wing President Yvonne Duquet and violence, and murders against social leaders and Columbia this is one of the indigenous.

President Trump United States Bolivia Donald Trump Senate Supreme Court Sudan President Cheney Ananias International Criminal Court Vietnam Dr. Factory Sars Governor Gavin Newsom President Omar Bashir Cambodia Kansas Governor Michelle California
These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

Science Friction

08:15 min | 2 d ago

These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

"Hi It's Natasha. Mitchell with science friction. I'll be the first admit that as a GP price all of I was pretty skeptical of things. I certainly had sympathy for for conditions like FIBROMYALGIA. But I didn't have the empathy that I have now. I didn't understand it I. Really didn't get it. And Gosh if I could go back and speak to myself as a GP prior to all of this, I know that I would have been much better doctor then and I will hopefully be a much stop to now. As Corona virus cases explode again in the you kind across Europe today three doctors from the UK share confronting personal experiences of what's being called long covert. I have seen too many cases on nine of people not being heard not being Nessin to. That symptoms and their concerns not being validated. I've seen heartbreaking stories of people just being dismissed of seeing heartbreaking stories of people losing their jobs. And I am very lucky that I have a platform where I can speak up and try and get long covert recognizes melnace. The term long covert is being used to describe a whole cluster of symptoms and afflictions many extremely disturbing and disabling that lingering on some people after they've been infected with the SARS Cov to virus thousands across the world are now finding solidarity on social media and in virtual support groups that are popping up and long covert. To not discriminate healthy people young people, people who apparently had a mild case of covid nineteen. And every system in their bodies can be affected up until the last a week or two. The concept of long caved has been dismissed by quite a lot of people even in the medical sphere many my colleagues have been unwell since March and have really struggled to get any kind of medical inputs until the last couple of months those weren't hospitalized with the illness would just sort of left to get on with it. It's the classic thing a suspect. It might even be a bloke thing do not for long enough it will go away. Yeah. Diminish it ignore it hope it's not their. Own I another thing to worry about uh, suspect always going through people's minds and that will include medics politicians policies such as civil servants, everybody. But they will be left with the long term consequences and in terms of the total health burden that will weigh exceed whatever acute covid to us by the time of comes on. So we facing another pandemic this one silent confusing and hard to diagnose knows a pandemic of long coverted. I'm Dr Amy Small I'm thirty nine and I'm Jay P in Lothian in Scotland a gorgeous part of the world in the Scottish lowlands and before the pandemic Dr smalls life was a when I think back it was busy and chaotic and getting up at six thirty every morning and out house by seventh day and yet as a family, we were very active and very busy but it work back in February and March. I'm in colleagues were on high alert the sense of impending doom that we felt on those first few weeks moore seeing reports of huge numbers of people dying in. Italy. In just thinking gosh you know. Is that coming away at it was just really really scary I'm Dr Natalie Mcdermott I'm an academic clinical electra at King's College London and she specializes in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dr McDermott is no stranger to deadly infections Ebola cholera now coronavirus she's been on the front line of the Mall I was working in Liberia in in the capital Monrovia in July twenty fourteen as as cases of started spread very rapidly our more queseda flowing because we had so many dead bodies but we didn't have sevices coming to pick them up so the burial teams weren't Well. They were trying their best, but they were limited as well at during that time two of my colleagues one of whom was on medical director for treatment facility they became infected with. I saw a space about thirty percent of my patients that died in those first few weeks. I was in Liberia that he percent of them were health coworkers what Natalie witnessed firsthand was hellish but going is her as a doctor she went on to do a PhD, investigating the genetics of asa sipped ability to a bowl avars disease. And when Covid nineteen heat I was working in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Great Ormond Street Hospital. When we started to see a surge of cases of what we now who multi-system inflammatory syndrome children previously healthy children started falling very ill they come in generally unwell but looking okay and then within a few hours sometimes but maybe you set me within twenty four hours. Many of them would suddenly drop their blood pressure and they and become very touchy. It said it heart rate would become very fast at that stage it was thought children were only mildly affected by. Covid nineteen and on the whole, it seems they are but the Natalie and colleagues found all lot of them did test positive in terms of the throat swaps full cave nineteen they tested positive for antibodies to cave in nineteen either actually at the beginning of that onus or at some point Jerry net illness doctrine failing on consulting genetic pathologists to Saint Mark's hospital in Harrow in London and Sinn. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin Ireland in filing is a practicing doctor and later in the genetics of bail and related cancers collaborating with colleagues around the world including here in Australia. At the beginning of the pandemic back in March whiles looked pretty safe or think. To identify, cases in Wales. H. One about forty kilometers outside of me. So eastern West. So you get the impression whereas almost none of it about. So the odds of you catching, it must be next to nothing.

Dr Natalie Mcdermott Covid Liberia Fibromyalgia Mitchell Europe Great Ormond Street Hospital UK Medical Director Dr Amy Small Dr Smalls Wales Moore Monrovia ASA Italy Scotland
SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may provide immunity for at least 5–7 months

Made in America

01:03 min | 3 d ago

SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may provide immunity for at least 5–7 months

"That we are seeing that other bodies once you're exposed to the virus are lasting up to seven months. This is as long as they could follow. Remember, folks, this is basically a new illness, but they're reporting Antibodies present up to seven months, and this is very encouraging because initially we were thinking that the antibodies only lasted about three months. Once you are exposed to you don't have long term immunity and this is an area that's actively being studied. Remember you. You get a test for the anti Jin to find out if you have the illness, and then you get a blood test for the and a body to find out if he's been exposed in the past. Now we're studying the antibody in you have you been exposed in the past and the body's own immune system makes antibodies and it's being seen at least seven months later. This is the area we're going to continue learning about, but it is hoped that there's long

JIN
Nigerians Demand an End to Police Squad Known as SARS

BBC Newshour

00:22 sec | 4 d ago

Nigerians Demand an End to Police Squad Known as SARS

"That there'll be judicial enquiries into police brutality and all of the countries 36 states. It follows weeks of protests sparked by a number of deaths at the hands of a now disbanded police unit. The special anti robbery squad all sauce on Thursday, the army won't it might intervene if people didn't obey a government ban on large rallies. But people still came out from Nigeria my

Robbery Nigeria Army
From End Sars to End Swat, Nigeria protests explained

The Takeaway

05:30 min | 5 d ago

From End Sars to End Swat, Nigeria protests explained

"It's been more than a week of protests against police brutality in Nigeria tens of thousands of Nigerians have taken to the streets where police officers have opened fire on demonstrators and arrested hundreds at least ten protesters have been killed so far. Protesters have been calling for police reform and specifically the end of a unit that has been accused of human rights abuses. The unit is called the specialize anti robbery squad. Or SARS over the weekend the President of Nigeria said the unit would be disbanded but demonstrators remain skeptical and are continuing to protest until all of their demands are met joining us now is the BBC's Nigeria correspondent, my any Jones from Lagos. Welcome to the show Miami High Tanzania. So we said that people are protesting this unit but what was was there something that set off the protests to begin with? So the process initially started on early in October when a visual appearance to should meet the appearing to show some young men being dragged by a sales offices out of a hotel. It's unclear when the video was taken, but it was shared very widely on social media in Nigeria and started a resurgence in a Hashtag the had been seen in the poss which was. The HASHTAG and saws. This hashtag first appeared thinking twenty eighteen and had been used a couple of times before when similar videos had been posted showing solves officers allegedly brutalizing members of the public but this time round it picked up a lot of speed and this movement. This youth led movement that seems quite organic has emerged from it what types of policing tactics Are. Residents are Nigerians protesting and who are SARS targeting generally. So, Nigerians have been protesting everything from extortion to torture to extrajudicial killings. I'd be see that's Members of Saul's particularly allowed to act with impunity. on targets often young members of the public who? hops occurring mobile phones laptop they accused him of Internet's cameras The also occasionally target people driving nice calls and particularly they young female asking them how they made their money and they say that these practices are completely unacceptable and that they're taking advantage of their position as plain clothes, policemen to extort people for money. And and carry tile carry a brutal acts of violence against members of the public. Now, we mentioned that the president of Nigeria has since said that he would disband this unit but protesters are still wanting demands to be met. What specific demands are they asking for Miami Su they have a number of demands had a half five key demands they want all protesters to be released. Divest full justice for victims of police brutality who've been killed and compensation for their family they want an independent body to overseen investigation into police misconduct They've also asked for a psychological evaluation and training of members of SAWS, and they want to increase salaries for policemen across the board. Protesters have been killed by law enforcement ten people we understand so far has there been any accountability or. Justice for those people. So that's one of the key reasons why protesters is still out on the street despite the dissolution of sauce for them the dissolution does not constitute any actual justice for victims and they said the fact that people have been killed these protests at no officer has been charged investigations being launched. Nothing appears to have been done to that the forties and not committed to reforming police in any. Substantive Way and they said, they'll keep coming out onto the streets until they see some actual chain beyond just rhetorical the government beyond promises of reforms that they say they've seen before they want to see officers charged they want to see changes puts into law and wants to be assured that police officers in Nigeria would no longer be allowed to act with impunity. Let's talk a little bit about who these protesters are. Are they largely young people? Are they women? Are they men? Who are we seeing? That's taking to the streets that's what's been very interesting about this latest wave of protests. It's just the shit -versity of people who've gotten involved. You have members of the Nigerian DASS per sending money from abroad from the U S from. From the UK, you have young middle class people who live in Nigeria who educated abroad who are lending their skills be it's legal skills medical skills kills in logistics and organizing, and then you have you know ordinary Nigerians perhaps who've lived here their whole lives who are often targeted by the police because they seem as as powerless with not. So well connected all these diverse groups are coming. To a these protests because they say that the violence committed by south under underway to police because this is also a protest about abuses of police in Nigeria a whole affect everyone.

Nigeria Officer President Trump Miami Robbery BBC Lagos Saul Jones Extortion UK
Why we must all stand against police brutality in Nigeria

The Breakdown with Shaun King

05:43 min | 5 d ago

Why we must all stand against police brutality in Nigeria

"Before we fully dive into today's episode. Let me first. Say to all of the protesters and demonstrators and everybody who was working hard to fight back against police violence in. Nigeria, from those of you who donate for those of you who might be listening to this on instagram or I tunes or spotify wherever you are in the world let me first say a from my mouth to your ears that we are standing in solidarity with you. We believe in you we're grateful for your for your courage and bravery in the face of state sanctioned violence and I wanNA start there because I'm not. Nigerian. I'm not in Nigeria and I only have the perspective of an outsider here. When I have often heard other people from other countries, speak about police violence in the United States. It has often been painfully clear to me that sometimes. You truly have to be in a place to understand the complexity and nuance of it, and for instance, when George Floyd was murdered an and people all over the world almost twenty million people saw that video just from my social media accounts alone. People, just struggled. To understand how people from. Of the United. States in particular struggled to understand how something like that was possible. Well in the United States where we have a painful history of lynching. Where black men in particular are killed in broad daylight in front of everybody where where people serve as judge jury and executioner, and we've seen these images, our whole lives, we know the bloody history of lynching in this country. For us when we saw we were are are conscious in our heart and soul they were shocked in disturbed. But. For us, it was just a part of of how this country works. But. For people around the world, it was like hold on what? Or. When people saw the video of white men literally chasing down, Aubrey? And Shooting and killing him these men were were racist white supremacist dislike hold on. People are being chased in murdered. Wire. People breaking into the home of Brianna Taylor shooting and killing her and people around the world have tried as outsiders to understand the unique pain what it means to be black in America. And now we as Americans in end from side of the continent of Africa but particularly outside of Nigeria. We are seeing the crisis of police violence explode and what we don't understand is. How long has this been going on? What did this feel like last month last year ten years ago what is the history and legacy in context for it and so for many of us who like I? Have always followed African news closely and try to try to watch the major breaking news from throughout the continent the best that I can. It's it's certainly hard to do that from American news sources but try to follow at least the big stories the best I can for a lot of US including myself. The protest and demonstrations against police violence. Seemingly came out of nowhere. And what I know is that they never come out of nowhere I know that that's not actually how it happened. It's just the media coverage. Finally. Boiled over to the point in the protests and demonstrations against this police violence grew so much that it finally broke through into the news cycle that if finally trended across social media. And the Hashtag in SARS. Was Everywhere on all of my time lines in all of my direct messages and I'll be frank. It took me. A few days to even understand what people were were saying when they said in. SARS because here in the United States. When we're in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic for those of you who may be listening around the world, this pandemic has ravaged our country with nearly two hundred and twenty five thousand people dead nearly eight million people now have contracted the corona here and in this pandemic, the word. SARS for us is also a word frequently used with a type of flu here. and. So when I first started seeing in some ours. I thought that the. Flu had caught on somewhere else not I'm not joking that's literally what my mind process when I first saw it. and. It took me a couple of days to understand that end SARS. This was early last week probably ten days ago or so that end SARS had anything to do with police brutality, took me a forty eight hours or so to understand what it was really

United States Nigeria America FLU Spotify Brianna Taylor George Floyd Aubrey American News Africa
A Conversation on Nigeria's uprising

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:46 min | 5 d ago

A Conversation on Nigeria's uprising

"A video of a man apparently being killed by police goes viral. Protests breakout grow, and spread even internationally. Calls for police reform get better and louder. The police react violently protesters are killed. Off It's too familiar story and this time it's happening across. Nigeria. The focus of the protesters fury, it's a group called the specialist Anti Robbery, squad, or SARS secretive outfit with a long-running reputation for brutality. Stop Stop. Stop killing. It seems clear that Nigeria's people have had enough. President Muhammadu Buhari has already made concessions, but the protest mood hints discontent that stretches far beyond police reform. These have been completely widespread protests taking place in most of the major cities, not least in Lagos, which is the main commercial hub Buju, which is the capital. Jonathan. Rosenthal. Is The economists Africa editor. It is the biggest rising in. Nigeria in a in a very long time. So it seems there was a lot of pent up frustration before this about the police the really has been an and frankly this goes back a very long way that the protests of Tatton's really deep well of anger against the police and in particular against the special entry robbery squad, which was set up in the one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety s many's tackle violent crime in logos. And this has been a particular target because of its brutality people have seen as sort of absolutely faceless and an accountable. Amnesty International looked into it and they found that just in the period between January two, thousand, seventeen may two, thousand and twenty. They found more than eighty cases of abuse torture extra-judicial killings and found that they've been absolutely no accountability no attempts by the Nigerian police force to police itself, and so how has the government responded to all these protests? What you've seen as really two faces of response on the one hand you've had. Quite a violent response by the police of police have fired into protests. We believe the two people have been killed by the police that there will serve reports of police using water cannon, tear gas being protesters, and the like, and the very same time this has been happening. You've had the government's trying to come down almost the side of protest saying that they would dismantle police unit that they would redeploy the offices elsewhere and prison Bahari has has spoken to. This is just one step in our immune. To excessive. Loser. In order not sure that the parameter duty of the police and I look for some agencies. remains. The section of lives and loudly hoods up people. Let's there will be investigations civil society and Human Rights will be involved in this to cry up to bring accountability bring greater oversized to policing in Nigeria, and that seems to be giving the protesters what it is we're looking for. It is a first step of what the protesters want. The they've been I is quite skeptical of the school. There is a very, very long history of. Police violence and police abuse many years people in Nigeria would call special police, units, kill and. Previous protests have been match with with previous promises to reform units and to bring in more accountability. So I think there's a lot of skepticism by protesters about whether the government will follow through. That south has. Has. been dissolved different words to need disbanded and dissolved this year we're not funding for the same lies. Okay. The second issue is that they are are concerned about. The much broader issue of pleasing injustice and rule of law than just this special anti-robbery squad. There are calls for Vesa Training for police officers, much better judicial oversight, and frankly also just better pay better training and more effective policing. In that regard, it seems to be a real echo of what we've seen in America and elsewhere in the world this year. It really has. So when process brockhouse initially in the United States on black lives massive movement, there was a lot of empathy and sympathy within Africa broadly, and one saw both ordinary people and leaders of States speaking out on this issue, the year twenty twenty remembered for the massive groundswell to push back. The frontiers of racism. Under the umbrella. Hashtag black lives matter movement. As a country that has known to well the and wish of institutionalized racism. So Africa supports the demands. Quickly in Africa in the sense that. A lot of civil society groups and just ordinary folk in Africa would see their leaders condemning what is happening in the US and yet. Overseeing police, sources that we're frankly as as violence and dangerous at her across many parts of Africa. There's really been this upwards of support Nachos for black lives matter but turning into into anger at their locally sing. Of course, the SMI- Jaren issues has also taken off. Nigeria has a very large, very, very active, very vocal diasporas. We've seen protests taking place else when that's been brought in some international stars cut each on up a John Vega have been speaking on this issue.

Nigeria Africa Robbery President Muhammadu Buhari United States Amnesty International Lagos Smi- Jaren Rosenthal Bahari Jonathan John Vega Editor Buju America
Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

Coronacast

04:55 min | Last week

Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

"The advice on masks has changed a lot over the course of this pandemic. Hey at the beginning, we were getting some mixed messages about where the mosques were effective at all whether perhaps they could do more harm than good and then over time and we have talked about it a lot on this show already and you acquire vocal quite early on. In the pace that mosques are fictive and that they should be made mandatory in the heavy made mandatory in Victoria. The lightest that we know about what types of face coverings provide the most protection against carbon. So let's just do a little bit of the history going back to the can remind ourselves in the beginning World Health Organization and expert groups such as ours in the study were down on what's called Aerosol Spray. They thought it was just about droplets nearby and you pick it up off of surfaces. Out of date research, it's important but not all aerosol spread we're just talking way. I'm talking if you were in the room with me and Snort well-ventilated room, you could catch it from me over a period of an hour or so even though you're socially distanced happens in restaurants, choir practices and so on. And that's made people realize around the world that mask wearing is really important and some countries of the world they already knew that. So we've drifted towards mask-wearing. What we know that works is at least a two layered cotton mask when the inner layer is quite closely woven in the outer layer is going to be the waterproofing or a surgical, an approved surgical mask or an in one thousand five masks that doesn't have one of those one way valves on the front because they'll just spray the virus sites to people just remember that you're protecting others by wearing a facemask others so. That's the story facemasks. Now, there's a couple of pieces of research which are out in the last few days, which are quite interesting on face masks because one of the negative findings on face masks are only from one of the proponents of face massacres, Rhino McIntyre, from the Kirby Institute in Sydney she and others did a randomized trial in Vietnam with the people who were homemade masks, we're more likely to transmit viruses. This is a few years ago before covet. They even had worries at the beginning. This was actually about the way these masks were being maintained and turned over and so on the. Reanalysis in the British Medical Journal and shown in fact, it was the way they were looking after these cloth masks and the masks that were just hand washed in warm water in a basin and heart to dry they continue to transmit the virus. But if you went into a hospital laundry or you wash them properly and sixty degrees in a proper cycle, then they were actually. Okay. So it's the way that these were maintained and the second one was face shields. Face shows were allowed in Victoria allowed anymore by themselves because they continue to spread the virus and a study of healthcare workers in India has shown that the addition of a face shield to face masks significantly reduces the chances of healthcare workers being infected. So facials do work as an extra device, but not instead of masks healthcare workers in do generally use face shield Sunday it's part of the PPI, and so they're pretty well sorted, but they're still being a problem in Australia with healthcare worker infection. Either because they've not been wearing p. not being provided and in many cases, we still don't know how many health care workers caught the infection sonoma's I'm going to reveal something to the audience about you and your e mailing habits is that you love to either get up very late at night early in the morning and look three research journals. It's a continuous variable by the way. Yes. And then it just like like randomly with research articles that we should talk about. So let's just rip through a whole bunch of them right now you're why should you sleep? You know exactly if you're not skin asleep, why should I be at asleep? So first of all, what's the chances that a baby could catch covid from? It's Mother's breast milk, I? Mean this is a very live topic and with meeks findings mean baby there are some reports of babies, newborn babies, catching SARS COV to, and this is a very small study looking at breast milk and really no convincing. Evidence that the breast milk trend had SARS COV to it. Maybe one sample had some doubts about it. But essentially in this small study has to be said, no evidence of transmission of sauce cartoon, the breast move what about a win we're taking a swab from someone's noise to test them from covid. Is there a best way of doing this? You know really interesting piece from an ent surgeon talking about how sometimes people who are taking swabs, and of course, this is in the American context get the anatomy. Wrong. So we think that the way into the nose is straight up. Since painful when in fact, it's actually imagine you've got your nose it's actually straight back and it's actually quite deep. So it could be centimeters back. So you've actually the swamp has got to go quite far back, and if you tell people this won't be uncomfortable. You're Aligarh it will be uncomfortable, and so he's got to go right back and quite deep to get to the. Back of the nose in the throat, the nasal ferrings. So it's not up it straight back my eyes were watering just looking at it either way it sounds

Victoria World Health Organization British Medical Journal Rhino Mcintyre Aligarh Meeks Kirby Institute Vietnam Sydney Australia India
Coronavirus Cases Rising in Victoria, Australia

Coronacast

05:08 min | Last week

Coronavirus Cases Rising in Victoria, Australia

"At the new, south Wales stats around me. July. There were fifteen eighteen fourteen coronavirus cases a day but never escalated, and there was no lockdown and life was pretty normal. Why isn't that happening now in Victoria with their current numbers? So reasons one is that you know the bottom line is that it's very hard for tour to retrofit the ideal contact tracing system and two years for New South Wales to build up the infrastructure to get there. So they've been playing catch up. The essential reason is Victoria has always had. A backlog, it's much less than it was, but you in the early days of this second wave, it was in the thousands where they didn't know where the virus was where people were getting from, and at one point, I think had four thousand people under investigation. So these are the mystery cases that they haven't been able to pin down where it's come from. Well I think depend on a lot of them but they they didn't know where it was coming. And in New South Wales, it's just a more int- faster contact tracing system where they're on top of it. You might have one or two cases at any one time where they don't come from maybe five and they get down pretty quickly. They also don't wait to tell you for the next day where it's all happening. We tell during the day so they might release their figures in the morning, but there's a case in a gym or go watch over certain restaurant or cafe they'll tell you during the day. So this is constant updating an alert system going on and they're. Just more onto it and it's always appeal art working hard and Victoria the are working hard is is just that the system works better in New South Wales and the result is and has been the result all along, which is there's less virus circulating in your New South Wales during the second wave is that part of the problem? Though is maybe Victoria of God at the beginning, and then it just got to such large numbers before they could figure out the best system. Yes but trip so they have talked about how New South Wales was lucky and it was lucky that they. Sensed, didn't have this breakdown in Authority. Get very angry at me. When I said, they're lucky because this is a lot of hard work here and so on. But in a sense, they didn't have an underground unknown spreads from Hotel Corentin which got into large social networks, and by the time they discovered it, it would have overwhelmed any contact tracing system but equally, they're contact tracing system wasn't sufficiently localized testing system. That responsive that the could get on onto its as fast as possible. So took a while I, think that Victoria really put the rest of the country on its goddess well, though that people saw what was happening there in other states and said, okay, we're going to start getting tested by going to be on the front foot with this doesn't happen here and that's the other reason what was as lucky as that they knew it was coming and so were they were on alert but. They still had a significant outbreak in south Sydney Hotel, crossroads motel, and from various restaurants and so on, and it looked very worrying at one point in New South Wales, and it was teetering on the brink of the managed to bring it back and it still is teetering on the brink by the way because New South Wales has had some cases which are surprises by again they seem to have gotten top fairly quickly with testing. It's incredibly low as they were tour around about the same time. They find it in the sewage they went in and they looked and they find some extra cases and as as we said Corona Casta as both a worry and good news is that the the diagnostic going up means that they're starting to find cases and the tasting rate went up dramatically I think it tripled over night. So we're not only answering questions from a high profile ABC colleagues Lisa's asking how is Metro Melvin going to be able to get to the fourteen day rolling average of five so that they can move into the third step of their roadmap for reopening there's no magic about this it's just continuing to. What you're doing, which is wearing masks when you're out. Keeping your social distance being really hygienic, wiping down surfaces being alert as much as possible, not having large family occasions. And hoping that the context system can actually get on top of this because cases now are down at numbers. The contact tracing system will be getting on top of it and yet it's hovered around nine ten for a few days but it will start to come down things will we'll get back but it's just going to take some time. There's a lot of virus circulating in. Victoria. So one of the things that's happening today, there's still a lot of circulating in. Victoria but kids are going back to school and marks. Emailed us about this saying is bit disappointed about it saying that kids are being said that they're less infectious but the best evidence seems to be inconclusive. What do we know about how safe it is to be sending kids back to school now it's remarkable how uncertain some of the evidence is here if you take the balance of evidence, the balance of evidences that children undertain are less susceptible to SARS covy to. and. They seemed to transmit it less. It's not as if they don't transmit it at all about that risk goes up after the age of ten considerably.

New South Wales South Wales Victoria Wales Hotel Corentin Corona Casta Sydney Hotel ABC Metro Melvin Lisa
3 win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020 for discovering Hepatitis C virus

60-Second Science

02:58 min | 2 weeks ago

3 win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020 for discovering Hepatitis C virus

"Guess we're we're sort of in the middle of the major biology education Charles Rice of the Rockefeller University in New York City I. think that you know the field has definitely changed since days when was a graduate student and I think one of the things that is is very reassuring. Now is really global response to this is pandemic. Of Academic and clinical. In Pharma Communities, the rate of progress earlier today October Fifth Twenty Twenty Rice was informed that he had won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery of the virus that Causes Hepatitis C.. The identification of the virus has led to tests and treatments for the Condition Ri- shared the prize with Harvey Alter of the National Institutes of Health and Michael. Houghton of the University of Alberta, it took US months and months of of toil to sequences single viral genome. Now, people can do that in a matter of hours and the rate at which people have been able to sort of make progress on understanding SARS Gobi to and And covid nineteen is spectacular. Rice spoke this morning on a web press conference from Rockefeller. University. So I think it's it's taught us a lot of things about science in general. There's really a a pressing problem we sort of you know mobilize people all around the world sort of work on these problems. Really you know great progress can be made. You know people would love to have a cure a week or so vaccine and a week I mean that's not feasible but the speed with which good they're. -PEUTIC and and vaccines will be developed for SARS Kobe to prevent covid nineteen is Going to be a spectacular and it's it has a way of I think in a really sort of changing the way science is done to really make it in a sort of more of a community after rather than something that many years ago might have been pursued by a few labs in isolation. So I think the sort of young biologist today just South this amazing collection of tools and capabilities to understand what's going on in virus biology in and the host response at a level that was just never before possible. I'm very. Optimistic on this sort of future of this and I do hope maybe the success with Hepatitis C. and I would predict these eventual success and getting a handle on the current coronavirus pandemic. We face will sort of encouraged us to not only recruit more virologists but also just sort of encouraged people to study these little troublemakers because you never know when they're gonNA pop out and cause trouble. So It's worth a with a small investor.

Twenty Twenty Rice Nobel Prize Rockefeller University University Of Alberta Covid National Institutes Of Health Harvey Alter Graduate Student Gobi Rockefeller Pharma Communities Houghton New York Kobe Michael
Mirati to Rival Amgen in Solid Tumors

Breaking Biotech

08:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Mirati to Rival Amgen in Solid Tumors

"So to start I wanNA talk about exact sciences ticker symbol e x a s, and they are now trading at around twelve billion dollar market cap, and what they announced is liquid biopsy testing data in six different cancer types showing a sensitivity of eighty six percent and a specificity of ninety five percent, and they did kind of a grab bag of cancer types. We have lung ovarian, liver pancreatic, and Alpha Jill. And so I did video on exact sciences quite a while ago I thought their evaluation was a little bit toppy back then and was waiting for dipped to buy, and that's what I did during the Cova crisis I took a small position and then I sold just recently at around ninety four and I think is trading just over one hundred dollars right now but this. Is Nice to see them kind of moving into new areas because I think one of the things that they're struggling with is leaning on their old testing kit the colours guard while all these other companies are trying to get into things like liquid biopsy, which it's going to be a real game changer in the space. Once these treatments get validated and approved by the FDA. Now. They're not alone doing this exact sciences is kind of just finally getting into this because other big players like alumina through grail they just acquired this private company called grail officially officially. We've garden health personalisation of been floating around and invitations. Well, who just acquired archer DSL there's a lot of companies in the space, but exact scientists has shown some pretty good success in their previous testing kits. So it just makes sense them to jump into this new area and be a good competitor. So I think right now probably a little bit toppy with the price around one hundred but I'm pretty pleased with the small profit. I made given the number shares that I have. So that's exact sciences. Want to move now into regeneration ticker symbol. And they're trading at a sixty billion dollar market CAP. I did a video on them also a few months ago, looking at kind of their staples in terms of the different products that they offer and I concluded that they were relatively over-valued back. Then I think now also a little bit overvalued, but it does depend on how well their product. So and the kind of revenue they can bring in obviously but the news that we heard is that they released data on their antibody cocktail for covid nineteen. and. What we saw is that it reduced viral loads and symptoms versus placebo in non. Patients who are infected with SARS co to and what they shared our results from initial cohort of two hundred and seventy five patients, and they also have nine hundred or more patients enrolled. So this is kind of a preliminary analysis that they're showing US and they've called it a phase one, two, three trials. So they're doing the PK the safety along with the efficacy and other sorts of secondary outcomes all at once and when I look through their stuff, they started off by kind of categorizing patients based. On Sarah Negative or zero positive and I, think it's important that they do this because we're looking at a treatment for covid nineteen and if people are already sero-positive in their bodies, already mounted an antibody response in order to bring down viral loads. So what regeneration is trying to pose here is that the negative patients which means they have not mount that antibody response have significantly higher viral load and they make a better target for most treatments probably also their antibody cocktail that they're gonNA share data with. So. Then the data that they show here shows a range of efficacy based off of viral load. So we have tended the power of four copies, parallel all the way to tend to the seven copies personnel. So quite a big range in viral load here and I just blew this up on the screen. What we're seeing is that at the higher viral load, the treatment and there two different doses here in the green and the red line, we see that much more dramatic decrease in the amount of viral load in. These patients and it does kind of make sense because if your body's already mounted an antibody response, the window of efficacy is just going to be a bit smaller than if it's before the at which your body's manning response. So I think for these patients, it's definitely positive data. They also looked at other other metrics as well and I'm not going to get into everything but they did look at a day to alleviation of symptoms and they looked at the overall population of patients. It's the difference of nine with Placebo. To between six and eight, depending on the dose that they gave the antibody cocktail with the negative group alone, the placebo was thirteen days and then the low and high dose was six and eight respectively. So obviously a big difference when it comes to whether or not the patient is zero negative or positive. So that's probably going to inform the FDA when it comes to approving the drug or giving some kind of guidance on which patients should take the drug and who are likely to see more positive outcomes from that. So overall. I think it's good. It gets a step ahead of the Gilead data where I don't think we've even seen a placebo group yet. So it's nice to see regenerate actually do this placebo controlled trial. We can see whether or not there is efficacy and I, look forward to seeing the rest of the data I'm not if this merits taking a position regenerate here given that they're such a large company already and they have so many different assets that are I would say more likely to contribute to their bottom line. This doesn't entice me to take a position, but it's nice to see that we're getting all these therapies are starting to see vaccine data, and this just makes me feel better in general that we're going to move towards being able to treat this disease and hopefully get out from under this and then Kinda recover with the economy. With that, let's talk about the main story for today, and that is morality Therapeutics Ticker Symbol M rt ex, and they're trading at a price of one sixty, two point zero five per share giving them a market cap of seven point two, billion dollars. Their Q. Two, twenty, twenty, net loss was eighty, three, million dollars, and this represents an eighty percent increase year over year there their q two net current cash is six, hundred million dollars giving them a runway of about until twenty twenty two I would say but let's also be careful that if they see positive data. This year or next year is a good chance that they're going to raise again. And what Morad is trying to do is develop targeted cancer treatments and they're specifically looking at solid tumors and even more specific than that are K. Rasa inhibitors, and so they have to compounds Marta six, eight, four, nine, and x, one, three, three. They're also looking at checkpoint inhibitor resistance with their compound sicher Vance it, and I'll talk about that in a bit later. To start though we gotta talk about chaos and the reason why this is so important is that chaos mutations are present in a large population of cancer patients. The first thing it's important to note is that chaos is pretty ubiquitous. It's a critical part of the map kinase signaling pathway, and this is very important in basically every single cell. This pathways involved in Cell Proliferation Cell Survival had differentiation here. There's a whole bunch of other stuff and it makes a little bit confusing because it is involved in. So many different pathways that if you were just to inhibit this molecule non specifically, you're likely to see significant side effects with patients. It's for this reason that it's important that we can come up with a targeted therapy that will only target cells that have a mutation in chaos rather than the healthy normal. KS. To talk a little bit more about its function, it works as a GT as and what this means is that it takes a molecule GDP converts it to GDP using that phosphate group to continue the signaling pathway. The next step is Raff or something like that mutations in. A company twenty, one point, six percent of all human cancers, and then I have here that chaos the predominant or exclusive Rask's mutated in three of the top four neoplasms that account for cancer deaths in the US lung colon and pancreatic. Cancer.

FDA United States Cancer Alpha Jill Sarah Negative KS Raff Rask Manning Gilead Solid Tumors Morad Marta
An Experimental COVID-19 Vaccine Begins Human Clinical Trials

The Bio Report

04:42 min | 2 weeks ago

An Experimental COVID-19 Vaccine Begins Human Clinical Trials

"May May Peter Thanks for joining us. Great to be any pleasure. We're GONNA talk about Kovacs Peptide vaccines and the company's efforts to develop a vaccine for covid Nineteen Kovacs is a division of United Biomedical which has long produce. Vaccines May maybe you can begin by just talking about how Kovacs came about. He Asher. So it started about six months ago when cove nineteen was coming across ocean and essentially how you know my husband, my Lou gave Peter a content listen i. think we could do something about this curve nineteen we we were ground SARS, the first one almost twenty years ago, and thankfully for the world never win anything anywhere but this covid nineteen doesn't appear to be. Letting down. So I think we can leverage our platform for both diagnostics vaccine's what do you think and of course Peter was like absolutely let's do it. So that was the birth. Origination of Kovacs. Now here we are in body told for one vaccine later. Up there you're you're both in investor and vice chairman what was the relationship? How did you know me and what led you to become involved? So I had met may may an Lou years earlier through the X Prize Foundation they were at our annual visionary event, which is our big get together with sort of world leaders and Philanthropists and Ed became really super close friends. We have kids same age and I joined their board of a sister company called United Neuroscience, which is now rebranding as back sanity. and. I found them to be just absolutely brilliant passionate dedicated biotech leaders who had a very different mindset from the beginning that that redneck was very. Resonated with me from a perspective of things I care about about demonetizing democratizing healthcare, and and. So I joined their board at this other company. And in March when they called me a like of course, let's jump in and I helped pull together the Capitol to kick Kovacs off. And then May. and Lou who are co CEOS of Kovacs and also the other company vaccine entity. You'll have an amazing science team. Globally around the world and end within thirty days will was extraordinary from a standing start being able to use and leverage different parts of the of the previous companies. May Enter team first of all developed what is now the most sensitive most Pacific blood antibody test? This is not PR. This is have you developed antibodies right? The blame by test serology and they developed thirty different vaccines. And started. Looking at those the efficacy, those vaccines and ended up with a lead candidate, which is pretty extraordinary. Think of you as a a fairly big vision guy people may know you as the founder of the x prize earlier singularity. University. Also co-authored a very optimistic view of the future in abundance. Bestseller really a good guy who's embraced technology is making a better world. In some respects you you're interested Kovacs's understandable given the scope of this pandemic at the same time it. Almost, a bit mundane in that. It's it's not a problem necessarily in in need of a new technological solution. Is there something about Kovacs that? Inspires you in light of the other things you do. While they're is the it's the platform. Here in the platform, something, that may his mom? Who is the you know the? Founder of the company and and really the inventor of the technology. So we're living in a world right now that is healthcare isn't healthcare at sick care and the system takes care of you after you're sick and while we spend an extraordinary amount of money. In the United. States. Are Healthcare is awful I mean really is terrible. It's comparatively to other countries money we spend we should be ashamed of what we get result

Nineteen Kovacs Sars LOU Founder X Prize Foundation United Biomedical Asher Vice Chairman United Neuroscience Peter Demonetizing ED
A Conversation With Skai Jackson

On with Mario Interviews

06:12 min | 3 weeks ago

A Conversation With Skai Jackson

"Mario Lopez. Zoom from the new season of dancing with the stars actress Sky Jackson. Welcome. To the show sky all you Larry Al. Hawaii I'm doing well, I'm doing what you know what it's funny. I'm laughing right now. 'cause you look. Just. Like a little young mini version of a friend of mine. In Surrey Hall who's pretty? WHO's she's beautiful but I'm thinking. A little very. Funny. deller that where are you zooming from right now? I am home right now I'm. And the. On my way to her show Nice and how have rehearsals been through so far? We're. been a lot I mean we rehearse about four or five hours per day every single day even on weekends. So it is a lot of my dance partner is really great. We have fun with each other I learned the dance pretty quick and it just a good time. Overall. Are you a fan of the show or did it take some convincing to do it? You know what I was abandoned show my family I would watch it and then I didn't watch it for a period of time and then the offer came about and it wasn't something that I was like, yes, I'm GonNa do it right away it was a long thought process behind it but I was like you know what on quarantine right now Hollywood's shutdown let me just have fun during this time. Yeah good attitude, good attitude, and are you glad once you jumped in is it more difficult than you thought or or use? It as difficult as I thought would be I have had friends who have done the shell before. So they kinda give me insight on the even before I knew I was doing like you're rehearsals a really hard. It's a lot of work, but you know what I like challenge. So I'm just ready to take on the challenge you feel because you're. Young and athletic and condense dance at the judges might have been a little tough on you and how'd you maybe to a different standard? You know what? I think the judges might be a little bit more tough on me, which is fine. I take whatever the judges have to say you know, of course into consideration apply that to the next week. So this any notes that they give me his very helpful for me so I don't really take it as like Dang why are they so hard on me? I wish I could be a little bit lighter I. Think it's just for the best interest good attitude to have right now this week is Disney. Night work can you see us about with your performance? You know what? I can't say what style dancers song were doing but just know is one of my favorite Disney movies I love her it's a Disney princess I'll give you a hint. Her name starts with t you probably guessed what kind of it's from but the dances killer, it's really fast. It's a lot of fine and I think people are GonNa love it think it'd make a great transition right there. CONGRATS. You gotTa Popular Youtube Channel. What kind of things do you like to do the? You know what I like to do different blogs just to show my fans like what I do on a daily basis because I feel like I can get lost during instagram I. Mean I mainly just post videos I do lives a lot too but not everyone can tune in for that. So make sure that I'm always wagging they're just doing stuff at. Sea Doing. So even like the dancing the SARS, I did a cute little wild yesterday and I'll upload that but I always liked saying connected with my fans any way possible good for you. They can support you. Through this journey and vote and what have you holiday now sky and eighteen okay you're adult. Now how'd that feel? You know what? It doesn't feel any different from when I was seventeen there's different. More responsibility. For you now, it was about about this time last year when you start. In the House X. Video for Panini, how'd you film that skydiving see? You know what it was really nerve wrecking because they really did have a really high up I didn't jump out of an actual plane of course but I, was like harnessed on these ropes and they just kept bouncing up and down up and down. So that was a little bit nerve wracking because I'm not the biggest fan of like really tall heights but video shoot was really cool NASA's dope. I had a really good time. It was my first music reveal that evidence Nice Nice. Cool I'm sure not the last I before I can. They might be the last journey. That's it. No more it's not like a one time thing you know. I'm like you know what? It's a one time thing. So I'm glad I did it the one time with him fair enough. All right. Before I, let you put on the spot with some quick questions, quick answers. A small. Favorite show you've binge during quarantine. Or on my block, it's on Netflix I barely watch TV but I watch that show on it's good her mom black. Okay. Song all lyrics to. Songs I know all the lyrics do honestly pretty much. Any NICKI Menaj John. I love her. It's a Lotta Eric's. Lyrics. Yeah. At one, the music comes on I concert you know wrapping a little bit but. Okay, she's cool. Celebrity crush growing up. ooh So liberty crush growing up maybe like Leonardo DiCaprio Titanic. Okay. came out a long time ago. So later. Yeah. Go too late night snack. Will. I like icees like sorbet that's my late night snack. I could eat the whole jar of that. It's really bad. Be Any animal would you pick? I will be a tiger, I. Love Tigers they're. I think they're. So fierce there so fast. So Tiger for sure have you had a conversation, Carol, Baskin About Tigers You know what I have not. I've only seen her twice in person she's actually credited nice. But Yeah I haven't yet maybe one day we'll get more conversation. Sounds good. Sounds good. We'll hey good luck and we'll hold to see in person one of these days watch dancing with the stars on Mondays on Fox skype. Thank you so much. Check in. Mario. Okay.

Mario Lopez Disney Sky Jackson Surrey Hall Hawaii Larry Al Nasa Partner Leonardo Dicaprio Hollywood Netflix Tiger Nicki Menaj John Panini Carol
A Look at AppGyver

No Code No Problem

01:28 min | 3 weeks ago

A Look at AppGyver

"I, want to talk about ap Gai ever hit on posted a screen shot on twitter earlier at guy ever in the image said, and I quote for all indie developers. Organizations. anyone else really with less than ten million dollars in revenue slash funding composer pro, which is builder is free for life. sars-like. Okay. That's pretty sweet. So, naturally, I had to jump in and see what they had to offer. They have a nice on boarding on the have a nice on boarding process in once I was very pleased actually. So the builder was nicely built with an array of forms lists, etc, and you can use at Gabar to make web APPS and mobile APPs with password fields, authentification search bars, and more. Something that I really liked about composer pro was how the responsiveness with simple and how you could choose between devices whether that be an Iphone X. are or an ipad mini or a web APP on to ensure that your application is always looking its best So yeah. So I, I really really really enjoyed it. It's Gives me a gives me a bubble VIBE, right but not so daunting as to bubble right so I think that it's definitely worth a shot if you're looking to build a web, APP. Or out and you WANNA try different builder have googlers composer pro is definitely a good choice.

Twitter Gabar
University of Pittsburgh scientists discover antibody that 'neutralizes' virus that causes COVID-19

Frank Beckmann

01:06 min | Last month

University of Pittsburgh scientists discover antibody that 'neutralizes' virus that causes COVID-19

"The University of Pittsburgh. The story just ran across it. Scientists have discovered an antibody or antibody. That neutralizes the virus that causes covert 19. The antibody component is 10 10 Times smaller than a full sized antibody has been used to create a drug called a B eight. Which is shared the report that was published by the researchers in a general called cell yesterday and this drug a seal is a potential preventative against SARS covered too. So I believe that's the second wave or would that be covered 19. Now it's covered 90. Maybe it is not only has not only potential for therapy as therapy for covert 19 Said the chief of division of infectious diseases at Pitt. It could also be used to keep people from getting SARS covered to infections. So, uh, this is very rare, promising we'll

Sars University Of Pittsburgh
How To Consistently Reach Your Sales Quota

Journey to $100 Million

04:39 min | Last month

How To Consistently Reach Your Sales Quota

"What's up? Everybody Needs Kevin Daisy. So we are fairly new at sales as far as the station is concerned having professional. salespeople. We're about, I guess a year and a half into it I. It was Eric and I always sell in the business. then. We had a Glenn who came on about. Not, even a year and a half ago. Now, if our sales professional and we're looking to hire more so we're kind of quickly scale on this up. But we have a very basic system as far as what we're looking for. What the monthly quota is. An and they should be bringing in and it is super basic and as for me, it still works I know we might get more sophisticated as we grow in the teams grow and we have managers and things like that. But right now it's it's super basic. So interesting lay it out for you. and you can see how all this may be different than your model or if you don't have a model because you're disowned for yourself. something you can think about doing. SARS is very. Is. Five thousand dollars a month. In monthly reoccurring revenue. That's the theme here monthly reoccurring revenue five grand every month, not five gram once or twice or ten times, and then Kinda sit back. Five men every month. That's all we care about. We want those results. If you do the math on that, if you're GONNA do five grandmothers salesperson. Times twelve that sixty thousand dollars of monthly reoccurring revenue. So that means a month thirteen. We've collected sixty grand. From the clients that you've brought in as a salesperson here. At Mont Thirteen but take that that book of business. Times another twelve and that seven hundred, twenty, thousand dollars. So a very successful salesperson in their first year should be over half a million at least. And that's what looking at. That's the kind of success we need to grow this business. Now we do have ramp up period. said. You come on with us for as a salesperson which we're hiring right now as recording this for sales. There's a ramp up period so The first few months. Washington. The first four months or not one hundred percent of that. So we actually sort out with about a two week training period. A month is twenty, five percent of five grand, which is twelve fifty. Then he gets to fifty percent seventy percent and then the fourth full month. After a two week. Period you're expected to bring in five thousand in monthly recurring revenue. So right now, this is a very basic system and it works. We don't care about how many phone calls you made. We don't care about how emails you sent. I don't care if you want to network in meetings or not doesn't matter to me. It's. Can You bring in five thousand a month in New York consistently. And again, this reoccurring. So this is contacted. Using on twelve month. So, as predictable cash flow that we can count on for at least next year. So. That's really how we're building up our sales and growing the company. In if I can just hire another person and they can achieve that. Five thousand per month each. Then, we're in really good spot and we're growing very quickly. So. That's what we're trying to do again right now is very basic, but it works for us. We've had other people tell us different things and don't do like do it like this. Do like that. But for us is working out, well, we also pay salespeople a salary plus the commission net. And we do the life for that the life of the account. So. We've got a pretty good system going also the salespeople here they're not account managers. So they can build a book business and then keep building it not managing. There's accounts. Our operations team which according to the episode on that but. Operations seems takes over that relationship and the responsibility. So the salesperson continued yourself. Now, they can touch base and and reach out of the client of course, but it's not really the responsibility so. They Cabal. You know what you're tracking with sales was important for us the results, how much can you bring in per month and for us the minimum is five grand per month. And that's going to set us up for success. We were

Glenn Mont Thirteen Kevin Daisy Eric New York Washington
"sars" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:27 min | Last month

"sars" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Is your morning ritual. Garrett Louis with you here can s t a M 7 90, Tucson's most stimulating talking. We'll get into this more later on in the show, and I want to get to this more tomorrow. 905 with his doctor back to Cherry at the U of a who did a study? It says. Basically looks like you could have years of immunity if he had the cove it from the virus and years of immunity. I'm curious. You know, he may or may not know anything about this, but He also talked about the 2003 SARS epidemic. And this piece in conservative review, and I put this on my Facebook parlor and Twitter. This is really remarkable. Conservative review reports during the 2003 Stars epidemic, The CDC advised the following about the reliance of PCR testing. They said to decrease the possibility of false positive results. Testing should be limited to patients with a high index of suspicion for having SARS cova disease. So you really must have, like a lot of symptom, not just and you know what? Your duty never to get a test. Get a test. Get it? No, it's not what's supposed to happen? Why is this star is different from that stars. Any positive specimen should be retested in a reference lab to confirm that it's positive. And to be confident that a positive PCR specimen indicates the patient's infected with SARS Cove ID. A second specimen should be also confirmed positive. And then the W. H O. The World Health Organization warned a single test result is insufficient for the definitive diagnosis of stars. Covert infection, man Has That changed too. This one, right? It's unbelievable. And then it's reported here. There's no meaningful evidence a symptomatic individuals contributed to the community spread. While there are several studies showing the opposite that they didn't and yet we're told to wear a mask. Even if you're not sick, you don't feel sick. You could have it and spread it and like I've been telling you, there's no evidence of it. Now the CDC is moving in this direction of reality, advising against testing a symptomatic individuals. Again. It was all about. Betting the curves of hospitals. People get sick. Let him go to a hospital. What the hospitals make money. This is out of control. And we have literally no Republican lawmakers giving us any help to stop do Sienna. While they can't get there, they can't get a session. Get out there and shame the hell out of him. Because now he's moving on to flu. Trying to say that we have to also stay diligent, Vigilant. Keep everything closed. I'm gonna keep a state of emergency for the food. We've never had a state of emergency for the flu. Where's the outrage? I tell you. You know what? Honestly, at this point isn't even worth that. You could have a crazy Democrat. Don't get me wrong, but it is it. Is it worth voting? For these wimps these Reina This's exactly Arizona Republicans were Finch. Inbred Roberts, Vince Leech. I mean, they're not even saying a damn word. Trust me. They were calling me all the time. Without Vince Lige. It can take all the time. And now silence. Only thing could be more like Don Don was on fire. Yesterday we get the Dons and Biden highlights. All coming up right here on canister. President Trump says Portland leaders haven't been able to deal with ongoing violent protest. He told Fox News that Democrats have lost control of the radical Left. Protests began in South Los Angeles last night after Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies shot and killed an African American man on a bicycle. Investigators say the man fought with deputies and was caring of firearm..

CDC SARS President Trump Vince Leech Garrett Louis Los Angeles County Don Don Finch Cherry Facebook Tucson South Los Angeles Vince Lige Fox News Dons Twitter Portland Biden Inbred Roberts
"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:46 min | 5 months ago

"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The dads tragic as they are not on the scale of thousand nine hundred eighteen pandemic of influenza so We do need to be ready still for the next pandemic in in a sense In the in the West we have been very lucky right. There have been some close calls. Sars was a really close near Miss. I keep thinking about the ten percent. Ten to fifteen percent fatality rate with ours. I mean it's almost unimaginable. What would have happened if that Abbott epidemic had spun or pandemic has spun fully out of control so so to get back to what you said a little earlier in this hour Dr Kahn. You're still seeing the United States kind of bouncing around two thousand deaths per day but we're having states also trying to pick up economic activity and get back on on their on their feet. So are they doing the right thing so correct? So we're still bouncing around after four five weeks at twenty thousand cases a day which is way too many and yes. I don't think these are mutually exclusive. We can reopen but we can reopen safely but reopened safely. You need to drop cases down in our communities and what we wanted to have his the cases in the teens a all of the various all of the various tools than checklists about reopening talk about how many cases there are in the community. You know as so the less cases the safe for people aren't to go out and about their business. Yes you can reopen but please reopen safely and that's about public health again. You know sharpen that acts. Find those cases find those on tax and thank you. By the way I misspoke NASA Two Thousand and said twenty thousand cases a day. I'm clearances today. Correct Dr Khan if I may just yesterday you you put out this tweet saying. Can you clearly identify if your community has controlled substantial community transmission if not then then planning and precautions are merely theater? Yes so that's the About doing this simultaneously so I think this is where people need to hold the local and state officials accountable to say what is community mission. Look like that. You're asking us to go out and about in my community so yes I want. I Want My. I want to be able to go to the grocery store. I want to send my kids back to school but I want to send my kids back to school when I know the least likely to get infected in least likely to get infected if there's low community transmission and the bad is on my state and local officials to guarantee me that low community transmission this is covert nineteen. This is not flew out there in the community that we can do nothing about. This is a disease that we know we can do something about and get down to low levels and that was my point that we need to be making a short. We need to make sure that would driving down transmission driving down transmission. So I I mean. Perhaps you've said this before this hour but I'm going to ask you again directly right now. What should we be doing to continue to drive down that transmission right now? We should be making sure. We have enough testing capability in America to identify every case early isolate that individual identified that person's contacts and put them in quarantine for fourteen days and that strategy has worked and continues to work in many countries worldwide to drive down transmission. And that makes it safer for you to go out and about Your Business and do everything you WanNa do. So essentially we should. We should be doing what you saw and health the Singaporean government due in two thousand. Three exactly and what the Chinese and the New Zealanders are doing today in Taiwan. I I suppose I I come to this again and again There must be something about. Human beings are human systems that While we may we have times of extreme collective intelligence we also have times of extreme collective ignorance and trying to figure out puzzle. My Way we get out of this collective ignorance that we have right now especially if to to stretch your metaphor of viral intelligence. I mean you. We read that passage from your book at the beginning of Pastas saying microbes. Who will have the last word? We can't let the microbes have the last word. Can we Dr Khan absolutely now? We're smarter and even though they have the ability to multiply multiple times per day. We are very ingenious than we do know they have only so many strategies to infect us in we will continue to think of new ways to protect ourselves but that's about making the appropriate choices. An idea that was part of that passage to we need to make the appropriate choices about our systems to protect us. And that starts today to say that this disease is not inevitable in our communities. And that's why every time I hear about the second wave I go. This is not inevitable. We have a choice to make here to drive down transmission in our communities and protect our individuals as they go out and about their days. We'll Dr Ali Khan is dean of the College of Public Health and a professor of epidemiology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He spent a couple of decades before that at the Centers for Disease Control and prevention including as director of the CDC's Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. Dr Khan. Thank you so.

Dr Ali Khan CDC Dr Kahn United States NASA College of Public Health Abbott Office of Public Health Prepar Taiwan America University of Nebraska Medical professor director
"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

13:59 min | 5 months ago

"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office Public Health Preparedness and Response and he was Deputy Act and acting director of the National Center for Zoonotic vector-borne and Enteric Diseases many positions he held at the CDC for quite some time. Dr Cohn has been around the world chasing viruses and trying to tamp out outbreaks and we WANNA learn from his experience about why we took the missteps in this country that we did with the COVID. The novel Cova Corona Virus outbreak. Now Dr Con- you were telling us about your experience in two thousand three in Singapore and how the detail with which the Singaporean government decided to basically do you were effectively talking about contact tracing down to looking at receipts from taxi drivers seats from taxi drivers looking at their credit card statements and then once they quarantine people how they updated it again for the twenty first century they would put cameras in people's homes and randomly call them in the morning and the evenings to and then that would give them a certain time window to connect to the. Webcam and make sure that they were there. So they They updated everything for the twenty first century while I guess at that point was the twentieth century at to make sure that the quarantine these quarantine in isolation measures and their affective. They were very effective And they got their outbreak under control but the bigger point. Besides updating isolation quarantine was that they stuck to their strategy despite the setbacks they had during the course of that outbreak with these unexpected unexpected cases occurring in markets and and taxicabs and other places. Okay so As with so many of of the conversations that I've had in the past couple of months we have the luxury of looking back on history But I'm wondering if you could actually put us squarely in terms of what you were thinking and feeling in that moment in early in two thousand and three when you were in Singapore. Was there ever a time where you were wondering if the efforts that you were helping with? Would they work? Wouldn't they work? Were there moments of uncertainty or absolutely. There were numerous moments of uncertainty. So when I got there at the moment of uncertainty resolved around. How do you identify who infected whom within hospitals a so Sars coronavirus one. A you become more infectious. Has You became As you progressed in your illness so that disease was mainly transmitted within healthcare settings so there was a challenge to try to understand who you are infecting within the hospital so there was uncertainty there that we could capture everybody who was sick because then you had to go. Look for all the visitors into the hospital than if you'd left the hospital and went to another hospital so eventually Singapore Jab tracking that down. Then the next big point of uncertain became when we saw this large Number of cases that occurred in a market that was completely unexpected with no link backed with digital cases. Bats what we would call community transmission Would be the term that people would recognize And that was very disheartening. But again the a Singaporean. Public health authorities just worked right through it instead. Okay we're GONNA take each. And every one of these cases find their contacts and keep going about our business And they did. And despite the uncertainty and And I remember that day was very disheartening for everybody but Couple of weeks later they got all of those under control again and I can i. You know those days when I thought about you know now. In retrospect I think about that day in Singapore would all those cases. I'm sure that's my in South Korea Felt when they opened up South Korea couple of weeks ago and then they had one individual who caused about two hundred cases around five nightclubs. So I'm sure they felt the exact same way when all of a sudden they thought they were on the right track and they had this you know blossoming of cases around a single individual. Wow so there are so many details about this SARS experience that you had that we could dive into but I am constrained by time Dr Console. So let's fast forward a tiny bit you you you you you help the Singaporean government in the midst of that SARS outbreak. You saw the successes that they had in two thousand three you come back to the United States. You're you're at the CDC AT THIS TIME. Did you come back and say wow? I Willard a whole lot. And here's what we need to do in the United States. What what do you think the most important lessons that you learned that you wanted the? Us to to vigorously incorporate in terms of its public health responses to emerging diseases so one of the main lessons we learnt at during the SARS outbreak. A couple let me go through some of them So the SARS outbreak was one of the best reminders. We ever had was about how air travel can rapidly move disease worldwide. And this all has to do with this wonderful thing called an incubation period and the incubation period which almost every movie ignores is the time you get infected to the time you manifest disease and this incubation period always protected us when you needed to get on a boat go from Point A. Point B. Because by the time you got to wherever you were going you knew you were infected. That doesn't work with airplanes because the time it takes to fly from London to New York is less than the time it takes for you to sort of incubate that disease so you can show up in New York City from Milan and then three days later manifest your disease so the SARS outbreak made that very clear and taught us a lot about what it means to screen people at Borders Because you'RE NOT GONNA pick up everybody of this incubation period. It also taught us something about super spreading events. Which is the sort of even though we talk about this covid nineteen causing maybe two to three additional cases for each individual. There are some individuals where you can see fifteen twenty fifty one hundred cases around that individuals. These are called super spreading events. A those are very problematic in this disease and needs to be considered as you think about mass gathering and other events on what the implications of those are and it told us we need to be careful about thinking about these diseases generally because there wasn't just SARS there's also another related disease called Moore's In the Arabian Peninsula. That proved that has proved problematic for them. And they've and they've had cases in South Korea of Mars so and then the other piece is this robust public health response that's required by countries and globally right. Those are the lessons that we took away from that outbreak that we try to bake into our system so when my last jobs at CDC was ensuring that the US was prepared for all public health threats whether they were natural or man-made and we tried incorporate that into our planning processes but going back to the ax in the display case We have always funded public health than preparedness with sense on the dollar compared to our healthcare and we see that playing out now which is that we have failed to fully support and fund. Cdc In state and local public health departments. Yeah well so Dr. Khan I keep thinking about The book that you wrote the next pandemic in two thousand sixteen And you go into a lot of detail about Not just what you learn for example regarding SARS but you have a basically what amounts to list of things that we needed to do or must continuously do not just not just occasionally but continuously due to be ready for these kinds of global disasters and the reason. I don't mean to laugh because this is not funny but it just does it almost. Maybe that's just like my my kind of reaction of disbelief. When I read the list of things that you were writing about years ago right the monetary of actually viruses in the field in the wild if we can systems to produce diagnostic tests very fast and in huge numbers surge capacity in our healthcare system. Smarter supply chains for P. P. Ventilators et Cetera et coordination from local state federal international level. I mean it's like a list of all of the things you could check them off of the things that did not happen in two thousand twenty so you talk about a failure of imagination. I mean is it more. That almost seems a little generous is more that we had A. We went through a deliberate act of ignorance from our own experience. We clearly have despite a long history of emerging infectious diseases and pandemic so know. Two thousand seven Two thousand nine at the h one n one pandemic so we've had experiences with emerging infectious diseases in and a and a mild to moderate influenza pandemic in the US we have failed to take those lessons too hard to make sure we built robust public health systems and the comment about healthcare systems is on a one of the things that I had the honour of helping put together while I was at. Cdc with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation was a numeric metric of how prepared the United States was and one the lowest indicators in that was healthcare system there nece and the thing that got us in trouble with. This outbreak was healthcare system preparedness. So it's not like we didn't know where the is worth that needed to be fixed That would have helped during this outbreak. Well so I was just digging through Some older Actually through the war Robert where Web Robert Wood Johnson website. Because of the work that you had done with them and it's really really interesting because I think back in twenty thirteen In the summer of twenty thirteen you you they had sponsored a congressional briefing that you attended and at that time You had said by every measure. Our nation is dramatically better prepared for public health threats than they were. And you outlawed outlines some things that were going on. Cdc that the showed that that stronger public health preparedness. What changed between then and now. I don't think anything changed. I mean every year our preparedness has improved in the US. The problem is the level of preparedness has never gotten to attend so Okay our current preparedness in the. Us is like a six point. Seven on the numerical scale we developed so we had gone up. I think from six point three to six point four to six point five over the years I was there. So we were making incremental baby step changes And improving our systems. But we still have a long way to go. Does that make sense? Yes it does. And thank you for that clarification. Because it it's I suppose the reason why why I asked you that Dr is for someone like you and your colleagues former your current colleagues Nebraska former colleagues at the CDC colleagues worldwide who studied who are in the World of epidemiology and infectious diseases. This do you feel a sense of frustration heartbreak? Now about how We were. We still had a ways to go in preparedness and even though we knew how to get there as a nation this nation. We didn't do it. It's it's impossible not to feel a sense. Sense of frustration. Does ninety thousand Americans have died so far so you have to feel a sense of frustration and heartbreak at at what's happened. I mean each and every one of those is the tragic death than it's not you know you don't know what could have happened especially given hindsight but Yes of there is a sense of frustration and I know even during my time at CDC that while there was a lots of support for preparedness activities following nine eleven some additional support when there was concern about avian influenza potential avian influenza outbreak in two thousand five six and seven you know when there's not this looming threat directly there. You know dollars fall off to supply to support preparedness activities in state and local health departments and also state and local officials have responsibility to support their own state and local health departments. So I hope if nothing else people realize that they need to do this. And not just for the next endemic even for this current pandemic. We need to strengthen our public health departments to help us get these cases down into the teens. Yeah.

CDC United States SARS Disease Control and Prevention South Korea Singaporean government Singapore Dr Cohn Dr Con COVID acting director National Center for Zoonotic v Dr Console Arabian Peninsula Nebraska P. P. Ventilators
"sars" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:00 min | 5 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Cases in the state the team identified a sars co viewed mutation that's never been found before work eighty one of the letters have vanished permanently deleted from the genome one of the reasons why this mutation is one of interest is because it kind of mirrors what happened in two thousand three with the severe acute respiratory syndrome the first sars outbreak remember that that would just kinda went away the article published on Tuesday said researchers noted that during the middle in late phases of the sars epidemic mutations scientists believe that a weakened virus that causes less severe disease that may have a selective advantage if it's able to spread through populations by people who are unknowingly infected which it seems like a lot of that's happening now anyway yeah we know without question viruses mutate sometimes they mutate rapidly sometimes they mutate slowly he refers to the process as the physical phenomenon now we've seen innumerable epidemics sars in two thousand two and three swine flu in two thousand nine what we know what happens and sometimes they just fizzle out despite people running around saying the sky is falling the sky is falling and it doesn't happen explaining the two things happen the virus does mutate such that the very Dylan's decreases one is good it's not going to be as lethal it's not going to be as severe as the thing that's bad is you might have more commonly a community transmission and what you end up is exactly what we saw with sars three four years after the crisis we saw that people had if you will antibodies to them and yeah the epidemic just fizzled now we have studies showing five six seven years later that people still had antibodies against the sars that's actually good news well okay we can only hope right about eleven before the hour and we'll get back to your calls just ahead then some other industry headlines coming up would you believe that there are actually industry headlines involving the coveted how could that be yeah we'll get to those coming.

sars Dylan
"sars" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

15:29 min | 6 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Ideas

"And Sirius Xm with the enwright files. I'm NOLA I. Few Infectious Diseases Inspires much fear and dread as Ebola in twenty fourteen. An Ebola outbreak killed thousands in the west African nations of Liberia. Sierra Leone and Guinea those countries were in turmoil. Their healthcare systems were pushed beyond the breaking point and their economies were in tatters. Fear drove the response and much of the affluent world. Political leaders called for Western countries to shut their borders to west Africa. Something experts said would likely worsen an already dangerous and destabilizing public health crisis in globalized world. One thing that would have kept the world safer from terrifying public health. Crises like Ebola would have been investing in the public healthcare systems in the developing world. Dr James Are. Bensky is one of the world's top experts in global public health. He was the international president of doctors. Without Borders when it won the Nobel Peace Prize in nineteen ninety nine. He is an officer of the order of Canada when I interviewed him in November twenty fourteen. He was a professor of medicine at the Dalla. Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Here is that conversation. How do you contend with the argument driven? Perhaps by fear that Ebola is only an airplane right away from Texas or auto or Winnipeg. We've seen in the last few weeks There is some truth to that But there's also truth to the fact that epidemics have very particular dynamics and it's absolutely vital to understand the dynamic of a particular epidemic and to respond appropriately to achieve containment a control and mitigation of the epidemic. If you don't do that Then the natural course of an epidemic spread and so the reality is that two of the dynamics that are really important. Our fear and panic one must understand the nature of fear understand the nature of panic and respond appropriately and that's not simply fear and panic outside of West Africa. It's also in panic inside West Africa. But how how did Nigeria examined Senegal? They've managed to contain right and even end their their bricks. Yeah so Nigeria. I think is a very good example of what is necessary And what is sorely lacking in much of the developing world and particularly in this particular case and in the three countries. Liberia Sierra Leone and Guinea when the epidemic emerged in Nigeria. It first of all was in two separate. Travelers who were essentially members of the elite class of society. One was a diplomat was a businessman very quickly. The infrastructure of formal and informal of Nigeria was mobilized to first of all identify a problem secondly respond appropriately with containment an isolation and thirdly to engage in what's called an active case finding so they have the infrastructure that well they had an infrastructure and most importantly they had strong leadership capacity and the exercise that leadership they also had expertise so the WHO was already in Nigeria and had been present for a number of years working on polio eradication and on Guinea worm that capacity was in country and was just shifted to deal with the Abo- la outbreak and so those essential principles are the vital elements of a viable Public Health Response. Whether that's local or whether it's global but you said in that explanation that Nigeria specifically had the wherewithal to deal with one read you a quote from one of your colleagues former colleagues. I think in mid says some frontier doctor from Windsor who's been treating Ebola in Liberia and he told Maclean's magazine the following we are overwhelmed. Our resources are stretched to the limit. We need to double our staff right here right now. That doesn't seem to me that you can get any worse. Don't resource. What what it illustrates is the the limits of a charitable response to a major public health crisis as opposed to a government as as opposed to a government and multilateral government response you cannot rely simply on goodwill goodwill is a necessary starting point but it also requires appropriate resources appropriate infrastructure appropriate personnel. And to be clear. I'm not speaking for MS up here server. Msf is a charitable organization with enormous capacity. Enormous skill. Developed in fact the protocols around Containment control mitigation of a bowl. But it's a charity. It's a group of people who freely come together to focus on humanitarian. It is not a state it does not have legal mandate and responsibility to pursue protect promote the public health. And so in the face of an epidemic of this kind of this scale it must be state based responsibility and response that deals with the reality of the epidemic but isn't the real the also that the international community has been relying at initially anyway on NGOs like MSF to deal with the crisis if it is a global threat. Why doesn't that Paradigm Change? Why doesn't read governments in countries and UN? And everybody involved. Well when it shows us is that this is a major governance deficit a black hole if you will in our global governance architecture and system. It's a crisis that can become an opportunity in the sense that if we carefully analyze the causes and conditions of the particular crisis carefully analyzed the deficits that led to the crisis. We can actually begin to imagine And then to construct a proper global public health architecture. You've worked all over Africa. Can you give me a sense? Like a survey sense of what kind of medical infrastructure there are in these countries much of the developing world. I would characterize in terms of health as policy rich in that capacity poor So there's lots of good thinking. There's lots of good analysis. There's lots of good understanding of the nature of both clinical need and of public health Needs now that generalization made there's a great degree of variability across the developing world. So there are certain pockets. For example South Africa has a highly developed clinical and public health system there are deficits of course but relative to other developing world Middle Income Countries South Africa is extremely well developed The same could be said for Ghana for Indonesia for Thailand for example but the low income countries have in fact the lowest capacity for the forty eight low income countries. They spend on average between eleven and fifteen dollars per year per person on health care in Ontario. We spend somewhere between thirty five hundred and forty three hundred per person per year. Now that should tell you everything about what kind of capacity you get for eleven bucks. What we're seeing in west Africa is that that public health infrastructure is simply not there. It's not there insufficient form to deal with this particular issue. And then the failure to recognize the gravity of of the epidemic has led to a kind of a cascade effect throughout the system so that the health systems are on. The verge of collapse or have already collapsed. And so you're seeing now for example massive increases in malaria quite apart from a bowl because people can't get treatment many of the hospitals and clinics are abandoned. Healthcare workers. Aren't going to work. Because they're afraid like everybody else. And there isn't an appropriate support system for them. Basic surgical needs Are Not you know? Cases being met and so on and so on and so on but when you read stories Jim how they they don't have the right kind of gloves or the right kind of masks or things. That are so elementary to us. We throw away. I don't know how thing a situation that could arise unless the world just doesn't give a damn well. I think it's a good question. We come to a point here with this particular epidemic and it really calls into question The very nature of our relationship to others and the degree to which we care or don't care and also calls into stark focus the interdependence within which we exist and the real kind of necessary caring the wise self interest if you will that lies at route to a future viable global public health system can't separate needs over there from Needs over here or needs over there that that become potential threats over over here to Bricusse is a disease that we've human beings have lived with for Millennia every year. There are nine million new cases of tuberculosis around the world and now tuberculosis is completely treatable and infectious disease. One point nine million people still die of TB every year now because as a human society we have failed to actually treat those people with tuberculosis. And because there's such high morbidity and mortality associated with it there's now emergence of multiple drug resistant tuberculosis these emerge because of poorly or partially treated Tiburcio service. And so now. We have a five hundred thousand cases every every year of multiple drug resistant to work. If you get 'em dart as it's called eighty percent of the people who who get MDR TB aren't even detected and don't get treatment of the twenty percent who do get treatment only half will live and treatment itself is extremely difficult. It's like chemotherapy for cancer. And it's a twenty four month period and leaves people with hearing loss with kidney failure with with all sorts of other potential side effects to the treatment. Now that is a direct consequence of failing to treat to Bricusse that the cost of treatment for MD. Rtp is about four thousand dollars for the full treatment course the cost of treatment for regular TB is forty to sixty dollars a couple of weeks ago. We had on the program a doctor working with the Gates Foundation and she works in the area. Ntd neglected tropical diseases and there are thirty or forty of them or something rather than she was explaining them and then she said of course you know. We could cure these diseases for fifty cents a year per person. In many cases we actually have the treatments. We actually have the technologies what was lacking is the health system and the public health system to actually properly identify treat and support people through the course of therapy when a health care system is stretched beyond capacity to deal with crisis. What does that do to our country in terms of the economy? The government's social unrest. Have you seen countries almost brought to their knees because of well in in the early part of the twenty first century there were several African countries wearing their leaders had declared that their nations are on the verge of collapse because of HIV now with a massive international movement to gain access to treatment for HIV that situation for those countries and for many others around the world has radically changed. There's no question that there are highly significant threats to national stability and as being a good example of that And the reverberations of that effect through the public sector through the private sector through the military orders and then potentially beyond borders in my view. It self evident that if if you don't deal with with the bushfire then it's going to spread. It's that simple again. A public health issue like Turkey losses or Bulla is a call to action a call to see the nature of the problem and to deal with it effectively. How you view responding to that call. We still don't yet have in my opinion appropriate. Strong clear political leadership on this epidemic. We still at a point where we're using in my view. A kind of charitable mindset but among nation states which who wants to give or to donate a certain amount of money or send a certain treatment clinic or support a certain region. There isn't a clear political imperative that has been acted upon to appropriately. Engage the measures that are necessary to to contain and control the mitigate the epidemic. Even though there's been a Security Council resolution on this well why don't we have that we have the World Health Organization under its number? Don't we have nation states saying here's what we're doing and we're going to give this amount of money this number of resources we do. We certainly do and we also have the usual practice that follows the grand and glorious declarations. You know that so much is pledged to not quite enough is delivered. We live With a series of post World War Two United Nations Institutions Bretton Woods institutions that have adopted very particular norms of practice in terms of dealing with crisis and those norms are practice are no longer appropriate in situations of this kind one of the provisions of the Charter that was never actually exercised was the creation of a standing force to deal with threats to International Security. And so at this point they're still a kind of a donation mentality among nation states Toward issues of this kind. But what is the ACLU DHS those pathways of getting the resources and material in the money to the People? Who Need it? It's just that there isn't an appropriate pipeline to deal with problems of this kind. It's akin now what we have to instead of a pipeline bringing the the resources there. We have a bunch of people running around feeling buckets running along the road to bring the water to the necessary people who are trying to put out the fire. That's no longer appropriate. We need to build. Those pipelines is the World Health Organization up to the task. Well you know. The World Health Organization does great things. The World Health Organization however like so many multilateral institutions has been functionally limited. Its budget is four billion dollars. A year of that four billion one billion mandatory and is made by contributions by member states..

World Health Organization epidemic Nigeria Liberia west Africa Guinea Lana School of Public Health Sierra Leone Msf Ebola Sirius West Africa tuberculosis Africa Bricusse international president Bensky
"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

10:50 min | 6 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic Cumin. I Dr Halima Gesellschaft up a new serology test for covert nineteen has been developed and is now in use by clinic laboratories. We're willing to discuss that today. Serology testing can identify those who have had an immune response to the saw ours. Covy chew virus meaning that they have been infected with cove in nineteen and have now recovered and are producing. Antibodies in their system. Here to discuss this with us. Today is the director of Male Clinics Infectious Disease Serology Laboratory. Dr Eliot feel. Welcome Dr Phil. Thank you happy to be here while. It's wonderful to have you here with us today. We're learning so much by doing these interviews and I am certainly enjoying them. I'm wondering if you can tell us here so much about testing in the news but not really. What kind could you tell our listeners? With the differences between molecular testing and serology testing. Sure so it's A. It's a significant difference the molecular tests which are typically done off of a swab of the nose or the throat detect genetic material of the virus and that indicates that the viruses actually bear and is likely causing the patient's symptoms on the other hand Sheer logic testing detects a patient's immune response to the virus vice specifically looking for antibodies which attach and essentially inactivate or kill the virus in their a major component of how we fight off really any infectious disease These antibodies take time to develop and become detectable by these antibody tests. And timing really depends on the type of antibody were detecting whether it's an eye. Gm or an I G A G type. Antibody can take anywhere from days to weeks for that response to develop. Why is it so important for us to know who has had the virus recovered from well? So who's developed an immune response to the virus is really an important component of our public health response to this and make allowing us to better understand the transmission characteristics knowing how many individuals have actually been infected versus Who maybe didn't develop symptoms and how this percentage of individuals changes over time and then on a more a patient by patient basis and important component of this year logic tests is identifying individuals. Who HAVE ANTIBODIES TO STARS KOBE? To would make them eligible to donate plasma which can then be administered to sick individuals to help fight off the infection so there's a few Utilization Perspectives that. We can consider when thinking about your logic. Testing looks great. And they also discuss it in reference to reopening the country and allowing stay at home orders to be lifted. Can you describe how serologic testing might help those efforts? So that's a great question as there's really been a lot of interest at the local in state level and the national level for using SIR logic testing to guide. Return to work activities on initiatives and. I think it's a really intriguing idea but nonetheless. We need to exercise some caution with how he used this testing so while. I think it's likely true that these individuals that are positive for antibodies to stars. Covy to or or to Kobe. Nineteen while I think they're likely at lower risk for reinfection compared to an antibody negative individual. We still really don't understand or know the level or the duration of protective immunity That these antibodies give us so I think antibody tests will ultimately be another tool for risk management and risk assessment as we develop plans to get everyone back to work But right now given what we know I would be cautious against relying solely on a sheer logic test result to guide these decisions And these recommendations. All of us have watched the news. And seeing these testing centers in the big swabs that are being put in the back of people's noses to test and even president trump has talked about his own testing in that it was unpleasant. How IS SEROLOGY TESTING? Done? And is it similar to the other testing? It's quite different sociologic. Testing is typically done off a blood sample. Most of the tests require a routine Vena puncture be done on some of the tests out there do say that it can be done off of finger stick whole blood so it depends on the test here at Mayo Clinic. our tests that we're using all require serum to be collected and then the serum is tested using what we call or what are called enzyme-linked immunosorbent essays or or Lila's these tests. Take about three to four hours to complete but they can process about ninety samples At a time and that can be done entirely on an automated instrument or platform Which makes this sort of testing really attractive for high throughput Type Laboratory. While there's something amazing so how many tests can he Laboratory like what we have at the Mayo Clinic. Perform on a daily basis So right now we actually have a testing capacity of approximately ten thousand antibody tests per day Between our internal Mayo Clinic practice and the External Mayoclinic Reference Laboratory. So that's quite a lot In really I think as the need evolves in or increases. We do plan to be able to meet that. Need an increase our testing capacity as appropriate. But just sounds amazing. That's really sounds like a lot of tests. It's a lot more than we usually do. So yes how is Mayoclinic being to work with other medical centres. I'm an assistant with access to serologic testing so great question. So you know there is a few things that we've been doing over the last month. First and foremost were really trying to provide education And ordering guidance as much as possible for these antibody tests you know this is a new virus antibody testing. It's a new type of test and to a certain extent we really had this test available before we knew how best to use it. So providing that educational component I think has been really beneficial to both external medical centers but also for us. Because there's been a lot of Idea exchanges between us and and other clinicians so that's been really beneficial and then also we are physically offering on our test to be order -able by Other medical centers across the across the country. And I think that's really beneficial because it allows those hospitals to focus on providing molecular testing. Which is a much more crucial and essential. Need at the moment cinch does Actually diagnose active infection compared to see your logic testing which tells you yes. This individual has been infected at some point in the past. But it's not really to be used as a diagnostic so that urgency and need for a result is not as great as it is for molecular test. When I was a child I remember hearing guy now knows an old wives tale have going to medical school. But if you've had a virus once you can never get it again. In fact I use this example before but my parents sent me to a girlfriend's house when she had the chicken pox hoping that I would get the chicken pox so that I'd never get it again now. I know the chicken pox in covert nineteen are very distinctly different viruses. But I'm wondering what is known about immunity after someone has been infected with covert nineteen. Yet you know that is really one of the key questions right now. After recovery does an individual have complete or partial immunity to Kobe nineteen eighteen. And so how long does that last to be honest because we really only been dealing with this virus for four or five months? We don't have a good sense of the duration of that protective immunity. That you're talking about I think we can say that based on prior studies during the SARS outbreak in the early two thousands we know that protective immunity against that virus which is closely related to SARS Kobe to that protective immunity seemed to be detectable for about two years after infection. And then there's been some preliminary studies in In monkeys suggesting that they have at least short term immunity one month after recovery of from Kobe. Nineteen as we see more and more information I think there will probably be at least some short term and immunity But we really need more studies in this area before we can make any conclusive comments on the duration of that protection from reinfection. I just have one last question for you because this brought it to mind for me. I saw on the news yesterday. I believe it was that some patients were becoming a according to the news that reinfected with cove in nineteen soon after having a suffered from it is that reinfection or is it just persistence or do we know that yet. Yeah I think I think that's a really important thing that we all need to consider whether this is truly reinfection versus whether we're still detecting residual nucleic acid from these individuals Is is something that we're really learning more about so I think only time will tell to be honest at this point. Thank you very much touch with the owns very informative visiting with Dr led. Today she's the director of our Infectious Disease Serology Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota. Thanks so much for being with us today. Thank you Mayo Clinic. Cuna is a production of the Mayo Clinic News Network and is available. Wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts. To see a list of all male clinic podcasts visit news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot. Org then the PODCASTS. Thanks for listening and be well. We hope you'll offer review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to Mayo Clinic News Network at Mayo Dot Edu..

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic News Network Male Clinics Infectious Diseas Kobe director Dr Halima Gesellschaft Dr Eliot Dr Phil Infectious Disease Serology La External Mayoclinic Reference SARS Mayoclinic Gm Rochester Minnesota Cuna president
"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

Limitless Mindset

06:53 min | 7 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

"Here's why I fear that. Subsequent coming waves of the pandemic may be worse. The Rush Job vaccine that big Pharma rolls out will not be safety or placebo tested. There will be a huge global. Push TO GET ALMOST. Everyone vaccinated many places. The state will totally disregard informed consent. And we'll just force the population to be vaccinated and vaccines tend to Cause Immuno suppression. I linked to some sources on this. This is why you always hear people say I got my yearly flu shot and then I got the flu anyway. I expect that the coming vaccine will work more or less the current flu shots that we have. The evidence indicates that they only work about half the time. But I think that it will work more or less for the current cove nineteen strain but the virus will mutate and the vaccine will render multitudes more vulnerable to the life threatening pulmonary effects of the virus a paper published in the esteemed journal plus one warned that previous SARS coronavirus vaccines resulted in pulmonary. Immuno pathology quote these SARS cove. Vaccines all induced antibody and protection against infection with SARS cove however challenge of mice given any of the vaccines led to occurrence of the T. H. Two type Immuno Path Oji suggesting hyper sensitivity to the SARS. Cove components was induced caution in proceeding to application of a SARS cove vaccine in humans is indicated. And perhaps you're thinking Jonathan don't be a silly conspiratorial Anti Vaccine. Scientists on television are always telling us that vaccines are safe and effective. You have the right to your own opinions but not to your own science. I believe in science. Well I also believe in science but I've read enough to understand that there's a lot of bad science out. There do your best to research science and evaluate the evidence instead of just listening to make up embellished experts on television. But there's a tremendous signal to noise problem in science. We may not all be qualified to understand complicated science but we have the rational capacity to ask Kit Bono who benefits from the science that we are being told to believe and I will quote from Bill Sardi who is an author and researcher. Who's done some great analyses of the effects of vaccines? Here's what he had to say about a coveted nineteen vaccine. Everyone on the planet is expected to hold their breath. Metaphorically speaking and wait for a future vaccine that will buy my predictions end up hospitalizing. Many and leading to hundreds of thousands of high risk individuals like diabetic smokers drinkers and the frail elderly. Lead them to their early demise because these are the people who do not develop sufficient. Antibodies following vaccinations. I penned a prior report EXTRAPOL- extrapolating from published flu studies which predicts that six hence to one point three percent serious side effects after mandated corona virus vaccination. Among the nation's seventy two point six million senior dolt would hospitalize between four hundred and thirty five thousand nine hundred and forty-three thousand and a subsequent one point four mortality rate would then result in fifty four thousand two hundred eleven thousand deaths approximately so. He's looking at the data. That's out there about the incidents of serious side effects and yes mortality that occurs as a result of vaccination we know from the data that the government collects on vaccines because they have a big database. That is actually publicly available. We know that Among infants among children's the vaccinations result in something like four to five hundred deaths every year. So there are more. There is mortality verified mortality that does occur and when they are gonNA force or strongly strongly encourage large large amounts of people that death toll given the proportion of people that are gonNA be mandated or required to receive a vaccine. It's going to be very very high. It's going to be a a death toll. That may totally eclipse what we are seeing with. Cova nineteen so a lot of people are talking also about chloroquine and I expect chloroquine to be demonized in the coming weeks and months because it seems to be a highly effective solution for more serious corona virus cases. And here's the thing. Get this even in the United States where we have higher drug drug costs. It only costs five dollars and thirty cents quite affordable right. Big Pharma will make unprecedented prophets tens if not hundreds of billions of dollars off a corona virus vaccine this year or perhaps next year when they come out with it and every subsequent year as the virus mutates.

Big Pharma SARS flu Bill Sardi chloroquine United States Cova Jonathan Kit Bono T. H. researcher
"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

Limitless Mindset

06:27 min | 7 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

"I have not taken these and I hope not too as I have been an implementing all of the natural nutraceutical herbal type bio hacks and they have kept me from getting sick during the Chili Eastern European winter. Here and they've kept my wife very very healthy during this during this chilly time of the year when people tend to get sick however I like to have things like this on hand as a last resort. Just in case me or someone close to me came down with a really nasty case of the flu or was God forbid struggling with Cova nineteen and these are both sold by roof on DOT com. They are both still in stock. But frankly I don't know how long they will be check it out. We've got a rather timely unbought saying this is a package from Rue Pharma in Moscow. And they've sent me river impressive supply. Okay this is a corona virus care package and Vinyl Alexi. Thank you thank you. Thank you Alexi. Placebo choice. Seba does we've got anti SAR. This arbitral Arbil anti SARS medication. And if you're really worried about the current virus especially like if you have to go to hospital in time soon these sorts of items would be in a really smart idea and you can get them from Rue Pharma Dot Com. We've got a third of ice in my. Which is Greek for your eyes. If your if your eyes are strained from binge watching the the scaremongering media about the coming apocalypse one of than we have what these this is reba. Verron remove Aaron. Okay so this is actually HIV AIDS medication and luckily we don't have AIDS. Don't worry guys don't worry. This is in our age story video blog but the revolt there really is what they are using to treat the corona virus cases. So I don't I really don't anticipate that we will contract it so this US orbital which is a potent anti-influenza and anti SARS drug. And as you can see. I've got both the one hundred and two hundred milligram examples of it here and break down a little bit of the science and some of what I was able to dig up on so it was developed in Russia in the nineteen eighties and it can cure and prevent acute respiratory diseases. Including pneumonia and bronchitis is treats chronic bronchitis and pneumonia. Something I found interesting about. Arbitral is according to the researchers that have done the. Meta analyses on this it is effective even against mutated viruses. The mutations are the big concern with for example cove in nineteen people are saying well. They're developing treatments. Maybe they're going to develop a vaccine for the current strain of the virus but what about next year when it when it mutates into something else and what the scientists are saying about it that I find really interesting is that it is universally effective against Aren a viruses because it binds to and inhibits a protein? That is in all our Rene viruses. Apparently it's given to young children pregnant women and even the elderly and it's more effective than Tamiflu. As far as dosage and usage the prevention protocol is two hundred milligrams daily with a treatment duration of ten to fourteen days. And then if you actually had flu the treatment protocol is two hundred milligrams four times a day. So that's once every six hours and you would do that for six days. I looked up the side effects. And to quote from wikipedia no known overdose cases have been reported and allergic reactions are limited to people with hypersensitivity the LD fifty is more than four grams per kilogram and l. d. fifty is a measurement of how much of give drug they need to give to a rat to kill it. You can find on pubmed one hundred and thirty scientific papers on arbitral and also found four recent clinical studies on Arbil as a treatment for corona virus. Here's what I found. From clinical features of sixty nine cases with Corona virus disease and twenty one thousand nine hundred in Wuhan China quote orbital treatment showed tendency to improve the discharging rate and decrease the mortality rate. There are over sixty scientific papers. On orbital's anti influenza effect to quote the most recent farber doll abroad and potent antiviral molecule incorporates rapidly into membranes. These data suggest that the potent antiviral effects of Arbil are mediated at least in part through its membrane oh tropic effects likely giving place to the formation of perturbed membrane.

Vinyl Alexi Rue Pharma Dot Com Arbil AIDS pneumonia Rue Pharma bronchitis Cova Seba US Wuhan China farber Aaron Moscow Russia wikipedia
"sars" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

07:28 min | 7 months ago

"sars" Discussed on The Science Show

"This is the science show. What if we in two thousand sixteen of a lost generation to see magnificent beasts like elephants and Rhinos? Out in the wild. What if there was something we could have done to stop the industrial slaughter? But we didn't bother yes such how we started the sun show for years ago with a special from the triple. As on the International Criminal Trade in wildlife it's huge and may also have given us that virus yes bats but also possibly pangolins and even snakes. There was a superb expose in sixty minutes on channel nine two weeks ago back to twenty sixteen and how we could have avoided the pandemic wildlife crime is currently the fourth largest transnational organized crime in the world it is just under the weapons trade drug trade and human trafficking trade. It's worth about twenty billion dollars a year annually and the ivory trade is about three billion dollars that twenty billion dollars. So it's a big problem. There about fifty thousand elephants a year being killed right now with only about four hundred fifty thousand left in Africa and one of the complexities of this problem is dealing with this transnational organized. Crime where you have these sophisticated networks of criminal entities that are experts at moving contraband from one place to another without being detected in one of the consequences of that is that as you get further away from the source. The potential places the contraband could fall gets more diffuse. It gets more expensive to trace and the salaries of the agents go up so it becomes more and more problem Michigan further away. What we have done is we've tried to focus our attention using genetics to determine the source of the actual poaching into figure out how many major source populations are there. Because in doing that you can potentially vote this law enforcement on those areas for the contraband from getting into this transit. Where these complex? Networks makes it so difficult to attack and it also allows us when we focus law enforcement at the same time to make. These countries held accountable so that they are not denying the magnitude of the problem in their own country. Now the way that we focus on this work because we use DNA from large issues a seizure. That is a minimum of half a tonne worth minimum. The million dollars and the reason that we focus on those seizures is because that's seventy percent of all seized ivory that bear the signature of large organized. Crime Syndicates. These are people that can afford to lose a million dollars at a single encounter with law enforcement. The work we published in science showed that virtually one hundred percent of all large ivory seizures that we analyzed in the last decade came from really just two locations. Twenty two percent of the ivory was made up of forced elephant ivory and that came from an area with the northeast corner of Gabon in northwest corner of Congo and seventy eight percent of the ivory was savannah ivory and that all came from Tanzania so Tanzania clearly is the biggest hotspot that we have encountered in this trade and was surprising to all of us. One of the things that this suggests that the number of kingpins driving this trade are relatively few because so much of this. Big Trade is focused in one area. It also suggests that these hot spots are very slow to change so when we analyze the recent seizure. It's very actionable. Information allows us to get right to the source. Our work has already brought down one of the largest ivy dealers in west Africa. We are now hot on the trail of probably the largest ivory dealer and one of the things that we are now moving towards is trying to apply this technology to other species in need and one species that we are focusing on most heavily is the Pangolin which looks like an Armadillo and it's hairs modified into scales. It is currently among the most if not the most post animal in the world. And it's the size of a cocker Spaniel and with that. I'm going to turn it over to my graduate student. H J who is focusing her PhD on applying this technology to help address the penguin problem so many of these Hanjiang Kim and I'm currently a graduate student at the University of Washington. Sam just mentioned pangolins are just like an theaters and that they feed primarily on termites and ants and instead of having long hair to protect themselves their hair has been turned into scales and hence there's still made up Cheriton and these animals are currently being poached both for meat for delicacy and their skills for medicinal purposes around the world and during the last decade. We've seen many many seizures of pangolins and these are larger than the largest ivory. Caesar we've ever seen just last year. We saw an eleven point. Five ton of Pangolin meat being seized in China which is about over two thousand six hundred animals and because penguins are small and they're also ternal and incredibly elusive species. And this is the problem because currently we don't know how many animals are left in the wild we have no population estimates for any of the species for the majority of populations out there and this basic question. Where are they coming from? And how quickly are they being decimated around the world? I joined doctor's lab about a year and a half ago and I started working in the illegal ivory trade and the more. I learned about this technique. I realized that this is perfect. To apply to the penguins because pangolins are very widely distributed animal their pound in both Asia and Africa. We four species in Asia ENFORC- piece Africa and not only are they in both continents. They range about around forty eight different countries around the world and it becomes urgent that we find that word approaching is happening so that we can direct law enforcement and protective measures and the populations that are being currently being targeted using the experience and expertise. That's currently in this lab. As well as the lessons that Tamas learned over the years during the ivory trade we hope to be able to transfer this method onto the pangolins in a much faster pace in much for transferable manner so I will be collecting data to create a genetic reference Mafuta penguins around the world and we hope to complete this within the year. Using Conservation canines second. We also can develop genetic markers. That's not only compatible across all species but can be more easily transferred to other labs so that we can share this technology once it's fully developed and finally. I think the most important piece to all this is cooperation between the researchers currently working on the Pangolin trade. And this is one of the biggest lessons I learned in this lab and currently there is many wonderful researchers around the world and we all share the same goal enough effort to try to the penguins. And we'll be working cooperatively with all these different groups to build a system for the penguins that we can save them before. It's too late in the playoffs. In Twenty Sixteen and one of those teams assisting in the hunt is at Taronga Zoo as we broadcast on the side show on August. The twenty four th last year pangolins may have been the vector in those wet markets carrying corona viruses. Perhaps from bats next. The world is in lockdown a twenty billion dollar criminal industry..

Africa International Criminal Trade Big Trade Asia graduate student Taronga Zoo Tanzania Gabon Michigan west Africa Caesar Sam China Tamas Congo Kim
"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

11:58 min | 8 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"Very good insight I would say that This is an example of what the new biology has done for medicine and science. I mean within a week or two. This virus was sequence. The sequence information put into A genomic database so that other investigators could have access to that well. The reason that's important is multifold number one by knowing that sequence you can design primers that are the basis for the. Rt PC. Are Ask say number two. You can look at those genetic sequences and over time understand the molecular evolution so Are the viruses that cause such severity in Wuhan China Different Than The viruses? Here you can literally trace the course of an epidemic The other thing is by knowing those sequences we can take advantage of that information design novel vaccines particularly when we get to the point of 'em are a DNA based faxing this. This allows us to do that in an formed way. So there's there's a lot of advantages to having that that sequence as soon as possible and to sequencing many a isolates it is many geographic areas as we can and you you started to drift towards this conversation. I definitely want to build towards that That dialogue about some vaccine genomics but start with talking about the degree of public attention right. Now there's press conferences. There snooze stories updated minute by minute. And we're seeing a congressional hearing much of this discussion is. When can we have a vaccine ready? What you talked a bit about. You know. Those aren't even very well known for Physicians so let me. Just take a minute to describe this. But this is what I've seen development in the US starts with an idea usually from biotech startup or accademia. From the time they come up with the idea until the time of vaccine is the license takes seven to ten years usually and about one billion dollars U K. One of the fastest was the vaccine. Just licensed in December for a bullet that took six years in spite of the public health emergencies that he bowl a percentage. So what will happen is an ideal become up with and then you go into animal testing. You find an appropriate animal model. And you're looking to see. Is it safe? And is it a -ffective so you're going to see if there's immuno-genetic this actually raise protective immune response we don't know in this case because there's no Corlett of protection so you will challenge those animals with the live virus to see if it protect if it does then you apply to the FDA go into phase one studies with their permission. These are called first in man trial. They involve ten of people so this week and I h in the Derna started the first trial of a stars. Covy to vaccine it's an MRI rene based vaccine. We talk about that later if you'd like. And they will test forty six people looking for evidence of any toxicity safety issues and trying to figure out. What's the right dose? What's the right route of administration? How many doses? How far apart that sort of thing if they if it passes phase one it goes into space to where you now enroll hundreds of people with the same. I is it immunogenetics. Is it safe then you you give those data to the FDA they look at it and if they agree that it seems to be safe than they have some benefit you go into phase three now. You're you're enrolling thousands to tens of thousands that that gap between face to face. Three is called the valley of death because the vast majority of vaccine candidates antivirals other medications will not make it past the values de that cost hundreds of millions of dollars to do. And when you think about it when you're looking at an epidemic let's just take Zico was a good example. Ebola turned out to be a good example. Ideally you WANNA do a randomized controlled clinical trial so Roughly half might get the vaccine candidate. Half an irrelevant vaccine or placebo. You wait and see what happened. Well sometimes the epidemic doesn't allow us to do that. We have to test it out if they face three results or positive. Fda looks at it they make the decision to license that and then they usually request phase four studies that we know about the hundreds of thousands of people. So long winded. Answer to say. We're not GONNA have a vaccine for this epidemic. Maybe the next one Lots of vaccine candidates were developed for Stars. Not One of them got past phase one. The only exception to this is the president. Hold the powers of emergency use authorization. He could decide that at some point in the future. The risk is so great that the benefits and unknown risks of less or unknown or untested vaccine would be worth it otherwise by law regulatory pathway has to be followed. Kinda fascinating I was. GonNa ask about SARS. And Moore's where at what point vaccine development stuttered for them really right at phase one Some some folks who are listening to this. We'll know that I was providing direct care to the patients in West Africa and when I get got back was exposed to all the data about the evolving genetics for it and also got to hold a vial of the now approved vaccine in my hand. But I didn't get to put it in my body I would. I would not hesitate when there's hesitation about vaccines is a whole other discussion. But in the settings of outbreaks do you find and this is this is purely editorializing. I'm giving you this opportunity. That people are more receptive to vaccines. There is some public skepticism in debate about rape regular seasonal or childhood vaccines. When there's heightened attention and heightened concern you feel that people are more receptive to vaccines in general. You're right the higher. The perceived risk of disease the lower the perceived risk of the vaccine and that can be helpful of course in the context of an epidemic. Where you're trying to test a vaccine I've been in vaccine development of vaccine testing for about what thirty three years now and it always used to be that when we ran a vaccine trial. I was the first to enroll into the study. I felt strongly that I couldn't ask other people to enroll in a study. I was unwilling to roll it now. Of course you can't do that. Irbe's don't don't allow you to do that or say that but Just to make the point that these are the. It's really important that the public have some sense of trust. Which is why we have the regulatory pathway. We we do. It is designed to be sometimes lower than we want but it is to liberate. It is data informed. It's time proven it's reflective and it's transparent giving lots of I the opportunity to see the data and make reason decision. I respect both. The premise of is saying. I'm willing to take this myself. And also the importance of this process and the hair and transparency and safety that it ensures. Do you WanNa talk. A little bit introduced the topic of Immunex. I'm sorry the topic of Immune Amax. Oh Yeah So we actually developed a field in taking off of that in vaccines that we call backs a nomex and also the inverse of that adverse dome but it takes it takes advantage of what's called systems biology so as all of our listeners will know much of ion is reductionist so we will look at a pathway or eight drug with one outcome and of course. That's not biologically how we were created So we we are a distant we are as it turns out. A very complex system with elegant redundancy built in. And what we attempt to do when we're looking at vaccines and how The body reacts to it is to look across as many systems as we can. So it's not only the immunologic with the genetic the proteome the Lipid Olmec the glide comic Everything that we can conceivably measure it. It's been said this way and I think it's a pretty good way of saying it. You know in the past. We did science by doing a couple of ass as on thousands of patients in the new biology in the Baxter illness in systems. Biology way of doing things we do. Thousands of tests one tens of subjects so some of the experiments that we do in my lab will generate a terabyte of data. I literally cannot even visualize my own data. We have to send it to buy a win from the Titian to have a and other programs. They developed to help us make sense of our data. We'll we'll give vaccine in that define time point. Look at. How every single gene in the body reacts to that is suppressed as it activated. What pathways are activated? You suppressed so it's really in an unprecedented look into how the body responds to vaccines than we've ever had before the and then the implications for this how does how does that speed the development of a back scene for SARS Kofi too. Yeah so so it does and an upbeat person generally and then we can apply it to ours. Kobe too but the benefit is primarily understanding. What is actually happening? If we know that certain genes are required for a protective immune response. Well that's helpful particularly when we know perhaps concomitant medications that somebody would be taking that would suppress the very genes. We want activated interested develop immunity. The other side of it is to develop molecular signatures of Potential harm in somebody for example My one really terrible experience I had the position as we got transferred.

FDA Wuhan US epidemic Derna Zico president Ebola rape West Africa Kobe Irbe Moore Titian Immunex
"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

09:33 min | 8 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"We get the opportunity to dig further into Cova nineteen as the outbreak evolves and gets much much more public attention today. We're joined over the phone by Dr Greg Poland mayoclinic internist research specialist. He's the editor for vaccine. He's widely recognized as an international expert. In Vaccine Development has worked with the military and on public policy and is distinguished investigator here mayoclinic. Thanks for joining us today. Greg my closer I think that right now everybody who's GonNa be listening to. This is following the situation reports in it's inundated with the rapid expansion of Krahn virus in our country. The situation coming from China and it has a pretty good background of that. Are there details that you would like our audience to know to start with? I think A number of things one is some very preliminary they stay at cautiously because it needs to be confirmed with some very preliminary information suggesting a reason for why we're seeing very different severity and mortality rate as this virus has moved from country to country the way I sort of explained it. If you've ever seen those pixelated pictures you know the first pixel that show up. You can't tell what you're looking at when you get to maybe fifty percents of the Pixel you get the sense. It's a space and when you get to eighty percent or more you can say. Oh it's a picture of George Washington. We're somewhere in between that. We've got enough pixel to begin developing antivirals to know how to handle the virus to to have a pathway toward vaccine development but not enough pixels to say is what happened in China going to be reflective of what will happen here so far very early too few pixels but very early Impression would be no. It's different here than there. One reason is differential cultural. Spur example About fifty percent or more of Chinese men smoke. Well that's the that's a dangerous thing for any Respiratory virus illness for another thing. There has been some preliminary information suggesting that the virus is mutating. An are nate virus like this particular kind pens to gather a mutation that that allows for genetic fitness. So I'm talking about that level of mutation Maybe on the order of One a week one every other week something like that. So we're getting into three plus week Three plus months in this outbreak and there are some preliminary evidence. It's only one investigative team at indeed mutations have occurred that appear to be making the virus somewhat less virulent that's a great analogy and and some encouraging news there and I think that one of the things that causes public fear in any outbreak is that that initial picture isn't clear we're looking at something new and as the data is gathered as we see enough cases to truly understand the clinical picture. We we developed the subtleties of this. Yeah I've actually Somewhat jokingly that we need a new icy icy ID code called Corona virus. Things diety but quality information helps combat to and I think helps people be more comfortable. That efforts are being made and understanding is coming for what this is. Could I ask you kind of more basic question first of all? We've seen corona viruses. This is the third novel Corona Virus But most Corona viruses. Give us the common cold. Do you think that most all of us have had a corona virus in the past almost certainly There are four seasonal corona viruses that have been identified it caused upward each year of thirty percent of sort of the upper respiratory cold and quote or respiratory illnesses that we see and the reason. I say almost certainly all of us have and repeatedly. Is that oddly enough? Immunity to those seasonal corona viruses doesn't seem to last very long in terms of protection. Maybe only less than a handful of years some suggest Really only two or three years. So yes we've been inspected. What's different about these as you mentioned? Is that this. Is the third recognized corona virus that in the last eighteen years that has Jumped the species barrier so this is inherently do a no sweat it is jumped the species barrier to infect human with burying level but nonetheless higher than most respiratory viruses in terms of severity and case fatality. Would you be willing to make some comparisons to this and are two prior novel Corona Virus Events? Of course so you know when you think back to Stars in two thousand started in November two thousand two and finished in June or July of two thousand and three there were about eight thousand known infection and a case fatality rate of ten percent so slightly under eight hundred people died and involved. Thirty seven countries not eighty one by the way ours was declared a pandemic. And that's one point I would make is despite what we hear. This is a pandemic by any criterion. Just a matter of time. Well we had merged and in that case. We had about twenty five hundred known cases in the first outbreak And it was about a thirty five percent. A Taliban rate now stars spontaneously stopped merced hasn't immersed continues to circulate just a few cases now and then primarily in the Middle East but two very different although there are some similarities very different Beta Corona viruses as is this one Beta corona virus. One of the interesting things that we saw with SARS and is true of a star's Koby to That's the name of the virus diseases. Copay nineteen is thinking propensity to caused Diarrhea and in the case of Star Stars Covy to it's only about three to five percent or so but virus has been isolated out of those stool specimens suggesting as we saw with SARS. That oral fecal route not just respiratory route could be a method for transmission and there's a famous apartment complex during SARS that had disrupted plumbing and became a native for an or an outbreak center. Interesting that you say that. Because there's there was a similar outbreak in an apartment building with SARS copay to where they were able to isolate a multi plumbing issue that they think accounted for white people above and below got infected. Is there any sense? And I think you've already answered this. That exposure prior krona viruses is going to convey any immunologic protection against this one. Yeah good question. Colin none none that we know of another words would would immunity to a seasonal corona virus in some way less than the impact of infection was stars. Kobe to We don't think so haven't seen any evidence of that Rather what we seen and in fact. Let me just backtrack a bit at one level and argue mint or This not being true is that we're seeing the highest rates of severity and case fatality in older people now true immunised national they have co morbidity. But you would have expected sort of build up if that were the case of someone. Unity season after season after when they're exposed to circulating seasonal corona viruses and that does not appear to be the case that makes that makes absolute sense. Now one of the things that seems different to me. Your impression of this is Yup. We're getting very rapid global transport of this illness and that's to be expected go. Transit is something that we have to contend with. What seems different to me. Historically with this is how rapidly we're getting high quality data particularly particularly genetic information about this when it's what are the implications.

virus diseases China Dr Greg Poland Cova investigator editor nate Diarrhea George Washington Middle East merced Kobe Koby Colin
"sars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:46 min | 9 months ago

"sars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Than the sars epidemic of two thousand two and two thousand three fox's John sincerity more than forty three thousand people infected Americans was named the fox news now here's your storm team ten forecast here it's of rain throughout the day on Tuesday steadiest along the coastline as temperatures holding the low and mid forties clearing overnight with a low down near thirty degrees Wednesday morning a mix of clouds and sun on Wednesday high again the lower forties a brief wintry mix early on Thursday turning to reign as temperatures rise back into the mid forties our storm team ten we are all just mark Searles on newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM first came season right let's say the vehicle is registered so yeah which I in order to mention in the entry fee continues order continues please the first one protected but like right about but I project recording with a fireman office for him and all project with only located throughout North America nine other okay they have been very it'll be a very not only the game forever the breakdown of all religions and it'll hold everything right now we look up they are they're going to do I'm glad Lewis you're listening to ground zero Everest called at eight seven seven seven three three one zero one one that's eight seven seven seven three three one zero one one but a lot of feelings with us right about this free Spence three friends was originally the brainchild of the.

North America Lewis sars John fox mark Searles Spence
"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

15:20 min | 9 months ago

"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The global health community should contain this outbreak of corona virus. And we want to know what your questions are. What do you want to know about the spread of Corona virus? Boom this is on point What's it take to start something from nothing? And and what does it take to actually build it. I'm Guira is every week on how I built. Speak with founders behind some of the most inspiring companies in the world. NPR's that's how. I built this. Listen now. This is on point. I magnin Cardi. Were talking this hour about the spread of Wuhan Corona virus and whether there are important lessons to be learned from the SARS outbreak back in two thousand two and two thousand three now in a press press conference just yesterday. Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam outlined security measures. She is taken to stop the spread of Corona virus between mainland China and Hong Kong. Long here she explains. Why one of the keys to controlling the epidemic is to substantially reduce the flow of people between between the two places in other words? We're not just talking about mainland visitors to Hong Kong but also Hong Kong travelers to the mainland and the number of commuters meters must be reduced substantially both ways. That's Hong Kong leader Carrie. Lam Translation provided by BBC News. Well I'm joined joined. Today by Dr Samir Mubarak She's an infectious disease physician and microbiologist. At sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre with us from Toronto Canada doctor Mubarak a welcome to point. Thank you. It's happy I'm glad to be here and also with us from Baltimore. Maryland is Dr Jennifer. She's an epidemiologist and senior scholar scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and Director of the outbreak observatory which conducts research to improve outbreak preparedness and response. Dr Naza. Welcome to you. Thanks so much back now now Dr Mubarak if I can just start I start with you. You have in your hospital there. The SUNNYBROOK Health Sciences Centre in Toronto. You've had a or treated a confirmed case of Corona viruses. That right that is correct so tell us about how that went and what tells us about the kind of response we should be having living sure so The patient in question was actually quite well informed so very fortunately when he Informed the EMS or the paramedics that he required transportation. He alerted them even before they got to his home Of his travel history and his symptoms so from the get go people were well aware and well prepared so the individuals who picked him up were wearing the required personal protective equipment attend. Fortunately also passed on the information to our institution so When we welcomed him in our emergency department he was put in isolation from the very the beginning has been isolation ever since And his family members so his family members are Self isolated at home so also so. We're aware that They need to self isolate so there really has been very little from the time at least That he arrived in Toronto Exposure or to the public. So we're very grateful. They seem to be quite acutely aware of what they needed to do. I have to admit I don't know exactly where they were educated. Aided about that if it was before they left are in transit or once they landed in Pearson Certainly they took the appropriate steps to to protect the people around. Those I see so this is this is one of those travel cases. Dr Doughty was talking about in in this case in Canada. Okay so doctor Dr Nozoe. Let's take a step back here and now I'm going to ask both of you this from your perspective as an epidemiologist water. Some of the most important questions you'd like to have answered first of all right now about this corona virus. Yeah so the thing that I'm paying a lot of attention to is The severity of the reported cases and The the not just the number of deaths but the numbers of deaths and proportion to the number of reported cases You know as we enhanced surveillance Both within China and outside of China. It's not terribly surprising that the case numbers are going up in fact to some extent that somewhat reassuring that we are finding additional cases and Also reassuring that so far. The A number of the additional cases particularly those reported outside of China are Have more mild eld illness and so it really makes us have to question and thinking about what the risk posed from this viruses is not just the numbers of cases but how severe is it in relation to other respiratory viruses and. I think that's where there's still an open question. I think where we are. This week is looking a little bit different than where we were last weekend. A and I'm sure next week we might feel differently still well so just follow up on that you said. The number of cases reported outside of China are more mild than those inside of China is there is yeah. Do we have any understanding about why that might we. Don't I mean I think there are a number of possibilities. One the first one is maybe just people who are healthy Tend to be the ones who travel bowl and those may not be the people who are as likely to develop severe illness or or die. it could also Be that We're just finding these these these cases it's just you know Could just be a coincidence. it could also be that you know there's just something about The cases in China kind of different the severe cases and I don't think we really have a handle on that so doctrine Mubarak Oh. What are some of the key questions that you want to be? Answered order needs to know about corona virus. Now well I think there are a couple of basic questions I mean. We have some idea. Based on publications from a smaller cohort of what the clinical presentation is like Right now not surprisingly. It's not unlike many of the other respiratory viruses that that we see The Lancet paper did highlight a few key features that are helpful to know In a minority of patients for example people there was some cardiac injury. We have a sense. Now what we might expect to see on x rays and cat scans so more information like that. Just really basic information's nations very helpful It'll be very helpful as well to understand the distribution of the virus in the body we. There's a small proportion of individuals In that again very small series of of acutely and quite severely unwell individuals. You have to bear that in mind as well that they had some virus in their blood but we obviously they had virus in the respiratory tract. But what's the distribution. How long do they shed for With prolonged shedding. Is it still infectious. We don't know that we don't know about How much the environment might get contaminated so be it the air or surfaces? Those were are some of the things that I know that People looked at both for SARS informers as well because it has implications in terms of infection control. Also you're looking at the patient but you're also looking at the environment around them that would be helpful And then just trying to understand what the risk factors for severe disease because we're seeing quite a spectrum of disease and it's always helpful with any kind of syndrome to understand early on one in a patient's course who is at risk of getting worse So that you can decide whether to admit them or is it okay for them to go home and and there were we will need a substantial amount of cases to release start to be able to pick out those determined and you mean be on sort of the regular risk factors of age. Immuno compromised things like that. That is correct. I mean we anticipate probably those will be important. But it's also important to know because we need to plan if this is going to be a significant epidemic nick Or pandemic if we understand what proportion need Critical care for example we need to prepare for that eventuality. We'll doctor knows a we have a a question here on our website. Josh wants to know. Isn't this one. Meaning the Wuhan Corona virus contagious during a symptomatic incubation periods as well so will the numbers infection numbers I guess. Aren't they going jump. Like crazy So we don't really know the answer to that question There have been some reports of that raised the prospect that people may be able to transmit infection potentially early in The their disease. which you know I think has different implications and potentially SARS where a lot of the transmission tended to be when people were kind of well L. progressed with their illness but I think it's too early for us to truly know what this situation is These are based on very small reports and It's hard to tell. Sometimes people don't quite remember when their symptoms began T to know sort of what level of asymmetric transmission. There is Dr Franchi at a press conference yesterday. I think Raised a fair point as to you know even if it's possible and it's has been observed In in certainly in outbreaks in the past to a limited degree to what extent is this something that we really need to worry about in terms of overall case it's numbers Do we expect large number of cases to be Transmitted this way and I think the evidence air is really mixed. We'll can you just remind us because SARS is the example apple it keeps popping to mind what ultimately led to the containment of SARS so in my mind And I think many other people really credit I think a lot of the heroics should be Ah Directed at health facilities You know in in in particular health facilities were important for four of the isolation and treatment of infectious cases as well as the protection of healthcare workers who are involved in their care and really when we saw transmission to the community. Many times it was Involved healthcare facilities and so Really I think The strongest evidence is that Prompt a case Isolation and infection control in healthcare setting while you know the the heroic doctors nurses who are treating the infected patients You know to make sure they remain safe while doing so I think was possibly one of the most important measures I see a doctor Mubarak. Do you want to respond to that as well. What do you think was were were the factors that led to the SARS containment? I completely agree. I mean for SARS there were no antivirals no vaccines and and it. It really was fundamental bread and butter infection prevention and control as well as Very strong very strong public. Health response. Obviously but Jennifer makes a good point. A lot of the transmission wasn't healthcare facilities and that event really changed. How many healthcare facilities now now deal with even just run of the mill seasonal influenza virus And that was also reinforced further by the two thousand and nine pandemic so just to give you an example A specific example. I can't work. I cannot renew my hospital privileges if I am not fit mask fit tested. You know these. These types of administrative requirements Although they don't they don't sound like a big intervention it means that pretty much everyone for example at Sunnybrook. Now who's working there. There they have these physicians if they have hospital privileges that they've been fit tested and that's just one small part of it. Just the annual annual screening for federal or Respond Tori illness for influenza is now duly. Everybody it's in place in in most in most Institutions and now for something like this You know we're really just amplifying or increasing or enhancing what we're already already doing and just to briefly add because both murders and Ebola are currently active People are already so because it's the throws was a flu season at the timing is good and bad. I guess it's a double edged sword. It's good in the sense that everybody's already thinking about Febrile respiratory illness and on top of that because Mars and Ebola virus are active in certain jurisdictions. People are still being screened for travel because those systems are already in a place we can leverage the much more easily than trying to build them from scratch so now obviously we add Travel from Wuhan specifically travel from China So much easier than back in twenty seven Sorry to two thousand and two when when none of that was face. So a matter of luck there in the timing. But but doctor since Dr Mubarak mentioned flu season here. Just as for some perspective and I know a lot of people probably want to know about this. I mean in in the since October of two thousand nineteen through January eighteenth of two thousand twenty so a couple month period and In the in very recent history the CDC estimates there have been eight thousand flu deaths in the United States alone just in a couple of months that's deaths from influenza. So are we overly concerned about corona virus. Yeah so First of all I think the level of concern right now is warranted given given the uncertainties that we're dealing with and we just don't simply know A lot about the virus answer those key questions about severity and You know the risk of progression to severe illness or death so I think it's appropriate that we are giving this virus attention trying to increase surveillance. Understand understand how widespread it may be to understand how many mild cases there are out there versus the severe cases that would help us gauge The the the level of of health threat posed by it But I think it's absolutely critical that we do try to hold our knowledge about the virus in comparison to other respiratory Tori viruses. That we deal with on a day-to-day basis and so that's why my earlier comments about Paying attention closely to the severity are key because Obviously obviously any level of severe illness or death is a public health concern But we also have to deal with a number of other viruses and Need to compare what we're seeing with this virus to those in order to know You know how much of a relative threat it is will live in Maryland to Children recently recently died from the flu. And you know and That's that's obviously a deeply worrisome situation Well it just want to quickly go to a call before we gotta take a break here..

China Dr Mubarak Wuhan Corona Toronto sunnybrook Health Sciences Cen Dr Samir Mubarak Hong Kong Dr Jennifer SARS Canada NPR influenza Febrile respiratory illness Dr Naza Baltimore respiratory tract Maryland
"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

10:43 min | 9 months ago

"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"That was seventeen years ago. Thomas was talking thing about SARS. Another corona virus now SARS eventually reached thirty seven countries and killed over seven hundred people now that the world is facing facing a new corona virus. What are the most important lessons to be learned from the SARS outbreak? Can those lessons be applied. And should they be applied to containment aiman efforts around Wuhan Corona Virus. This hour on point what it will take to stop corona virus. And you can join us. We'll be talking with several infectious disease specialists today today. What do you want to know? What do you need to know about this? New Corona virus while we're going to begin in Bethesda Maryland. Dr Anthony FAUCI joins us. He's director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of health. Dr Phil she welcome to on point. Thank you good to be with you. So first of all we do have at least a five confirmed cases of Wuhan Corona virus in the United States. I was wondering if you might give us your your evaluation of the current risk of the virus spreading in the US at the moment sure well there are five individuals that are all travel cases directly from Wuhan. which is the epicenter in China of the outbreak of these individuals have been identified Hanafin? They've been isolated and what we're doing right now is we're doing what's called contact. Tracing on at least one hundred individuals that came into contact act with these individuals At the time that they were infected right now there have been no indications but we're still investigating at the CDC. He is doing that that. There is a secondary transmission in other words. There have been no human-to-human transmissions that have been recognized at this point in the United States which is good news because these people have been around for a while and as each day goes by we get more and more reports from the CDC about what the status that is of the contexts are so right now. The risk is low but as you know from what's going on in China. This is a very seriously evolving situation nation in China but for the United States at this particular time with the five individuals and no secondary transmissions. Things seem to be at a low risk. But we've got to keep an eye on it. Of course that can change and so tell us what you make of the current response so far. Because I'm thinking if those five cases in the US were travel vol- cases. We still have hundreds if not thousands of flights coming in and out of the United States. Perhaps fewer now from China but from other places where we know corona virus it has been found. Yeah but But I it's a very good question Ignorant it's very important to distinguish if you look at what's going on. In China versus the relatively few cases in the countries in which there are a travel related even though there has been some secondary transmission such as in in Germany the burden of disease in those other countries that have travel related. Cases is at this point so low that the odds of there being any import tation from France or Germany or Japan of one of those countries is exceedingly low at this point point. So the thing you need to concentrate on from a containment standpoint is taking the kind of surveillance of an testing of you've attention to people coming in from China now. The important thing that the Chinese did that in many respects is very helpful is that they've essentially cut off flights out of Wuhan which is overwhelmingly the EPI center but the rest of China starting to have the acceleration of cases. So that's the reason why as you probably heard correctly that we started off with five airports in which there was the kind of of screening as people came came in a syndrome screening as well as questioning screening now. They've enhanced broad general screening of fifteen additional airports reports now for a total of twenty for people who are coming from China. So right now the real surveillance of what you WANNA do about people coming into the country is clearly focused on China and not focused on other countries in which there's one or two or three travel related cases right so so help me understand something. Dr Vouch e We have seen a ballooning very quickly of the number of cases over the past several days. Right I mean I think it was just yesterday in China it was roughly forty five hundred then this morning at jumped around six thousand. That's a twenty five percent increase overnight. Can you explain why that is the disease actually spreading faster we catching. We've finding more cases you know it's a combination of both. I mean what it is clearly. It is spreading fast. What what what we're seeing now is that we're into what we call the generations of infection? So if I if I get infected I'm first generation Phai infect check you that second pick somebody else that's third you know we're well into six seven eight and long so when you have a number of people who are infected. They're infecting a few people. Then you're going to have a major I wouldn't say explosion but certainly an acceleration of cases. There's there's a terminology called our ought which is means that how many infected people will get infected from one index case and so if by in fact two people then the Arrow at for me is too but are autism population base thing so it's really an average Of How many people get infected from people who are already infected right now. That's about one point. Five to three point five. Three point. Six When you look at really rapidly spreading diseases like measles is up there and eleven twelve thirteen fourteen eighteen? It's really very high but it's high enough enough now that it is it is accounting for this type of spread. The real question is is the measures that the Chinese have have done. A really rather draconian in the sense of shutting down forty five million people Whether or not that's going to have a positive effect on my backfire and have some deleterious effects like causing panic or interfering with supplies in and out. We don't know and the reason we don't know is because this has been unprecedented. There's been restrictions in other outbreaks. But never to this magnitude so if this helps we're going to be obviously looking very very closely over the next weeks to months whether that acceleration that we're seeing is going to continue view. which would be quite ominous or whether it's going to slow down based on not only what the Chinese are doing within their own country but the recognition recognition of other countries of travel cases and having them handle it properly the way we were fortunate enough to do in the United States and Ainley that those five cases were recognized early they were isolated and they have their contacts traced? If that happens broadly. We're in relatively better shape right. If you have spillover into other countries and lack of control then we'd have a problem okay. There's so many questions here Dr Chee Let me just ask you do we yet know confidently where this corona virus has come from. You know we don't you know what the price with the precise jump was from an animal to a human but I can say with some considerable confidence that knowing corona viruses and what their animal reservoirs. It almost certainly started off with an animal human interface because the reservoir of he's Infections Corona virus or an animal an animal particularly bats are very important in the reservoir aspect of this infection. So you know if it acted like well let me give you some examples quickly with SARS. We finally found out it was a bat that gave it to a palm civic cat which then interact with the human species with mayors. It was a bathroom gave it to a camel and Campbell gave it to people so I would not be surprised even though I don't know precisely that it was something similar to what we've seen with SARS and with mayor's so this zoonotic transmission of disease. I mean. Are we just going to see more. And more of this as time goes by well you know as as long as we continue to do. Two things encroach upon the environment where animals animals are that we usually don't have human-animal interface. The more you do that. Encroaching on rainforests encroaching on pristine areas of the environment. You'll see see it. But also it's the proximity between the human species and animal types that actually hall viruses and we we know we see that in China a lot. And that's the reason why when you talk about flu a lot even though it is an exclusive often you see flu coming out from China China and the reason is that flu is fundamentally a wildfowl bird type infection that has reservoirs in birds and chickens uh-huh and in pigs and when you talk about the agricultural situation in a country like China which traditionally has people very much intermingling with ducks folks and with birds and with chickens and pigs. That's how you have the jumping of species that's what we're seeing with the h five and one that had gone on years ago in the seven and nine flu. That is now still a little bit of an issue with some infections occurring right. Well Dr. We've just got you for another thirty seconds or so. So do you think that Examining the global response to SARS is a good way to draw lessons about the best way to contain this corona virus in some respects. Yes yes I mean obviously good public health practices with SARS namely identification isolation that contact tracing successfully put an end to SARS so that would be an important element of what we're doing here with the corona virus. Well Dr Anthony FAUCI Director of the National Institute of Allergy and infectious just diseases at the National Institutes of health. Dr Raji thank you so much for joining us today. Great to be with you but when we come back we'll talk with two more infectious disease. Specialists about how.

China Wuhan Corona Virus United States Dr Anthony FAUCI China China National Institute of Allergy National Institutes of health flu Dr Phil director Wuhan Thomas Dr Raji Bethesda Maryland CDC Dr Chee EPI France National Institute of Allergy
"sars" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"sars" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Restaurants, and there's rural class restaurants. There's like, you know, Morimoto and like, I mean, there's all the best of the best celebrity chefs opened all these new restaurants, and then there is for years. It's been a Planet Hollywood there as they reimagined it. They redid it, kinda bring it more upscale. So it's in this new era, right? And the way they re in invented Planet Hollywood, the Planet, Hollywood experience is a broadened guy Fieri to do a new menu. It's like you ought to buy on these high end restaurants and all these high end shopping, and then you walk by the the new Planet Hollywood, and there's this big old guy Fieri sign like on, and you know, like just real probably does more business than. A lot of. He's appealing to to the mainstream. You know, someone has to be the CBS sitcom of cooking. Chilies on drugs and a laugh track, and that's what you get with the guy. Feary menu. It's not high brow, but it's what the people want. He's giving it to them, right. Hey, speaking of the reading wildfires, you know, obviously we cover, we've been covering it on our site and stuff, and we haven't mentioned here in the podcast. It's been a crisis. We've been watching, you know, in covering in keep you keep that in your prayers. I mean, obviously, Bethel music is based in Bethel church and all their huge ministry, and a lot of the people in that ministry have been affected, you know, and it's it's a tough situation. I mean, there's yeah so many people display. Yeah, yeah. I, I would say to death church now has been doing a drive in the partner. I'd leave with Salvation Army to to help the community there so you can check out them on social media tiller out more about those efforts. One of my sisters lives there and her husband. I know you had sisters have sisters and one of them lives in reading and has a husband and Basit pictures yesterday that they, everyone has to wear face masks all the time right now because the air quality is so unhealthy. Been SARS Tulsa SARS a unit. My favorite. And I've said this before SNL skit of all time is and it's very underrated in no one would ever have this on the list for good reason because it's one joke, but they just play it to the death. His. Bennetts very minor hosts, it was Peter SARS guard the actor and they did a whole bit where he has rented the late night TV time to try to sell off a warehouse of Peter SARS guard SARS Gars. Splaine's. He's invested all his out. During the SARS scared his agent, talked him into Peter SARS guard SARS guards. Well. Outlet. Reading California for the air quality. She's somebody get Peter SARS on the phone. I would just love to be in the SNL writer or like you hear about the infamous pitch meetings where they pitched the idea like war, Michaels, and all the cast. Pierce Sargus this week. So I was singing. The skit would be he. He selling Peter SARS guard SARS guards the skit there like. Not. I mean, that's it. They're called. Is perfectly a year after the SARS. I in case you missed it this week, John gray and Don lemon got into a heated debate about passers role roles in politics. So actually, this is interesting was happening while I was on New York last week, and he was one of the speakers as he was here in New York, and then when over was on Don lemons show and all this kind of happened during conference. It was it was crazy, but John gray was among several black faith leaders recently invited to the White House to discuss prison reform measures. So CNN's Don lemon invited the pastor. He's passed relentless church in South Carolina onto the show to discuss the meeting, but admonished, gray claiming the meaning sent mixed messages about some of the president's more polarizing comments about race. John gray, however, explained with everything that I could have lost and could still lose..

Peter SARS SARS Planet Hollywood John gray Don lemon Pierce Sargus SNL Fieri Hollywood Splaine New York Morimoto Salvation Army Bethel church CNN CBS South Carolina California partner Bennetts
"sars" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"sars" Discussed on Ologies

"It's so real, like it's so that is how it has happened for for SARS, I think was very similar series of events in terms of like wildlife to an outdoor market to the domestic animal to then humans. And so this like SARS actually was a pretty good shot at it for a while. And then. It for various reasons. It didn't become like a full fledged pandemic, thank goodness because we controlled it or because it just out this is so fun. Okay. The reason that I get really excited about this stars one, but one of the main reasons why stars didn't become as big of a pandemic as it could have been as people were afraid that it would is because we were able to catch it early and they did a lot of really intense quarantines at airports, but the reason you could Corentin at an airport is because SARS with when you get infected with SARS, you actually begin to show symptoms before you're infectious. Oh, so if you're coughing on a plane during two thousand six SARS outbreak. If you were on a plane from any of the areas where SARS had been a problem and you were coughing, they were going to quarantine you, oh, that worked as a quarantine method because people were not yet infectious with something like influenza, you're infectious for several days before you show symptoms. So Corentin is much less effective. And what about equal. The reason that it became as big as it did was in part because of miscommunication between like World Health Organization and CDC and like people on the ground. It was in part because it made it into a larger city that it didn't usually usually outbreaks happen at sort of more rural areas because that is a disease that tends to happen as what we call spillover. So from animal populations billing over into human populations. Bats, right? That's in this case. Yeah, they are pretty sure in the big twenty, fourteen Abol outbreak. They traced it back to a kid playing in a tree with a bat. This is sad for humans and also for the bats, and I hate that because bats are like just getting on the up and up. Don't worry about bats guys. They're good. They're cool. The got. We should save them. They're really important. Yeah, and they are, but they also are great diseases, so many diseases, right? That's I have no idea. I think it's part of it is because they're mammals and they can disperse long distances. Also the. The for a lot of bats. There's this communal living like Salata that's in one population. Yeah, and so you have the opportunity for something to spread very rapidly and so with with the bullet, what's the latest on like a vaccine for that? How are we? Let's check in on. Let's knock on Ebola's door and do a little visit from what I know there is a vaccine that they tested right towards the end of that outbreak in two thousand fourteen and it is effective. And so I think now they have been using it in current outbreaks that are happening. Okay. So so that's a little easier. Yeah. And the thing is that here in the US there really was never a reason to not sleep easy because since the way that he bullet is transmitted is is through close physical contact with blood or other bodily fluids you living in Chicago or LA you're not at risk, right? That's not the disease that's going to become the next pandemic just because mostly because of the mode of transmission. Okay. So what is the medical. Community stance on illnesses that some would argue our behavioral or lifestyle influenced smoking related lung cancer or obesity heart disease. Do those fall under the same epidemiological protocol in terms of response to them? Yes. So I know the CDC I think just a couple of years ago actually classified obesity as a disease. So it's officially classified. I have personal feelings about that, but yeah, because I feel like it's not. We say, we say that certain behaviors are a choice, but I feel like they're so we're, we're marketed to in a way that is that is pathology in and of itself xactly..

SARS Corentin influenza CDC World Health Organization US Chicago LA
"sars" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"sars" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Brazelle september 23rd which is this saturday numerology fists uh and and and others who watch for signs and they have and say that this is a very important date because these signs are happening in heaven do you have a couple of pieces from the documentary yes uh so we have what i just described a whole lot better which has the whole september 23rd theory area here it is on september 23rd of 2017 there is an alignment that is happening warranties on moon stars in consulations which looks like something that john wrote about in chapter twelve of the book of revelation in the first two verses is talking about this on the moon stars the wandering stars which we call planets constellation which is virgoe john says that he sees a great sign in heaven there is a woman she's closed in the sun with the moon under her feet she has a crown of twelve sars but she's also pregnant and notches pregnant she's in labour an amount to give purse lino them virgoe beat the woman will actually be at her feet at this hour traversed by her shoulders clothing herbs on and in her head will be twelve stars nine of those will be the constellation of what makes of leo they're always there but the three other ones that are not there are this is the alignment of atlanta's mercury will line have venus that is there and also mars making that the twelve stars are we conceive of.

consulations john sars leo atlanta