26 Burst results for "Sarnoff"

"sarnoff" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on The Big Picture

"The biggest trailer in the history of trailers premiered a couple of weeks ago. It's spiderman no way home. Now if you're a fan of the ring a podcast network. There was a two plus hour episode of the ringer verse entirely about this trailer. Hosted mallory ruben featuring danielson there was also a green room execution with mallory and then there was also a conversation between chris and andy on the watch about the spiderman. No way home trailer. So what do we have to contribute to this conversation. I actually do have something. I i love so much in. Particular is one of the greatest out there. But i do not listen to the two our breakdown of the trailer because that is engaging with the trailer and m. c. you and the world building in the way that fans of that franchise in existence do and i just engaged with things differently but i did listen to the watch. And here's the one thing that i think. Everyone is missing from this conversation. Wow here we go. I'm excited about this. Which is just understanding that. Tom holland is basically a one man one direction at this point for an entire generation. And so the the idea that this is like the most watch trailer ever has a lot to do with you. Know spiderman and the popularity of these movies and yada yada. It also has a lot to do with a lot of fans of a certain age who for whom tom holland and sunday and also like a massive massive star. They are the entry point for these movies. These franchises and also kind of the most important. I mean there's just like a teen beat quality to this which i do not say it's important for the teens. Have idols it really is. I'm speaking for the teen girls here. Anti boys honestly. I don't know why being exclusionary but so i what i think is interesting is to what extent can you convert those fans like phase. Whatever but clearly part to you and the multi verse which is what both this trailer and internals and this next chapter is trying to do

Michael sarnoff mallory ruben nicholas gucci amanda danielson mallory andy chris Tom holland tom holland
"sarnoff" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"I just don't see like a a heyday insight. You don't not yet okay. i don't would. It would cause for heyday to be inside in a playbook for us so specifically what i do so cdl as a a international offshore drilling contractor so basically what that means is we own and operate the rig so week we own the rigs himself Which are i can't really say it's a great business model. But they're very very expensive assets on it takes a lot of capital in order to own them and to keep it running and her day so the build cost when we you know. Companies like cedras were made by previous employer pacific drilling when they were made. The bill costs on these units. Averaged seven hundred and fifty million dollars a piece okay. And and as an industry we built over a hundred of them in the last decade and and majority of Those inspect those even run with the contract. Well that's that's right And that kind of goes to your your question. You know what is it. What is it gonna take for a heyday in for us. We gotta get rid of the inventory. I mean if you look at it from a supply chain point of view. We've got much stuff sitting around on the shelf. Still as long as things are on the shelf. But he's seeing that happening people gonna take a rigs out of commission. You are definitely You know the noble pacific merger that took place was a big one. I think they sold off the pacific aura. In maybe the pacific melting so two of the seven units over there And yeah you're gonna see a lot more of it and that's the next phase in our industry. I mean suwa offshore kind of lags behind onshore of semi. My history is offshore. Sarnoff a no drilling. Now i've been on land pro for about ten eleven years now. So would you like more. What i mean the people you honestly..

cedras Sarnoff
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I'm an executive producer with Howstuffworks and I heart radio and love all things Tech. And before I jump into what is going to be the main focus pun intended for this episode. I want to mention something about RC A because we're continuing our story. Well, Arcia And something that happened Darcy in 1948. That was the year that Howard Hughes would by controlling stake in RKO Pictures, the motion picture company. And also theater chain are CIA had purchased a theater chain and created RKO specifically in order to get a foothold with its optical on film sound system. So if you listened to the earlier episodes of our CIA you remember they went so far as to create an entirely new film company. In order to establish this technology. Will that being done now? In 1948? They no longer saw necessary to keep this motion picture company around and sold off. The controlling interest to Howard Hughes, someone that I should try doing a full episode about in the future, but that is one Complicated cat right there anyway in 1949, David Sarnoff, the man who was the general manager and then the president of our CIA. Would then become the chairman of the board of our CIA. He also remained on as president of the company. So he had unprecedented control of our CIA and Sarnoff, you may remember. Had a bit of a reputation of being something of a control freak. Someone who really wanted the company he worked for to excel, and he greatly resented anyone who appeared to stand in the way of that. Well and the previous upside the most recent one, I talked about how Garcia was a pioneer in consumer electronic televisions, and how the U. S government forced our CIA to spin off one of its two NBC radio and television networks. Which would become ABC also remember, CBS, the third of those of the big Three networks in the United States actually grew out of a talent agents failed attempts to get his client's booked on NBC radio shows, so we are now in an era in which we have three broadcast giants. NBC, ABC and CBS and NBC and ABC. Both came from the same company. CBS came out because no one NBC would hire this guys. Talent. Interestingly, so television is slowly starting to pick up And as I mentioned at the end of the last episode, RC would push a new innovation in the early 19 fifties, which was color television. At RC A. Wasn't the only company working on color TV. CBS was also very much in the game. Both companies have been experimenting with color TV strategies since the 19 forties, and it was a CBS engineer who seemed to win. At least at first. Now I want to chat about this for a moment as well, because the system that this guy made was truly amazing, and it was dependent upon a peculiarity of human biology. We have what some people refer to as the persistence of vision. This is the same thing that makes animation work for us animation or or film. If you're looking at a real film, you know, like something that's actually Hosted two photographic film. Is just a serious of still images. If we play those still images back at a fast enough speed, we perceive what appears to be movement. Even though if you were to slow it down enough, you'd see it's just a Syriza's still images. There's no actual movement happening. The human eye and brain can process about 10 to 12 separate images per second and can retain an image for about 1/15 of a second. So if you have an image, and you replace it with a new image faster than 1/15 of a second You can create the illusion of continuity of movement from one image to the next. Now a common term for this is the persistence of vision and again. A lot of different illusions depend upon this is it's this limitation of our faculties. And a guy named Peter Carl Goldmark, who was a Hungarian born engineer who immigrated to America and then would work for CBS would rely upon this peculiarity to create an early form of color television. And his system was an electro mechanical system. Inside the television was a color wheel with red, green and blue sections on it. And both the camera, the television camera and the receiver or TV says had a color wheel. The wheels, positions and rotation would match precisely and the wheels would spend at an incredible 1440 times per minute. That was the speed of rotation. So the light coming into the camera would pass through this color wheel, which would kind of act like a filter. So remember earlier when I mentioned and the previous episode That an electron beam would make 60 passes over a screen in a second, but it would only hit the odd lines on one pass and the even lines on the next pass. Those individual passes are called fields. So if you had all the odd lines, that's one field all even lines that's a second field to fields make up a video frame. Because then you have all the lines. Then you have all the lines that make up the entire picture. So that's a video frame. That's standard wouldn't work for the color images in gold marks system because there would be noticeable flicker from the different colors. If you were only doing this At 60, really, really. 30 frames a second, It would actually end up being closer to 20 because you have two divided by 31 for each color. Instead, Goldmark would increase the field rate to 144 fields per second. Instead of 30. Each color would get scanned twice in a second, and the number of frames or complete images shown on screen would drop down to 24 frames per second instead of 30 frames per second. Goldmark decreased the resolution of the image from 525 lines to 405 lines, which means you're making the picture smaller. And the reason he did. This was because otherwise he would need a lot more bandwidth per channel to send that much information to a receiver. Anyway. Because of that persistence of vision the these colors while they're technically changing very, very quickly, our eyes and our brains can't keep up with that. They can't distinguish how those colors are changing so fast from red, green and blue. So we perceive a mixture of those colors and thus with a combination of electronic and mechanical elements, Gold marks approach allowed for a color TV, and it gets way more technical and psychological really, to describe exactly how this works so that you represent all the different colors. But this is the basics of how the system worked..

David Sarnoff Peter Carl Goldmark America CIA RKO Pictures CBS RKO 525 lines ABC 405 lines 60 1948 31 1949 United States 30 NBC Howstuffworks 60 passes Each color
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:59 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Jonathan Strickland, Ivan, executive producer with Howstuffworks and I heart radio and love all things Tech. And before I jump into what is going to be the main focus pun intended for this episode. I want to mention something about RC A because we're continuing our story. Well, Arcia And something that happened Darcy in 1948. That was the year that Howard Hughes would by controlling stake in RKO Pictures, the motion picture company. And also theater chain are CIA had purchased a theater chain and created RKO specifically in order to get a foothold with its optical on film sound system. So if you listen to the earlier episodes of our CIA, you remember they went so far as to create an entirely new film company. In order to establish this technology. Will that being done now? In 1948? They no longer saw necessary to keep this motion picture company around and sold off. The controlling interest to Howard Hughes, someone that I should try doing a full episode about in the future, but that is one Complicated cat right there anyway in 1949, David Sarnoff, the man who was the general manager and then the president of our CIA. Would then become the chairman of the board of our CIA. He also remained on as president of the company. So he had unprecedented control of our CIA and Sarnoff, you may remember. Had a bit of a reputation of being something of a control freak. Someone who really wanted the company he worked for to excel, and he greatly resented anyone who appeared to stand in the way of that. Well and the previous upside the most recent one, I talked about how our CIA was a pioneer in consumer electronic televisions, and how the U. S government forced our CIA to spin off one of its two NBC radio and television networks. Which would become ABC also remember, CBS, the third of those of the big Three networks in the United States actually grew out of a talent agents failed attempts to get his client's booked on NBC radio shows, so we are now in an era in which we have three broadcast giants. NBC, ABC and CBS and NBC and ABC. Both came from the same company. CBS came out because no one NBC would hire this guys. Talent. Interestingly, so television is slowly starting to pick up And as I mentioned at the end of the last episode, Arcia would push a new innovation in the early 19 fifties, which was color television. At RC A. Wasn't the only company working on color TV. CBS was also very much in the game. Both companies have been experimenting with color TV strategies since the 19 forties, and it was a CBS engineer who seemed to win. At least at first. Now I want to chat about this for a moment as well, because the system that this guy made was truly amazing, and it was the dependent upon a peculiarity of human biology. We have what some people refer to as the persistence of vision. This is the same thing that makes animation work for us animation or or film. If you're looking at a real film, you know, like something that's actually Hosted two photographic film. Is just a serious of still images. If we play those still images back at a fast enough speed, we perceive what appears to be movement. Even though if you were to slow it down enough, you'd see it's just a Syriza's still images. There's no actual movement happening. The human eye and brain can process about 10 to 12 separate images per second and can retain an image for about 1/15 of a second. So if you have an image, and you replace it with a new image faster than 1/15 of a second You can create the illusion of continuity of movement from one image to the next. Now a common term for this is the persistence of vision and again. A lot of different illusions depend upon this is it's this limitation of our faculties. And a guy named Peter Carl Goldmark, who was a Hungarian born engineer who immigrated to America and then would work for CBS would rely upon this peculiarity to create an early form of color television. And his system was an electro mechanical system. Inside the television was a color wheel with red, green and blue sections on it, and both the camera The television camera and the receiver or TV set had a color wheel. The wheels, positions and rotation would match precisely and the wheels would spend at an incredible 1440 times per minute. That was the speed of rotation. So the light coming into the camera would pass through this color wheel, which would kind of act like a filter. So remember earlier when I mentioned and the previous episode That an electron beam would make 60 passes over a screen in a second, but it would only hit the odd lines on one pass and the even lines on the next pass. Those individual passes are called fields. So if you had all the odd lines, that's one field all even lines that's a second field to fields make up a video frame. Because then you have all the lines. Then you have all the lines that make up the entire picture. So that's a video frame. That's standard wouldn't work for the color images in gold marks system because there would be noticeable flicker from the different colors. If you were only doing this At 60, really, really. 30 frames a second, It would actually end up being closer to 20 because you have two divided by 31 for each color. Instead, Goldmark would increase the field rate to 144 fields per second. Instead of 30. Each color would get scanned twice in a second, and the number of frames or complete images shown on screen would drop down to 24 frames per second instead of 30 frames per second. Goldmark decreased the resolution of the image from 525 lines to 405 lines. Which means you're making the picture smaller. And the reason he did. This was because otherwise he would need a lot more bandwidth per channel to send that much information to a receiver. Anyway. Because of that persistence of vision these colors while they're technically changing very, very quickly, our eyes and our brains can't keep up with that. They can't distinguish how those colors are changing so fast from red, green and blue. So we perceive a mixture of those colors and thus with a combination of electronic and mechanical elements, Gold marks approach allowed for a color TV, and it gets way more technical and psychological really, to describe exactly how this works so that you represent all the different colors. But this is the basics of how the system worked. By the way side note. Goldmark was also in charge of the team that would develop the micro groove technology that would make 33 a third rpm long playing vinyl records possible. And since our CIA had previously attempted to market 33 a third rpm records, though they did not do so with a micro groove. I suspect Sarnoff felt Goldmark was a thorn in his side. After all, Goldmark had created a new standard for color TV and a new standard for records. And son of wasn't really happy when other people took the lead or other companies took the lead. Our CIA had its own version of the same sort of mechanical color television approach. They had developed. There's independently of gold mark, but the CBS version provided a better picture. And so in 1950, the FCC made the CBS approach the standard for color televisions. Temporarily. It was only temporarily the standard. So if you've listened to my earlier episodes on R C a, you know that David Sarnoff wanted to be the leader and all things and he was fiercely competitive, and I suspect he was very much infuriated that the FCC would choose the technology of a rival company. Actually, I don't have to suspect he absolutely Woz because Sarnoff led a crusade against CBS and the FCC. So R C A and another company called Color Television, sought an injunction against the FCC's decision to go with the CBS standard..

CIA CBS Color Television David Sarnoff Peter Carl Goldmark Goldmark Howard Hughes NBC FCC RKO Pictures RKO engineer Darcy ABC Jonathan Strickland Howstuffworks executive producer
"sarnoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What? Uhh! I'm like, shocked by this story, and he didn't. That was it. You didn't see him again? He didn't know you could tell you felt bad. Did you expect something more to happen? Like did you think? Oh, this is gonna go sit down and eat together. I was gonna You know, lay out my whole life story for heavy and he was gonna plane his life Where you been? E was kind of looking forward to that bitch. And that didn't happen. Mostly. I just want to, like study his face for longer. Just because that Ximena I've seen him twice and I still can't really remember what you look like. Do you regret not not pursuing him in some way? Yeah, absolutely. In the moment, I was just, you know, so sick E just really couldn't comprehend it until I got on the bus. But I was kind of just why Didn't I run after him? I've just spent my whole life wondering about this man. And you know, the chance to talk to him was put right in front of my face and I didn't really understand that at the time and I let it go. Emiliano Garcia Sarnoff also hadn't seen his father in many years. Since he was seven or eight years old. He.

Emiliano Garcia Sarnoff Ximena
"sarnoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm like, shocked by this story, and he didn't. That was it. You didn't see him again. He didn't You know, different. Tell you felt bad. Did you expect something more to happen? Like did you think? Oh, this is gonna go sit down and eat together. I was gonna You know, lay out my whole life story with heavy and he was gonna plane his life Where you been? E was kind of looking for it to happen, And it didn't happen. Mostly. I just wanted like study his face for longer because that's I mean, I've seen him twice and I still can't really remember what he looks like. Do you regret not not? Pursuing him in some way. Yes, absolutely. In the moment, I was just, you know, so sick. I just really couldn't comprehend. It wasn't until I got on the bus that I was kind of just why didn't I run after him? I've just spent my whole life wondering about this man. And you know, the chance to talk to him was put writing from my face, and I didn't really understand that at the time and I let it go. Emiliano Garcia. Sarnoff also hadn't seen his father in many years since he was seven or eight years old. He lived in California, but he was visiting a national park in Mexico with.

Emiliano Garcia Sarnoff Mexico California
"sarnoff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on KCRW

"Uhh! I'm like, shocked by this story, and he didn't. That was it. You didn't see him again. He didn't know what to tell you so bad. Did you expect something more to happen? Like did you think? Oh, there's how this is gonna go Sit down and eat together. I was gonna You know, lay out my whole life story for him, and he was gonna plane his life Where you been? E was kind of looking forward to that. But That didn't happen. Mostly, I just I wanted like study his face for longer Just because That's you know, seen him twice and I still can't really remember what you look like. Do you regret not not pursuing him in some way? Yeah, absolutely. In the moment, I was just, you know, so sick. I just really couldn't comprehend living until I got on the bus. But I was kind of just why didn't I run after him? I've just spent my whole life wondering about this man and you know The chance to talk to him was put writing from my face and I didn't really understand that at the time and I let it go. Emiliano Garcia Sarnoff also hadn't seen his father in many years. Since he was seven or eight years old. He lived.

Emiliano Garcia Sarnoff
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And so is our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be R C a tow launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920, Westinghouse launched K D K a. L. Of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded our CIA to do so. They gave him some funds so he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated U. S champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event. Back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. RC a began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired and add in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when R C A made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and 18 T. R C. A formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations in different regions, with stations being part of the overall network. Which was a new idea. The time Neil creates your your content in a central location and then distributed using these various radio stations that was revolutionary. NBC had two semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So he had NBC Blue and NBC Red. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called WJZ, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E. A F, which was founded by a TNT in 1923. While all this was going on, Sarnoff was already looking at the potential future of television in 1924 R. C. A transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of electronic televisions. When the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive. They're very complicated, and they had limited Successful results, Let's say, but the real boon would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions, and that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now. This is not entirely a happy story. 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir Warrick in and if you've listened to my episodes about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file. Oh, Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund his Warrick ins work and in 1930 R C A would take over the research as working would actually go over to Garcia as well becoming our CIA employees. Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case and R C a would have to pay fines and royalties to him, But by that time His health was in shambles. He had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff Solent litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment. So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in RCs early history. Now, If you heard my episodes about the history of turntables, you'll remember the early days of the photograph and the gramophone and the gramophone. I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles in the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Now, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was the company. That really was the focus of this this strife Berliner and gets the credit for inventing the first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. This were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders did as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical..

Westinghouse Sarnoff NBC CIA Jack Dempsey Farnsworth Blue Network Red Network New York City Sarnoff Solent George Carpentier Berliner Gramophone Company Emile Berliner Vladimir Warrick engineer victor talking machine company United States U. S National Broadcasting Company
What to expect from the media and streaming world at CES 2021

The 3:59

06:03 min | 1 year ago

What to expect from the media and streaming world at CES 2021

"Wonder woman nine hundred. Four headaches bill max at the same time as theaters on christmas day big change the status quo streaming. We'll hear more about the seismic shift to see us. So let's break down what we expect. Roger chang and this is your daily charge with me to discuss this. Is our media expert johnson. Welcome joan tyrod. So what are you expecting a from this very special very remote and virtual ceus very special. Cs indeed media has always had a big presence at cbs. It's kind of felt like a satellite separate. See us in a way. There'd be this huge confab media. Movers and shakers they all sort of congregate at the area. So it's sep. It's physically separate from from where the show floors are and it felt kind of like its own conference in and of itself. It's grown over the years but of course like everything else would see this year. It's going to be completely different. Virtual and a lot of the reason that people go meet people media marketing go to see us is because it gives you that opportunity at the beginning of the year. Everyone's going to be there. You can have meetings. You can try to broker the deals that you haven't been able didn't weren't able to get to get to blast year you can start strategizing stuff for the next year and so because we're not physically the same place and none of that's going to happen. We are gonna have is still going to have some media executives coming to see talking on panels. There's going to be an attempt at recreating a party. Virtually we'll see how that goes. But the main highlight the big person that's going to be talking is going to be an sarnoff who is essentially the head of warner brothers. Studios and warner brothers is of course the studio that made a lot of people in hollywood go postal for their planned to release all their movies on. Hbo max over this year yeah. Let's let's talk about that one woman. Nineteen eighty four. It was a big coup for consumers who already had. Hbo match what they figured out that they had hbo. Max the able to stream it right away and christmas day but it didn't it. Obviously we talked about this earlier. It definitely annoyed angered a number of folks in hollywood. I'm curious if you think we're going to get any more feedback or any more commentary around that from radio. That's certainly what people are most interested in hearing since wonder woman nineteen four was released this way Basically it was the first sitting of this hybrid the so called hybrid strategy of releasing warner brothers. New movies online and in theaters at the same time for a month. And then those movies come off of. Hbo max and from all indications it the strategy did really really well for wonder woman you know it had sixteen point seven million at the us box office. Its first weekend which is the best that any film has done. Post pandemic in the us by far Of course it's it's a fraction of what would happen in normal times with these are normal times and so that's why that's why it's also it also was on. Hbo maxine hbo's max's traffic. You know we don't have a lot of data to go out about how popular it was. Hbo max has said that viewing hours. The day that one woman nineteen eighty-four was released on max tripled compared to a typical day. The pre the previous month so by all indications this strategies first attempt was successful. What we don't know is whether or not the initial rancour from hollywood insiders about this plan whether that success has placated anger. Or if warner brothers is going to need to make changes to placate some of those hollywood movers and shakers so that it doesn't completely shred it's relationships with big name directors with stars. That are that are disappointed in how things going on. I don't know if they're actually going to talk about that. But that's certainly what people want to know. Yeah there's clearly love anticipation for that. I magic actually. The the media side of us would somewhat benefit from the remote nature of the show because the show is traditionally have been all about big gadgets. Tv's appliances things that you want to physically be at the show for two to touch and to get hands on time with with media a lot of it is is discussing about what's going dentistry showing off trailers stuff that you don't actually physically need to be there for. Do you think that that that aspect of it might i guess. Bolster the media's role in this year now even s every other time see. cs has been a physical event. People that go to the media focused element of they. Don't even go to the show floor. Like i don't know how many times i've talked to people at what zona see space which is kind of the general term for the location in the area where the media focused. The stuff is happening. Anytime i asked him have actually gone to the show floor. I don't think i've ever heard anybody that said. Oh yeah yeah yeah. I checked it out. Sometimes you'll be like. Oh maybe at the end when i there's some time at the end before i fly out. I might go over there and see what's still happening but people in media. Don't go go to to try out physical gadgets and see things in person they go there to see each other in person and so the fact that this is a virtual festival just means that not. As many people have an impetus to participate. Because most of the impetus is to go there and see people and interact with them. Yeah and get get deals.

HBO Warner Brothers Roger Chang Joan Tyrod Hollywood Maxine Hbo Sarnoff Headaches CBS Johnson Studios MAX United States CS
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Communications across vast distances, and various companies began toe work toward the goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be R C a tow launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920, Westinghouse launched K D K a. L. Of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded our CIA to do so. They gave him some funds so he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated U. S champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France, and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit RC a began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired and add in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when R C A made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and 18 T. R C. A formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations. In different regions with stations being part of the overall network, which was a new idea of the time. Neil creates your your content in a central location and then distributed using these various radio stations. That was revolutionary. NBC had two semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So he had NBC Blue and NBC read. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called WJZ, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E. A F, which was founded by a TNT in 1923. While all this was going on, Sarnoff was already looking at the potential future of television. 1924 R C a transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of electronic televisions. When the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature. I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive. They're very complicated, and they had limited Successful results, Let's say, but the real boon would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions, and that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now. This is not entirely a happy story. 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir Warrick in and if you've listened to my episodes about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file. Oh, Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund his Warrick ins work and in 1930 R C A would take over the research as working would actually go over to Garcia as well becoming our CIA employees. Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 RC a would file a patent suit against file? Oh, Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case and R C a would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time his health was in shambles, he had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to CERN obstinate, litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in RCs early history. Now, If you heard my episodes about the history of turntables, you'll remember the early days of the photograph and the gramophone and the gramophone. I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles and the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I have to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Now, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it..

Westinghouse Sarnoff NBC Farnsworth New York City Red Network Jack Dempsey United States CIA victor talking machine company Blue Network George Carpentier U. S National Broadcasting Company Dr Frank Conrad Pennsylvania Pittsburgh
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"They can't distinguish how those colors are changing so fast from red, green and blue. So we perceive a mixture of those colors and thus with a combination of electronic and mechanical elements, Gold marks approach allowed for color TV and it gets way more technical and psychological really, to describe exactly how this works so that you represent all the different colors. But this is the basics of how the system worked. By the way side note. Goldmark was also in charge of the team that would develop the micro groove technology that would make 33 a third rpm long playing vinyl records possible. And since our CIA had previously attempted to market 33 a third rpm records, though they did not do so with a micro groove. I suspect Sarnoff felt Goldmark was a thorn in his side. After all, Goldmark had created a new standard for color TV and a new standard for records and Sarnoff wasn't really happy when other people took the lead or other companies took the lead. Our CIA had its own version of the same sort of mechanical color television approach. They had developed. There's independently of gold mark, but the CBS version provided a better picture. And so in 1950, the FCC made the CBS approach the standard for color televisions. Temporarily. It was only temporarily the standard. So if you've listened to my earlier episodes on R C a, you know that David Sarnoff wanted to be the leader and all things and he was fiercely competitive, and I suspect he was very much infuriated that the FCC would choose the technology of a rival company. Actually, I don't have to suspect he absolutely Woz because Sarnoff led a crusade against CBS and the FCC. So R C A and another company called Color Television, sought an injunction against the FCC's decision to go with the CBS standard. That actually put a temporary halt on color televisions, because while the matter was being decided, CBS couldn't accept any sort of sponsorship money for color television programming, so there was no money coming in to support the programming. There was very little chance to make the programming in the first place. CBS was going to invest in something without knowing for sure that could go forward with it. So it kind of put the brakes on color TV. Now. The courts rejected this injunction. Garcia then appealed it, and this went up the court system and in 1951, the matter got all the way up to the Supreme Court of the United States and the Supreme Court also agreed with the FCC, or at least they said the FCC had not acted improperly in stating that the CBS standards were fined. But sir enough was not ready to give up. Once it was clear the gold marks CBS approach was going to win out RC a concentrated on moving away from this electro mechanical approach toward a purely Elektronik method of transmitting and displaying color television. Meanwhile, CBS was running into trouble of its own. The company was finding it hard to convince a Public market, a consumer market to purchase a new, expensive television set. Nolly isn't new and expensive. It was incompatible with existing black and white broadcasts. It was a different resolution, and it was a different methodology. And in the summer of 1950, the United States entered the Korean War, which disrupted CBS is manufacturing processes. Which meant the company couldn't make sets for people to buy on Lee. A couple of 100 sets had been produced. At that point, color television had stalled out early, and that gave Sarnoff sometime to push his team into getting the electronic approach ready for display. So how did this Elektronik version work? Well, I talked in the last episode about how cathode ray tube TVs work, So I'm not going to go over all that again because it's exactly the same thing up to a point. The cathode ray tube is like a giant light bulb and as special philosophers that glow when struck by electrons, the filament inside the cathode ray to gives off an electron stream. That, and odds are positively charged elements focus and direct towards specific points or pixels on the back side of the screen service that creates television pictures. Guess I did go over it again. I never learned. So how does color television work? How is it different from this? Because this approach really. It just means that when electrons hit the fosters the philosopher's get excited and they start to glow. If they get a lot of energy, they glow brighter that they get a little energy. They don't grow glow is brightly and if they don't get in the energy they're dark, and that combination gives you the images of black and white. Pictures that move across your TV screen. This is happening. Lots of times per minute. Right, Like every every single pixel is being eliminated 30 times per second, So it's pretty amazing. Or at least the electron beam is passing over. Maybe not activating but passing over every foster for 30 times a second. 60 times for a second, The electron beam is actually crossing the entire screen. It's only but only constraints on the odd lines or the even lines. So how does the color television work in comparison? Well, the basic sort of the same. You still have the filament that generates the electrons. You still have the fosters. You still have the positively charged elements directing the stream of electrons. You still direct the beam across the screen line by line from the upper left to the lower right 60 times per second, at least in the United States. But there are three ways a color TV screen differs from a black and white screen first. You have three electron beams, not just one, and each of those beams is responsible for one of the three main colors from which all other color on screen originates. So there called the red, green and blue streams. Let me get that clear. The election streams themselves are not red, green and blue. There are electrons You don't see like a red laser of blue laser and a green laser. We could call them streams, 12 and three and it would be just the same. But they are responsible for specific groups of phosphor dots. And the phosphor dots are water are red, green or blue. So one stream will on Lee. Activate the green dots. One will on Lee activate the red dots, and one will only activate the blue dots. So if you have a black and white screen You have that whole sheet of Foster for that substance that gives off light when electrons excited to higher energy state with the CRT color TV set, you have three different kinds of Foster's that correspond with those colors image in early a red, green and blue now explain how this works in greater detail just a moment but first Let's take a quick break. What do.

Color Television CBS David Sarnoff FCC United States Goldmark CIA Lee Supreme Court Foster Elektronik Nolly Garcia
"sarnoff" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Get one for a dollar and share it today. The Dow S and P and NASDAQ, all ending the day in positive territory and closing at new record highs. The House speaker's optimistic lawmakers can approve a coronavirus relief package and avert a government shutdown next week. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi believes there is movement on a coronavirus relief deal based on a bipartisan proposal outlined by several senators earlier this week, but that $908 billion proposal It's far less than what Pelosi another top Democrats previously accepted. That is a total game changer, a new president and a vaccine. Pelosi also says she agrees with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that combining covert relief with a larger spending bill to prevent a government shutdown is the best scenario. Time magazine announcing It's kid of the year scientist and inventor Gitanjali Row is 15 and was selected from more than 5000 nominees. She uses technology to solve issues ranging from opioid addiction to cyber bullying. And among her inventions is a device that detects lead in drinking water inspired by the Flint water crisis. It was just so unacceptable that kids my age were essentially drinking a poison every day, and I realized that something really needed to be done to help solve that problem. It sends results to an app. She also created audio courtesy of time next week. Time will announce its person of the year, which was one last year by climate activists. Gratitude, Berg Another teenager, Tanya J. Powers, Fox News and Sarnoff of Warner Brothers Pictures says the studio decided to stream all its movies next year. At the same time, they play in theaters because big and bold is a necessity right now, Sarnoff calls it a temporary solution and the one year plan to stream the films on HBO Max the studio's 17 films, including New Matrix movie as well as Godzilla versus Kong. I'm rich Dennison and this is Fox News. Your weather update four tonight cloudy with a low of.

Gitanjali Row Nancy Pelosi Sarnoff Time magazine Fox News Mitch McConnell rich Dennison Senate HBO president Warner Brothers Pictures Tanya J. Powers New Matrix scientist
Warner Bros. to stream all new movies in 2021

Mark Levin

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Warner Bros. to stream all new movies in 2021

"Decided to stream all its movies next year. At the same time, they play in theaters because big and bold is a necessity right now, Sarnoff calls it a temporary solution and the one year plan to stream the films on HBO Max the studio's 17 films, including New Matrix movie as well as Godzilla versus Kong. I'm rich Dennison and this is

Sarnoff New Matrix HBO Godzilla Versus Kong Dennison
Tiger nearly tears volunteer's arm off at Carole Baskin's Big Cat Rescue

Mojo In The Morning

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Tiger nearly tears volunteer's arm off at Carole Baskin's Big Cat Rescue

"Dune in heights. Godzilla vs kong among them will be available for you to watch from your couch the same day that they debut in physical movie theaters and while warner brothers. Ceo and sarnoff said this is a one time sixth made necessary by the pandemic. I m hearing from a few different people a few different sources that this was where the movie industry was kinda sorta headed anyway. The pandemic just forced it to happen a little earlier than planned. I'm crossing my fingers. They only do it for a year but people are saying. This

Godzilla Vs Kong Sarnoff Warner Brothers
Warner Bros. to release all its 2021 films on HBO Max

AP 24 Hour News

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Warner Bros. to release all its 2021 films on HBO Max

"Mike Rossi, a reporting Warner Brothers films in 2021 will stream on HBO Max. At the same time they opened in theaters. Warner Brothers is making a big change for 2021, announcing its new releases will stream on HBO Max in the United States. At the same time they opened in theaters after one month streaming will stop and the movies will only be available in theaters. Move was made due to the ongoing pandemic that has most U. S theaters currently closed. Warner had already announced Wonder Woman 1984 will debut on HBO, Max and in theaters this month, Order Media Studios chief executive and Sarnoff calls it a one year plan. Mike Rossia. Following to the lasting impact of the Corona virus Pandemic. Warner Brothers Pictures says all of its 2021 movies will debut simultaneously in theaters and on HBO, Max in the United States. The decision was made with the majority of US theaters currently closed, Warner says. After one month streaming on HBO, Max will stop and the new films will play only in theaters. Warner's 2021 releases will include the New Matrix movie, Godzilla versus Kong and the Lin Manuel Miranda adaptation. In the heights

HBO Mike Rossi Warner Brothers Films Warner Brothers Order Media Studios Mike Rossia Warner Sarnoff United States U. Max Will Godzilla Versus Kong Manuel Miranda
In seismic shift, Warner Bros. to stream all 2021 films

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

In seismic shift, Warner Bros. to stream all 2021 films

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Warner brothers films in twenty twenty one will stream on HBO Max at the same time they open in theaters Warner brothers is making a big change for twenty twenty one announcing its new releases will stream on HBO Max in the United States at the same time they open in theaters after one month streaming will stop at the movies will only be available in theaters the move was made due to the ongoing pandemic that has most U. S. theaters currently closed Warner had already announced Wonder Woman nineteen eighty four will debut on HBO Max and in theaters this month order media studios chief executive and Sarnoff calls it a one year plan hi my cross yes

Mike Rossi Warner Brothers HBO United States Warner Sarnoff
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Is our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be RC a toe launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio have mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920. Westinghouse launched de que es el of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded RC a to do so. They gave him some funds so that he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated US champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France, and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. Arcia began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired an ad in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when I made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and ATT and T are formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations in different regions with stations being part of the overall network, which was a new idea of the time, you know, create your You're content in a central location and then distribute it using these various radio stations that was revolutionary. NBC had to semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed. So it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So you had NBC Blue and NBC, Rhett. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called W. J Z, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E a F, which was founded by a T and T in 1923. While all this was going on star enough, was already looking at the potential future of television in 1924 transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of electronic televisions when the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, and I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive, very complicated, and they had limited Successful results. Let's say, but the real Boone would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions. And that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now, this is not Entirely a happy story. In 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir, Oregon. And if you've listened to my episode's about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file Oh Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund Zoric in's work, and in 1930 RC would take over the research is working would actually go over to see as well becoming our CIA employees? Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case, and RC would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time his health was in shambles, he had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in Garcia's early history. Now you heard my episode's about the history of turntables. You'll remember the early days of the photograph and the graf a phone and the gramophone I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles in the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth. Siri's in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Well, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife. Berliner gets the credit for inventing the first flat disk record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you had put on a spool. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disc were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship, and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders did as well. It took a while to get the right materials. But once they did Those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinists named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platters that you could listen to the disk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman..

Westinghouse Sarnoff NBC Emile Berliner Jack Dempsey New York City United States CIA Garcia Berliner Gramophone Company Blue Network Red Network victor talking machine company engineer Farnsworth U. S George Carpentier Dr Frank Conrad National Broadcasting Company
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:35 min | 2 years ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And so is our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be RC a toe launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that can pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920. Westinghouse launched de Que es el of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded RC a to do so. They gave him some funds so that he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated US champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event. Back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. Arcia began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired an ad in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when our CIA made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and Auntie are formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations. In different regions with stations being part of the overall network, which was a new idea of the time, you know, create your your content in a central location and then distribute it using these various radio stations. That was revolutionary. NBC had to semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So you had NBC Blue and NBC read. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called W. J Z, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E, a F, which was founded by a T and T in 1923. While all this was going on, star enough, was already looking at the potential future of television. In 1924 transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of Elektronik televisions when the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, and I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive, very complicated, and they had limited Successful results, Let's say, but the real Boone would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions, and that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now. This is not entirely a happy story. In 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir, Oregon. And if you've listened to my episode's about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file Oh Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund Warrick in's work, and in 1930 RC would take over the research is working would actually go over to see as well becoming our CIA employees? Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win That case, and Garcia would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time His health was in shambles. He had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in our CIA's early history. Now you heard my episode's about the history of turntables. You'll remember the early days of the photograph and the graf a phone and the gramophone I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles and the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Well, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife. Berliner gets the credit for inventing the first flat disk record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a spool. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disc were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the desk being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably. But Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman, and this would lead to massive trouble..

Westinghouse Sarnoff CIA NBC Emile Berliner Jack Dempsey New York City United States Farnsworth Blue Network Berliner Gramophone Company Red Network victor talking machine company engineer U. S George Carpentier National Broadcasting Company Dr Frank Conrad
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:09 min | 2 years ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be RC a toe launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920 Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916 Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd, 1920 Westinghouse launched K D K a. L. Of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded Garcia to do so. They gave him some funds so that he could pursue this. And on July 2nd, 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated US champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France, and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. Arcia began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired and add in New York City. Two years later. In 1924 there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when our CIA made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and ATT and T are formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations in different regions, with stations being part of the overall network. Which was a new idea of the time, you know, create your your content in a central location and then distribute it using these various radio stations that was revolutionary. NBC had to semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So he had NBC Blue and NBC Rhett. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called W. J. Z, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E. A F, which was founded by a TNT in 1923. While all this was going on. Sarnoff was already looking at the potential future of television in 1924 transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of Elektronik televisions when the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, and I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive, very complicated, and they had limited Successful results. Let's say, but the real Boone would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions. And that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now, this is not Entirely a happy story. In 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir, Oregon. And if you've listened to my episode's about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file Oh Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund Zoric in's work, and in 1930 RC would take over the research is working would actually go over to see as well becoming our CIA employees? Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case, and RC would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time his health was in shambles, he had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in our CIA's early history. Now you heard my episode's about the history of turntables. You'll remember the early days of the photograph and the graf a phone and the gramophone I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles in the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth. Siri's in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Well, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife. Berliner gets the credit for inventing the first flat disk record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a spool. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disc were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks..

Westinghouse Sarnoff CIA Jack Dempsey NBC United States New York City Red Network Emile Berliner Garcia Blue Network engineer victor talking machine company Farnsworth Berliner Gramophone Company George Carpentier U. S National Broadcasting Company
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:38 min | 2 years ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Strickland, Ivan, executive producer with HowStuffWorks, I heart radio and love all things Tech. And before I jump into what is going to be the main focus pun intended for this episode. I want to mention something about R C A because we're continuing our story. And something that happened Darcy in 1948. That was the year that Howard Hughes would by controlling stake in RKO Pictures, the motion picture company. And also theater chain. Arcia had purchased a theater chain and created RKO specifically in order to get a foothold with its optical on film sound system. So if you listen to the earlier episodes of RC, eh, you remember they went so far as to create an entirely new film company. In order to establish this technology. Will that being done now? In 1948 they no longer saw necessary to keep this motion picture company around and sold off. The controlling interest to Howard Hughes, someone that I should probably do it a full episode about in the future, but that is one Complicated cat right there anyway. In 1949 David Sarnoff, the man who was the general manager than the president of our CIA would then become the chairman of the board of Arcia. He also remained on his president of the company, so he had Unprecedented control of our CIA and Sarnoff. You may remember had a bit of a reputation of being something of a control freak s someone who really wanted The company he worked for to excel, and he greatly resented anyone who appeared to stand in the way of that well and the previous upset the most recent one. I talked about how he was a pioneer in consumer electronic televisions and how the U. S government forced our CIA to spin off one of its to NBC radio and television networks. Which would become ABC also remember, CBS, the third of those of the big Three networks in the United States actually grew out of a talent agents failed attempts to get his client's booked on NBC radio shows, so we are now in an era in which we have three broadcast giants. NBC, ABC and CBS and NBC and ABC. Both came from the same company. CBS came out because no one at NBC would hire this guys. Talent. Interestingly, so television is slowly starting to pick up and as I mentioned at the end of the last episode would push a new innovation in the early 19 fifties, which was color television. I wasn't the only company working on color TV. CBS was also very much in the game. Both companies have been experimenting with color TV strategies since the 19 forties. And it was a CBS engineer who seemed to win, at least at first. I want to chat about this for a moment as well, because the system that this guy made was truly amazing, and it was Dependent upon a peculiarity of human biology. We have what some people refer to as the persistence of vision. This is the same thing that makes animation work for us animation or or film. If you're looking at a really film, you know, like something that's actually Hosted two photographic film. Is just a series of still images. If we play those still images back at a fast enough speed, we perceive what appears to be movement. Even though if you were to slow it down enough, you'd see it's just a Siri's of still images. There's no actual movement happening. The human eye and brain can process about 10 to 12 separate images per second and can retain an image for about 1/15 of a second. So if you have an image, and you replace it with a new image faster than 1/15 of a second You can create the illusion of continuity of movement from one image to the next. Now a common term for this is the persistence of vision and again. A lot of different illusions depend upon this is it's this limitation of our faculties. And a guy named Peter Carl Goldmark, who was a Hungarian born engineer who immigrated to America and then would work for CBS would rely upon this peculiarity to create an early form of color television. And his system was an electromechanical system. Inside the television was a color wheel with red, green and blue sections on it. And both the camera, the television camera and the receiver or TV set had a color wheel. The wheels, positions and rotation would match precisely and the wheels would spin at an incredible 1440 times per minute. That was the speed of rotation. So the light coming into the camera would pass through this color wheel, which would kind of act like a filter. So remember earlier when I mentioned and the previous episode Not that an electron beam would make 60 passes over a screen in a second, but it would only hit the odd lines on one pass and the even lines on the next pass. Those individual passes are called fields. So if you hit all the odd lines, that's one field all even lines that's a second field to fields make up a video frame. Because then you have all the lines. Then you have all the lines that make up the entire picture. So that's a video frame. Now. That's standard wouldn't work for the color images in gold marks system because there would be noticeable flicker from the different colors. If you were only doing this At 60 really, really 30 frames a second, It would actually end up being closer to 20 because you have two divided by 31 for each color. Instead, Goldmark would increase the field rate to 144 fields per second instead of 30 Age color would get scanned twice in a second, and the number of frames or complete images shown on screen would drop down to 24 frames per second instead of 30 frames per second. Goldmark decreased the resolution of the image from 525 lines to 405 lines. Which means you're there, making the picture smaller. Ahh! And the reason he did. This was because otherwise he would need a lot more band with per channel to send that much information to a receiver. Anyway, because of that persistence of vision, these colors while they're technically changing very, very quickly, our eyes and our brains can't keep up with that. They can't distinguish How'd those colors are changing so fast from red, green and blue? So we perceive a mixture of those colors and thus with a combination of electronic and mechanical elements. Gold marks approach allowed for color TV. And it gets way more technical and psychological really, to describe exactly how this works so that you represent all the different colors. But this is the basics of how the system worked by the way side note. Goldmark was also in charge of the team that would develop the micro groove technology. It would make 33 a third rpm long playing vinyl records possible. And since our CIA had previously attempted to market 33 a third rpm records, though they did not do so with a micro groove. I suspect Sarnoff felt Goldmark was a thorn in his side. After all, Goldmark had created a new standard for color TV and a new standard for records and, Ah Sarnoff wasn't really happy when other people took the lead or other companies took the lead had its own version of the same sort of mechanical color television approach. They had developed. There's independently of gold mark, but the CBS version provided a better picture. And so in 1950 the FCC made the CBS approach the standard for color televisions. Now temporarily. It was only temporarily the standards. If you've listened to my earlier episodes on Garcia, you know that David Sarnoff wanted to be the leader in all things and he was fiercely competitive, and I suspect he was very much infuriated that the FCC would choose the technology of a rival company. Actually, I don't have to suspect he absolutely wass because Sarnoff led a crusade against CBS and the FCC and another company called Color Television sought an injunction against the FCC is decision to go with the CBS standard. That actually put a temporary halt on color televisions, because while the matter was being decided, CBS couldn't accept any sort of sponsorship money for color television programming, so there was no money coming in to support the programming. There was very little chance to make the programming in the first place. CBS was going to invest in something without knowing for sure that could go forward with it. So it kind of put the brakes on color TV. Now. The courts rejected this injunction. Garcia then appealed it, and this went up the court system and in 1951 the matter got all the way up to the Supreme Court of the United States and the Supreme Court also agreed with the FCC, or at least they said the FCC had not acted improperly in stating that the CBS standards were fine. But Sarnoff was not ready to give up. Once it was clear that gold marks CBS approach was going to win out RC a concentrated on moving away from this electro mechanical approach toward a purely Elektronik method of transmitting and displaying color television. Meanwhile, CBS was running into trouble of its own. The company was finding it hard to convince a Public a market a consumer market to purchase a new, expensive television set. Nolly isn't new and expensive. It was incompatible with existing black and white broadcasts. It was a different resolution, and it was a different methodology, and in the summer of 1950 the United States entered the Korean War, which disrupted CBS's manufacturing processes. Which meant the company couldn't make sets for people to buy on Lee..

CBS Color Television David Sarnoff Peter Carl Goldmark NBC Howard Hughes FCC CIA United States RKO Pictures RKO Goldmark engineer Arcia Darcy Strickland ABC Supreme Court
"sarnoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Right here were all these keys that plants along the side boards are to be seen right here and all of a sudden it just now everybody drop to the ground his name is the judge wrote to the group everybody drops I like to shoot when they get where you don't get I don't I get down on the ground and as late as it is the minute the last shot the police roll right off roll right up but I think the way I was on the ground he really turned the corner he had his lifelong but he turned to Sarnoff report of the Chicago sun times a group of people gathered in Douglas park in the twenty nine hundred block of west Roosevelt road when someone opened fired from a black Camaro and wounded seven people at a playground police said Chicago what you will yeah okay sure the card overall developed over Hey some car came to see somebody dead not from the community that was out there and he just sent his enemy and he just opened fire on a crowd of barbecues and people everybody well okay okay hold no no we don't okay all right hold on while I get the paramedics now the early hours of Sunday and in the time since Friday evening we've heard how three people have been killed by guns and many more injured join me for the second part of the documentary when we'll find out a lot more about what happened to those caught up in the events of Sunday the fourth of August twenty nineteen after.

Douglas park Chicago Sarnoff
"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:26 min | 2 years ago

"sarnoff" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Overtake black and white TV sales until nineteen seventy meanwhile RCA and CBS did battle over which company would define the future of television at that same time Sarnoff was waging a separate war about radio waves his adversary was someone who used to be a close friend of his a guy named Edwin Howard Armstrong Armstrong was an electrical engineer he had attended Columbia University brilliant guy apparently one of those people who really was only interested and studying anything that directly appealed to him and had no interest whatsoever in any other subjects Armstrong had already achieved a great deal by the late nineteen twenties but we're concerned specifically with his work and FM radio FM stands for frequency modulation as opposed to AM radio which stands for amplitude modulation in both cases we're talking about changing a radio wave in some way to transmit information so it's all about very ing something some aspect of the radio wave and with ATM or amplitude modulation them all in the name it's all about the amplitude the strength of a radio signal by varying that modulating the strength of the signal you can encode audio onto a radio wave and you have a receiver and it has a device to decode that modulation essentially to reverse this process so that whatever information was laid on top of that radio wave can they be played back you can convert it into an audio signal the electrical signal really that represents an audio signal send that to an amplifier and then on to speakers but ACM has some drawbacks and a big one is that it is it interference really can come into a transmissions quite easily stuff like electrical equipment can introduce interference or thunderstorms and you get static and other noise that gets introduced into the signal so you don't get a clean signal sort of way to eliminate all of that static that noise Armstrong wanted to experiment with frequency modulation which was already a known method at that time but I have yet to produce results that were remarkably better than A. M. broadcasts and as the name suggests instead of messing with the strength of a radio wave you mess with its frequency you increase or decrease its frequency to encode audio on top of that radio wave otherwise the very similar system you would have a receiver that would pick up the radio wave and the decoder that would take that modulation of frequency and convert it back into an electrical signal that would represent audio so Armstrong believed that the reason why FM had not really shown to be better than AM was because earlier attempts that focus on too narrow a range for modulation people are not changing the frequency and off essentially so Armstrong began to experiment with wide band FM he filed and received five patents for his approach and he had an agreement with RCA that said the company was going to have the right of first refusal on any patents that Armstrong was able to secure while working in FM he demonstrated his system to R. C. A. R. C. A. would actually tested out fairly extensively in the mid nineteen thirties and it was pretty clear that the system was superior to a for the purposes of radio broadcasts within a given region AM signals could be picked up further away than FM in most cases but RCA was so focused on developing television that relatively little attention was given to the FM developments and ultimately Armstrong wasn't presented with any sort of deal for his work a short while later Armstrong brought his ideas to some other companies the RCA wasn't doing anything with them and his intent was partnering with those other companies and licensing his patents in order to start changing radio stations over from AM to FM which would actually require lots of work that would require not just a a format switch but new equipment FMN AM transmitters and receivers are not compatible you can't have both in the same radio sets if you have a receiver it may have an FM receiver and an ATM receiver but they are two separate receivers are not and it's it's it's not a compatible technology again because you're looking at different modulations and you're looking at different sizes of radio waves as well so in nineteen forty RCA says you know what this FM thing makes a lot of sense to us now now that we're really looking at it that we've got a deal to make with you and they there are strong with the really attractive contract he would get a cool one million dollars which in today's money is around eighteen million dollars in return RCA would get a royalty free license to use this FM patents it was supposed to be a non exclusive deal however so RCA would not get the exclusive rights to use this they just wouldn't pay any royalties on anything they earned and in return Armstrong we get this one million dollar fee however Armstrong had already made arrangements with other companies to license his pads and they had to pay royalties on everything they sold anything that made use of one of his patents he would get a little cut of it and he felt like if he signed this agreement with RCA it wouldn't be fair to these other companies that had to pay them every time they sold something if RCA didn't have to do the same thing how is that fair so he refused he said I'm sorry this deal is not going to work with me and that ticked off sign off to no end so Sarnoff directs his engineers to work on FM tack of their own rather than Lysons Armstrong's work and give them royalties he says forget it let's just make our own FM tack and the company serves to develop systems that they claim do not infringe upon Armstrong's patents RCA then took another step because Sarnoff isn't please with just trying to sidestep Armstrong he wants to punish Armstrong and the company begins to encourage other companies to not license Armstrong's patents in other words cutting off our strong source of revenue because Armstrong's not making radios himself he's licensing his designs to other companies the NRC is saying don't do that he now we've come up with our own FM transmissions stuff don't bother paying him for the stuff so Armstrong goes and suse RCA and NBC and he's pretty confident is gonna went right off the bat but the legal proceedings lasted much longer than he anticipated at the expense drained his personal finances by nineteen fifty some of his parents had actually expired so you couldn't even really leverage those anymore and lawsuits were continuing meanwhile his mental health was deteriorating they felt strongly that he was being cheated out of his money and the credit for his work and what's worse this mirrored something that had happened to Armstrong earlier in his life he had worked on an invention that he felt he was responsible for but ultimately the credit went to a different engineer so I felt like this was happening all over again in the winter of nineteen fifty four after having driven away his own wife he he actually hit her during an argument and she had left him to leave and that live with her sister Armstrong decide to end his own life he jumped out of the window of his thirteenth floor apartment and landed on a on a balcony ten stories below and died he had a suicide note in his pocket they expressed his deep regret for hitting his wife and for his actions and Sarnoff would shrug off any responsibility he might have played in Armstrong's deterioration he said I didn't kill Armstrong the Armstrongs wife Marian took over the case on behalf of her deceased husband and she pursued it with determination at the end of nineteen fifty four RCA and Merion Armstrong reached a settlement the amount was said to be around a million dollars which was the V. R. C. A. had proposed Armstrong in return for the royalty free use of the batons pretty tragic story now before I sign off I should also mention that at the same time RCA was working on technology that was not meant for your average consumer I've been focusing on the consumer tech because that's the stuff most of us are familiar with the things we come in contact with radios televisions that kind of thing that the company had become an important partner with the US military during World War two they had developed a lot of components that were used in radar systems but that relationship with the military continued after World War two was over in the late nineteen forties RCA developed a system called typhoon to help the navy test missile designs typhoon was a guided missile simulator so the idea was that would let navy engineers test out different ideas different designs under different test conditions all in a computer simulated environment which meant they didn't have to go out actually build rockets and then seek out those conditions and test them for real that gets really expensive it's a logistic nightmare this way they can do it in a simulated environment and test up these different ideas before ever committing to a specific design typhoon debuted in Princeton at RCA's are in the facility it had more than four thousand electron tubes and it took up fifty three computer racks the room it was and had to be air conditioned to keep everything at the right operating temperature there was not common defined air conditioning and a lot of Princeton buildings at that time before this so RCA also developed Ultron microscopes and the television microscope during these years but don't really have enough time in today's episode to go into detail on those will pick up with a little bit of that in the next episode but we're really gonna try and focus on wrapping up our sees history at least up to present day in our next episode so we're going to skip over a lot of stuff to hit the highlights anyway RCA's work also branched out beyond electronics I think the this is something worth commenting on the company developed reading aids for people with impaired vision and they also had that came up with a new way of producing penicillin which seems kind of crazy but now it's absolutely true RCA was producing penicillin they use radio frequency heating during the process so one of the stages of penicillin production requires you to remove water from penicillin shortly after you've separated penicillin out from the solution you develop it and so you develop.

RCA CBS Sarnoff
RCA @100 with Tim Sarnoff

Talking Tech

05:28 min | 3 years ago

RCA @100 with Tim Sarnoff

"Whether you're an established name a brand new startup right. Now has a television this listen to the radio. <hes> has played a record. Well thank R._C._A.. For that or C._A.. Is a name that many of us older folks oops remember. They were so dominant the <hes> the company was started by David Sarnoff. I am sitting here with Tim Sarnoff David Sarnoff grandson to talk about the legacy of R._C._A.. which is now a hundred years old? Tim Come a little closer to me and just re just spit out some of the multiple dimensions that came from R._C._A.. Well R._C._A.. Back in nineteen nineteen was really focused on radio and what was important about radio radio in one thousand nine thousand nine hundred and it's hard for people to sort of grasp a world without it but before radio the only way you got news was through either the newspaper which was mostly local newspaper or walking not driving. I'm walking to the nearest town and the average person only walked one day away so the news you got was as close as one day aways walk and frankly when radio came along it brought the world to everyone so significant invention initially was to bring the world to everyone's living and between Nineteen nineteen through nineteen twenty six that was sort of haphazard until N._B._C. was created under our C._A. and it. It was the first network to bring the news from all over the world into your living them R._C._A.. Sold the first radio had the first network that actually spawned the set on the second network which was A._B._C.. That's that's true. It was <hes> the red network in the Blue Network and then a year later was C._B._S.. <hes> so there were three dominant networks there were a number of them that came up and disappeared over fifty year period but those were the three that basically were maintained until cable came along and had the first TV well R._C._A.. During that time in Nineteen twenty-three started developing the T._v. with his work and on the side were a number of other inventor inventors. There was Farnsworth who was inventing a version of of <hes> electronic T._v. and all of the functions of those inventions had to be culminated into a business so the real invention of T._v. wasn't the T._v.. Itself but the business to actually manage the T._v.. The broadcast system that had to be set up there was an antenna that was put up on the Empire State Building that was the structure of creating call letters and times for the <hes> stations to actually not interfere with each other there was the advertising system television was more than just a box television was an industry industry and R._C._A.. Spent about fifty million dollars from nineteen twenty three to nineteen thirty nine to develop the first television business and then there was records and record player well yes of course C._A.. Had acquired through Marconi Tony Victor talking machine and Victor Records and they also owned R._C._A.. Music Label R._C._A.. Also was very much focused in newer high technology so when the tube which was probably one of the greatest inventions. Inventions of the twentieth century was vacuum tube and that allowed all sorts of other inventions to occur until silicon chip came along and the semiconductor in the second half of the twentieth century and it was able I'll bet enabled everybody to miniaturize all of the pieces of the electronics so that you could fit an entire world of electronics inside a small box during the thirties and forties after television was starting to really really become a reality for the rest of the world are then spent a disproportionate amount of its treasure about one hundred million dollars to create color television to add little fidelity in reality to television system and even in the sixties sixty s when television was ubiquitous across pretty much everywhere the notion of trying to slimline the television by creating a liquid crystal display rather than having it in a tube and the notion of trying hi to transfer with fiber rather than just over the air and the notion of setting it up on satellites rather than having it go terrestrial. We're all focused as R._C._A.. From the fifties sixties and early seventies and then G._e.. Bought R._C._A.. In the eighties and today day R._C._A.. Is a memory for many of us even though the brand name is owned by technicolor. You'll talk about that in a minute but what happened what happened R._C._A.. Why did it fall apart well? It didn't fall apart. It was acquired. It was acquired by G._e.. And and what G._E.. Acquired was R._C._A.. And all of the companies owned underneath the banner which included N._B._C. and Hertz rent a car and banquet foods and say records and R._C._A.. Records and <hes>. Patents thousands and thousands of patents for inventions that are C._a.. Had created over the first half of the century and there were <hes> many people who still thought of R._C._A.. From what what it was which was sign of quality and invention and there are many

Tim Sarnoff David Sarnoff David Sarnoff Blue Network Victor Records Empire State Building Marconi Hertz Farnsworth Tony Victor Technicolor One Day One Hundred Million Dollars Fifty Million Dollars Hundred Years Fifty Year
Will HBO Max work and will consumers pay?

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

05:10 min | 3 years ago

Will HBO Max work and will consumers pay?

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as bounty of the Hollywood reporter and Matt. We've known that this industry is disrupted and Warner brothers and Warner media. Its parent are sort of the ultimate case study. You're right now of what is going on. Warner Brothers was the premier studio in this industry for so many years and being the chairman of Warner Brothers was the biggest deal imaginable and they have now announced that an Sarnoff who who comes from the B._B._C. America America and has really good experience and is very well regarded but is completely almost completely unknown in Hollywood is going to be the chairman of Warner brothers and at the same time the Warner media is announcing in the launch of this H._B._O.. Oh Max which is the streaming service that they have been building toward and they are pulling programming from all over the place to service this thing. This is a huge priority. So first of all your people were going to have to look at that they do. I need this will this H._B._O.. Max Idea Work and at the same time within the industry. There's a question of well gee. What does this mean for Warner Brothers? I mean is Warner. Brothers now going to be subservient to the streaming service and does being chairman of Warner Brothers really have any kind of clout and prestige or are you just going to be taking orders effectively from Bob Greene Blah who runs the streaming service as well as these other cable channels and H._B._O.. He reports to <hes> John Stanky the. Head of Warner media as does and Sarnoff but it's not so clear what it all means in terms of who has power this really does represent a sign of the Times entertainment because when A._T.. And T. bought the Time Warner assets it was very clear that the crown on jewel was not warner brothers. It was H._B._O.. Because they could leverage H._B._O.. To create a global streaming service that will hopefully in their words compete with net flix and that's what every conglomerate is trying to do right now. They're trying to leverage with their assets are create new stuff and go head to head with Netflix so you're seeing warner media pullback a lot of the content that was out there most notably friends which has been streaming on Netflix is now going. Going to switch over to this new H._B._O.. Max they're gonNA start doing with a bunch of other shows on the C._W.. On Turner on the Turner Networks Like T._N._T.. And T._B._S. Some C._N._N.. Content this is all going to be funneled into this H._B._O.. Bill mack streaming service will be pitched as an add on to H._B._O.. Or as its own thing a little bit more expensive than the traditional H._B._O.. Costs currently and that's where we're at right now because comcast is doing the same thing with the N._B._C.. Universal shows like the office just pulling it away from net flicks doing their own thing. Disney is launching their own thing. We're going to get into a very stratified ecosystem where the streaming services are tops and the contents suppliers are going to be the studios that they own and. Hopefully others they think I mean has made a Fortune Selling T._v.. Shows the T._v.. Division has been lead you know Big Bang theory two and a half men all of these shows in different networks very profitably and enjoying all of the reaping all of the rewards that followed followed and they just sold a huge project to Netflix Sandman so they're still looking to get that cash coming in the door obviously the I don't even know how you sort it out and I think more importantly people in the industry. I don't know how you sort it out if I'm making a T._v.. Show and Warner Brothers is making that show at what goes to H._B._O.. Max what goes somewhere else. What do I sell to C._B._S.? A._B._C. or or Hulu or whatever so I think it's it's almost like this dizzying situation within the industry of figuring. Bring out who is going to emerge victorious and how these things are going to be sorted and that's that's a potential big change for Warner Brothers which as you mentioned has been this people say there are the arms dealer of Hollywood in the sense that they have sold everybody but if you look at what Disney is doing Disney is very purposefully holding back a lot of their stuff and they are trying to create an ecosystem around this new Disney plus streaming service that will be the one stop shop for Disney. Now Disney has a very strong consumer rebrand and people know Disney and they want Disney oriented content. It's not quite the same for Warner Brothers. They don't have that brand name they just you wouldn't the average person on the street wouldn't even know that one brothers produced two and a half men yet. It's probably the biggest revenue generator that the company has so I just I think it'd be very interesting to see how warner's approaches this ecosystem and who they sell to and who they don't and from the consumer standpoint of course the question is how much does this cost they said it will.

Warner Brothers Warner Media Time Warner Warner Disney Hollywood Chairman Netflix Sarnoff Kim Masters Comcast John Stanky Reporter Hulu Matt Turner Bill Mack America Bob Greene
WarnerMedia names Ann Sarnoff as CEO of Warner Bros

Ethan Bearman

00:23 sec | 3 years ago

WarnerMedia names Ann Sarnoff as CEO of Warner Bros

"Warner media has named bbc executive and sarnoff head of warner brothers now she replaces former studio chief kevin ziggy hara who departed in march over misconduct allegations sarnoff is the first woman to lead the ninety six year old warner brothers currently the president of a._b._c. studios america's sarnoff has also been top executive with the w._n._b._a. and

Warner Media Executive Warner Brothers Sarnoff President Trump BBC Kevin Ziggy A._B._C. Studios America Ninety Six Year
DA Rosen exploring legal options after Reuben Fosters latest arrest

San Francisco Chronicle Sports - Spoken Edition

04:09 min | 4 years ago

DA Rosen exploring legal options after Reuben Fosters latest arrest

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. DA Roseanne exploring legal options after Ruben Foster's latest arrest. Santa Clara county district attorney Jeff Rosen said he has exploring the legal options after former forty Niners linebacker Ruben foster who is on probation for a gun charge in the bay area. Was again booked in jail over the weekend. This time in Tampa Florida on suspicion of domestic violence. Rosen released a statement on Monday morning one day after the forty Niners released foster twenty four following his Saturday arrest at the Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay on suspicion of one count of first degree misdemeanor domestic violence battery. We are sad though, not surprised and exploring the legal options Rosen said in the statement the cycle of domestic violence. It's frightening and frighteningly powerful every day. This office faces the challenges of keeping survivors safe and holding domestic violence, abusers criminally accountable foster who is out of jail after posting two thousand dollars is accused of. Attacking his on again off again girlfriend. Eliza NS Twenty-eight during an argument in their hotel room. Tampa police on Monday received a nine one one call of the incident. My ex-boyfriend took my phone and broke it and slap me in my face. The woman in the recording later identified as NS told the dispatcher the operator asked NS if foster was still at the hotel, and she answered that he had gone downstairs and has said she did not need paramedics for her injuries. And is is in Foster's tumultuous relationship has been marked by calls to police and legal trouble. Prosecutors charged foster with domestic violence after Anna's told police he attacked her at his Los Gatos home in February and is though later recanted her statements when prosecutors filed charges the district attorney's office, though, still preceded with the case setting up a dramatic courtroom confrontation during a preliminary hearing inmate and has testified that she made up the attack after foster broke off their relationship, prompting Santa Clara county Superior Court Judge to dismiss. The charges as we said when the judge dismissed the case against Mr. foster our commitment to domestic violence survivors is unwavering Rosen said Monday foster later, pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor. Weapons charge. For an illegal rifle. Officers found on the floor of his bathroom and was sentenced to two hundred thirty two hours of community service and two years probation in July the NFL suspended foster for the first two games of the season. Following the plea team general manager John Lynch at the time said the forty Niners will continue to work with him on making better decisions and eliminating unnecessary distractions, but then in October officers in Santa Clara responded to a domestic disturbance incident between the couple after a neighbor called police. Investigators took pictures of the scene, but found no evidence of a physical violence and left without making an arrest. Officials said a forty Niner spokesman said Sunday the team was unaware of the October incident. The district attorney's office now has a number of options. Including refiling criminal charges against foster related to the February domestic violence arrest. Filing a motion to revoke his probation or both the whole idea was he was supposed to obey the law and stay out of trouble. And even a new case in another state can qualify as a probation violation said legal analysts you've Clark a former Santa Clara county prosecutor who now works as a private defense attorney. But recharging the case from February will likely bring a multitude of challenges for prosecutors specifically related to Anna says credibility, her prior statements would be admissible and unless she had a very credible excuse as to why those statements were not true. I think it's going to be a difficult case for the district. Attorney Clark said San Francisco Chronicle staff writer, Megan Cassidy contributed to this report. Evans Sarnoff he is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer, Email eastern off ski at SF chronicle dot com. Twitter at Evans, sir. Noffke?

Ruben Foster Jeff Rosen San Francisco Chronicle Foster Santa Clara County Tampa Santa Clara Anna Niners Santa Clara County Superior Co Evans Sarnoff Attorney Eliza Ns Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay NS Probation Violation Clark